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25 English Presentation Phrases

Does giving a presentation make you feel a little nervous?

Well, you’re not alone.

According to Forbes , giving a presentation makes 80% of us feel nervous !

The good news is that feeling nervous might be a good thing. This feeling pushes us to prepare ourselves better, and as long as you’re well prepared, you’ll do just fine.

So then, let’s take a look at how we can prepare ourselves to give amazing presentations in English. Today, we’re going to focus on the business English phrases you can count on (depend on) to make your presentation go more smoothly from start to finish.

But first, here are some tips to use when preparing for your presentation.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Greeting Your Audience

You’re now standing in front of your audience. Before you begin your presentation, start by greeting your audience, welcoming them to the event and introducing yourself.

1. Good morning/afternoon/evening, everyone.

2. welcome to [name of event]..

Sample sentence: Welcome to our 3rd Annual Sales Leadership Conference.

3. First, let me introduce myself. I am [name] from [company].

Beginning your presentation.

After you have given an introduction, you are ready to begin speaking about your topic. Use these phrases to get started.

4. Let me start by giving you some background information.

Use this phrase to give your audience a brief overview of the topic you’ll be discussing. This is a good way to give them an idea of what’s going on and to bring them up to date.

5. As you’re aware, …

If you’re bringing up a topic that your audience already knows about or is aware of, then you can use this phrase to introduce this known topic.

Sample sentence: As you’re aware , the CEO of DHL Express has often said that globalization is here to stay.

Transitioning to the Next Topic

Before you move on to your next point, be sure to make it clear to your audience that you’re now starting a new topic. Let them know exactly what that new topic will be. The two phrases below are very similar in meaning, and they can both be used for transitions.

6. Let’s move on to…

Sample sentence: Let’s move on to our second sales strategy.

7. Turning our attention now to…

Sample sentence: Turning our attention now to the results of our 2016 customer survey.

Providing More Details

Use these phrases to tell your audience that you’ll be giving them a more detailed explanation of the topic. Both the words ‘expand’ and ‘elaborate’ mean to explain more fully.

8. I’d like to expand on…

Sample sentence: Now I’d like to expand on my point about increasing our market share.

9. Let me elaborate further.

Linking to another topic.

When making reference to a point you made earlier, or to remind your audience about something you said before, use these phrases to that link.

10. As I said at the beginning, …

This phrase lets you remind your audience about a point you made earlier. It can also be used to emphasize a point or theme.

Sample sentence: As I said in the beginning , we’ll see an increase in profit if we follow these five steps.

11. This relates to what I was saying earlier…

This phrase will help you make connections between ideas in your presentation. It shows that two different ideas are connected.

Sample sentence: This relates to what I was saying earlier about increasing production to meet the year-end demand.

12. This ties in with…

Sample sentence: This ties in with the way we’ve been doing business for the past 20 years.

Emphasizing a Point

Use these phrases to draw attention to an important point that you want your audience to note.

13. The significance of this is…

The word “significance'” is similar in meaning to “importance.”

Sample sentence: The significance of this is , if we complete this project on schedule, we’ll have more people available to work on the next project.

14. This is important because…

Sample sentence: This is important because any marketing effort we put in now will help to boost demand for our products in the long run.

15. We have to remember that …

Sample sentence: We have to remember that people are our most important resource.

Making Reference to Information

Very often, you may need to support your discussion points by drawing attention and making reference to information and data from studies, reports and other sources.

16. Based on our findings, …

Sample sentence: Based on our findings, 74% of our market is made up of teenagers who find our clothing line stylish and upbeat.

17. According to our study, …

Sample sentence: According to our study, 63% of working people in this city go directly to the gym after work.

18. Our data shows …

Sample sentence: Our data shows that more than 23% of men in this town who used to drive to work now prefer to save money and the environment by cycling instead.

Explaining Visuals

To present a clearer picture of your point, you may show your data, information or examples in the form of visuals such as charts, tables and graphs.

19. I’d like to illustrate this point by showing you…

The word “illustrate” means “show,” usually with examples, data or visuals.

Sample sentence: I’d like to illustrate this point by showing you a chart of the number of people in each age group who prefer to shop online.

20. This chart shows a breakdown of …

A “breakdown” refers to the detailed parts or figures that make up the total picture. A breakdown is often used in a presentation to show all the smaller parts behind something bigger.

