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The 8 Parts of Speech | Chart, Definition & Examples

The 8 Parts of Speech

A part of speech (also called a word class ) is a category that describes the role a word plays in a sentence. Understanding the different parts of speech can help you analyze how words function in a sentence and improve your writing.

The parts of speech are classified differently in different grammars, but most traditional grammars list eight parts of speech in English: nouns , pronouns , verbs , adjectives , adverbs , prepositions , conjunctions , and interjections . Some modern grammars add others, such as determiners and articles .

Many words can function as different parts of speech depending on how they are used. For example, “laugh” can be a noun (e.g., “I like your laugh”) or a verb (e.g., “don’t laugh”).

Table of contents

  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections

Other parts of speech

Interesting language articles, frequently asked questions.

A noun is a word that refers to a person, concept, place, or thing. Nouns can act as the subject of a sentence (i.e., the person or thing performing the action) or as the object of a verb (i.e., the person or thing affected by the action).

There are numerous types of nouns, including common nouns (used to refer to nonspecific people, concepts, places, or things), proper nouns (used to refer to specific people, concepts, places, or things), and collective nouns (used to refer to a group of people or things).

Ella lives in France .

Other types of nouns include countable and uncountable nouns , concrete nouns , abstract nouns , and gerunds .

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A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun. Pronouns typically refer back to an antecedent (a previously mentioned noun) and must demonstrate correct pronoun-antecedent agreement . Like nouns, pronouns can refer to people, places, concepts, and things.

There are numerous types of pronouns, including personal pronouns (used in place of the proper name of a person), demonstrative pronouns (used to refer to specific things and indicate their relative position), and interrogative pronouns (used to introduce questions about things, people, and ownership).

That is a horrible painting!

A verb is a word that describes an action (e.g., “jump”), occurrence (e.g., “become”), or state of being (e.g., “exist”). Verbs indicate what the subject of a sentence is doing. Every complete sentence must contain at least one verb.

Verbs can change form depending on subject (e.g., first person singular), tense (e.g., simple past), mood (e.g., interrogative), and voice (e.g., passive voice ).

Regular verbs are verbs whose simple past and past participle are formed by adding“-ed” to the end of the word (or “-d” if the word already ends in “e”). Irregular verbs are verbs whose simple past and past participles are formed in some other way.

“I’ve already checked twice.”

“I heard that you used to sing .”

Other types of verbs include auxiliary verbs , linking verbs , modal verbs , and phrasal verbs .

An adjective is a word that describes a noun or pronoun. Adjectives can be attributive , appearing before a noun (e.g., “a red hat”), or predicative , appearing after a noun with the use of a linking verb like “to be” (e.g., “the hat is red ”).

Adjectives can also have a comparative function. Comparative adjectives compare two or more things. Superlative adjectives describe something as having the most or least of a specific characteristic.

Other types of adjectives include coordinate adjectives , participial adjectives , and denominal adjectives .

An adverb is a word that can modify a verb, adjective, adverb, or sentence. Adverbs are often formed by adding “-ly” to the end of an adjective (e.g., “slow” becomes “slowly”), although not all adverbs have this ending, and not all words with this ending are adverbs.

There are numerous types of adverbs, including adverbs of manner (used to describe how something occurs), adverbs of degree (used to indicate extent or degree), and adverbs of place (used to describe the location of an action or event).

Talia writes quite quickly.

Other types of adverbs include adverbs of frequency , adverbs of purpose , focusing adverbs , and adverbial phrases .

A preposition is a word (e.g., “at”) or phrase (e.g., “on top of”) used to show the relationship between the different parts of a sentence. Prepositions can be used to indicate aspects such as time , place , and direction .

I left the cup on the kitchen counter.

A conjunction is a word used to connect different parts of a sentence (e.g., words, phrases, or clauses).

The main types of conjunctions are coordinating conjunctions (used to connect items that are grammatically equal), subordinating conjunctions (used to introduce a dependent clause), and correlative conjunctions (used in pairs to join grammatically equal parts of a sentence).

You can choose what movie we watch because I chose the last time.

An interjection is a word or phrase used to express a feeling, give a command, or greet someone. Interjections are a grammatically independent part of speech, so they can often be excluded from a sentence without affecting the meaning.

Types of interjections include volitive interjections (used to make a demand or request), emotive interjections (used to express a feeling or reaction), cognitive interjections (used to indicate thoughts), and greetings and parting words (used at the beginning and end of a conversation).

Ouch ! I hurt my arm.

I’m, um , not sure.

The traditional classification of English words into eight parts of speech is by no means the only one or the objective truth. Grammarians have often divided them into more or fewer classes. Other commonly mentioned parts of speech include determiners and articles.

  • Determiners

A determiner is a word that describes a noun by indicating quantity, possession, or relative position.

Common types of determiners include demonstrative determiners (used to indicate the relative position of a noun), possessive determiners (used to describe ownership), and quantifiers (used to indicate the quantity of a noun).

My brother is selling his old car.

Other types of determiners include distributive determiners , determiners of difference , and numbers .

An article is a word that modifies a noun by indicating whether it is specific or general.

  • The definite article the is used to refer to a specific version of a noun. The can be used with all countable and uncountable nouns (e.g., “the door,” “the energy,” “the mountains”).
  • The indefinite articles a and an refer to general or unspecific nouns. The indefinite articles can only be used with singular countable nouns (e.g., “a poster,” “an engine”).

There’s a concert this weekend.

If you want to know more about nouns , pronouns , verbs , and other parts of speech, make sure to check out some of our language articles with explanations and examples.

Nouns & pronouns

  • Common nouns
  • Proper nouns
  • Collective nouns
  • Personal pronouns
  • Uncountable and countable nouns
  • Verb tenses
  • Phrasal verbs
  • Types of verbs
  • Active vs passive voice
  • Subject-verb agreement

A is an indefinite article (along with an ). While articles can be classed as their own part of speech, they’re also considered a type of determiner .

The indefinite articles are used to introduce nonspecific countable nouns (e.g., “a dog,” “an island”).

In is primarily classed as a preposition, but it can be classed as various other parts of speech, depending on how it is used:

  • Preposition (e.g., “ in the field”)
  • Noun (e.g., “I have an in with that company”)
  • Adjective (e.g., “Tim is part of the in crowd”)
  • Adverb (e.g., “Will you be in this evening?”)

As a part of speech, and is classed as a conjunction . Specifically, it’s a coordinating conjunction .

And can be used to connect grammatically equal parts of a sentence, such as two nouns (e.g., “a cup and plate”), or two adjectives (e.g., “strong and smart”). And can also be used to connect phrases and clauses.

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What are the parts of speech?

Today's the day for you to learn about this important grammatical concept! But first...let's see what the parts of speech have to do with your clothes.

Parts of Speech Chart

Imagine that it's laundry day, and you've just finished washing and drying your clothes. You dump the contents of the laundry basket onto your bed, and you begin to organize everything. You fold matching socks together, you create a pile of perfectly folded shirts that you would be proud to show Marie Kondo, and you do the same thing with your pants, jackets, and everything else.

In the same way that we organize our clothes into groups based on each item's function and features, we organize our words into categories based on each word's function and features. We call these categories of words the parts of speech .

Some people categorize words into eight parts of speech, and some people categorize them into nine parts of speech. Neither one is wrong; they're just two ways of looking at things. We'll go over these categories below. Here at English Grammar Revolution, we categorize words into eight groups, but I'll tell you about the ninth one as well.

There's one important thing for you to know before we look at these categories: most words can function as more than one part of speech . They will only do one job at a time, but they can do different things in different sentences. Look at the word love in the following sentences.

My  love  of grammar inspired me to make this website.

Here, love is functioning as a noun. It's the subject of the sentence. 

I  love  you.

Now, love is acting as a  verb ! It's telling us an action.

The only way we can know how to categorize a word is to look at how it's acting within a sentence.

Okay, let's check out the parts of speech!

The 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns  name people, places, things, or ideas. They're important parts of our sentences because they perform  important jobs  (subjects, direct objects, predicate nouns, etc.).

A peacock walked through our yard .

The dog howled during the night , and it woke up our whole family .

Sometimes people get bogged down with this part of speech because there are also many subcategories of nouns. This is similar to the way that we have subcategories for our clothes. You may have a whole drawer full of pants, but you may also have different types of pants that you use for different purposes (workout pants, lounge pants, work pants, etc.). This is similar to the way that we can further categorize nouns into smaller groups. 

Here are a few of the subcategories of nouns:  proper nouns, common nouns ,  collective nouns ,  possessive nouns , and compound nouns.

Tip : Other parts of speech also have subcategories. If you're studying this information for the first time, ignore the subcategories and focus on learning about each broader category.

2. Pronouns

Pronouns  take the place of nouns. When most people hear the word pronoun , they think of words like I, we, me, he,   she, and they . These are indeed all pronouns, but they're a part of a subcategory called personal pronouns. Know that there are other kinds of pronouns out there as well. Here are some examples: myself, his, someone , and who .

Here are a few of the subcategories of pronouns:  reflexive pronouns ,  indefinite pronouns ,  possessive pronouns , and  relative pronouns . 

When we walked across the bridge,  we saw someone who  knows you .

I will fix the dishwasher  myself .

Verbs  show actions or states of being. They are integral elements of  sentences .   

The shuttle will fly into space.

The loving mother comforted  and soothed the baby.

In the Montessori tradition of education, they use a large red circle or ball to symbolize a verb, and they often teach children to think of verbs as a sun providing the energy of a sentence. Isn't that a lovely way to think of verbs?

I know that you're getting tired of hearing about subcategories, but linking verbs, action verbs, and helping verbs are described on the  verb page here . 

Modal verbs  are described on that link, and you can learn even more about  action verbs  and  linking verbs  from those links.

4. Adjectives

Adjectives  describe, or  modify , nouns and pronouns. I like to think of them as adding color to language. It would be hard to describe a beautiful sunset or the way a touching story makes us feel without using adjectives.

The wise, handsome owl had orange eyes.

The caring father rocked the baby.

One helpful strategy for learning about and identifying adjectives is to learn how they are diagrammed . Sentence diagrams are pictures of sentences that help us see how all of the words are grammatically related. Since adjectives modify nouns and pronouns, we diagram them on slanted lines under the nouns/pronouns that they are modifying. 

Sentence diagram of adjectives

My green and white book fell.

Book is a noun. It's the subject of this sentence. My, green , and white are all adjectives describing book , so we diagram them on slanted lines underneath book . Isn't that a great way to SEE what adjectives do?

Nine Parts of Speech

When people categorize words into eight parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners ( a, an,   the, this, that, etc. ) are subcategories of adjectives.  

When people categorize words into nine parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners make up their own category and are not a part of the adjective category. 

Adverbs  modify (describe) verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. Adverbs are similar to adjectives in that they both modify things. 

The extremely cute koala hugged its mom very tightly .

The dog howled loudly .

Sentence diagrams also make it really easy to see what adverbs do. Take a look at this diagram. What do you notice about the way the adverbs are diagrammed? 

Sentence diagram with adverbs

James ran very quickly.

Did you notice that the adverbs are diagrammed on slanted lines under the words that they are modifying?

Ran is a verb. Quickly is an adverb telling us more about the verb ran . Very is an adverb telling us more about the adverb quickly .

Doesn't the diagram make it easier to SEE what adverbs do?

6. Prepositions

Prepositions  are probably the most difficult part of speech to explain, but people generally have an easier time understanding them when they look at lots of examples. So...let's start with some examples of commonly used prepositions! 

in, for, of, off, if, until

The frog sat in the flower.

The baby cried for a long time.

I'm so convinced that memorizing some of the prepositions will be helpful to you that  I'll teach you a preposition song . 

Okay, now that we've looked at some examples, let's look at the definition of a preposition. 

Prepositions show the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and some other word in the rest of the sentence. 

Sentence diagrams will come to the rescue again to help us visualize what prepositions do. Think of prepositions as "noun hooks" or "noun bridges." In the diagram below, notice how the preposition down links the noun tree to the rest of the sentence.  

Sentence diagram of a preposition

The cat ran down the tree.

Since prepositions always function as "noun hooks," they'll always be accompanied by a noun. The preposition plus its noun is called a prepositional phrase .

If you find a word from the preposition list that's not a part of a prepositional phrase, it's not functioning as a preposition. (You remember that words can function as different parts of speech , right?)

7. Conjunctions

Conjunctions  join things together. They can join words or groups of words (phrases and clauses).

The hummingbird sat   and   waited .

The conjunction and is joining the words sat and waited .

Do you live  near the park or near the hospital ?

The conjunction or is joining the phrases near the park and near the hospital.  

The two conjunctions we just looked at ( and and or ) belong to a subcategory called coordinating conjunctions, but there are other subcategories of conjunctions as well. The other one that we use most often is  subordinating conjunctions . Subordinating conjunctions are a little trickier to learn because they involve a more complicated concept ( dependent adverb clauses ).

For now, just know that all conjunctions, no matter what type they are, connect things together. In fact, let's LOOK at how they do this by looking at a sentence diagram.

Here is a sentence diagram  showing how the coordinating conjunction  and  connects two clauses. 

8 parts of speech sa english

She cooked, and he cleaned. 

8. Interjections

Interjections show excitement or emotion. 

Wow ! That jump was amazing!

Phew , the baby finally fell asleep.

They are different from the other parts of speech in that they're not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence, and the way that we diagram them reflects that. Look at how we diagram interjections :

Sentence diagram with interjection

Yes ! We won the lottery!

The interjection yes sit sits there on its own line floating above the rest of the sentence. This helps show that it's not grammatically related to the other words in the sentence. 

It's time to review what we covered on this page.

  • We can categorize the words that we use into groups based on their functions and features. We call these groups the parts of speech.
  • Many words can function as multiple parts of speech. You need to look at each word in the context of a sentence in order to say what part of speech it is. 
  • The eight parts of speech are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections. 
  • You just learned about all of the parts of speech. Give yourself a high five! 

If you'd like to teach or learn grammar the easy way—with sentence diagrams—check out our  Get Smart Grammar Program .

It starts from the very beginning and teaches you grammar and sentence diagramming in easy, bite-size lessons. 

The Get Smart Grammar Program

Hello! I'm Elizabeth O'Brien, and my goal is to get you jazzed about grammar. 

This is original content from  https://www.english-grammar-revolution.com/parts-of-speech.html

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  • English Grammar
  • Parts of Speech

Parts of Speech - Definition, 8 Types and Examples

In the English language , every word is called a part of speech. The role a word plays in a sentence denotes what part of speech it belongs to. Explore the definition of parts of speech, the different parts of speech and examples in this article.

Table of Contents

Parts of speech definition, different parts of speech with examples.

  • Sentences Examples for the 8 Parts of Speech

A Small Exercise to Check Your Understanding of Parts of Speech

Frequently asked questions on parts of speech, what is a part of speech.

Parts of speech are among the first grammar topics we learn when we are in school or when we start our English language learning process. Parts of speech can be defined as words that perform different roles in a sentence. Some parts of speech can perform the functions of other parts of speech too.

  • The Oxford Learner’s Dictionary defines parts of speech as “one of the classes into which words are divided according to their grammar, such as noun, verb, adjective, etc.”
  • The Cambridge Dictionary also gives a similar definition – “One of the grammatical groups into which words are divided, such as noun, verb, and adjective”.

Parts of speech include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections.

8 Parts of Speech Definitions and Examples:

1. Nouns are words that are used to name people, places, animals, ideas and things. Nouns can be classified into two main categories: Common nouns and Proper nouns . Common nouns are generic like ball, car, stick, etc., and proper nouns are more specific like Charles, The White House, The Sun, etc.

Examples of nouns used in sentences:

  • She bought a pair of shoes . (thing)
  • I have a pet. (animal)
  • Is this your book ? (object)
  • Many people have a fear of darkness . (ideas/abstract nouns)
  • He is my brother . (person)
  • This is my school . (place)

Also, explore Singular Nouns and Plural Nouns .

2. Pronouns are words that are used to substitute a noun in a sentence. There are different types of pronouns. Some of them are reflexive pronouns, possessive pronouns , relative pronouns and indefinite pronouns . I, he, she, it, them, his, yours, anyone, nobody, who, etc., are some of the pronouns.

Examples of pronouns used in sentences:

  • I reached home at six in the evening. (1st person singular pronoun)
  • Did someone see a red bag on the counter? (Indefinite pronoun)
  • Is this the boy who won the first prize? (Relative pronoun)
  • That is my mom. (Possessive pronoun)
  • I hurt myself yesterday when we were playing cricket. (Reflexive pronoun)

3. Verbs are words that denote an action that is being performed by the noun or the subject in a sentence. They are also called action words. Some examples of verbs are read, sit, run, pick, garnish, come, pitch, etc.

Examples of verbs used in sentences:

  • She plays cricket every day.
  • Darshana and Arul are going to the movies.
  • My friends visited me last week.
  • Did you have your breakfast?
  • My name is Meenakshi Kishore.

4. Adverbs are words that are used to provide more information about verbs, adjectives and other adverbs used in a sentence. There are five main types of adverbs namely, adverbs of manner , adverbs of degree , adverbs of frequency , adverbs of time and adverbs of place . Some examples of adverbs are today, quickly, randomly, early, 10 a.m. etc.

Examples of adverbs used in sentences:

  • Did you come here to buy an umbrella? (Adverb of place)
  • I did not go to school yesterday as I was sick. (Adverb of time)
  • Savio reads the newspaper everyday . (Adverb of frequency)
  • Can you please come quickly ? (Adverb of manner)
  • Tony was so sleepy that he could hardly keep his eyes open during the meeting. (Adverb of degree)

5. Adjectives are words that are used to describe or provide more information about the noun or the subject in a sentence. Some examples of adjectives include good, ugly, quick, beautiful, late, etc.

Examples of adjectives used in sentences:

  • The place we visited yesterday was serene .
  • Did you see how big that dog was?
  • The weather is pleasant today.
  • The red dress you wore on your birthday was lovely.
  • My brother had only one chapati for breakfast.

6. Prepositions are words that are used to link one part of the sentence to another. Prepositions show the position of the object or subject in a sentence. Some examples of prepositions are in, out, besides, in front of, below, opposite, etc.

Examples of prepositions used in sentences:

  • The teacher asked the students to draw lines on the paper so that they could write in straight lines.
  • The child hid his birthday presents under his bed.
  • Mom asked me to go to the store near my school.
  • The thieves jumped over the wall and escaped before we could reach home.

7. Conjunctions are a part of speech that is used to connect two different parts of a sentence, phrases and clauses . Some examples of conjunctions are and, or, for, yet, although, because, not only, etc.

Examples of conjunctions used in sentences:

  • Meera and Jasmine had come to my birthday party.
  • Jane did not go to work as she was sick.
  • Unless you work hard, you cannot score good marks.
  • I have not finished my project,  yet I went out with my friends.

8. Interjections are words that are used to convey strong emotions or feelings. Some examples of interjections are oh, wow, alas, yippee, etc. It is always followed by an exclamation mark.

Examples of interjections used in sentences:

  • Wow ! What a wonderful work of art.
  • Alas ! That is really sad.
  • Yippee ! We won the match.

Sentence Examples for the 8 Parts of Speech

  • Noun – Tom lives in New York .
  • Pronoun – Did she find the book she was looking for?
  • Verb – I reached home.
  • Adverb – The tea is too hot.
  • Adjective – The movie was amazing .
  • Preposition – The candle was kept under the table.
  • Conjunction – I was at home all day, but I am feeling very tired.
  • Interjection – Oh ! I forgot to turn off the stove.

Let us find out if you have understood the different parts of speech and their functions. Try identifying which part of speech the highlighted words belong to.

  • My brother came home  late .
  • I am a good girl.
  • This is the book I  was looking for.
  • Whoa ! This is amazing .
  • The climate  in  Kodaikanal is very pleasant.
  • Can you please pick up Dan and me on  your way home?

Now, let us see if you got it right. Check your answers.

  • My – Pronoun, Home – Noun, Late – Adverb
  • Am – Verb, Good – Adjective
  • I – Pronoun, Was looking – Verb
  • Whoa – Interjection, Amazing – Adjective
  • Climate – Noun, In – Preposition, Kodaikanal – Noun, Very – Adverb
  • And – Conjunction, On – Preposition, Your – Pronoun

What are parts of speech?

The term ‘parts of speech’ refers to words that perform different functions in a sentence  in order to give the sentence a proper meaning and structure.

How many parts of speech are there?

There are 8 parts of speech in total.

What are the 8 parts of speech?

Nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections are the 8 parts of speech.

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The 8 Parts Of Speech In English

There are eight major  parts of speech .

  • Nouns  name persons, places, things, ideas, or qualities, e.g., Franklin, boy, Yangtze River, shoreline, Bible, desk, fear, happiness.
  • Pronouns  usually substitute for nouns and function as nouns, e.g., I, you, he, she, it, we, they, myself, this, that, who, which, everyone.
  • Verbs  express actions, occurrences, or states of being, e.g., be, become, bunt, inflate, run.
  • Adjectives  describe or modify nouns or pronouns, e.g., gentle, helpful, small.
  • Adverbs  describe or modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, e.g., almost, gently, helpfully, someday.
  • Prepositions  relate nouns or pronouns to other words in a sentence, e.g., about, at, down, for, of, with.
  • Conjunctions  link words, clauses, and phrases. There are coordinating conjunctions that link words, clauses, or phrases of equal importance, and there are subordinating conjunctions that introduce subordinate clauses and link them to main clauses.
  • Interjections  express feeling or command attention, either alone or in a sentence, e.g., darn, hey, oh, wow.

Some words ( adjectives ,  adverbs ,  interjections ,  nouns ,  verbs ) are productive classes allowing new members; others, with functional rather than lexical meaning ( articles ,  conjunctions ,  prepositions ) are nonproductive and have a limited number of members.

Some grammarians consider  articles ,  quantifiers , and  numerals  to also be parts of speech.

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Understanding the Parts of Speech in English

Yes, the parts of speech in English are extensive and complex. But we’ve made it easy for you to start learning them by gathering the most basic and essential information in this easy-to-follow and comprehensive guide.

White text over orange background reads "Parts of Speech."

Parts of Speech: Quick Summary

Parts of speech assign words to different categories. There are eight different types in English. Keep in mind that a word can belong to more than one part of speech.

Learn About:

  • Parts of Speech
  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections

Using the Parts of Speech Correctly In Your Writing

Knowing the parts of speech is vital when learning a new language.

When it comes to learning a new language, there are several components you should understand to truly get a grasp of the language and speak it fluently.

It’s not enough to become an expert in just one area. For instance, you can learn and memorize all the intricate grammar rules, but if you don’t practice speaking or writing colloquially, you will find it challenging to use that language in real time.

Conversely, if you don’t spend time trying to learn the rules and technicalities of a language, you’ll also find yourself struggling to use it correctly.

Think of it this way: Language is a tasty, colorful, and nutritious salad. If you fill your bowl with nothing but lettuce, your fluency will be bland, boring, and tasteless. But if you spend time cultivating other ingredients for your salad—like style, word choice, and vocabulary— then it will become a wholesome meal you can share with others.

In this blog post, we’re going to cover one of the many ingredients you’ll need to build a nourishing salad of the English language—the parts of speech.

Let’s get choppin’!

What Are the Parts of Speech in English?

The parts of speech refer to categories to which a word belongs. In English, there are eight of them : verbs , nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.

Many English words fall into more than one part of speech category. Take the word light as an example. It can function as a verb, noun, or adjective.

Verb: Can you please light the candles?
Noun: The room was filled with a dim, warm light .
Adjective: She wore a light jacket in the cool weather.

The parts of speech in English are extensive. There’s a lot to cover in each category—much more than we can in this blog post. The information below is simply a brief overview of the basics of the parts of speech. Nevertheless, the concise explanations and accompanying example sentences will help you gain an understanding of how to use them correctly.

Graphic shows the eight different parts of speech and their functions.

What Are Verbs?

Verbs are the most essential parts of speech because they move the meaning of sentences along.

A verb can show actions of the body and mind ( jump and think ), occurrences ( happen or occur ), and states of being ( be and exist ). Put differently, verbs breathe life into sentences by describing actions or indicating existence. These parts of speech can also change form to express time , person , number , voice , and mood .

There are several verb categories. A few of them are:

  • Regular and irregular verbs
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • Auxiliary verbs

A few examples of verbs include sing (an irregular action verb), have (which can be a main verb or auxiliary verb), be , which is a state of being verb, and would (another auxiliary verb).

My little sister loves to sing .
I have a dog and her name is Sweet Pea.
I will be there at 5 P.M.
I would like to travel the world someday.

Again, these are just the very basics of English verbs. There’s a lot more that you should learn to be well-versed in this part of speech, but the information above is a good place to start.

What Are Nouns?

Nouns refer to people ( John and child ), places ( store and Italy ), things ( firetruck and pen ), and ideas or concepts ( love and balance ). There are also many categories within nouns. For example, proper nouns name a specific person, place, thing, or idea. These types of nouns are always capitalized.

Olivia is turning five in a few days.
My dream is to visit Tokyo .
The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States.
Some argue that Buddhism is a way of life, not a religion.

On the other hand, common nouns are not specific to any particular entity and are used to refer to any member of a general category.

My teacher is the smartest, most caring person I know!
I love roaming around a city I’ve never been to before.
This is my favorite book , which was recommended to me by my father.
There’s nothing more important to me than love .

Nouns can be either singular or plural. Singular nouns refer to a single entity, while plural nouns refer to multiple entities.

Can you move that chair out of the way, please? (Singular)
Can you move those chairs out of the way, please? (Plural)

While many plural nouns are formed by adding an “–s” or “–es,” others have irregular plural forms, meaning they don’t follow the typical pattern.

There was one woman waiting in line.
There were several women waiting in line.

Nouns can also be countable or uncountable . Those that are countable refer to nouns that can be counted as individual units. For example, there can be one book, two books, three books, or more. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted as individual units. Take the word water as an example. You could say I drank some water, but it would be incorrect to say I drank waters. Instead, you would say something like I drank several bottles of water.

What Are Pronouns?

A pronoun is a word that can take the place of other nouns or noun phrases. Pronouns serve the purpose of referring to nouns without having to repeat the word each time. A word (or group of words) that a pronoun refers to is called the antecedent .

Jessica went to the store, and she bought some blueberries.

In the sentence above, Jessica is the antecedent, and she is the referring pronoun. Here’s the same sentence without the proper use of a pronoun:

Jessica went to the store, and Jessica bought some blueberries.

Do you see how the use of a pronoun improves the sentence by avoiding repetitiveness?

Like all the other parts of speech we have covered, pronouns also have various categories.

Personal pronouns replace specific people or things: I, me, you, he, she, him, her, it, we, us, they, them.

When I saw them at the airport, I waved my hands up in the air so they could see me .

Possessive pronouns indicate ownership : mine, ours, yours, his, hers, theirs, whose.

I think that phone is hers .

Reflexive pronouns refer to the subject of a sentence or clause. They are used when the subject and the object of a sentence refer to the same person or thing: myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves.

The iguanas sunned themselves on the roof of my car.

Intensive pronouns have the same form as reflexive pronouns and are used to emphasize or intensify the subject of a sentence.

I will take care of this situation myself .

Indefinite pronouns do not refer to specific individuals or objects but rather to a general or unspecified person, thing, or group. Some examples include someone, everybody, anything, nobody, each, something, and all.

Everybody enjoyed the party. Someone even said it was the best party they had ever attended.

Demonstrative pronouns are used to identify or point to specific pronouns: this, that, these, those.

Can you pick up those pens off the floor?

Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions and seek information: who, whom, whose, which, what.

Who can help move these heavy boxes?

Relative pronouns connect a clause or a phrase to a noun or pronoun: who, whom, whose, which, that, what, whoever, whichever, whatever.

Christina, who is the hiring manager, is the person whom you should get in touch with.

Reciprocal pronouns are used to refer to individual parts of a plural antecedent. They indicate a mutual or reciprocal relationship between two or more people or things: each other or one another.

The cousins always giggle and share secrets with one another .  

What Are Adjectives?

Adjectives modify nouns or pronouns, usually by describing, identifying, or quantifying them. They play a vital role in adding detail, precision, and imagery to English, allowing us to depict and differentiate the qualities of people, objects, places, and ideas.

The blue house sticks out compared to the other neutral-colored ones. (Describes)
That house is pretty, but I don’t like the color. (Identifies)
There were several houses I liked, but the blue one was unique. (Quantifies)

We should note that identifying or quantifying adjectives are also referred to as determiners. Additionally, articles ( a, an, the ) and numerals ( four or third ) are also used to quantify and identify adjectives.

Descriptive adjectives have other forms (known as comparative and superlative adjectives ) that allow for comparisons. For example, the comparative of the word small is smaller, while the superlative is smallest.

Proper adjectives (which are derived from proper nouns) describe specific nouns. They usually retain the same spelling or are slightly modified, but they’re always capitalized. For example, the proper noun France can be turned into the proper adjective French.

What Are Adverbs?

Adverbs are words that modify or describe verbs, adjectives, other adverbs, or entire clauses. Although many adverbs end in “–ly,” not all of them do. Also, some words that end in “–ly” are adjectives, not adverbs ( lovely ).

She dances beautifully .

In the sentence above, beautifully modifies the verb dances.

We visited an extremely tall building.

Here, the adverb extremely modifies the adjective tall.

He had to run very quickly to not miss the train.

The adverb very modifies the adverb quickly.

Interestingly , the experiment yielded unexpected results that left us baffled.

In this example, the word interestingly modifies the independent clause that comprises the rest of the sentence (which is why they’re called sentence adverbs ).

Like adjectives, adverbs can also have other forms when making comparisons. For example:

strongly, more strongly, most strongly, less strongly, least strongly

What Are Prepositions?

Prepositions provide context and establish relationships between nouns, pronouns, and other words in a sentence. They indicate time, location, direction, manner, and other vital information. Prepositions can fall into several subcategories. For instance, on can indicate physical location, but it can also be used to express time.

Place the bouquet of roses on the table.
We will meet on Monday.

There are many prepositions. A few examples include: about, above, across, after, before, behind, beneath, beside, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, onto, past, regarding, since, through, toward, under, until, with, without.

Prepositions can contain more than one word, like according to and with regard to.

What Are Conjunctions?

Conjunctions are words that join words, phrases, or clauses together within a sentence and provide information about the relationship between those words. There are different types of conjunctions.

Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, or clauses of equal importance: and, but, for, not, or, so, yet.

I like to sing, and she likes to dance.

Correlative conjunctions come in pairs and join balanced elements of a sentence: both…and, just as…so, not only…but also, either…or, neither…nor, whether…or.

You can either come with us and have fun, or stay at home and be bored.

Subordinating conjunctions connect dependent clauses to independent clauses. A few examples include: after, although, even though, since, unless, until, when , and while.

They had a great time on their stroll, even though it started raining and they got soaked.

Conjunctive adverbs are adverbs that function as conjunctions, connecting independent clauses or sentences. Examples of conjunctive adverbs are also, anyway, besides, however, meanwhile, nevertheless, otherwise, similarly, and therefore .

I really wanted to go to the party. However , I was feeling sick and decided to stay in.
I really wanted to go to the party; however , I was feeling sick and decided to stay in.

What Are Interjections?

Interjections are words that express strong emotions, sudden reactions, or exclamations. This part of speech is usually a standalone word or phrase, but even when it is  part of a sentence, it does not relate grammatically to the rest of .

There are several interjections. Examples include: ahh, alas, bravo, eww, hello, please, thanks, and oops.

Ahh ! I couldn’t believe what was happening.

When it comes to improving your writing skills, understanding the parts of speech is as important as adding other ingredients besides lettuce to a salad.

The information provided above is indeed extensive, but it’s critical to learn if you want to write effectively and confidently. LanguageTool—a multilingual writing assistant—makes comprehending the parts of speech easy by detecting errors as you write.

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Parts of Speech

What are the parts of speech, a formal definition.

Table of Contents

The Part of Speech Is Determined by the Word's Function

Are there 8 or 9 parts of speech, the nine parts of speech, (1) adjective, (3) conjunction, (4) determiner, (5) interjection, (7) preposition, (8) pronoun, why the parts of speech are important, video lesson.

parts of speech

  • You need to dig a well . (noun)
  • You look well . (adjective)
  • You dance well . (adverb)
  • Well , I agree. (interjection)
  • My eyes will well up. (verb)
  • red, happy, enormous
  • Ask the boy in the red jumper.
  • I live in a happy place.
  • I caught a fish this morning! I mean an enormous one.
  • happily, loosely, often
  • They skipped happily to the counter.
  • Tie the knot loosely so they can escape.
  • I often walk to work.
  • It is an intriguingly magic setting.
  • He plays the piano extremely well.
  • and, or, but
  • it is a large and important city.
  • Shall we run to the hills or hide in the bushes?
  • I know you are lying, but I cannot prove it.
  • my, those, two, many
  • My dog is fine with those cats.
  • There are two dogs but many cats.
  • ouch, oops, eek
  • Ouch , that hurt.
  • Oops , it's broken.
  • Eek! A mouse just ran past my foot!
  • leader, town, apple
  • Take me to your leader .
  • I will see you in town later.
  • An apple fell on his head .
  • in, near, on, with
  • Sarah is hiding in the box.
  • I live near the train station.
  • Put your hands on your head.
  • She yelled with enthusiasm.
  • she, we, they, that
  • Joanne is smart. She is also funny.
  • Our team has studied the evidence. We know the truth.
  • Jack and Jill went up the hill, but they never returned.
  • That is clever!
  • work, be, write, exist
  • Tony works down the pit now. He was unemployed.
  • I will write a song for you.
  • I think aliens exist .

Are you a visual learner? Do you prefer video to text? Here is a list of all our grammar videos .

Video for Each Part of Speech

8 parts of speech sa english

The Most Important Writing Issues

The top issue related to adjectives.

Don't write...Do write...
very happy boy delighted boy
very angry livid
extremely posh hotel luxurious hotel
really serious look stern look

The Top Issue Related to Adverbs

  • Extremely annoyed, she stared menacingly at her rival.
  • Infuriated, she glared at her rival.

The Top Issue Related to Conjunctions

correct tick

  • Burger, Fries, and a shake
  • Fish, chips and peas

The Top Issue Related to Determiners

wrong cross

The Top Issue Related to Interjections

The top issue related to nouns, the top issue related to prepositions, the top issue related to pronouns, the top issue related to verbs.

Unnatural (Overusing Nouns)Natural (Using a Verb)
They are in agreement that he was in violation of several regulations.They agree he violated several regulations.
She will be in attendance to present a demonstration of how the weather will have an effect on our process.She will attend to demonstrate how the weather will affect our process.
  • Crack the parts of speech to help with learning a foreign language or to take your writing to the next level.

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English Study Online

Parts of Speech: A Guide to Learning English Grammar

By: Author English Study Online

Posted on Last updated: December 27, 2023

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In this page, we will break down each part of speech and provide examples to help you understand their usage. We will also discuss how to identify the different parts of speech in a sentence and provide tips on how to use them correctly. Whether you are a beginner or an advanced English learner, this article will provide valuable insights into the parts of speech and improve your language skills. Let’s get started!

Table of Contents

Overview of Parts of Speech

In this section, we will provide a brief overview of the eight parts of speech in English. Understanding the parts of speech is essential for anyone learning the English language, as it enables them to construct meaningful sentences and communicate effectively.

The eight parts of speech are:

Prepositions

Conjunctions, interjections.

Each part of speech has a specific function in a sentence. For example, nouns are used to name people, places, things, or ideas, while verbs are used to describe an action or state of being. Adjectives are used to describe nouns, while adverbs are used to describe verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.

Pronouns are used to replace nouns in a sentence, while prepositions are used to indicate the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence. Conjunctions are used to connect words, phrases, or clauses, while interjections are used to express emotions or feelings.

Parts of Speech: A Guide to Learning English Grammar

Nouns are words that represent people, places, things, or ideas. They are one of the most important parts of speech in English and are used in nearly every sentence. In this section, we will explore the different types of nouns and their functions.

Common Nouns

Common nouns are general names for people, places, or things. They are not capitalized unless they appear at the beginning of a sentence.

  • Examples of common nouns include “book,” “city,” and “teacher.”

Proper Nouns

Proper nouns are specific names for people, places, or things. They are always capitalized.

  • Examples of proper nouns include “Harry Potter,” “New York City,” and “Ms. Johnson.”

Abstract Nouns

Abstract nouns are names for ideas, concepts, or emotions. They are intangible and cannot be seen, heard, or touched.

  • Examples of abstract nouns include “love,” “happiness,” and “freedom.”

Collective Nouns

Collective nouns are names for groups of people or things. They can be singular or plural, depending on the context.

  • Examples of collective nouns include “team,” “family,” and “herd.”

In this section, we will discuss the different types of pronouns used in English grammar. Pronouns are words that replace nouns in a sentence. They help to avoid repetition and make sentences more concise.

Personal Pronouns

Personal pronouns refer to specific people or things. They can be used as the subject or object of a sentence. Here are the personal pronouns in English:

I me my mine
you you your yours
he him his his
she her her hers
it it its its
we us our ours
they them their theirs

Demonstrative Pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns are used to point to specific people or things. They can be used to indicate distance or location. Here are the demonstrative pronouns in English:

this refers to something nearby
that refers to something farther away
these refers to multiple things nearby
those refers to multiple things farther away

Interrogative Pronouns

Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. They are typically used at the beginning of a sentence. Here are the interrogative pronouns in English:

who refers to a person
whom refers to a person (object of a verb)
whose refers to possession
what refers to a thing or idea
which refers to a specific thing or idea

Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. They can be used as the subject or object of a sentence. Here are the indefinite pronouns in English:

anybody refers to any person
anyone refers to any person
anything refers to any thing or idea
each refers to individual members of a group
either refers to one of two things
everybody refers to every person
everyone refers to every person
everything refers to every thing or idea
neither refers to none of two things
nobody refers to no person
no one refers to no person
nothing refers to no thing or idea
one refers to a singular person or thing
some refers to an unspecified number or amount
somebody refers to some person
someone refers to some person
something refers to some thing or idea

Verbs are one of the most important parts of speech in English. They are used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. In this section, we will cover the three types of verbs: action verbs, linking verbs, and helping verbs.