Sample sentence: This chart shows a breakdown of the ingredients we use in our gluten-free products.

Restating Your Point

Sometimes in order to emphasize your point, you have to state it in a way that’s easier for your audience to understand and remember. This often involves rephrasing, simplifying or clarifying your point.

21. In other words, …

Use this phrase to rephrase or reword your point in another way.

Sample sentence: In other words , we need to change our current design to make it more attractive to older children.

22. To put it simply, …

Use this phrase to simplify points that are complex or difficult to understand.

Sample sentence: To put it simply , we’ll need you to work harder at making this launch a success.

23. What I mean to say is …

Use this phrase to explain your point in a way that’s easier for your audience to understand.

Sample sentence: What I mean to say is that we need to change the way we market our products.

Concluding Your Presentation

This is the very end of the presentation. You have said everything you need to say, and now you need to finish it nicely. You may also have some time for questions. If there is time for questions, invite your audience to ask any questions they have.

24. In conclusion, let me sum up my main points.

As part of your closing statement, “sum up” (summarize, state briefly) your speech by mentioning the main points of your speech.

25. Thank you for your attention. Now I am happy to answer any questions you might have.

End your presentation by thanking your audience and offering to answer their questions.

The Top 3 Tips for Preparing Your Business Presentation in English

1. have a plan.

Always have a plan. Spend some time thinking about not only what you’re going to say but how you’re going to say it.

If English isn’t your native language, it’s very important that you think about what language you’re going to be using. Think about all the vocabulary, phrases and grammar that will make your message clear and easy to understand.

What are the big ideas you want to explain for your presentation? Which words will express these ideas best? I recommend:

  • Have a clear goal in mind to help you stay on track and be logical. Whenever you feel lost during the presentation, just remember this clear, main goal. An example of a goal could be to convince potential clients to work with you. Whenever you don’t know what to say next, remember to focus on the advantages you want to present and on examples of what you did in the past to deserve their trust. Encourage them to ask you questions related to this goal.
  • Research content. If you know your facts, you already have the core of your presentation prepared. Write these facts down on topic cards, give out handouts (papers) with important information or include them on your PowerPoint slides.
  • Prepare the delivery. Rehearse giving the presentation several times. Some people like recording themselves, others prefer practicing in front of a mirror or having friends listen to them while presenting. Choose the method that works best for you.
  • Decide whether you are going to read or speak freely. Reading can sound unnatural, but you can use certain tricks to avoid this. You can underline important sentences which you can memorize, so that from time to time you can stop reading, say your memorized lines and look at the audience. In this way, reading can be made more natural. Make sure you slow down so that the audience can follow you.

Speaking freely is much better if you can remember everything you want to say, because you will seem more knowledgeable, prepared and confident. However, this can be more stressful.

2. Use Visuals

Using some visuals can make your presentation more entertaining, easier to understand and can get your points across more convincingly. My advice:

  • Decide whether you need a PowerPoint presentation or not. Do you have graphs, results or other things like this to show? Then yes, you need one. Are you just telling a story? Then you probably do not.
  • Do not fill your slides with too much information. Use a maximum of seven short lines of text—even seven can be too many. Highlight key words so the audience can see the main ideas right away. Use bullet points rather than full sentences.
  • If you are presenting graphs or charts , give the audience time to read them.  Do not show a huge table of data if they audience will not have time to read and understand it. Make sure you try reading each slide while timing yourself to see how long it takes, so you do not jump to the next slide too early during your presentation.

3. Structure Your Presentation Well

It is a common mistake to give an unclear and unorganized presentation. This happens when the presenter just starts speaking without a clear goal in mind. They might suddenly realize their allotted speaking time has ended, or that the audience is bored because they are not following what is being said. Here’s what you should do instead:

  • Decide on three main points (or less) that you want to make. Audiences can’t usually focus on more than three points.
  • Tell them from the beginning what points you will be making. Audiences like to know what to expect. Tell them the main goals of your presentation directly in the introduction.
  • Presenting main points: firstly, secondly, last but not least
  • Making additions: moreover, furthermore, in addition, besides, what’s more
  • Making purposes clear: in order to, so as to
  • Presenting reasons and causes: on account of, due to, since, seeing that
  • Presenting consequences: consequently, as a result, therefore
  • Expressing contrast: in spite of, despite, although, even though, however, nevertheless, in contrast, on the contrary

So with this, you’ve mastered the 25 most commonly used phrases used in presentations and my three favorite tips.

Once you learn them, I think you’ll find them very useful to you in any presentation.

Become familiar with them and I promise you’ll feel much less nervous in your next presentation.

And One More Thing...

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials , as you can see here:

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If you want to watch it, the FluentU app has probably got it.

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

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FluentU lets you learn engaging content with world famous celebrities.

For example, when you tap on the word "searching," you see this:

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FluentU lets you tap to look up any word.

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

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FluentU helps you learn fast with useful questions and multiple examples. Learn more.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words—and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

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business presentation in english example

Home Blog Business Business Presentation: The Ultimate Guide to Making Powerful Presentations (+ Examples)

Business Presentation: The Ultimate Guide to Making Powerful Presentations (+ Examples)

Business Presentation Ultimate Guide plus examples

A business presentation is a purpose-led summary of key information about your company’s plans, products, or practices, designed for either internal or external audiences. Project proposals, HR policy presentations, investors briefings are among the few common types of presentations. 

Compelling business presentations are key to communicating important ideas, persuading others, and introducing new offerings to the world. Hence, why business presentation design is one of the most universal skills for any professional. 

This guide teaches you how to design and deliver excellent business presentations. Plus, breaks down some best practices from business presentation examples by popular companies like Google, Pinterest, and Amazon among others! 

3 General Types of Business Presentations

A business presentation can be given for a number of reasons. Respectively, they differ a lot in terms of content and purpose. 

But overall, all types of business presentations can be classified as:

  • Informative
  • Persuasive 
  • Supporting 

Informative Business Presentation 

As the name suggests, the purpose of an informative presentation is to discern the knowledge you have — explain what you know. It’s the most common type of business presentation out there. So you have probably prepared such at least several times. 

Examples of informative presentations:

  • Team briefings presentation 
  • Annual stakeholder report 
  • Quarterly business reviews
  • Business portfolio presentation
  • Business plan presentation
  • Project presentation

Helpful templates from SlideModel:

  • Business plan PowerPoint template
  • Business review PowerPoint template
  • Project proposal PowerPoint template
  • Corporate annual report template

Persuasive Business Presentation 

The goal of this type of presentation is to persuade your audience of your point of view — convince them of what you believe is right. Developing business presentations of this caliber requires a bit more copywriting mastery, as well as expertise in public speaking . Unlike an informative business presentation, your goal here is to sway the audience’s opinions and prompt them towards the desired action. 

Examples of persuasive presentations:

  • Pitch deck/investor presentations
  • Sales presentation  
  • Business case presentation 
  • Free business proposal presentation
  • Business proposal PowerPoint template
  • Pitch deck PowerPoint template
  • Account Plan PowerPoint template

Supporting Business Presentation 

This category of business PowerPoint presentations is meant to facilitate decision-making — explain how we can get something done. The underlying purpose here is to communicate the general “action plan”. Then break down the necessary next steps for bringing it to life. 

Examples of supporting presentations:

  • Roadmap presentation
  • Project vision presentation 
  • After Action Review presentation 
  • Standard operating procedure (SOP) PowerPoint template 
  • Strategy map PowerPoint template 
  • After action review (ARR) PowerPoint template 

What Should Be Included in a Business Presentation?

Overall, the content of your business presentation will differ depending on its purpose and type. However, at the very minimum, all business presentations should include:

  • Introductory slide 
  • Agenda/purpose slide
  • Main information or Content slides
  • Key Takeaways slides
  • Call-to-action/next steps slides

We further distill business presentation design and writing best practices in the next section (plus, provide several actionable business PowerPoint presentation examples!). 

How to Make a Business Presentation: Actionable Tips

A business presentation consists of two parts — a slide deck and a verbal speech. In this section, we provide tips and strategies for nailing your deck design. 

1. Get Your Presentation Opening Right 

The first slides of your presentation make or break your success. Why? By failing to frame the narrative and set the scene for the audience from the very beginning, you will struggle to keep their interest throughout the presentation. 

You have several ways of how to start a business presentation:

  • Use a general informative opening — a summative slide, sharing the agenda and main points of the discussion. 
  • Go for a story opening — a more creative, personal opening, aimed at pulling the audience into your story. 
  • Try a dramatic opening — a less apparent and attention-grabbing opening technique, meant to pique the audience’s interest. 