Action Verbs

Action verbs are used to describe an action that is being performed by the subject of the sentence. They can be used in the present, past, or future tense. Here are a few examples of action verbs:

Linking Verbs

Linking verbs are used to connect the subject of the sentence to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that describes it. They do not show action. Here are a few examples of linking verbs:

Helping Verbs

Helping verbs are used in conjunction with the main verb to express tense, voice, or mood. They do not have a meaning on their own. Here are a few examples of helping verbs:

In conclusion, verbs are an essential part of English grammar. Understanding the different types of verbs and how they are used in a sentence can help you communicate more effectively in both written and spoken English.

In this section, we will discuss adjectives, which are an important part of speech in English. Adjectives are words that describe or modify nouns or pronouns. They provide more information about the noun or pronoun, such as its size, shape, color, or quality.

Descriptive Adjectives

Descriptive adjectives are the most common type of adjectives. They describe the physical or observable characteristics of a noun or pronoun. For example, in the sentence “The red car is fast,” “red” is a descriptive adjective that describes the color of the car, and “fast” is another descriptive adjective that describes its speed.

Here are some examples of descriptive adjectives:

Quantitative Adjectives

Quantitative adjectives are used to describe the quantity or amount of a noun or pronoun. They answer the question “how much” or “how many.” For example, in the sentence “I have two apples,” “two” is a quantitative adjective that describes the number of apples.

Here are some examples of quantitative adjectives:

Demonstrative Adjectives

Demonstrative adjectives are used to point out or indicate a specific noun or pronoun. They answer the question “which one” or “whose.” For example, in the sentence “This book is mine,” “this” is a demonstrative adjective that indicates the specific book that belongs to the speaker.

Here are some examples of demonstrative adjectives:

In conclusion, adjectives are an important part of speech in English. They provide more information about nouns and pronouns, and they help to make our language more descriptive and precise. By understanding the different types of adjectives, we can use them effectively in our speaking and writing.

In this section, we will discuss adverbs, which are words that modify or describe verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Adverbs give more information about the action, manner, place, time, frequency, degree, or intensity of a verb.

Adverbs of Manner

Adverbs of manner describe how an action is performed. They answer the question “how?” and usually end in “-ly”, but not always. Here are some examples:

  • She sings beautifully.
  • He speaks softly.
  • They ran quickly.
  • The dog barked loudly.

Adverbs of manner can also be formed by adding “-ly” to some adjectives. For example:

  • She is a quick learner. (adjective: quick)
  • He is a careful driver. (adjective: careful)

Adverbs of Place

Adverbs of place describe where an action takes place. They answer the question “where?” and usually come after the verb or object. Here are some examples:

  • She looked everywhere.
  • He lives nearby.
  • They went outside.
  • The cat hid underneath the bed.

Adverbs of Time

Adverbs of time describe when an action takes place. They answer the question “when?” and can come at the beginning, middle, or end of a sentence. Here are some examples:

  • She wakes up early every day.
  • He arrived yesterday.
  • They will leave soon.
  • The concert starts tonight.

Adverbs of time can also be used to show the duration of an action. For example:

  • She studied for hours.
  • He worked all day.
  • They talked for a long time.

In this section, we will discuss prepositions and their usage in English. Prepositions are words that show the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence. They usually indicate the position or direction of the noun or pronoun in relation to other elements in the sentence.

Prepositions of Time

Prepositions of time are used to indicate when an action took place. They include words such as “at,” “in,” and “on.”

  • “At” is used for specific times, such as “at 2 pm” or “at midnight.”
  • “In” is used for longer periods of time, such as “in the morning” or “in October.”
  • “On” is used for dates, such as “on Monday” or “on July 4th.”

Prepositions of Place

Prepositions of place are used to indicate where something is located. They include words such as “in,” “on,” and “at.”

  • “In” is used for enclosed spaces, such as “in the house” or “in the car.”
  • “On” is used for surfaces, such as “on the table” or “on the floor.”
  • “At” is used for specific locations, such as “at the park” or “at the beach.”

Prepositions of Direction

Prepositions of direction are used to indicate movement. They include words such as “to,” “from,” and “towards.”

  • “To” is used to indicate movement towards a specific destination, such as “I am going to the store.”
  • “From” is used to indicate movement away from a specific location, such as “I am coming from the park.”
  • “Towards” is used to indicate movement in the direction of a specific location, such as “I am walking towards the museum.”

In this section, we will discuss the different types of conjunctions and their functions in English grammar. Conjunctions are words that connect words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence. They are essential in creating complex sentences and conveying relationships between ideas.

Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses that are of equal importance. They are easy to remember using the mnemonic device FANBOYS: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so. Here are some examples:

  • I like pizza and pasta.
  • She is neither tall nor short.
  • He wanted to go to the beach, but it was raining.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions connect dependent clauses to independent clauses and establish a relationship between them. They are used to show cause and effect, time, condition, and contrast. Some examples of subordinating conjunctions are:

Here are some examples:

  • Because it was raining, we stayed inside.
  • Although she was tired, she stayed up to finish her work.
  • While I was studying, my roommate was watching TV.

Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions are pairs of words that work together to connect words, phrases, or clauses. They are used to show a relationship between two elements. Here are some examples:

  • both…and
  • either…or
  • neither…nor
  • not only…but also
  • Both my sister and I like to read.
  • Either you come with us or you stay here.
  • Not only was he late, but he also forgot his homework.

In conclusion, conjunctions are important in creating complex sentences and conveying relationships between ideas. By understanding the different types of conjunctions and their functions, you can improve your writing and communication skills.

In English grammar, interjections are words or phrases that express strong emotions or feelings. They are also known as exclamations and are one of the eight parts of speech in English. Interjections are grammatically independent from the words around them, and they can often be removed from a sentence or context without affecting its basic meaning.

Interjections can be used to express a wide range of emotions, including surprise, joy, anger, frustration, and pain. Some common examples of interjections include “ wow ,” “ ouch ,” “ yay ,” “ oh no ,” and “ oops .” They can be used to add emphasis to a sentence or to convey a particular tone or mood.

It is important to note that interjections do not have any grammatical function in a sentence. They are not nouns, verbs, adjectives, or any other part of speech. Instead, they simply stand alone as a way to express emotion.

When using interjections in writing, it is important to consider the context in which they are being used. While they can be a useful tool for adding emphasis or conveying emotion, they can also be overused or misused, which can detract from the overall effectiveness of the writing.

Articles/Determiners

In English grammar, articles and determiners are words that are used with nouns to provide more information about them. They help us to understand the context and meaning of a sentence.

There are three articles in the English language: “ the ,” “ a, ” and “ an. ” “The” is known as the definite article because it refers to a specific noun that has already been mentioned or is known to the reader. For example, “The cat is sleeping on the sofa.” In this sentence, “the” refers to a specific cat that has already been mentioned or is known to the reader.

“A” and “an” are known as indefinite articles because they refer to any member of a group or class of nouns. “A” is used before words that begin with a consonant sound, while “an” is used before words that begin with a vowel sound. For example, “I need a pen” and “She ate an apple.”

Determiners

Determiners are words that come before a noun to provide more information about it. They can include articles, as well as words like “ this ,” “ that ,” “ these ,” and “ those .”

In addition to these, there are other types of determiners such as possessive determiners (e.g. “my,” “your,” “his,” “her,” “its,” “our,” and “their”), demonstrative determiners (e.g. “this,” “that,” “these,” and “those”), and quantifying determiners (e.g. “some,” “any,” “many,” “few,” “several,” etc.).

Determiners can also be used with adjectives to provide more information about a noun. For example, “She ate the delicious apple” and “I saw that beautiful sunset.”

Understanding articles and determiners is crucial for mastering English grammar. By using them correctly, you can convey your thoughts and ideas more clearly and effectively.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the 8 parts of speech in English?

In English, there are eight parts of speech: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. Each part of speech serves a different function in a sentence and helps to convey meaning.

What are some examples of different parts of speech?

Here are a few examples of different parts of speech:

  • Noun: dog, cat, book, table
  • Pronoun: he, she, it, they
  • Verb: run, jump, sing, dance
  • Adjective: happy, sad, tall, short
  • Adverb: quickly, slowly, loudly, softly
  • Preposition: in, on, at, under
  • Conjunction: and, but, or, so
  • Interjection: wow, oh, ouch, hooray

What is the difference between a noun and a verb?

A noun is a word that represents a person, place, thing, or idea. A verb is a word that represents an action, occurrence, or state of being. In other words, a noun is a subject or object in a sentence, while a verb is the action or occurrence that takes place.

What are the different types of nouns?

There are several different types of nouns, including:

  • Common nouns: refer to general, non-specific people, places, things, or ideas (e.g. dog, city, book)
  • Proper nouns: refer to specific people, places, things, or ideas and are always capitalized (e.g. John, Paris, The Great Gatsby )
  • Concrete nouns: refer to tangible, physical objects (e.g. table, chair, car)
  • Abstract nouns: refer to intangible concepts or ideas (e.g. love, happiness, freedom)
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Parts of Speech

English grammar.

The parts of speech explain how a word is used in a sentence.

There are eight main parts of speech (also known as word classes): nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections .

Most parts of speech can be divided into sub-classes. Prepositions can be divided into prepositions of time, prepositions of place etc. Nouns can be divided into proper nouns, common nouns, concrete nouns etc.

It is important to know that a word can sometimes be in more than one part of speech. For example with the word increase .

Increase can be a verb e.g. Prices increased and increase can also be a noun e.g. There was an increase in the number of followers.

The eight main parts of speech in English are:

NOUN - (Naming word)

A noun is the name of a person, place, thing or idea.

Examples of nouns: Daniel, London, table, dog, teacher, pen, city, happiness, hope

Example sentences: Steve lives in Sydney . Mary uses pen and paper to write letters .

Learn more about the different types of nouns .

PRONOUN - (Replaces a Noun)

A pronoun is used in place of a noun or noun phrase to avoid repetition.

Examples of pronouns: I, you, we, they, he, she, it, me, us, them, him, her, this, those

Example sentences: Mary is tired. She wants to sleep. I want her to dance with me .

ADJECTIVE - (Describing word)

An adjective describes, modifies or gives more information about a noun or pronoun.

Examples: big, happy, green, young, fun, crazy, three

Example sentences: The little girl had a pink hat.

VERB - (Action Word)

A verb shows an action or state of being. A verb shows what someone or something is doing.

Examples: go, speak, run, eat, play, live, walk, have, like, are, is

Example sentences: I like Woodward English. I study their charts and play their games.

ADVERB - (Describes a verb)

An adverb describes/modifies a verb, an adjective or another adverb. It tells how, where, when, how often or to what extent. Many adverbs end in -LY

Examples: slowly, quietly, very, always, never, too, well, tomorrow, here

Example sentences: I am usually busy. Yesterday , I ate my lunch quickly .

PREPOSITION - (Shows relationship)

A preposition shows the relationship of a noun or pronoun to another word. They can indicate time, place, or relationship.

Examples: at, on, in, from, with, near, between, about, under

Example sentences: I left my keys on the table for you.

CONJUNCTION - (Joining word)

A conjunction joins two words, ideas, phrases or clauses together in a sentence and shows how they are connected.

Examples: and, or, but, because, so, yet, unless, since, if.

Example sentences: I was hot and exhausted but I still finished the marathon.

INTERJECTION - (Expressive word)

An interjection is a word or phrase that expresses a strong feeling or emotion. It is a short exclamation.

Examples: Ouch! Wow! Great! Help! Oh! Hey! Hi!

Example sentences: Wow! I passed my English test. Great! – Ouch! That hurt.

Summary Chart

Sometimes teachers include Articles as a ninth part of speech so we have included it here. Note, an article is a type of adjective.

ARTICLE - (Defining word)

An article is used before a noun. These are divided into definite (the) and indefinite (a, an). Articles help define nouns.

Examples: a, an, the

Example sentences: I need a dictionary. The dictionary needs to be in English.

Next activity

See our grammar notes with more details about nouns , pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections (coming soon).

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Parts of speech in english – video.

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In this lesson, you can learn about parts of speech in English.

How many parts of speech are there in english can you name them, and explain what they do, understanding parts of speech —nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on—can help you to understand english sentence structure and how english grammar works., in this class, you’ll learn the basic information about parts of speech, you’ll see some ways that parts of speech can be more complicated than you might expect, and you’ll have several chances to practice, quiz: parts of speech in english.

Now test your understanding of the different parts of speech by trying this quiz. There are 20 questions, which get harder as you go through it!

When you have finished, click ‘View Questions’ to see all the correct answers and read the explanations. There are links to further study resources in the explanations.

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1 . Question

For the first five questions, answer true or false.

True or false: a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function and meaning in the sentence.

Review part three of the lesson if you need help with this one.

2 . Question

True or false: a noun can be a word or a phrase.

3 . Question

True or false: if a word can be a noun, it can only be a noun.

4 . Question

True or false: when analysing parts of speech, you don’t need to think about what the sentence means.

5 . Question

True or false: articles (‘the’, ‘a’), demonstratives (‘this’, ‘that’), quantifiers (‘some’, ‘few’) and possessive adjectives (‘your’, ‘their’) are all determiners.

Remember that determiners specify the noun you’re referring to. Do all these words do this?

6 . Question

For the next five questions, choose the part of speech described.

What part of speech can be an action or a state?

  • Interjections
  • Conjunctions

‘Run’ is an action and ‘understand’ is a state.

7 . Question

What part of speech can describe verbs, adjectives, adverbs or whole sentences?

  • Prepositions

8 . Question

What part of speech represents or replaces nouns?

9 . Question

What part of speech expresses an emotion or can be used to react to something?

10 . Question

Which part of speech doesn’t indicate something about a noun?

  • Determiners

11 . Question

For the next five questions, match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“He slept badly.”

Sort elements

12 . Question

Match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“She has bought a second-hand car.”

  • noun phrase

This time, you’re not analysing each word but the function of word groups and phrases in the sentence.

13 . Question

“Um, can you stop making so much noise, please?”

  • ‘um’ and ‘please’
  • 'can' and 'stop'
  • 'you'
  • 'making so much noise'

14 . Question

“Is this your bag or mine?”

  • conjunction
  • (possessive) pronoun

15 . Question

“Hey! Give his new watch back to him.”

  • interjection
  • preposition

16 . Question

For the last five questions, tick all the words that are correct.

Which words can be nouns?

You need to choose three answers.

17 . Question

Which words can be adverbs?

Only one word here is not an adverb.

18 . Question

Which words can be determiners?

This time there are two correct answers.

19 . Question

Which words can be more than one part of speech?

Two answers are correct; one of the others doesn’t even exist!

20 . Question

Which words are conjunctions?

  • nevertheless

This is a deliberately difficult question to end with! A conjunction must be followed by a noun (or noun phrase) and then a verb, with no commas.

So, first question: how many parts of speech are there?

Well, we did a Google search, and many of the top results said ‘eight’. So there must be eight parts of speech in English.

Wrong! There are nine.

So, what are they?

1. Guide to Parts of Speech in English

Number one: nouns. Nouns can be things, animals, or people, like doctor, pencil, tree or cat.

Nouns can also be ideas or abstract things, like idea, happiness, time or money.

Parts of Speech in English - cat image

Number two: verbs. Verbs can be actions, like do, run, fly or win.

Verbs can also describe states, like be, love, believe or understand.

Number three: adjectives. Adjectives describe nouns. For example: red, big, metal, or beautiful.

Number four: adverbs . Adverbs can describe verbs, meaning they describe how someone does something. For example, quickly, loudly, angrily or well.

Adverbs can also describe adjectives, other adverbs, or even whole sentences. For example, very is an adverb which can describe an adjective— very slow —or another adverb— very slowly.

Unfortunately or sometimes are adverbs which can be used to add information to a whole sentence.

For example:

  • Unfortunately, they missed the train and were late to their own wedding!
  • Sometimes, I wish I’d made different choices in life.

So, adverbs are a little more complicated. Here’s a good way to remember it: adjectives and adverbs both describe other words. They are both used to add information to something else.

Adjectives describe nouns, and adverbs describe everything else: verbs, adjectives, adverbs and whole sentences.

Number five: pronouns.

Pronouns replace or represent nouns. For example, I, you, she or they are pronouns which represent different people.

You use pronouns to avoid repeating the same word, or to refer to something when it’s obvious what you mean.

  • How was the weather there?

There is a pronoun which refers to a place. If you’ve already mentioned the place you’re talking about, you don’t need to say it again.

Another example:

  • Give me two, please.

Two is a pronoun which refers to a quantity of something which has already been mentioned. The person you’re talking to already knows what you’re talking about.

Number six: prepositions.

Prepositions usually go before a noun or noun phrase. What’s their job?

Prepositions can do two basic things: first, they can add an idea of time, place, or movement to a noun. For example:

  • on Wednesday
  • in the corner
  • towards the door

Secondly, prepositions can connect other words to a noun, or a pronoun.

For example, think about the verb depend on. The preposition on connects the verb depend to the object of the verb. For example:

  • It depends on the cost.

Usually, the noun or noun phrase goes after the preposition.

However, sometimes the preposition can link to a noun (or pronoun) earlier in the sentence. For example:

  • What does it depend on?

Here, on links to the pronoun what.

Number seven: conjunctions.

Conjunctions connect two things. A conjunction can connect two words:

  • I like cake and ice-cream.

A conjunction can connect two phrases:

  • Do you want to go now or wait till this afternoon?

You can also use a conjunction to connect two clauses:

  • Although I’ve been trying to learn for years, I’m still really bad at drawing.

Number eight: determiners

Determiners go before a noun. They include words like a, the, this or that, which help to specify which noun you’re talking about.

Words like my, your, his, her, etc. are also determiners. They specify which noun you’re talking about by saying who something belongs to.

Determiners can also tell you how many of something there are. Look at three examples:

  • ten bananas
  • some people
  • both of my brothers

The words ten, some and both are determiners.

Number nine: interjections

Interjections are different, because they aren’t normally part of a sentence.

Interjections are words or phrases which show how you feel. For example:

Parts of Speech in English - interjections

So, now you know about the nine parts of speech in English.

2. Practice with Parts of Speech in English

Let’s practice! Look at three sentences. Each sentence has five words.

  • They told me about it.
  • Look in the big cupboard.
  • Put it there, but carefully.

Can you identify which part of speech each word is? Pause the video and think about your answers.

How did you do? Could you identify the parts of speech correctly?

Let’s look at one more.

  • I’m staying in this evening.

What part of speech are these words? Think about it.

So, I is a pronoun, am is a verb, and staying is also a verb.

What about in? Did you say it’s a preposition?

It’s not a preposition; it’s an adverb.