Standard Informative Opening 

Most business presentation examples you see start with a general, informative slide such as an Agenda, Problem Statement, or Company Introduction. That’s the “classic” approach. 

To manage the audience’s expectations and prepare them for what’s coming next, you can open your presentation with one or two slides stating:

  • The topic of your presentation — a one-sentence overview is enough. 
  • Persuasive hook, suggesting what’s in it for the audience and why they should pay attention. 
  • Your authority — the best technique to establish your credibility in a business presentation is to share your qualifications and experience upfront to highlight why you are worth listening to. 

Opening best suited for: Formal business presentations such as annual reports and supporting presentations to your team/business stakeholders. 

Story Opening 

Did you ever notice that most TED talks start with a quick personal story? The benefit of this presenting technique is that it enables speakers to establish quick rapport and hold the listener’s attention. 

Here’s how Nancy Duarte, author of “Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations” book and TED presenter, recommends opening a presentation: 

You know, here’s the status quo, here’s what’s going on. And then you need to compare that to what could be. You need to make that gap as big as possible, because there is this commonplace of the status quo, and you need to contrast that with the loftiness of your idea. 

Storytelling , like no other tool, helps transpose the audience into the right mindset and get concentrated on the subject you are about to discuss. A story also elicits emotions, which can be a powerful ally when giving persuasive presentations. In the article how to start a presentation , we explore this in more detail.

Opening best suited for: Personal and business pitches, sales presentations, other types of persuasive presentations. 

Dramatic Opening 

Another common technique is opening your presentation with a major statement, sometimes of controversial nature. This can be a shocking statistic, complex rhetoric question, or even a provocative, contrarian statement, challenging the audience’s beliefs. 

Using a dramatic opening helps secure the people’s attention and capture their interest. You can then use storytelling to further drill down your main ideas. 

If you are an experienced public speaker, you can also strengthen your speech with some unexpected actions. That’s what Bill Gates does when giving presentations. In a now-iconic 2009 TED talk about malaria, mid-presentation Gates suddenly reveals that he actually brought a bunch of mosquitoes with him. He cracks open a jar with non-malaria-infected critters to the audience’s surprise. His dramatic actions, paired with a passionate speech made a mighty impression. 

Opening best suited for: Marketing presentations, customer demos, training presentations, public speeches. 

Further reading: How to start a presentation: tips and examples. 

2. Get Your PowerPoint Design Right

Surely, using professional business PowerPoint templates already helps immensely with presentation deck design since you don’t need to fuss over slide layout, font selection, or iconography. 

Even so, you’ll still need to customize your template(s) to make them on brand and better suited to the presentation you’re about to deliver. Below are our best presentation design tips to give your deck an extra oomph. 

Use Images, Instead of Bullet Points 

If you have ever watched Steve Jobs’s presentations, you may have noticed that he never used bullet-point lists. Weird right? Because using bullet points is the most universal advice in presentation design. 

business presentation in english example

But there’s a valid scientific reason why Jobs favored images over bullet-point texts. Researchers found that information delivered in visuals is better retained than words alone. This is called the “ pictorial superiority effect ”. As John Medina, a molecular biologist, further explains :

“Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%.”

So if your goal is to improve the memorability of your presentation, always replace texts with images and visualizations when it makes sense. 

Fewer Slides is Better

No matter the value, a long PowerPoint presentation becomes tiring at some point. People lose focus and stop retaining the information. Thus, always take some extra time to trim the fluff and consolidate some repetitive ideas within your presentation. 

For instance, at McKinsey new management consultants are trained to cut down the number of slides in client presentations. In fact, one senior partner insists on replacing every 20 slides with only two slides . Doing so prompts you to focus on the gist — the main business presentation ideas you need to communicate and drop filler statements. 

Here are several quick tips to shorten your slides:

  • Use a three-arc structure featuring a clear beginning (setup), main narrative (confrontation), ending (resolution). Drop the ideas that don’t fit into either of these. 
  • Write as you tweet. Create short, on-point text blurbs of under 156 symbols, similar to what you’d share on Twitter. 
  • Contextualize your numbers. Present any relevant statistics in a context, relevant to the listeners. Turn longer stats into data visualizations for easier cognition. 

Consistency is Key 

In a solid business presentation, each slide feels like part of the connecting story. To achieve such consistency apply the same visual style and retain the same underlying message throughout your entire presentation.

Use the same typography, color scheme, and visual styles across the deck. But when you need to accentuate a transition to a new topic (e.g. move from a setup to articulating the main ideas), add some new visual element to signify the slight change in the narrative. 

Further reading: 23 PowerPoint Presentation Tips for Creating Engaging and Interactive Presentations

3. Make Your Closure Memorable 

We best remember the information shared last. So make those business presentation takeaways stick in the audience’s memory. We have three strategies for that. 

Use the Rule of Three 

The Rule of Three is a literary concept, suggesting that we best remember and like ideas and concepts when they are presented in threes. 

Many famous authors and speakers use this technique:

  • “Duty – Honor – Country. Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, and what you will be” . Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
  • “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness” are the unalienable rights of all humans that governments are meant to protect.” Thomas Jefferson 

The Rule of Three works because three is the maximum number of items most people can remember on their first attempt. Likewise, such pairings create a short, familiar structure that is easy to remember for our brains. 

Try the Title Close Technique

Another popular presentation closing technique is “Title Close” — going back to the beginning of your narrative and reiterating your main idea (title) in a form of a takeaway. Doing so helps the audience better retain your core message since it’s repeated at least two times. Plus, it brings a sense of closure — a feel-good state our brains love. Also, a brief one-line closure is more memorable than a lengthy summary and thus better retained. 

Ask a Question 

If you want to keep the conversation going once you are done presenting, you can conclude your presentation with a general question you’d like the audience to answer.

Alternatively, you can also encourage the members to pose questions to you. The latter is better suited for informational presentations where you’d like to further discuss some of the matters and secure immediate feedback. 

Try adding an interactive element like a QR code closing your presentation with a QR code and having a clear CTA helps you leverage the power of sharing anything you would like to share with your clients. QR codes can be customized to look alike your brand.

If you are looking for a smoother experience creating presentations on the fly, check out the AI PowerPoint maker —it offers everything you can ask forfrom presentation design in a couple of clicks.

12 Business Presentation Examples and What Makes Them Great 

Now that we equipped you with the general knowledge on how to make a presentation for business, let’s take a look at how other presenters are coping with this job and what lessons you can take away from them. 

1. N26 Digital Bank Pitch Deck 

The Future of Banking by N26. An example of a Business Presentation with a nice cover image.

This is a fine business pitch presentation example, hitting all the best practices. The deck opens with a big shocking statement that most Millennials would rather go to the dentist than step into a bank branch. 

Then it proceeds to discuss the company’s solution to the above — a fully digital bank with a paperless account opening process, done in 8 minutes. After communicating the main product features and value proposition, the deck further conceptualizes what traction the product got so far using data visualizations. The only thing it lacks is a solid call-to-action for closing slides as the current ending feels a bit abrupt. 

2. WeWork Pitch Deck

Business Presentation Example by WeWork

For a Series D round, WeWork went with a more formal business presentation. It starts with laying down the general company information and then transitions to explaining their business model, current market conditions, and the company’s position on the market.

The good thing about this deck is that they quantify their business growth prospects and value proposition. The likely gains for investors are shown in concrete numbers. However, those charts go one after another in a row, so it gets a bit challenging to retain all data points. 

The last part of their presentation is focused on a new offering, “We Live”. It explains why the team seeks funds to bring it to life. Likewise, they back their reasoning with market size statistics, sample projects, and a five-year revenue forecast. 

3. Redfin Investor Presentation 

Redfin Investor Presentation for Business. A Technology-Powered Real Estate Company.

If you are looking for a “text-light” business presentation example, Redfin’s investor deck is up to your alley. This simple deck expertly uses iconography, charts, and graphs to break down the company’s business model, value proposition, market share, and competitive advantages over similar startups. For number-oriented investors, this is a great deck design to use. 

4. Google Ready Together Presentation 

This isn’t quite the standard business presentation example per se. But rather an innovative way to create engaging, interactive presentations of customer case studies .

Interactive Online Presentation example by Google, from Customer Insights.  Google Ready Together Presentation.