How does this work? We had the word in in one of the sentences you saw before, and it was a preposition.

So, what’s going on?

3. The Same Word Can be More than One Part of Speech

Some words can only be one thing.

For example, the words independence or hair can only be nouns.

Believe and destroy can only be verbs.

However, many words can be more than one part of speech.

There are two things happening here.

First, a word can be two different things, which have the same written form and the same pronunciation.

Think about the word win. Is it a noun or a verb?

It can be both.

  • I’m sure they’ll win the game this weekend.
  • We’ll be hoping for a win in the big game this weekend.

Many words are like this. Another example: red can be an adjective or a noun.

  • What do you think about this red for the kitchen?
  • I like that red top she was wearing.

This is very common: very often, a word with one written form can be two (or more) different parts of speech.

We told you there are two things happening here; what’s the other?

Sometimes, a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function in the sentence.

Look at two sentences:

  • I have a few photos of my grandparents.
  • Sure, you can have a few.

Here’s a question: what part of speech is few in these sentences?

In the first sentence, few is a determiner; in the second, it’s a pronoun.

Can you explain why this is?

Think about what few does in these two sentences.

In the first sentence, few adds a quantity to the noun photos. It tells us how many photos you have. This makes it a determiner.

In the second sentence, few replaces a noun. You don’t know which noun it replaces, but in context, you would understand what the person meant.

Maybe it was ‘a few biscuits’, or ‘a few pieces of paper.’

We don’t know! But, you do know that few replaces a noun, which makes it a pronoun.

Another example is the sentence we saw before:

Prepositions go with nouns, and connect nouns to other words in the sentence. In here doesn’t go with a noun, so it can’t be a preposition.

Learn more with this Oxford Online English lesson on adverbs – to, in, at .

In here means ‘at home’, and it adds information to the verb stay. What kind of words add information to verbs?

Adverbs! So, in is an adverb.

Wait a minute, did we ever finish explaining what parts of speech are in this sentence?

You’re right! We didn’t. Let’s do it now. You need to say what parts of speech the words this evening are.

Can you do it?

Maybe you said that this is a determiner, and evening is a noun. That’s technically correct, but it’s not the best answer.

The best answer is that this evening is an adverb.

How do you explain that?

4. Compound Parts of Speech in English

Until now, you’ve seen single words, and how single words can be nouns, verbs, etc.

However, when you’re thinking about parts of speech, you can’t just think about single words. Phrases can also be nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on.

Let’s do an example:

  • Add a small spoonful of brown sugar, then turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

Think about the first part of this sentence: add a small spoonful of brown sugar.

What parts of speech do we have here?

Of course, you can go through it word by word. You can say, add is a verb, a is a determiner, small is an adjective and so on.

But, is that the most useful way of looking at it?

It makes more sense to see this as a verb— add —and a noun— a small spoonful of brown sugar.

The noun is made up of several parts of speech: determiners, adjectives, prepositions and nouns, but together they have one meaning. These words refer to one thing.

You can analyse a sentence in several different layers. So, you can see a small spoonful of brown sugar as six individual words, or one noun phrase.

You could also see it as three parts: a determiner— a small spoonful —a preposition— of —and a noun— brown sugar.

Confused? We understand! You want to know the answer. You want to know which way is ‘correct’.

There isn’t one ‘correct’ way to see this. There are different perspectives.

A better question is: which perspective makes more sense?

In this sentence, a small spoonful of brown sugar refers to one thing in the world. So it makes sense to think of it as one part of speech in the sentence.

What about the second part of the sentence? How would you analyse the parts of speech?

As you saw before, there isn’t one right answer, but here’s a suggestion.

The sentence contains a conjunction— then —and then two verb phrases linked with the conjunction and.

This makes sense because the sentence is telling you to do two things: turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

So, it makes sense to see turn the heat down as one part of speech, because it’s telling you do to one thing.

Let’s put these ideas together.

First, when you think about parts of speech, you can’t just memorise information. You have to look at each sentence individually, and think about what each word is doing.

Secondly, always think about what the sentence means in the real world. Sentences aren’t abstract things; they refer to real people, real things and real actions.

There is always more than one way to analyse the parts of speech in a sentence: choose the way that makes sense based on what the sentence is telling you about real life!

Let’s do a more challenging practice exercise so you can see these ideas in action.

5. More Challenging Practice with English Parts of Speech

Look at three sentences:

  • Amazing! It’s way better than I ever thought it would be.
  • She was an amazing clinician , who came up with many innovative ways to treat patients.
  • I don’t believe it!

How would you analyse the parts of speech in these sentences? Think about the ideas we talked about in the last section. Does it make sense to break the sentences into individual words, or is it better to group words into phrases?

Pause the video and think about your ideas.

You can pause the video again to look at these in more detail.

Notice how the same word can be different parts of speech in different sentences. For example, amazing is an interjection in one sentence, and an adjective in another.

Notice also the different layers of analysis. For example, look at the phrase many innovative ways. You can see this as one noun phrase, or as a determiner plus a noun phrase, or as three individual parts: a determiner, an adjective and a noun.

Which is correct? They all are! Choose the perspective which makes more sense to you.

Thanks for watching!

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parts of speech

Parts of Speech

What is a Part of Speech?

We can categorize English words into 9 basic types called "parts of speech" or "word classes". It's quite important to recognize parts of speech. This helps you to analyze sentences and understand them. It also helps you to construct good sentences.

Parts of Speech Table

Parts of speech examples.

  • Parts of Speech Quiz

This is a summary of the 9 parts of speech*. You can find more detail if you click on each part of speech.

part of speech function or "job" example words example sentences
action or state (to) be, have, do, like, work, sing, can, must EnglishClub a website. I EnglishClub.
thing or person pen, dog, work, music, town, London, teacher, John This is my . He lives in my . We live in .
describes a noun good, big, red, well, interesting My dogs are . I like dogs.
limits or "determines" a noun a/an, the, 2, some, many I have dogs and rabbits.
describes a verb, adjective or adverb quickly, silently, well, badly, very, really My dog eats . When he is hungry, he eats quickly.
replaces a noun I, you, he, she, some Tara is Indian. is beautiful.
links a noun to another word to, at, after, on, but We went school Monday.
joins clauses or sentences or words and, but, when I like dogs I like cats. I like cats dogs. I like dogs I don't like cats.
short exclamation, sometimes inserted into a sentence oh!, ouch!, hi!, well ! That hurts! ! How are you? , I don't know.
  • lexical Verbs ( work, like, run )
  • auxiliary Verbs ( be, have, must )
  • Determiners may be treated as adjectives, instead of being a separate part of speech.

Here are some examples of sentences made with different English parts of speech:

verb
Stop!
noun verb
John works.
noun verb verb
John is working.
pronoun verb noun
She loves animals.
noun verb noun adverb
Tara speaks English well.
noun verb adjective noun
Tara speaks good English.
pronoun verb preposition determiner noun adverb
She ran to the station quickly.
pron. verb adj. noun conjunction pron. verb pron.
She likes big snakes but I hate them.

Here is a sentence that contains every part of speech:

interjection pron. conj. det. adj. noun verb prep. noun adverb
Well, she and my young John walk to school slowly.

Words with More Than One Job

Many words in English can have more than one job, or be more than one part of speech. For example, "work" can be a verb and a noun; "but" can be a conjunction and a preposition; "well" can be an adjective, an adverb and an interjection. In addition, many nouns can act as adjectives.

To analyze the part of speech, ask yourself: "What job is this word doing in this sentence?"

In the table below you can see a few examples. Of course, there are more, even for some of the words in the table. In fact, if you look in a good dictionary you will see that the word " but " has six jobs to do:

  • verb, noun, adverb, pronoun, preposition and conjunction!
word part of speech example
work noun My is easy.
verb I in London.
but conjunction John came Mary didn't come.
preposition Everyone came Mary.
well adjective Are you ?
adverb She speaks .
interjection ! That's expensive!
afternoon noun We ate in the .
noun acting as adjective We had tea.

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FAQ: frequently asked parts of speech questions

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Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech: Definitions and Examples

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General Education

feature-parts-of-speech-sentence-map

If you’re trying to learn the grammatical rules of English, you’ve probably been asked to learn the parts of speech. But what are parts of speech and how many are there? How do you know which words are classified in each part of speech?

The answers to these questions can be a bit complicated—English is a difficult language to learn and understand. Don’t fret, though! We’re going to answer each of these questions for you with a full guide to the parts of speech that explains the following:

  • What the parts of speech are, including a comprehensive parts of speech list
  • Parts of speech definitions for the individual parts of speech. (If you’re looking for information on a specific part of speech, you can search for it by pressing Command + F, then typing in the part of speech you’re interested in.) 
  • Parts of speech examples
  • A ten question quiz covering parts of speech definitions and parts of speech examples

We’ve got a lot to cover, so let’s begin!

Feature Image: (Gavina S / Wikimedia Commons)

body-woman-question-marks

What Are Parts of Speech? 

The parts of speech definitions in English can vary, but here’s a widely accepted one: a part of speech is a category of words that serve a similar grammatical purpose in sentences.  

To make that definition even simpler, a part of speech is just a category for similar types of words . All of the types of words included under a single part of speech function in similar ways when they’re used properly in sentences.

In the English language, it’s commonly accepted that there are 8 parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, conjunctions, interjections, and prepositions. Each of these categories plays a different role in communicating meaning in the English language. Each of the eight parts of speech—which we might also call the “main classes” of speech—also have subclasses. In other words, we can think of each of the eight parts of speech as being general categories for different types within their part of speech . There are different types of nouns, different types of verbs, different types of adjectives, adverbs, pronouns...you get the idea. 

And that’s an overview of what a part of speech is! Next, we’ll explain each of the 8 parts of speech—definitions and examples included for each category. 

body-people-drinking-coffee-with-dog

There are tons of nouns in this picture. Can you find them all? 

Nouns are a class of words that refer, generally, to people and living creatures, objects, events, ideas, states of being, places, and actions. You’ve probably heard English nouns referred to as “persons, places, or things.” That definition is a little simplistic, though—while nouns do include people, places, and things, “things” is kind of a vague term. I t’s important to recognize that “things” can include physical things—like objects or belongings—and nonphysical, abstract things—like ideas, states of existence, and actions. 

Since there are many different types of nouns, we’ll include several examples of nouns used in a sentence while we break down the subclasses of nouns next!

Subclasses of Nouns, Including Examples

As an open class of words, the category of “nouns” has a lot of subclasses. The most common and important subclasses of nouns are common nouns, proper nouns, concrete nouns, abstract nouns, collective nouns, and count and mass nouns. Let’s break down each of these subclasses!

Common Nouns and Proper Nouns

Common nouns are generic nouns—they don’t name specific items. They refer to people (the man, the woman), living creatures (cat, bird), objects (pen, computer, car), events (party, work), ideas (culture, freedom), states of being (beauty, integrity), and places (home, neighborhood, country) in a general way. 

Proper nouns are sort of the counterpart to common nouns. Proper nouns refer to specific people, places, events, or ideas. Names are the most obvious example of proper nouns, like in these two examples: 

Common noun: What state are you from?

Proper noun: I’m from Arizona .

Whereas “state” is a common noun, Arizona is a proper noun since it refers to a specific state. Whereas “the election” is a common noun, “Election Day” is a proper noun. Another way to pick out proper nouns: the first letter is often capitalized. If you’d capitalize the word in a sentence, it’s almost always a proper noun. 

Concrete Nouns and Abstract Nouns

Concrete nouns are nouns that can be identified through the five senses. Concrete nouns include people, living creatures, objects, and places, since these things can be sensed in the physical world. In contrast to concrete nouns, abstract nouns are nouns that identify ideas, qualities, concepts, experiences, or states of being. Abstract nouns cannot be detected by the five senses. Here’s an example of concrete and abstract nouns used in a sentence: 

Concrete noun: Could you please fix the weedeater and mow the lawn ?

Abstract noun: Aliyah was delighted to have the freedom to enjoy the art show in peace .

See the difference? A weedeater and the lawn are physical objects or things, and freedom and peace are not physical objects, though they’re “things” people experience! Despite those differences, they all count as nouns. 

Collective Nouns, Count Nouns, and Mass Nouns

Nouns are often categorized based on number and amount. Collective nouns are nouns that refer to a group of something—often groups of people or a type of animal. Team , crowd , and herd are all examples of collective nouns. 

Count nouns are nouns that can appear in the singular or plural form, can be modified by numbers, and can be described by quantifying determiners (e.g. many, most, more, several). For example, “bug” is a count noun. It can occur in singular form if you say, “There is a bug in the kitchen,” but it can also occur in the plural form if you say, “There are many bugs in the kitchen.” (In the case of the latter, you’d call an exterminator...which is an example of a common noun!) Any noun that can accurately occur in one of these singular or plural forms is a count noun. 

Mass nouns are another type of noun that involve numbers and amount. Mass nouns are nouns that usually can’t be pluralized, counted, or quantified and still make sense grammatically. “Charisma” is an example of a mass noun (and an abstract noun!). For example, you could say, “They’ve got charisma, ” which doesn’t imply a specific amount. You couldn’t say, “They’ve got six charismas, ” or, “They’ve got several charismas .” It just doesn’t make sense! 

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Verbs are all about action...just like these runners. 

A verb is a part of speech that, when used in a sentence, communicates an action, an occurrence, or a state of being . In sentences, verbs are the most important part of the predicate, which explains or describes what the subject of the sentence is doing or how they are being. And, guess what? All sentences contain verbs!

There are many words in the English language that are classified as verbs. A few common verbs include the words run, sing, cook, talk, and clean. These words are all verbs because they communicate an action performed by a living being. We’ll look at more specific examples of verbs as we discuss the subclasses of verbs next!

Subclasses of Verbs, Including Examples

Like nouns, verbs have several subclasses. The subclasses of verbs include copular or linking verbs, intransitive verbs, transitive verbs, and ditransitive or double transitive verbs. Let’s dive into these subclasses of verbs!

Copular or Linking Verbs

Copular verbs, or linking verbs, are verbs that link a subject with its complement in a sentence. The most familiar linking verb is probably be. Here’s a list of other common copular verbs in English: act, be, become, feel, grow, seem, smell, and taste. 

So how do copular verbs work? Well, in a sentence, if we said, “Michi is ,” and left it at that, it wouldn’t make any sense. “Michi,” the subject, needs to be connected to a complement by the copular verb “is.” Instead, we could say, “Michi is leaving.” In that instance, is links the subject of the sentence to its complement. 

Transitive Verbs, Intransitive Verbs, and Ditransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that affect or act upon an object. When unattached to an object in a sentence, a transitive verb does not make sense. Here’s an example of a transitive verb attached to (and appearing before) an object in a sentence: 

Please take the clothes to the dry cleaners.

In this example, “take” is a transitive verb because it requires an object—”the clothes”—to make sense. “The clothes” are the objects being taken. “Please take” wouldn’t make sense by itself, would it? That’s because the transitive verb “take,” like all transitive verbs, transfers its action onto another being or object. 

Conversely, intransitive verbs don’t require an object to act upon in order to make sense in a sentence. These verbs make sense all on their own! For instance, “They ran ,” “We arrived ,” and, “The car stopped ” are all examples of sentences that contain intransitive verbs. 

Finally, ditransitive verbs, or double transitive verbs, are a bit more complicated. Ditransitive verbs are verbs that are followed by two objects in a sentence . One of the objects has the action of the ditransitive verb done to it, and the other object has the action of the ditransitive verb directed towards it. Here’s an example of what that means in a sentence: 

I cooked Nathan a meal.

In this example, “cooked” is a ditransitive verb because it modifies two objects: Nathan and meal . The meal has the action of “cooked” done to it, and “Nathan” has the action of the verb directed towards him. 

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Adjectives are descriptors that help us better understand a sentence. A common adjective type is color.

#3: Adjectives

Here’s the simplest definition of adjectives: adjectives are words that describe other words . Specifically, adjectives modify nouns and noun phrases. In sentences, adjectives appear before nouns and pronouns (they have to appear before the words they describe!). 

Adjectives give more detail to nouns and pronouns by describing how a noun looks, smells, tastes, sounds, or feels, or its state of being or existence. . For example, you could say, “The girl rode her bike.” That sentence doesn’t have any adjectives in it, but you could add an adjective before both of the nouns in the sentence—”girl” and “bike”—to give more detail to the sentence. It might read like this: “The young girl rode her red bike.”   You can pick out adjectives in a sentence by asking the following questions: 

  • Which one? 
  • What kind? 
  • How many? 
  • Whose’s? 

We’ll look at more examples of adjectives as we explore the subclasses of adjectives next!

Subclasses of Adjectives, Including Examples

Subclasses of adjectives include adjective phrases, comparative adjectives, superlative adjectives, and determiners (which include articles, possessive adjectives, and demonstratives). 

Adjective Phrases

An adjective phrase is a group of words that describe a noun or noun phrase in a sentence. Adjective phrases can appear before the noun or noun phrase in a sentence, like in this example: 

The extremely fragile vase somehow did not break during the move.

In this case, extremely fragile describes the vase. On the other hand, adjective phrases can appear after the noun or noun phrase in a sentence as well: 

The museum was somewhat boring. 

Again, the phrase somewhat boring describes the museum. The takeaway is this: adjective phrases describe the subject of a sentence with greater detail than an individual adjective. 

Comparative Adjectives and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives are used in sentences where two nouns are compared. They function to compare the differences between the two nouns that they modify. In sentences, comparative adjectives often appear in this pattern and typically end with -er. If we were to describe how comparative adjectives function as a formula, it might look something like this: 

Noun (subject) + verb + comparative adjective + than + noun (object).

Here’s an example of how a comparative adjective would work in that type of sentence: 

The horse was faster than the dog.

The adjective faster compares the speed of the horse to the speed of the dog. Other common comparative adjectives include words that compare distance ( higher, lower, farther ), age ( younger, older ), size and dimensions ( bigger, smaller, wider, taller, shorter ), and quality or feeling ( better, cleaner, happier, angrier ). 

Superlative adjectives are adjectives that describe the extremes of a quality that applies to a subject being compared to a group of objects . Put more simply, superlative adjectives help show how extreme something is. In sentences, superlative adjectives usually appear in this structure and end in -est : 

Noun (subject) + verb + the + superlative adjective + noun (object).

Here’s an example of a superlative adjective that appears in that type of sentence: 

Their story was the funniest story. 

In this example, the subject— story —is being compared to a group of objects—other stories. The superlative adjective “funniest” implies that this particular story is the funniest out of all the stories ever, period. Other common superlative adjectives are best, worst, craziest, and happiest... though there are many more than that! 

It’s also important to know that you can often omit the object from the end of the sentence when using superlative adjectives, like this: “Their story was the funniest.” We still know that “their story” is being compared to other stories without the object at the end of the sentence.

Determiners

The last subclass of adjectives we want to look at are determiners. Determiners are words that determine what kind of reference a noun or noun phrase makes. These words are placed in front of nouns to make it clear what the noun is referring to. Determiners are an example of a part of speech subclass that contains a lot of subclasses of its own. Here is a list of the different types of determiners: 

  • Definite article: the
  • Indefinite articles : a, an 
  • Demonstratives: this, that, these, those
  • Pronouns and possessive determiners: my, your, his, her, its, our, their
  • Quantifiers : a little, a few, many, much, most, some, any, enough
  • Numbers: one, twenty, fifty
  • Distributives: all, both, half, either, neither, each, every
  • Difference words : other, another
  • Pre-determiners: such, what, rather, quite

Here are some examples of how determiners can be used in sentences: 

Definite article: Get in the car.  

Demonstrative: Could you hand me that magazine?  

Possessive determiner: Please put away your clothes. 

Distributive: He ate all of the pie. 

Though some of the words above might not seem descriptive, they actually do describe the specificity and definiteness, relationship, and quantity or amount of a noun or noun phrase. For example, the definite article “the” (a type of determiner) indicates that a noun refers to a specific thing or entity. The indefinite article “an,” on the other hand, indicates that a noun refers to a nonspecific entity. 

One quick note, since English is always more complicated than it seems: while articles are most commonly classified as adjectives, they can also function as adverbs in specific situations, too. Not only that, some people are taught that determiners are their own part of speech...which means that some people are taught there are 9 parts of speech instead of 8! 

It can be a little confusing, which is why we have a whole article explaining how articles function as a part of speech to help clear things up . 

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Adverbs can be used to answer questions like "when?" and "how long?"

Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives (including determiners), clauses, prepositions, and sentences. Adverbs typically answer the questions how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent? In answering these questions, adverbs function to express frequency, degree, manner, time, place, and level of certainty . Adverbs can answer these questions in the form of single words, or in the form of adverbial phrases or adverbial clauses. 

Adverbs are commonly known for being words that end in -ly, but there’s actually a bit more to adverbs than that, which we’ll dive into while we look at the subclasses of adverbs!

Subclasses Of Adverbs, Including Examples

There are many types of adverbs, but the main subclasses we’ll look at are conjunctive adverbs, and adverbs of place, time, manner, degree, and frequency. 

Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs look like coordinating conjunctions (which we’ll talk about later!), but they are actually their own category: conjunctive adverbs are words that connect independent clauses into a single sentence . These adverbs appear after a semicolon and before a comma in sentences, like in these two examples: 

She was exhausted; nevertheless , she went for a five mile run. 

They didn’t call; instead , they texted.  

Though conjunctive adverbs are frequently used to create shorter sentences using a semicolon and comma, they can also appear at the beginning of sentences, like this: 

He chopped the vegetables. Meanwhile, I boiled the pasta.  

One thing to keep in mind is that conjunctive adverbs come with a comma. When you use them, be sure to include a comma afterward! 

There are a lot of conjunctive adverbs, but some common ones include also, anyway, besides, finally, further, however, indeed, instead, meanwhile, nevertheless, next, nonetheless, now, otherwise, similarly, then, therefore, and thus.  

Adverbs of Place, Time, Manner, Degree, and Frequency

There are also adverbs of place, time, manner, degree, and frequency. Each of these types of adverbs express a different kind of meaning. 

Adverbs of place express where an action is done or where an event occurs. These are used after the verb, direct object, or at the end of a sentence. A sentence like “She walked outside to watch the sunset” uses outside as an adverb of place. 

Adverbs of time explain when something happens. These adverbs are used at the beginning or at the end of sentences. In a sentence like “The game should be over soon,” soon functions as an adverb of time. 

Adverbs of manner describe the way in which something is done or how something happens. These are the adverbs that usually end in the familiar -ly.  If we were to write “She quickly finished her homework,” quickly is an adverb of manner. 

Adverbs of degree tell us the extent to which something happens or occurs. If we were to say “The play was quite interesting,” quite tells us the extent of how interesting the play was. Thus, quite is an adverb of degree.  

Finally, adverbs of frequency express how often something happens . In a sentence like “They never know what to do with themselves,” never is an adverb of frequency. 

Five subclasses of adverbs is a lot, so we’ve organized the words that fall under each category in a nifty table for you here: 

     

It’s important to know about these subclasses of adverbs because many of them don’t follow the old adage that adverbs end in -ly. 

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Here's a helpful list of pronouns. (Attanata / Flickr )

#5: Pronouns

Pronouns are words that can be substituted for a noun or noun phrase in a sentence . Pronouns function to make sentences less clunky by allowing people to avoid repeating nouns over and over. For example, if you were telling someone a story about your friend Destiny, you wouldn’t keep repeating their name over and over again every time you referred to them. Instead, you’d use a pronoun—like they or them—to refer to Destiny throughout the story. 

Pronouns are typically short words, often only two or three letters long. The most familiar pronouns in the English language are they, she, and he. But these aren’t the only pronouns. There are many more pronouns in English that fall under different subclasses!

Subclasses of Pronouns, Including Examples

There are many subclasses of pronouns, but the most commonly used subclasses are personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, and interrogative pronouns. 

Personal Pronouns

Personal pronouns are probably the most familiar type of pronoun. Personal pronouns include I, me, you, she, her, him, he, we, us, they, and them. These are called personal pronouns because they refer to a person! Personal pronouns can replace specific nouns in sentences, like a person’s name, or refer to specific groups of people, like in these examples: 

Did you see Gia pole vault at the track meet? Her form was incredible!

The Cycling Club is meeting up at six. They said they would be at the park. 

In both of the examples above, a pronoun stands in for a proper noun to avoid repetitiveness. Her replaces Gia in the first example, and they replaces the Cycling Club in the second example. 

(It’s also worth noting that personal pronouns are one of the easiest ways to determine what point of view a writer is using.) 

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns are used to indicate that something belongs to or is the possession of someone. The possessive pronouns fall into two categories: limiting and absolute. In a sentence, absolute possessive pronouns can be substituted for the thing that belongs to a person, and limiting pronouns cannot. 

The limiting pronouns are my, your, its, his, her, our, their, and whose, and the absolute pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, ours, and theirs . Here are examples of a limiting possessive pronoun and absolute possessive pronoun used in a sentence: 

Limiting possessive pronoun: Juan is fixing his car. 

In the example above, the car belongs to Juan, and his is the limiting possessive pronoun that shows the car belongs to Juan. Now, here’s an example of an absolute pronoun in a sentence: 

Absolute possessive pronoun: Did you buy your tickets ? We already bought ours . 

In this example, the tickets belong to whoever we is, and in the second sentence, ours is the absolute possessive pronoun standing in for the thing that “we” possess—the tickets. 

Demonstrative Pronouns, Interrogative Pronouns, and Indefinite Pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns include the words that, this, these, and those. These pronouns stand in for a noun or noun phrase that has already been mentioned in a sentence or conversation. This and these are typically used to refer to objects or entities that are nearby distance-wise, and that and those usually refer to objects or entities that are farther away. Here’s an example of a demonstrative pronoun used in a sentence: 

The books are stacked up in the garage. Can you put those away? 

The books have already been mentioned, and those is the demonstrative pronoun that stands in to refer to them in the second sentence above. The use of those indicates that the books aren’t nearby—they’re out in the garage. Here’s another example: 

Do you need shoes? Here...you can borrow these. 

In this sentence, these refers to the noun shoes. Using the word these tells readers that the shoes are nearby...maybe even on the speaker’s feet! 

Indefinite pronouns are used when it isn’t necessary to identify a specific person or thing . The indefinite pronouns are one, other, none, some, anybody, everybody, and no one. Here’s one example of an indefinite pronoun used in a sentence: 

Promise you can keep a secret? 

Of course. I won’t tell anyone. 

In this example, the person speaking in the second two sentences isn’t referring to any particular people who they won’t tell the secret to. They’re saying that, in general, they won’t tell anyone . That doesn’t specify a specific number, type, or category of people who they won’t tell the secret to, which is what makes the pronoun indefinite. 

Finally, interrogative pronouns are used in questions, and these pronouns include who, what, which, and whose. These pronouns are simply used to gather information about specific nouns—persons, places, and ideas. Let’s look at two examples of interrogative pronouns used in sentences: 

Do you remember which glass was mine? 

What time are they arriving? 

In the first glass, the speaker wants to know more about which glass belongs to whom. In the second sentence, the speaker is asking for more clarity about a specific time. 

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Conjunctions hook phrases and clauses together so they fit like pieces of a puzzle.

#6: Conjunctions

Conjunctions are words that are used to connect words, phrases, clauses, and sentences in the English language. This function allows conjunctions to connect actions, ideas, and thoughts as well. Conjunctions are also used to make lists within sentences. (Conjunctions are also probably the most famous part of speech, since they were immortalized in the famous “Conjunction Junction” song from Schoolhouse Rock .) 

You’re probably familiar with and, but, and or as conjunctions, but let’s look into some subclasses of conjunctions so you can learn about the array of conjunctions that are out there!

Subclasses of Conjunctions, Including Examples

Coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions, and correlative conjunctions are three subclasses of conjunctions. Each of these types of conjunctions functions in a different way in sentences!

Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are probably the most familiar type of conjunction. These conjunctions include the words for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so (people often recommend using the acronym FANBOYS to remember the seven coordinating conjunctions!). 

Coordinating conjunctions are responsible for connecting two independent clauses in sentences, but can also be used to connect two words in a sentence. Here are two examples of coordinating conjunctions that connect two independent clauses in a sentence: 

He wanted to go to the movies, but he couldn’t find his car keys. 

They put on sunscreen, and they went to the beach. 

Next, here are two examples of coordinating conjunctions that connect two words: 

Would you like to cook or order in for dinner? 

The storm was loud yet refreshing. 

The two examples above show that coordinating conjunctions can connect different types of words as well. In the first example, the coordinating conjunction “or” connects two verbs; in the second example, the coordinating conjunction “yet” connects two adjectives. 

But wait! Why does the first set of sentences have commas while the second set of sentences doesn’t? When using a coordinating conjunction, put a comma before the conjunction when it’s connecting two complete sentences . Otherwise, there’s no comma necessary. 

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are used to link an independent clause to a dependent clause in a sentence. This type of conjunction always appears at the beginning of a dependent clause, which means that subordinating conjunctions can appear at the beginning of a sentence or in the middle of a sentence following an independent clause. (If you’re unsure about what independent and dependent clauses are, be sure to check out our guide to compound sentences.) 

Here is an example of a subordinating conjunction that appears at the beginning of a sentence: 

Because we were hungry, we ordered way too much food. 

Now, here’s an example of a subordinating conjunction that appears in the middle of a sentence, following an independent clause and a comma: 

Rakim was scared after the power went out. 

See? In the example above, the subordinating conjunction after connects the independent clause Rakim was scared to the dependent clause after the power went out. Subordinating conjunctions include (but are not limited to!) the following words: after, as, because, before, even though, one, since, unless, until, whenever, and while. 

Correlative Conjunctions

Finally, correlative conjunctions are conjunctions that come in pairs, like both/and, either/or, and neither/nor. The two correlative conjunctions that come in a pair must appear in different parts of a sentence to make sense— they correlate the meaning in one part of the sentence with the meaning in another part of the sentence . Makes sense, right? 

Here are two examples of correlative conjunctions used in a sentence: 

We’re either going to the Farmer’s Market or the Natural Grocer’s for our shopping today. 

They’re going to have to get dog treats for both Piper and Fudge. 

Other pairs of correlative conjunctions include as many/as, not/but, not only/but also, rather/than, such/that, and whether/or. 

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Interjections are single words that express emotions that end in an exclamation point. Cool!

#7: Interjections 

Interjections are words that often appear at the beginning of sentences or between sentences to express emotions or sentiments such as excitement, surprise, joy, disgust, anger, or even pain. Commonly used interjections include wow!, yikes!, ouch!, or ugh! One clue that an interjection is being used is when an exclamation point appears after a single word (but interjections don’t have to be followed by an exclamation point). And, since interjections usually express emotion or feeling, they’re often referred to as being exclamatory. Wow! 

Interjections don’t come together with other parts of speech to form bigger grammatical units, like phrases or clauses. There also aren’t strict rules about where interjections should appear in relation to other sentences . While it’s common for interjections to appear before sentences that describe an action or event that the interjection helps explain, interjections can appear after sentences that contain the action they’re describing as well. 

Subclasses of Interjections, Including Examples

There are two main subclasses of interjections: primary interjections and secondary interjections. Let’s take a look at these two types of interjections!

Primary Interjections  

Primary interjections are single words, like oh!, wow!, or ouch! that don’t enter into the actual structure of a sentence but add to the meaning of a sentence. Here’s an example of how a primary interjection can be used before a sentence to add to the meaning of the sentence that follows it: 

Ouch ! I just burned myself on that pan!

While someone who hears, I just burned myself on that pan might assume that the person who said that is now in pain, the interjection Ouch! makes it clear that burning oneself on the pan definitely was painful. 

Secondary Interjections

Secondary interjections are words that have other meanings but have evolved to be used like interjections in the English language and are often exclamatory. Secondary interjections can be mixed with greetings, oaths, or swear words. In many cases, the use of secondary interjections negates the original meaning of the word that is being used as an interjection. Let’s look at a couple of examples of secondary interjections here: 

Well , look what the cat dragged in!

Heck, I’d help if I could, but I’ve got to get to work. 

You probably know that the words well and heck weren’t originally used as interjections in the English language. Well originally meant that something was done in a good or satisfactory way, or that a person was in good health. Over time and through repeated usage, it’s come to be used as a way to express emotion, such as surprise, anger, relief, or resignation, like in the example above. 

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This is a handy list of common prepositional phrases. (attanatta / Flickr) 

#8: Prepositions

The last part of speech we’re going to define is the preposition. Prepositions are words that are used to connect other words in a sentence—typically nouns and verbs—and show the relationship between those words. Prepositions convey concepts such as comparison, position, place, direction, movement, time, possession, and how an action is completed. 

Subclasses of Prepositions, Including Examples

The subclasses of prepositions are simple prepositions, double prepositions, participle prepositions, and prepositional phrases. 

Simple Prepositions

Simple prepositions appear before and between nouns, adjectives, or adverbs in sentences to convey relationships between people, living creatures, things, or places . Here are a couple of examples of simple prepositions used in sentences: 

I’ll order more ink before we run out. 

Your phone was beside your wallet. 

In the first example, the preposition before appears between the noun ink and the personal pronoun we to convey a relationship. In the second example, the preposition beside appears between the verb was and the possessive pronoun your.

In both examples, though, the prepositions help us understand how elements in the sentence are related to one another. In the first sentence, we know that the speaker currently has ink but needs more before it’s gone. In the second sentence, the preposition beside helps us understand how the wallet and the phone are positioned relative to one another! 

Double Prepositions

Double prepositions are exactly what they sound like: two prepositions joined together into one unit to connect phrases, nouns, and pronouns with other words in a sentence. Common examples of double prepositions include outside of, because of, according to, next to, across from, and on top of. Here is an example of a double preposition in a sentence: 

I thought you were sitting across from me. 

You see? Across and from both function as prepositions individually. When combined together in a sentence, they create a double preposition. (Also note that the prepositions help us understand how two people— you and I— are positioned with one another through spacial relationship.)  

Prepositional Phrases

Finally, prepositional phrases are groups of words that include a preposition and a noun or pronoun. Typically, the noun or pronoun that appears after the preposition in a prepositional phrase is called the object of the preposition. The object always appears at the end of the prepositional phrase. Additionally, prepositional phrases never include a verb or a subject. Here are two examples of prepositional phrases: 

The cat sat under the chair . 

In the example above, “under” is the preposition, and “the chair” is the noun, which functions as the object of the preposition. Here’s one more example: 

We walked through the overgrown field . 

Now, this example demonstrates one more thing you need to know about prepositional phrases: they can include an adjective before the object. In this example, “through” is the preposition, and “field” is the object. “Overgrown” is an adjective that modifies “the field,” and it’s quite common for adjectives to appear in prepositional phrases like the one above. 

While that might sound confusing, don’t worry: the key is identifying the preposition in the first place! Once you can find the preposition, you can start looking at the words around it to see if it forms a compound preposition, a double preposition of a prepositional phrase. 

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10 Question Quiz: Test Your Knowledge of Parts of Speech Definitions and Examples

Since we’ve covered a lot of material about the 8 parts of speech with examples ( a lot of them!), we want to give you an opportunity to review and see what you’ve learned! While it might seem easier to just use a parts of speech finder instead of learning all this stuff, our parts of speech quiz can help you continue building your knowledge of the 8 parts of speech and master each one. 

Are you ready? Here we go:  

1) What are the 8 parts of speech? 

a) Noun, article, adverb, antecedent, verb, adjective, conjunction, interjection b) Noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, determiner, clause, adjective, preposition c) Noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, conjunction, interjection, preposition

2) Which parts of speech have subclasses?

a) Nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs b) Nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, and prepositions c) All of them! There are many types of words within each part of speech.

3) What is the difference between common nouns and proper nouns?

a) Common nouns don’t refer to specific people, places, or entities, but proper nouns do refer to specific people, places, or entities.  b) Common nouns refer to regular, everyday people, places, or entities, but proper nouns refer to famous people, places, or entities.  c) Common nouns refer to physical entities, like people, places, and objects, but proper nouns refer to nonphysical entities, like feelings, ideas, and experiences.

4) In which of the following sentences is the emboldened word a verb?

a) He was frightened by the horror film .   b) He adjusted his expectations after the first plan fell through.  c) She walked briskly to get there on time.

5) Which of the following is a correct definition of adjectives, and what other part of speech do adjectives modify?

a) Adjectives are describing words, and they modify nouns and noun phrases.  b) Adjectives are describing words, and they modify verbs and adverbs.  c) Adjectives are describing words, and they modify nouns, verbs, and adverbs.

6) Which of the following describes the function of adverbs in sentences?

a) Adverbs express frequency, degree, manner, time, place, and level of certainty. b) Adverbs express an action performed by a subject.  c) Adverbs describe nouns and noun phrases.

7) Which of the following answers contains a list of personal pronouns?

a) This, that, these, those b) I, you, me, we, he, she, him, her, they, them c) Who, what, which, whose

8) Where do interjections typically appear in a sentence?

a) Interjections can appear at the beginning of or in between sentences. b) Interjections appear at the end of sentences.  c) Interjections appear in prepositional phrases.

9) Which of the following sentences contains a prepositional phrase?

a) The dog happily wagged his tail.  b) The cow jumped over the moon.  c) She glared, angry that he forgot the flowers.

10) Which of the following is an accurate definition of a “part of speech”?

a) A category of words that serve a similar grammatical purpose in sentences. b) A category of words that are of similar length and spelling. c) A category of words that mean the same thing.

So, how did you do? If you got 1C, 2C, 3A, 4B, 5A, 6A, 7B, 8A, 9B, and 10A, you came out on top! There’s a lot to remember where the parts of speech are concerned, and if you’re looking for more practice like our quiz, try looking around for parts of speech games or parts of speech worksheets online!

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You might be brushing up on your grammar so you can ace the verbal portions of the SAT or ACT. Be sure you check out our guides to the grammar you need to know before you tackle those tests! Here’s our expert guide to the grammar rules you need to know for the SAT , and this article teaches you the 14 grammar rules you’ll definitely see on the ACT.