The short deck features a short video clip from a Google client, 7-11, explaining how they used the company’s marketing technology to digitally transform their operations and introduce a greater degree of marketing automation . The narrated video parts are interrupted by slides featuring catchy stats, contextualizing issues other businesses are facing. Then transitions to explaining through the words of 7-11 CMO, how Google’s technology is helping them overcome the stated shortcomings.

5. Salesforce Business Presentation Example 

This is a great example of an informational presentation, made by the Salesforce team to share their research on customer experience (CX) with prospects and existing customers.

Business Presentation Example by Service Salesforce on How to Know Your Customer. A look into the Future of Customer Experience.

The slide deck errs on the lengthier side with 58 slides total. But bigger topics are broken down and reinforced through bite-sized statistics and quotes from the company leadership. They are also packaging the main tips into memorable formulas, itemized lists, and tables. Overall, this deck is a great example of how you can build a compelling narrative using different statistics. 

6. Mastercard Business Presentation

This slide deck from Mastercard instantly captures the audience’s attention with unusual background images and major data points on the growth of populations, POS systems, and payment methods used in the upcoming decade.

Business Presentation by MasterCard on Technology and Payment solutions. The Unfinished Revolution.

Perhaps to offset the complexity of the subject, Mastercard chose to sprinkle in some humor in presentation texts and used comic-style visuals to supplement that. However, all their animations are made in a similar style, creating a good sense of continuity in design. They are also using colors to signify the transition from one part of the presentation to another. 

In the second part, the slide deck focuses on distilling the core message of what businesses need to do to remain competitive in the new payments landscape. The team presents what they have been working on to expand the payment ecosystem. Then concludes with a “title close” styled call-to-action, mirroring the presentation title.

7. McKinsey Diversity & Inclusion Presentation 

This fresh business slide deck from McKinsey is a great reference point for making persuasive business presentations on complex topics such as D&I. First, it recaps the main definitions of the discussed concepts — diversity, equity, and inclusion — to ensure alignment with the audience members. 

Business Presentation Example by McKinsey Company on Diversity Wins: How inclusion matters.

Next, the business presentation deck focuses on the severity and importance of the issue for businesses, represented through a series of graphs and charts. After articulating the “why”, the narrative switches to “how” — how leaders can benefit from investment in D&I. The main points are further backed with data and illustrated via examples. 

8. Accenture Presentation for the Energy Sector

Similar to McKinsey, Accenture keeps its slide deck on a short. Yet the team packs a punch within each slide through using a mix of fonts, graphical elements, and color for highlighting the core information. The presentation copy is on a longer side, prompting the audience to dwell on reading the slides. But perhaps this was meant by design as the presentation was also distributed online — via the company blog and social media. 

Business Presentation Example by Accenture on Accelerating Innovation in Energy.

The last several slides of the presentation deck focus on articulating the value Accenture can deliver for their clients in the Energy sector. They expertly break down their main value proposition and key service lines, plus quantify the benefits. 

9. Amazon Web Services (AWS) Technical Presentation 

Giving an engaging technical presentation isn’t an easy task. You have to balance the number of details you reveal on your slides to prevent overwhelm, while also making sure that you don’t leave out any crucial deets. This technical presentation from AWS does great in both departments. 

Business Presentation created by AWS explaining how to build forecasting using ML/DL algorithms.

First, you get entertained with a quick overview of Amazon’s progress in machine learning (ML) forecasting capabilities over the last decade. Then introduced to the main tech offering. The deck further explains what you need to get started with Amazon Forecast — e.g. dataset requirements, supported forecasting scenarios, available forecasting models, etc. 

The second half of the presentation provides a quick training snippet on configuring Amazon SageMaker to start your first project. The step-by-step instructions are coherent and well-organized, making the reader excited to test-drive the product. 

10. Snapchat Company Presentation

Snapchat’s business model presentation is on a funkier, more casual side, reflective of the company’s overall brand and positioning. After briefly recapping what they do, the slide deck switches to discussing the company’s financials and revenue streams.

business presentation in english example

This business slide deck by Snap Inc. itself is rather simplistic and lacks fancy design elements. But it has a strong unified theme of showing the audience Snapchat’s position on the market and projected vector of business development. 

11. Visa Business Acquisition Presentation 

VISA Acquisition of Plaid Business presentation.

If you are working on a business plan or M&A presentation for stakeholders of your own, this example from Visa will be helpful. The presentation deck expertly breaks down the company’s rationale for purchasing Plaid and subsequent plans for integrating the startup into their business ecosystem. 