When you have a good handle on parts of speech, it can make writing essays tons easier. Learn how knowing parts of speech can help you get a perfect 12 on the ACT Essay (or an 8/8/8 on the SAT Essay ).

While we’re on the topic of grammar: keep in mind that knowing grammar rules is only part of the battle when it comes to the verbal and written portions of the SAT and ACT. Having a good vocabulary is also important to making the perfect score ! Here are 262 vocabulary words you need to know before you tackle your standardized tests.

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The 8 Parts of Speech in English Grammar

Table of contents, introduction, what are parts of speech, a list of 8 parts of speech.

A. Action Verbs : Action verbs denote physical or mental actions and are the most common type of verbs. These verbs can be conjugated in simple and continuous tenses

C. Linking Verbs: Linking verbs connect the subject of a sentence to a subject complement, which describes or identifies the subject.

READ MOR ABOUT VERBS

Prepositions

Conjunctions, interjections, analyzing sentence structure (parts of speech) .

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The Eight Parts of Speech

  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections
  • Basic Sentence Structure
  • Sentence Fragments
  • Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices
  • Sentence Type and Purpose
  • Independent and Dependent Clauses: Coordination and Subordination
  • Subject Verb Agreement
  • Consistent Verb Tense
  • Other Phrases: Verbal, Appositive, Absolute
  • Pronoun Reference
  • Relative Pronouns: Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Clauses
  • Avoiding Modifier Problems
  • Transitions
  • Would, Should, Could
  • Achieving Parallelism
  • Definite and Indefinite Articles
  • Two-Word Verbs

TIP Sheet THE EIGHT PARTS OF SPEECH

There are eight parts of speech in the English language: noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. The part of speech indicates how the word functions in meaning as well as grammatically within the sentence. An individual word can function as more than one part of speech when used in different circumstances. Understanding parts of speech is essential for determining the correct definition of a word when using the dictionary.

1. NOUN

  • A noun is the name of a person, place, thing, or idea.

man... Butte College... house... happiness

A noun is a word for a person, place, thing, or idea. Nouns are often used with an article ( the , a , an ), but not always. Proper nouns always start with a capital letter; common nouns do not. Nouns can be singular or plural, concrete or abstract. Nouns show possession by adding 's . Nouns can function in different roles within a sentence; for example, a noun can be a subject, direct object, indirect object, subject complement, or object of a preposition.

The young girl brought me a very long letter from the teacher , and then she quickly disappeared. Oh my!

See the TIP Sheet on "Nouns" for further information.

2. PRONOUN

  • A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun.

She... we... they... it

A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun. A pronoun is usually substituted for a specific noun, which is called its antecedent. In the sentence above, the antecedent for the pronoun she is the girl. Pronouns are further defined by type: personal pronouns refer to specific persons or things; possessive pronouns indicate ownership; reflexive pronouns are used to emphasize another noun or pronoun; relative pronouns introduce a subordinate clause; and demonstrative pronouns identify, point to, or refer to nouns.

The young girl brought me a very long letter from the teacher, and then she quickly disappeared. Oh my!

See the TIP Sheet on "Pronouns" for further information.

3. VERB

  • A verb expresses action or being.

jump... is... write... become

The verb in a sentence expresses action or being. There is a main verb and sometimes one or more helping verbs. (" She can sing." Sing is the main verb; can is the helping verb.) A verb must agree with its subject in number (both are singular or both are plural). Verbs also take different forms to express tense.

The young girl brought me a very long letter from the teacher, and then she quickly disappeared . Oh my!

See the TIP Sheet on "Verbs" for more information.

4. ADJECTIVE

  • An adjective modifies or describes a noun or pronoun.

pretty... old... blue... smart

An adjective is a word used to modify or describe a noun or a pronoun. It usually answers the question of which one, what kind, or how many. (Articles [a, an, the] are usually classified as adjectives.)

See the TIP Sheet on "Adjectives" for more information.

5. ADVERB

  • An adverb modifies or describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

gently... extremely... carefully... well

An adverb describes or modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb, but never a noun. It usually answers the questions of when, where, how, why, under what conditions, or to what degree. Adverbs often end in -ly.

See the TIP Sheet on "Adverbs" for more information.

6. PREPOSITION

  • A preposition is a word placed before a noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

by... with.... about... until

(by the tree, with our friends, about the book, until tomorrow)

A preposition is a word placed before a noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence. Therefore a preposition is always part of a prepositional phrase. The prepositional phrase almost always functions as an adjective or as an adverb. The following list includes the most common prepositions:

See the TIP Sheet on "Prepositions" for more information.

7. CONJUNCTION

  • A conjunction joins words, phrases, or clauses.

and... but... or... while... because

A conjunction joins words, phrases, or clauses, and indicates the relationship between the elements joined. Coordinating conjunctions connect grammatically equal elements: and, but, or, nor, for, so, yet. Subordinating conjunctions connect clauses that are not equal: because, although, while, since, etc. There are other types of conjunctions as well.

The young girl brought me a very long letter from the teacher, and then she quickly disappeared. Oh my!

See the TIP Sheet on "Conjunctions" for more information.

8. INTERJECTION

  • An interjection is a word used to express emotion.

Oh!... Wow!... Oops!

An interjection is a word used to express emotion. It is often followed by an exclamation point.

The young girl brought me a very long letter from the teacher, and then she quickly disappeared. Oh my !

See the TIP Sheet on "Interjections" for more information.

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8 Parts of Speech

The 8 parts of speech in English are: Nouns, Adjectives, Adverbs, Verbs, Prepositions, Pronouns, Conjunctions, and Interjections.

A part of speech is a category of words that have similar grammatical functions or properties. In other words, they play similar roles in a sentence. For instance, a verb shows the action of a subject or the subject's state of being. 

The 8 parts of speech table

We'll now look in more detail at the function of each of these parts of speech. 

Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns are words used to talk about people, places, things, or ideas/concepts. Here are some examples:

  • Person: The President
  • Place: London
  • Thing: Table
  • Idea/concept: Neo-liberalism

So it may be naming something we can touch ( e.g. table; book; car ) or something we cannot touch ( e.g. Neo-liberalism; happiness; wish ).

There are both common nouns, used for classes of   people, places, things, or ideas/concepts,  and proper nouns, which is their given name, always with a capital letter.

Common Nouns

  • political party

Proper Nouns

  • Chester Avenue

Learn more about the various types of noun >>

Another of the 8 parts of speech are adjectives. They describe nouns or pronouns. They can come before or after the noun/pronoun they describe:

Absolute Adjectives

  • The  large  shopping complex
  • The  excited  child
  • She is  happy
  • It was a  shocking  film
  • Her dress was  lovely
  • He's a  good-looking  man

These are  absolute adjectives , but they can also be  comparative  (comparing two or more things) or  superlative  (showing degree or quality):

Comparative Adjectives

  • She's  fitter than the others
  • Their house is bigger
  • I ran faster  than you
  • Cats are more agile than dogs
  • Sue's  more tired than Tim

Superlative Adjectives

  • She's the fittest
  • Their house is the biggest
  • I ran the fastest
  • Cats are the most agile
  • Sue's the most tired

There are various other types of adjective. Learn more about the different types of adjectives >>

Adverbs modify verbs, other adverbs, and adjectives. There are adverbs of manner, time, place and degree . Here are examples of each being modified in relation to verbs, adverbs, and adjectives (the word being modified is underlined):

Adverbs Modifying Verbs

  • He runs fast
  • Ian quickly left the room
  • She spoke slowly

Adverbs Modifying Other Adverbs

  • He runs exceptionally  fast
  • Ian very  quickly left the room
  • She spoke extremely  slowly

Adverbs Modifying Adjectives

  • She's really excited
  • He's happily married
  • The elegantly designed dress is mine

Verbs form part of the predicate of a sentence.

In relation to the subject, they are used to express a physical action (e.g. walk; speak; show) or a mental action (e.g. think; feel; want). They can also express a state of being , mainly with the verb 'to be' but also some others.

Here are some examples:

Physical Action

  • He ran home
  • They chose the blue one

Mental Activity

  • I am thinking about it
  • Ian guessed the answer
  • She believes in ghosts

State of Being

  • She is a police woman
  • They seem worried

These though are main verbs. They have many other uses in a sentence so you should read about all the types of verbs further. 

Prepositions

Another of the 8 parts of speech are prepositions. These show the relationship between two words or phrases in a sentence. They precede a noun or pronoun.

Commons examples of prepositions are  above,  up, upon,  at, before, behind,  since, to, through, under, until, with, within,  about, against, along, around,  beside, between,  down, during,  below, by,  except, for, from, in, into, like, near, of, off, on,  toward.

In these example sentences with prepositions, the two words whose relationship is being expressed are underlined and the prepositions are in bold:

  • The book is on the table
  • He is the leader of the conservative party
  • The boy picked up the toy under the sofa
  • This is a present for your mother

Pronouns replace nouns and they prevent us from repeating the noun in a sentence. These are the types of pronouns with some examples:

  • Personal e.g. I; you; they; she
  • Possessive e.g. mine; yours; his; theirs
  • Relative e.g. who; which; that; whom
  • Demonstrative e.g. this; these; those
  • Reciprocal e.g. one another; each other
  • Emphatic / Reflexive e.g. myself; herself; itself; ourselves
  • Interrogative e.g. what; which; whom; whose

Here are some examples of these words used in sentences:

  • Martha decided she would leave
  • Why don't you use his  car instead of mine
  • Mick is a person who learns quickly
  • Shall we buy some of these ?
  • They began to argue with each other
  • Jenny is pleased with  herself
  • What time is he coming?

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are the of the 8 parts of speech responsible for joining together words, phrases, or clauses. There are three types:

  • Coordinating: and; or; but; so; yet; for; nor
  • Correlative: neither/nor; either/or; not only/but also
  • Subordinating: e.g. although; because; while; which; where; until

Coordinating Conjunctions

Used to connect like for like words (e.g. noun+noun):

  • I like apples and oranges ( 2 nouns )
  • His speech was slow but effective ( 2 adjectives )
  • Shall I say it loudly or quietly? ( 2 adverbs )

Or simple sentences (independent clauses):

  • I find the music annoying but she finds It pleasant
  • She came to the lecture late so she missed everything important
  • She took her umbrella for it was raining hard

Correlative Conjunctions

Used to join alternative or equal elements:

  • He felt neither happy nor sad about it
  • Sue had to decide to either quit or carry on
  • I went not only to Australia but also to New Zealand

Subordinating Conjunctions

Used to join subordinate clauses to main clauses:

  • The government won't vote on the bill until both parties agree
  • I'm still not tired although it is late
  • I'll eat the dish which you don't like

Interjections

Interjections are words used to express an emotion or a sentiment such as surprise, joy, disgust, fear, excitement, pain, or enthusiasm.

They usually appear at the start of a sentence and are not connected to it grammatically. Here are some examples of interjections in sentences:

  • Wow , that's an amazing score!
  • Oh , I didn't know you failed the exam
  • Well , we better not leave too late
  • Ow , that really hurt!
  • Ah , I understand now
  • Oops , I've forgotten to bring the sandwiches

Learn more about interjections >>

Are there only 8 Parts of Speech?

Sometimes rather than 8 parts of speech, you may see 9 or 10 listed. This is because some people treat articles and determiners  as separate categories. 

However, when there are only 8 parts of speech considered (as above), this is because as these two types of word modify nouns, they are classified under adjectives. 

Now practice what you have learned in our identifying parts of speech quiz

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Types of Clauses in English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clause

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction.

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

Nominalisation in English Grammar: High Level Writing Tips

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

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Subject Complements: Predicate Adjectives and Predicate Nominatives

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Examples of Parallelism in English Grammar

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How to Use Either and Neither with Examples

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Using object complements in a sentence enhances your ability to convey specific information about actions and their outcomes.

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Parallelism is about balancing the grammatical structure of words, phrases and clauses in your sentences. Parallel structure will improve your writing's coherence.

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8 Parts of Speech with Meaning and Useful Examples

Posted on Last updated: December 22, 2023

8 Parts of Speech with Meaning and Useful Examples

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Understanding the eight parts of speech is like unlocking the building blocks of language. We all use words every day, often without considering their specific roles in our sentences. By delving into the eight parts of speech, we gain the tools to express ourselves beautifully and powerfully. 

Table of Contents

8 Parts of Speech

8 Parts of Speech with Meaning and Useful Examples

Nouns are the building blocks of sentences, naming everything from people and places to feelings and ideas. Let’s explore the different types of nouns that give substance to our language.

Proper Nouns

Proper nouns are used to name specific, one-of-a-kind items and are always capitalized to signify their uniqueness. Examples include:

  • Names of People:   George ,  Elizabeth ,  Mohammed
  • Places:   Paris ,  Mount Everest ,  the Nile River
  • Organizations:   United Nations ,  Microsoft ,  Harvard University

Common Nouns

Common nouns are the general names for things and aren’t capitalized unless they start a sentence. These include:

  • General Objects:  chair, window, phone
  • Animals:  dog, eagle, shark
  • Places:  city, park, restaurant

Abstract Nouns

Abstract nouns represent ideas or concepts that are not tangible or can’t be experienced with the five senses. We use them to describe feelings, qualities, and states, such as:

  • Feelings:  love, anger, joy
  • Qualities:  bravery, honesty, intelligence
  • States:  freedom, childhood, poverty

Concrete Nouns

Concrete nouns are the opposite of abstract nouns; they name anything that can be experienced with our senses. Some examples are:

  • Physical Objects:  apple, book, car
  • People and Animals:  teacher, cat, child
  • Places:  home, beach, bakery

Through these categories, we see how nouns serve as the cornerstone for expressing everything we discuss, narrate, and describe in our language.

In our examination of the eight parts of speech, we turn our focus to pronouns, essential tools in language that stand in for nouns and keep our sentences fresh and less repetitive.

Personal Pronouns

Personal pronouns are the ones we use to designate specific people or things. They can take on different forms depending on case, whether it’s the subject or object in the sentence, and number, singular or plural. For example, in the first person singular, we use “I” for the subject case and “me” for the object case. Here’s a simple table for reference:

Subject (Singular) Object (Singular) Subject (Plural) Object (Plural)
I me we us
you you you you
he/she/it him/her/it they them

Demonstrative Pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns,  these  helpful words, point to specific things and typically vary depending on the proximity to the speaker. For objects near us, we use “this” for singular and “these” for plural. For objects farther away, “that” for singular and “those” for plural take their place.

Interrogative Pronouns

When we’re forming questions about people or objects, we use interrogative pronouns. The main interrogative pronouns are “who,” “whom,” “whose,” “which,” and “what.” We use “who” and “whom” for asking about people, where “who” is in the subject case, and “whom” in the object case.

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns show ownership and are quite handy for avoiding repetition. They must match the number and sometimes gender of the noun being replaced. Some examples are “his,” “hers,” “its,” “ours,” “yours,” and “theirs.” Unlike possessive adjectives, these pronouns stand alone and do not precede the noun. Here’s a quick list:

  • Singular: mine, yours, his, hers, its
  • Plural: ours, yours, theirs

Remember, pronouns are incredibly useful in our language, allowing us to maintain clarity while avoiding redundancy.

In our exploration of the parts of speech, we come to verbs, the words that express action or state of being in a sentence. They are essential for constructing meaningful statements, as they serve as the backbone of a sentence’s structure.

Action Verbs

Action verbs are the muscle of a sentence, driving forward the things characters and subjects do. Examples include  run ,  jump , and  think . These verbs can show physical actions like  run , mental actions like  think , or emotional states like  love .

Linking Verbs

Linking verbs act like a bridge, connecting a subject to more information about it. These verbs do not represent action. Instead, they link the subject to a subject complement, which can be a noun or adjective that describes the subject. Common linking verbs include  is ,  are , and  seems .

Auxiliary Verbs

We use auxiliary verbs, also known as helping verbs, to alter the mood, tense, or voice of the main verb in a sentence. They are the support system that expands the meaning of the main verb. For example, in the sentence “We  have finished  our project,” the word “ have ” is an auxiliary verb to the main verb  finished . Auxiliary verbs include forms of  be ,  have , and  do .

Adjectives are words that modify nouns or pronouns by giving additional information about them such as quality, quantity, or identity. They are an essential tool we use to create vivid descriptions and provide specific details in our sentences.

Descriptive Adjectives

Descriptive adjectives are the words we use to describe a noun’s characteristics, such as color, size, shape, texture, feeling, sound, and more. They help us paint a clearer picture of the things we’re talking about. For example:

  • The  bright  sun.
  • A  mysterious  noise.

Quantitative Adjectives

Quantitative adjectives specify the quantity of nouns, giving us an idea of ‘how many’ or ‘how much’. These can be exact numbers or words that denote amounts that can be measured or estimated. For instance:

  • Three  books.
  • Several  cookies.

Demonstrative Adjectives

Demonstrative adjectives point out particular nouns. We use them to demonstrate or indicate which one we’re referring to, especially when it’s clear from the context which noun the speaker means. They are often used in phrases like:

  • This  notebook.
  • Those  apples.

Adverbs play an integral role in adding detail to our sentences by modifying verbs, adjectives, other adverbs, or even whole sentences. They answer questions like how, when, where, and to what extent. Now, let’s look closer at the adverbs of manner, time, and place.

Adverbs of Manner

These adverbs describe  how  an action is performed. They can often be spotted by their  -ly  ending, although there are exceptions. For instance, in “She sings beautifully,” the word ‘beautifully’ explains how she sings. Here’s a quick list of examples:

  • Fast (note the lack of -ly)

Adverbs of Time

Adverbs of time provide information about  when  something happens. They can refer to a specific time like ‘yesterday’ or ‘later’, or suggest frequency like ‘often’ or ‘always’. Here’s a mini-table to explain:

Yesterday We met yesterday.
Soon We should see the results soon.
Frequently We visit the cafe frequently.

Adverbs of Place

Lastly, adverbs of place tell us  where  an action takes place. These don’t follow a specific pattern in their formation. Words like ‘here’, ‘there’, and ‘everywhere’ are some of the various adverbs of place. We use them as in:

  • “Please sit here.”
  • “They looked everywhere.”

Prepositions

Prepositions are the words that connect the elements of a sentence, indicating relationships between different entities such as place, time, and movement. They help us give our listeners or readers a clearer picture of what we are trying to communicate.

Prepositions of Time

Prepositions of time describe when something happens. We use  at  for specific times,  in  for months, years, centuries, and long periods, and  on  for days and dates. Here’s how we might use them in sentences:

  • We have a meeting  at  9 AM.
  • Our vacation starts  in  July.
  • My brother is coming to visit  on  Monday.

Prepositions of Place

When we talk about the location of something, we rely on prepositions of place to provide clarity.  At  indicates a specific point,  in  is used for enclosed spaces, and  on  shows a surface. Examples include:

  • The book is  on  the table.
  • She is waiting for us  at  the entrance.
  • They live  in  New York City.

Prepositions of Movement

To describe the direction of an action, we use prepositions of movement.  To  indicates direction towards something,  into  signifies movement from the outside to the inside of an enclosed space, and  through  demonstrates going from one side to another. Here’s how they work:

  • We are going  to  the theater.
  • She walked  into  the room.
  • The road runs  through  the forest.

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are the glue that holds sentences together, allowing us to combine words, phrases, and clauses to add complexity and clarity to our ideas.

Coordinating Conjunctions

We use coordinating conjunctions to join individual words, phrases, or independent clauses that are of equal grammatical importance. The acronym  FANBOYS  can help us remember them:  For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet,  and  So . Here’s how we might use them in sentences:

  • For : We brought a map,  for  we expected to explore uncharted territory.
  • And : She plays the guitar,  and  he sings along.
  • Nor : He neither smiled  nor  frowned.
  • But : She is small,  but  she is mighty.
  • Or : Do you prefer tea  or  coffee?
  • Yet : He’s been working all day,  yet  he seems very energetic.
  • So : It started raining,  so  we opened our umbrellas.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions help us link a dependent clause to an independent clause, giving us the means to show time, contrast, cause, and condition. Some common subordinating conjunctions include  because, although, while,  and  if . Examples include:

  • Because : We stayed indoors  because  it was raining.
  • Although :  Although  it was late, they continued their meeting.
  • While :  While  I cook, can you set the table?
  • If : We’ll go to the beach  if  the weather stays sunny.

Interjections

Interjections are expressive words that we use to convey emotion or exclamation, often standing apart from standard sentences. Think of them as spontaneous sound bytes that capture our immediate reactions. They are unique in that they can often stand alone or be inserted into a sentence without affecting its grammatical structure.

Here’s a simple way to categorize interjections:

  • Primary Interjections : Words like “Oops” and “Wow” that serve no other purpose than being an exclamation.
  • Secondary Interjections : Phrases used in everyday conversation, such as “Well, hello!” or “Oh no,” that can express a wide range of emotions.

We use interjections to:

  • Show surprise:  “Ah!”  or  “Oh!”
  • Express pain:  “Ouch!”  or  “Ow!”
  • Greet:  “Hey!”  or  “Hi!”
  • Bid farewell:  “Bye!”  or  “See ya!”

Remember, interjections often stand out because of their punctuation. While they typically end with an exclamation point, they can sometimes be followed by a comma or another punctuation mark if they’re part of a sentence.

When it comes to writing, use them sparingly. Since they pack a punch of emotion or emphasis, too many interjections can overwhelm our message and distract readers.

Here’s a quick run-down of how you might find interjections in sentences:

  • At the start:  “Yikes, that’s a huge spider!”
  • In the middle:  “That’s, well, a surprise.”
  • At the end:  “You’re moving to Spain , huh?”

Interjections are lively and fun, giving us the freedom to express ourselves vividly and with emotional flair!

Interactive Exercises

Exercise 1: identify the part of speech.

Read each sentence and identify the part of speech for the highlighted word. Choose from noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, or interjection.

  • The  dog  barked loudly throughout the night.
  • She  quickly  finished her homework before going out.
  • Can you believe how  beautifully  she sings?
  • I have  two  cats and one dog.
  • Before  the movie starts, let’s grab some popcorn.
  • He didn’t want to go to the party,  but  I convinced him.
  • Wow , that was an amazing trick!
  • She said that she would help,  which  was very kind of her.
  • The car is  yours  if you can afford it.
  • Please  turn  off the lights when you leave.
  • Preposition
  • Conjunction
  • Interjection

Exercise 2: Fill in the Blanks 

Choose a word from the list that fits the correct part of speech to fill in the blank. The parts of speech you need to choose from are noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

List: quickly, joy, and, blue, she, under, wow, runs, their, but

  • The sky is very __________ today.
  • __________, did you see that shooting star?
  • The cat __________ beneath the porch when it started to rain.
  • They __________ to the store to buy some milk.
  • __________ is a very helpful friend.
  • The children played __________ at the park.
  • I wanted to go to the beach, __________ it started to rain.
  • __________ book is on the table over there.
  • The rabbit hopped __________ the fence.
  • The __________ of winning the game made everyone smile.
  • blue (Adjective)
  • Wow (Interjection)
  • runs (Verb)
  • She (Pronoun)
  • quickly (Adverb)
  • but (Conjunction)
  • Their (Pronoun)
  • under (Preposition)

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you explain the different types of nouns found in the English language?

Nouns in English are categorized primarily into two types: common nouns and proper nouns. Common nouns refer to general items, such as ‘city’ or ‘dog’, while proper nouns name specific ones, like ‘New York’ or ‘Rover’. Additionally, there are concrete nouns for physical objects, abstract nouns for ideas or qualities, and collective nouns that represent groups.

Could you provide some examples of sentences that include all 8 parts of speech?

Certainly! Here’s a sentence that includes all eight parts of speech: “Surprisingly, she loudly declared, ‘Wow, our diligent study pays off!’, as the teacher promptly handed out the results.” In this sentence, you’ll find an adverb (surprisingly), pronoun (she), verb (declared), interjection (wow), possessive adjective (our), adjective (diligent), noun (study), and a preposition (off).

What are the common functions of each part of speech in a sentence?

In a sentence, nouns name entities; pronouns replace nouns to avoid repetition; verbs express actions or states; adjectives describe or qualify nouns; adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs; prepositions show relationships between nouns or pronouns and other words; conjunctions connect words or groups of words; and interjections express emotions.

Where can I find a chart or diagram that clearly shows the 8 parts of speech?

Charts or diagrams illustrating the eight parts of speech can often be found in English grammar textbooks or online educational resources. They provide a visual guide to understanding how each part of speech fits into sentence structure.

Friday 21st of July 2023

thank you so much. It helped a lot for my exams

Monday 24th of October 2022

Thanks again for telling and bringing it out

Friday 23rd of September 2022

Wednesday 13th of October 2021

Teagan Alexander

Wednesday 29th of September 2021

This helped me in class. Thank you????????

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Conjunctions

Prepositions, interjections, categorizing the parts of speech.

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part of speech , lexical category to which a word is assigned based on its function in a sentence.

There are eight parts of speech in traditional English grammar: noun, pronoun, verb , adjective , adverb , conjunction, preposition , and interjection . In linguistics , parts of speech are more typically called word classes .

Distribution of the Sino-Tibetan languages

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea. There are many subcategories of nouns, including common nouns, proper nouns, collective nouns, and abstract nouns.

Common nouns name basic things that can be seen and touched. Examples of common nouns include dog , banana , table , and book .

  • The dog ate a banana .
  • The book was on the table .

Proper nouns name specific people, places, and things, and they begin with a capital letter . Examples of proper nouns include George, New York City , Empire State Building , and Atlantic Ocean .

  • George sailed the Atlantic Ocean .
  • The Empire State Building is in New York City .

Collective nouns name groups of people or things. Examples of collective nouns include team , flock , litter , and batch .

  • The team won the game.
  • The flock flew south for the winter.

Abstract nouns name things that cannot be seen or touched. Examples of abstract nouns include happiness , truth , friendship , and beauty .

  • He brings her so much happiness .
  • The friendship is a strong one.

A pronoun is used in place of a noun. There are many subcategories of pronouns, including but not limited to personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, and reflexive pronouns.

Personal pronouns replace names of people, places, things, and ideas. Examples of personal pronouns include she , he , it , and they .

  • They enjoyed the party.
  • Mikey likes it .

Possessive pronouns replace nouns and indicate ownership. Because they modify nouns, they are also frequently categorized as adjectives. Examples of possessive pronouns include his , its , mine , and theirs .

  • The house is theirs .
  • The parrot knows its name.

Reflexive pronouns replace nouns when the subject and object in a sentence are the same. Examples of reflexive pronouns include myself , herself , themselves , and oneself .

  • She baked a cake all by herself .
  • They prepared themselves for the adventure.

A verb indicates a state of doing, being, or having. There are three main subcategories of verbs: doing verbs, being verbs, and having verbs.

Doing verbs indicate actions. Examples of doing verbs include run , wash , explain , and wonder .

  • Oliver washed the windows.
  • I wonder where the cat is hiding.

Being and having verbs do not indicate action and are considered relating (or linking) verbs because they connect one piece of information to another. Examples of being and having verbs include am , are , has , and own .

  • We are at the store.
  • John has a red baseball cap.

An adjective describes or modifies a noun or pronoun.

Adjectives provide information about the qualities or classifications of a person or thing. Examples of adjectives include tall , purple , funny , and antique .

  • The Willis Tower is a tall building.
  • There were several antique cars in the parade.

An adverb describes or modifies verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

Adverbs provide information about the manner in which things are done, as well as when, where, and why they are done. Examples of adverbs include quickly , extremely , fiercely , and yesterday .

  • The boy ran quickly through the rainstorm.
  • That was a fiercely competitive game yesterday.

A conjunction links words, phrases, and clauses. There are two main subcategories of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions.

Coordinating conjunctions link words, phrases, and clauses that are equally important in a sentence. Examples of coordinating conjunctions include and , but , or , and so .

  • The students read short stories and novels.
  • Liz went to the movies but not to dinner.

Subordinating conjunctions link subordinate clauses to a sentence. Examples of subordinating conjunctions include because , although , before , and since .

  • The team is cheering because it is excited.
  • Henry had Swiss cheese on his burger although he preferred cheddar.

A preposition provides information about the relative position of a noun or pronoun. Prepositions can indicate direction, time, place, location, and spatial relationships of objects. Examples of prepositions include on , in , across , and after .

  • The cat ran across the road.
  • The pencil is in the drawer.

An interjection acts as an exclamation. Interjections typically express emotional reactions to information in an adjoining sentence. Examples of interjections include eek , wow , oops , and phew .

  • Eek ! That was a huge spider.
  • Oops ! I didn’t mean to slam the door.

Although the number of parts of speech is traditionally fixed at eight, some grammarians consider there to be additional parts of speech. For example, determiners (also called determinatives) modify nouns and are therefore generally considered to be adjectives, but they differ from other adjectives in that their exact meaning is supplied by context . They include articles, demonstrative pronouns, possessive pronouns, and quantifiers. Examples of determiners include the , an , that , your , and many .

Over the years grammarians have also proposed changes in how parts of speech are categorized. The 2002 edition of the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , for example, placed pronouns as a subcategory of nouns.

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Learn 8 Parts of Speech in English Grammar!

The  parts of speech explain how a word is used in a sentence. There are 8 parts of speech (also known as word classes): nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions  and interjections.

Table of Contents

8 Parts of Speech in English

  • A  noun  names a person, place, things or idea.
  • Examples:  dog , cat, horse, student, teacher, apple, Mary and etc.
  • An  adverb  tells how often, how, when, where. It can describe a verb, an adjective or an adverb.
  • Examples:   loudly, always, never, late, soon etc.
  • A  verb  is a word or group of words that describes an action, experience.
  • Examples:  realize, walk, see, look, sing, sit, listen and etc.
  • An  adjective  describes a noun or pronoun.
  • Examples :  red, tall, fat, long, short, blue, beautiful, sour, bitter and etc.

PREPOSITION

  • A  preposition  is used before a noun, pronoun, or gerund to show place, time, direction in a sentence.
  • Examples:  at, in, on, about, to, for, from and etc.

CONJUNCTION

  • Conjunctions  join words or groups of words in a sentence.
  • Examples:    and, because, yet, therefore, moreover, since, or, so, until, but and etc…
  • Pronouns  replace the name of a person, place, thing or idea in a sentence.
  • Examples:  he, she, it, we, they, him, her, this, that and etc.

INTERJECTION

  • Interjections  express strong emotion and are often followed by an exclamation point.
  • Examples :  Bravo! Well! Aha! Hooray! Yeah! Oops! Phew!

8 Parts of Speech in English | Image

8 Parts of Speech in English

Please explain how to use the parts of speeches in sentence formation..

Pepe

Good matiral could you please send it to my by my email

jemima

Hi, why is the ARTICLE not part of the speech? Like in french? “The, a, an,…” to which category do they belong?

JT Uatokuja

Nice one, simplified as much as possible , reading through all, was like eating a pizza or taking a walk in park

Mate

Hello it’s boring ????????????????☺️☺️????????☺️

Saksham

Hhhhhqwl☺️☺️????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????️❤️????️????????????️????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????️????????????????????????????????

English Teacher Site

Parts of Speech: 8 Key Elements Explained and Their Usage Guide

  • Parts of speech are crucial to sentence structure and clarity in English grammar.
  • Each of the eight parts of speech serves a specific function within a sentence.
  • Mastery of parts of speech helps prevent common grammatical errors.

To develop a strong command of English, one must become adept at identifying and employing the eight parts of speech. Having a clear grasp of their functions can prevent common grammatical errors that often confuse readers and distort the message. A sentence’s clarity hinges on the correct placement and use of these essential components. With practice and knowledge, the mechanics of English become less daunting, enabling more effective and expressive communication.

Parts of Speech: 8 Parts of Speech, What Are They, How to Use Them

In English, the eight parts of speech are fundamental building blocks of language. Each part of speech serves a unique function within a sentence, contributing to the meaning and structure of communication.

Nouns name people, places, things, or ideas. They can be subject or object in a sentence:

  • Subject : The dog barks.
  • Object : She petted the dog .

Pronouns replace nouns and help avoid repetition:

  • She loves her dog.

Verbs express action or state of being:

  • Action: The dog runs .
  • State: The dog is happy.

Adjectives describe or modify nouns, giving more information:

  • The playful dog.

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, often ending in ‘-ly’:

  • She petted the dog gently .

Prepositions show the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other parts of the sentence:

  • The dog jumped over the log.

Conjunctions connect words, phrases, or clauses:

  • The dog ran and jumped.

Interjections express strong emotions or reactions, often standing alone:

  • Wow ! That’s a fast dog.

The following tables show examples and their usage:

Part of SpeechFunctionExample Sentence
NounNaming a person, place, thing, or ideaThe sat on the mat.
PronounReplacing a noun is happy.
VerbExpressing an action or stateThe cat .
AdjectiveDescribing a nounThe cat.
AdverbModifying a verb, adjective, or adverbThe cat purred .
PrepositionShowing relationship between two elementsThe cat is on the .
ConjunctionConnecting clauses or phrasesThe cat purred slept.
InterjectionExpressing emotion ! What a nice cat!

Using the Parts of Speech:

Part of SpeechHow to Use
NounUse as subject or object in a sentence
PronounTo avoid repetition of a noun
VerbTo denote action or state
AdjectiveTo provide details about a noun
AdverbTo modify or qualify an action or trait
PrepositionTo indicate location, time, or method
ConjunctionTo connect sentences or parts of a sentence
InterjectionTo exclaim emotion or a sudden reaction

Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech

Parts of speech are the categories that words are divided into based on their function. These classifications are essential for understanding how words can be combined to form meaningful sentences.

Nouns are the building blocks of sentences, representing people, places, ideas, or objects. They can be categorized into several types:

  • Common nouns : Refers to general items, e.g., ‘city,’ ‘dog.’
  • Proper nouns : Specific names of people or places, e.g., ‘London,’ ‘Elizabeth.’
  • Abstract nouns : Qualities or ideas, e.g., ‘bravery.’
  • Concrete nouns : Perceptible things, e.g., ‘book.’
  • Countable nouns : Items you can count, e.g., ‘apples.’
  • Uncountable nouns : Substances or concepts you cannot count, e.g., ‘sugar.’
  • Collective nouns : Groups of things or people, e.g., ‘flock.’
  • Singular noun : Represents one item, e.g., ‘car.’
  • Plural noun : Represents more than one item, e.g., ‘cars.’

Pronouns replace nouns in sentences, helping avoid repetition:

  • Personal pronouns : ‘I,’ ‘you,’ ‘he,’ ‘she.’
  • Demonstrative pronouns : ‘this,’ ‘that,’ ‘these,’ ‘those.’
  • Interrogative pronouns : ‘who,’ ‘what,’ ‘where.’
  • Indefinite pronouns : ‘anyone,’ ‘everyone.’
  • Relative pronouns : Connect clauses, e.g., ‘who,’ ‘which.’
  • Reflexive pronouns : Reflect back to the subject, e.g., ‘myself.’
  • Possessive pronouns : Show ownership, e.g., ‘yours,’ ‘ours.’

Verbs showcase action or a state of being in a sentence:

  • Regular verbs : Form their past tense by adding -ed, e.g., ‘talked.’
  • Irregular verbs : Have a unique past tense, e.g., ‘sang.’
  • Auxiliary verbs : Help the main verb, e.g., ‘have,’ ‘be.’
  • Transitive verbs : Require an object, e.g., ‘need’ (something).
  • Intransitive verbs : Do not require an object, e.g., ‘sleep.’
  • Linking verbs : Connect the subject to more information, e.g., ‘appear.’
  • Modal verbs : Express necessity or possibility, e.g., ‘must,’ ‘can.’
  • Phrasal verbs : Consist of a verb plus a particle, e.g., ‘give up.’

Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns, providing additional information:

  • Articles : The definite article ‘the,’ and indefinite articles ‘a,’ ‘an.’
  • Comparative adjectives : Compare two things, e.g., ‘taller.’
  • Superlative adjectives : Compare more than two things, e.g., ‘tallest.’
  • Coordinate adjectives : Equally modify a noun, e.g., ‘a cold, rainy night.’
  • Participial adjectives : Derived from verbs, e.g., ‘boring.’
  • Denominal adjectives : Formed from nouns, e.g., ‘golden.’

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs:

  • Adverbs of manner : Describe how something is done, e.g., ‘quickly.’
  • Adverbs of time : Indicate when something happens, e.g., ‘yesterday.’
  • Adverbs of place : Indicate where, e.g., ‘here.’
  • Adverbs of degree : Indicate the level of intensity, e.g., ‘very.’
  • Adverbs of frequency : Indicate how often, e.g., ‘often.’

Prepositions

Prepositions are used to show relationships between nouns or pronouns and other words in a sentence:

  • Preposition examples : ‘at,’ ‘on,’ ‘in.’

Conjunctions

Conjunctions connect words or groups of words:

  • Coordinating conjunctions : Connect elements of the same grammatical type, e.g., ‘and,’ ‘but.’
  • Correlative conjunctions : Work in pairs, e.g., ‘neither/nor.’
  • Subordinating conjunctions : Connect clauses, e.g., ‘although,’ ‘because.’

Interjections

Interjections express emotion and are often found at the beginning of a sentence:

  • Exclamatory words : ‘Wow!,’ ‘Ouch!,’ ‘Hooray!’

Parts of Speech Tables

Noun TypesExamples
Commonbook, city
ProperLondon, Elizabeth
Abstracthappiness, time
Concretecup, apple
Verb TypesExamples
Regulartalk, walk
Irregulargo, be
Auxiliaryhave, will
Transitivebring, give
Intransitivesleep, sit
Linkingseem, become
Modalcan, must
Phrasalbreak up, set out

Common Mistakes with Parts of Speech

Each part of speech plays a pivotal role in sentence structure and the conveyance of meaning. Recognizing and understanding their functions help both the writer and the reader communicate more precisely.

Using Parts of Speech Effectively

To use parts of speech effectively, one must grasp their specific functions within sentences. Here’s a brief overview:

  • Nouns : Name people, places, things, or ideas (e.g., cat, happiness).
  • Pronouns : Stand in for nouns (e.g., she, they).
  • Verbs : Express actions or states of being (e.g., run, is).
  • Adjectives : Describe nouns (e.g., sunny, blue).
  • Adverbs : Modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs (e.g., quickly, very).
  • Prepositions : Show relationships between nouns or pronouns and other words in a sentence (e.g., under, beside).
  • Conjunctions : Connect words, phrases, or clauses (e.g., and, because).
  • Interjections : Express strong emotions (e.g., wow, ouch).

Determiners, quantifiers, numbers , and articles are often considered part of the noun phrase and are essential in specifying which noun you’re referring to.

Common Errors and How to Avoid Them

1. Articles and Nouns :

  • Incorrect : I have cat.
  • Correct : I have a cat (when referring to any single cat).

2. Agreement between Subject and Verb :

  • Incorrect : She run every day.
  • Correct : She runs every day.

3. Overuse or Incorrect Use of Adverbs :

  • Incorrect : She sings very beautifully.
  • Correct : She sings beautifully (the adverb ‘very’ is often unnecessary).

4. Confusing Adjectives and Adverbs :

  • Incorrect : He runs quick.
  • Correct : He runs quickly (use an adverb to modify a verb).

5. Misuse of Pronouns :

  • Incorrect : Each student must submit their homework.
  • Correct : Each student must submit his or her homework (use ‘his or her’ for singular nouns).

6. Plural Forms and Possessives :

  • Incorrect : Childrens’ books.
  • Correct : Children’s books (the possessive apostrophe placement).

A table to help identify errors and corrections for subject-verb agreement and singular/plural confusion:

The cats is outside.The cats are outside.‘Cats’ is plural, so the verb should be ‘are.’
She have two dogs.She has two dogs.‘She’ is singular, so the verb should be ‘has.’

A table to help distinguish between possessive determiners and contractions:

Your funny!You’re funny!‘You’re’ is a contraction for ‘you are.’
Its raining.It’s raining.‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’

8 parts of speech sa english

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What Are The 8 Parts of Speech? Definitions and Examples

8 Parts of speech in English

Speaking and writing in any language involves using different parts of speech. Understanding what these parts are and how to use them correctly is important for effective communication. In English, there are 8 parts of speech, which include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. In this article, we will explore each of these parts of speech in detail, along with their definitions and examples. By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of the role and importance of the 8 parts of speech in English.

Content Guide

What Are Parts of Speech?

Parts of speech, also known as word classes, are categories that describe the role a word plays in a sentence. These categories help us understand how words work within sentences and how they relate to one another. In essence, parts of speech are a set of general rules that help us to form sentences that are clear, logical, and expressive. There are a total of 8 parts of speech in the English language, and each has its own set of rules. 

The 8 Parts of Speech

The 8 parts of speech are:

Prepositions

  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections 

Parts of Speech Chart

The following chart lists the 8 parts of speech—along with brief descriptions and examples.

Parts of speech chart with examples

It’s time to explore them in detail. So, let’s go ahead and learn the 8 parts of speech with definitions and examples.

A noun is a word that refers to a person, animal, place, idea, or thing. For example, John, cat, dog, table, house, office, etc. In English, nouns come in many different forms, including proper nouns, which are names that refer to people or places; descriptive nouns, which describe things; and common nouns, which are words that are used to refer to a wide range of things.

Common nouns are often used to refer to everyday objects, such as “chair,” “table,” and “door.” Other common nouns are used to refer to abstract concepts, such as “love,” “hate,” and “peace.” Nouns can also be singular, plural, and neuter. A singular noun refers to one person or thing, while a plural noun refers to more than one person or thing. A neuter noun is used to refer to something that isn’t either a person or a thing.

Let’s see some examples of nouns in sentences:

Person- Her name is Amy . Place – This park is so crowded. Thing- You never sit on this chair . Animal – They have a dog .

Pronouns are words that we use to replace nouns in sentences that refer to people, animals, objects, or places. Pronouns help us to avoid the repetition of nouns while we speak or write.  Words such as he, she, it, I, you, we, they, them, etc. are pronouns.

Let’s consider this paragraph without using pronouns:

Amy always wakes up early in the morning. Amy goes to the office and comes back in the afternoon. In the evening, Amy cooks dinner. After having dinner Amy goes to bed. This is Amy’s daily routine.

Did you find it a bit repetitive?

Now, when we replace the noun with pronouns, the paragraph becomes more engaging:

Amy always wakes up early in the morning. She goes to the office and comes back in the afternoon. She cooks dinner in the evening. And, after dinner, she goes to bed. This is her routine.

In this case, ‘She’ and ‘her’ are the pronouns we used instead of repeatedly mentioning Amy’s name.

Adjectives are words used to describe the person, place, or thing that a noun refers to. Adjectives are often used to add extra information about a noun. It can be used to describe a person’s age, gender, or personality. Adjectives are also used to describe the quality of a noun, such as its size, shape, or color. Some examples of adjectives are tall, short, good, bad, beautiful, large, funny, sad, etc.

Let’s see some examples of adjectives in sentences:

You look beautiful in this dress. It’s pleasant weather today. He is a kind person. She looks sad today. The movie we watched yesterday was engaging .

A verb is a word that describes specific actions, or an action that is being performed. They are also called action verbs. However, not all verbs are action verbs. There are non-action verbs that denote feelings or state of being. So, a verb can be either an action verb or a state verb. Action verbs are words such as “walk,” “run,” and “jump.” State verbs are words such as “be,” “look,” “love,” and “feel.”

Examples of verbs in sentences:

We play video games every day. They run very fast. I love pizza. He jumped off the bridge. She hates horror movies.

Adverbs describe or provide more information about verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. They are often used to describe the way something is done, how something is done, or how something feels. Moreover, adverbs can highlight distinctions between things or actions. For instance, we use words such as “slowly” or “carefully” to describe the way something is done. We often use words such as “well” or “badly” to describe how something is done.

Some examples of adverbs are always, quickly, badly, quietly, early, slowly, etc.

He runs faster than me. Can you finish your work early ? She was badly injured while playing. Can you do it silently ?  She was walking slowly towards me.

Prepositions are words that connect words in a sentence. Prepositions can be used to describe the location of something, as well as the time and manner in which something is done. The most common prepositions are: at, on, by, under, over, beside, before, after, behind, above, below, in, out, with, and without. Prepositions can also be used to indicate the relationship between two things (for example, beside means “next to”).

Prepositions are one of the most important parts of speech that you must learn to use correctly. They can make your writing clear and make your sentences more interesting.

Examples of prepositions in sentences:

My books are on the table.  He leaves for home at 8 p.m. You can sit beside me. They came here after me. I travel by public transport.

Conjunction

A conjunction is a word or phrase that connects two ideas or clauses. For example, consider these sentences: “I like sports. I like music.” These are two separate sentences, but you can connect them using the conjunction “and” to say, “ I like sports and music. ” Conjunctions help make our sentences flow smoothly by joining related thoughts or actions.

There are many different types of conjunctions. Some examples of common conjunctions are: and, but, when, unless, or, nor, for, yet, although, but not, because, not only, etc.

Examples of conjunction in sentences:

I cannot go to work today because my mother is sick. My dad used to ride horses when he was young. You are likely to fail unless you work hard.

Interjection

Interjections are words that show sudden feelings or emotions such as joy, surprise, or shock. We usually use the exclamation mark (!) with interjection words.  

Some examples of interjections are:

Oh! Wow! Hello! Ouch! Bravo!

Examples of interjections in sentences:

Oh! I forgot the keys. Wow! It looks great. Hello! Is anybody there?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about “Parts of Speech”

1. what are the parts of speech in english.

English has eight primary parts of speech: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections.

2. Why is it important to understand parts of speech?

Understanding parts of speech is crucial for effective communication and writing. It helps you structure sentences correctly, convey your thoughts clearly, and avoid grammatical errors.

3. How can I identify the parts of speech in a sentence?

You can identify parts of speech by understanding their functions and looking for clues within the sentence. Nouns name things, verbs show actions, adjectives describe nouns, and so on. Context and practice are essential tools for identification.

4. Can words change their part of speech in different sentences?

Yes, some words can function as different parts of speech depending on their usage and context. For example, “work” can be a noun (“I have a lot of work to do”) or a verb (“I need to work hard”).

5. What’s the difference between adjectives and adverbs?

Adjectives describe nouns and answer questions like “What kind?” or “Which one?” (e.g., “red car”). Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, addressing questions like “How?” “When?” “Where?” or “To what extent?” (e.g., “She sings beautifully”).

6. How do conjunctions function in sentences?

Conjunctions connect words, phrases, or clauses to form more complex sentences. Common conjunctions are “and,” “but,” “or,” “so,” and “because.”

7. What’s the role of prepositions in sentences?

Prepositions establish connections between nouns or pronouns and other words in a sentence, indicating aspects like location, direction, time, or manner. Examples of prepositions include “in,” “on,” “under,” “with,” and “between.”

8. When should interjections be used in communication?

Interjections are used to express strong emotions or sudden exclamations. They add emotional depth to your speech or writing. For instance, “Wow, that’s amazing!” or “Ouch, that hurts!”

9. Are there any online tools to help identify parts of speech in sentences?

Yes, there are many online grammar-checking tools and apps that can analyze and label the parts of speech in a sentence. They can be useful for practice and verification.

10. How can I improve my understanding of parts of speech?

Improving your understanding of parts of speech requires practice. Analyze sentences from books, articles, or conversations. Engage in grammar exercises and quizzes. Reading widely and regularly can also help reinforce your knowledge.

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Home » 8 Essential Parts of Speech in English with Examples

8 Essential Parts of Speech in English with Examples

8 Essential Parts of Speech in English with Examples

The parts of speech are used to describe how a word functions in meaning and also it tells the grammatical meaning in a sentence. Parts of speech are also called word class which means it is used to express the role of every word in a sentence. When a word is used in various parts of speech it can function more than one part of speech in a sentence. You need to understand the different parts of speech if you want to know how a word works in a sentence so you can improve your writing.

8 Essential Parts of Speech in English with Examples

Parts of Speech in English

Parts of Speech definition:

Parts of speech are different types of words that have specific jobs in sentences. For example, nouns name things, verbs show actions, adjectives describe nouns, and so on. Learning about parts of speech helps us understand how words work together in sentences.

There are 8 parts of speech.

  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections

Types of Parts of Speech:

Nouns are basically used to name people, places, animals, and things. Nouns typically function as the subject or object of a verb, or as the object of a preposition.

Example Words:

Cat House
Book Mountain
Table River
Car Ocean
Tree Sky

Noun Used in Sentences

  • The playful dog chased its tail around the yard.
  • The fluffy cat curled up on the couch and purred.
  •  The red car sped down the highway, leaving a trail of dust.
  • I’m reading a fascinating book by my favorite author.
  • We had a picnic by the serene river this weekend.

Noun Example Sentences in English

Noun Example Sentences in English

A verb is a word that is used to show action or a state of being. It tells you what someone or something does or is. For example, in the sentence ‘ He jumps,’ jumps is the verb because it shows the action of jumping.

run eat
sleep dance
laugh read
swim write
jump sing

Verb Used in Sentences

  • She ran to catch the bus.
  • He paints beautiful landscapes.
  • I read a fascinating novel last night.
  • The chef cooks delicious meals.
  • She teaches math at the local school.

Verb Used in Sentences

3 – Adjectives

Adjectives are words that describe nouns. They give more details about people, places, things, or ideas. For example, in the sentence The happy dog wagged its tail, happy’ is the adjective because it describes what kind of dog it is.

  • Beautiful sunset
  • Delicious pizza
  • Friendly dog
  • Cold ice cream
  • Eager children

Adjective is commonly placed before a noun and after the linking verb.

Before Noun Examples :

  • Little children
  • Modern technology
  • Beautiful artwork
  • Warm sunshine

After Linking Verb Examples:

  • The flowers are beautiful .
  • The cake tastes delicious .
  • The movie seems interesting .
  • The weather feels cold .
  • The room looks cozy .

Adjective is used to Explain nouns. Example Words:

  • Beautiful flowers
  • Gigantic elephant
  • Curious child

Adjective Example Words

Adjective Example Words

4 – Adverbs

An adverb is a word that modifies or describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. It often tells us how, when, where, or to what extent something happens. For example, in the sentence, She ran quickly, the word quickly is an adverb because it describes how she ran.

Quickly Quietly
Slowly Loudly
Carefully Happily
Sadly Suddenly
Seriously Angrily

Sentence Examples: 

  • She ran to catch the bus quickly .
  • It’s very hot outside today.
  • We should leave for the movie now .
  • The keys are over there on the table.
  • She has almost finished her work.

Adverb Example Sentences

Adverb Example Sentences

5 – Pronouns

Pronouns are the words that are used in place of nouns in order to to avoid unnecessary repetition. Instead of repeating the same noun, we use pronouns to talk about them.

I we
you you
he / she / it they
me us
him / her / it them
my / mine our / ours
your / yours your / yours
his / hers / its their / theirs
  •  I am going to the store.
  •  Can you pass me the salt?
  •   He is my brother.
  •   She loves to sing.
  • The cat is cute; it is playful.
  •   We are going to the beach.
  •   They won the game.
  • Give it to me .
  • I saw him at the park.
  •  I like her style.

Pronoun Example Sentences

Pronoun Example Sentences

6 – Prepositions

Prepositions are words that show the relationship between nouns or pronouns and other words in a sentence. It usually used to indicate location, direction, time, or the relationship between different elements in a sentence.

Under Above
Beside Between
Near Against
Across Alongside
Through Around
  •  The cat is sleeping in the basket.
  • The keys are under the cushion.
  • She is sitting between two friends.
  •  The airplane is flying above the clouds.
  • We met during the summer vacation.

Preposition Example Sentences

Preposition Example Sentences

7 – Conjunctions

Conjunctions are words that are used to connect words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence. They are used to link different parts of a sentence together to show how they are related.

Conjunction Words:

And But
Or So
If Because
Although Since
While Yet
Either…or Neither…nor
  • He and she went to the store.
  • She wanted to go, but he stayed home.
  •  It was raining, so we stayed indoors.
  •   If you study, you’ll do well on the test.
  • They left early because they had a long drive.

Conjunction Example Sentences

Conjunction Example Sentences

8 – Interjections

Interjections are words or phrases used to express sudden emotions or sentiments. They often stand alone or appear at the beginning of a sentence and convey feelings such as surprise, joy, excitement etc.

Interjection Words:

Wow Oh
Ouch Hey
Yay Ooh
Ah Hurray
Oops Alas
  • Wow! That was an amazing performance!
  • Ouch! I just stubbed my toe.
  • Hooray! We won the game!
  • Bravo! You did a fantastic job.
  • Ugh! I can’t believe it’s Monday again.

Interjection Example Sentences

Interjection Example Sentences

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Home » 8 Parts of Speech with Types, Definitions and their Examples

8 Parts of Speech with Types, Definitions and their Examples

8 Parts of Speech | 8 Types, Definition and Examples

Are you curious to Speak or Learn the English Language? well, Every word in the English language is referred to as a component of speech. The 8 parts of speech are Nouns , Pronouns, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. we will go over the Common Eight parts of speech in this tutorial, along with their definitions, types, and Examples. This is the article on the different 8 parts of speech and Their examples and definitions as well as Example Sentences.

The 8 parts of speech are the regular grammar categories to which words are allocated based on their functions of syntax, such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and so on. Stated differently, they talk about the varied roles that words might play in a sentence and the connections that words have to one another as defined by syntax and grammar .

Every single English word can be classified into one of the eight components of speech. A word’s part of speech is the purpose it fulfills in a sentence. These jobs were also designed to work as a team, much like any workplace or ensemble cast television series.

Also Check:

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Table of Contents

What Is a Part of Speech?

Before delving into the specifics, let’s clarify what we mean by a “Part of speech.” In English grammar, a part of speech is a category of main and a lot of words. These types of categories help us to understand how the words we use and Speak within the daily life Conversation.

8 Parts of Speech Are:

  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections

Names of 8 Parts of speech

 The 8 parts of speech:

Noun: the foundation of sentences.

  • Types: Common, proper, abstract, concrete, and countable nouns. See more…
  • Definition: A noun is a word that tells of a person, place, thing, or idea.
  • Example: cat , London , happiness ,
  • Nouns Example Sentences: She has an Adorable Cat . They are going to London. may god give you happiness.

Pronoun: Substitutes for Nouns

  • Types: Personal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns. See More…
  • Definition: A pronoun is a word that represents a noun to avoid repetition.
  • Example: he , she , it , they He is a good boy. she is studying. it is an amazing sight. they live in New York.

Verb: The Action Words

  • Types: Action verbs, linking verbs, helping verbs. See More….
  • Definition: in the English Language, A verb explains an action, occurrence, or state of being.
  • Example: Runs, smell, Going, playing,  He runs every morning. The flowers smell delicious. I am going with my Friends. they are Playing Football.

Adjective: Describing Words

  • Types: Descriptive adjectives, limiting adjectives. See More… 
  • Definition: An adjective describes or modifies a noun or pronoun.
  • Example: blue , tall , delicious today the sky is blue. He is a tall man. She makes delicious food.

Adverb: Modifiers of Verbs

  • Types: Adverbs of manner, place, time, degree. See More…
  • Definition: An adverb tells about the verb, adjective, or another adverb
  • Example: quickly,   beautifully, Loudly This boy runs quickly. She sings beautifully . He Speaks Loudly .

Preposition: Indicators of Position or Relationship

  • Types: Simple prepositions, compound prepositions. See More…
  • Definition: A preposition describes the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence.
  • Example: on, in, at, across The book is on the table. I am in the car. He is at the bus stand. She walked across the bridge.

Conjunction: Joining Words

  • Types: Coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions. See more…
  • Definition: A conjunction connects words, phrases, or clauses.
  • Examples: And, Because, that,  She likes tea and coffee. He went to the store because he needed groceries. this is the pen, that writes very well.

Interjection: Expressions of Emotion

  • Types: Expressive interjections, introductory interjections. See More…. 
  • Definition: An interjection Describe strong emotions or sudden bursts of feelings.
  • Example: wow! ouch! Ouwww! Wow! That was amazing! Ouch! That hurt. Ouwww! That’s amazing.

Eight parts of Speech and their Types, Definition and Examples

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  21. 8 Essential Parts of Speech in English with Examples

    The parts of speech are used to describe how a word functions in meaning and also it tells the grammatical meaning in a sentence. Parts of speech are also called word class which means it is used to express the role of every word in a sentence. When a word is used in various parts of speech it can function more than one part of speech in a sentence.

  22. 8 Parts of Speech with Types, Definitions and their Examples

    The 8 parts of speech are the regular grammar categories to which words are allocated based on their functions of syntax, such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and so on. Stated differently, they talk about the varied roles that words might play in a sentence and the connections that words have to one another as defined by syntax and grammar .