The business deck recaps why the Plaid acquisition is a solid strategic decision by highlighting the total addressable market they could dive into post-deal. Then it details Plaid’s competitive strengths. The slide deck then sums up all the monetary and indirect gains Visa could reap as an acquirer. 

12. Pinterest Earnings Report Presentation 

Pinterest Business Presentation Example with Annual Report

Annual reports and especially earnings presentations might not be the most exciting types of documents to work on, but they have immense strategic value. Hence, there’s little room for ambiguities or mistakes. 

In twelve slides, this business presentation from Pinterest clearly communicates the big picture of the company’s finance in 2021. All the key numbers are represented as featured quotes in the sidebar with diagrams further showcasing the earning and spending dynamics. Overall, the data is easy to interpret even for non-finance folks. 

To Conclude 

With these business presentation design tips, presentation templates , and examples, you can go from overwhelmed to confident about your next presentation design in a matter of hours. Focus on creating a rough draft first using a template. Then work on nailing your opening slide sequence and shortening the texts in the main part of your presentation when needed. Make sure that each slide serves a clear purpose and communicates important details. To make your business presentation deck more concise, remove anything that does not pertain to the topic. 

Finally, once you are done, share your business presentation with other team members to get their feedback and reiterate the final design.

business presentation in english example

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business presentation in english example

English Leadership Academy

35 Best Business English Presentation Phrases

You know that feeling as your throat get tight and dry. You swallow... g ulp.

You begin to have those feelings that you know so well, as you feel...

Can you relate to that terrible feeling of having to give a presentation in English?

You are a business executive, and you know you are not supposed to feel this way as a leader of your company. But, just the thought of an upcoming presentation significantly raises your stress level.

Giving a great presentation in any language is difficult.

Giving a great presentation in English as a non-native English business executive is a more difficult task. The good news is that there are many SKILLS you can learn to become a very effective presenter.

Although there are a few key components of every good presentation, this article will focus on the importance of using the The 35 Most Effective Business Presentation Phrases.

Let’s first take a moment and look at what makes an effective presentation.

An Effective Presentation

There are a few essential components for an effective presentation. The first step is great preparation for your upcoming presentation.

Preparation

Preparation is the most important part of every presentation. Before you give any presentation, you must have a plan for success.

The first step is to Know Your Audience. Who are you presenting to?

What is the Message Your Audience Needs or wants to hear from you?

What Call to Action do you want to leave your audience with?

Only after you have planned your presentation, it is time to move on to the actual presentation, which will include the following three sections:

10

Introduction

As stated earlier, this article will focus on the 35 Most Effective Business Presentation Phrases . This list will create great transitions and allow your presentation to flow naturally so that your audience is engaged in each step of the process.

11

Beginning with your Introduction

Your goal for the beginning of your presentation is to connect and engage with your audience.

You have prepared by getting to know your audience and now you want to introduce your message to your audience in a way that your audience can RELATE to your message.

Please do not start your presentation with

“Hi, my name is ______”

As you are aware, I’m a believer in beginning your presentation in a way that will connect and engage with your audience. Let's look at three great ways to start your presentation.

13

An effective presentation will begin in one of these ways:

There are times when a more traditional greeting will be appropriate and in these situations, you can greet your audience and specifically address your audience.

1. It is a pleasure to be here with the _______ (group/team/association) this morning/afternoon/ evening...

Example Sentence: it is a please to be here with the Digital Marketing Association this morning.

2. A special welcome to the _________ (group/team/association)...

Example Sentence. A special welcome to the XYZ Manufacturing Association. 

After you have properly started your effective presentation with a question/story/statistic, you may say something like...

3. I'm ___________ and I'm so excited to be here with the ________________ (group/team/association).

Example Sentence: I'm John and I'm so excited to be here with the sales team today.

Remember, do not use the "I'm ____ and I'm going to talk about____" as your first words - you only can do this after you have made an engaging introduction!

After you have successfully introduced your presentation and engaged your audience, it is time to begin discussing the content of your presentation.

14

Transition from the Introduction to the Message

After you have given an engaging introduction and connected with your audience, you are ready to begin speaking about your topic.

Don't just read your slides to your audience. They will not be engaged. Instead, use your slides as a guide and the key is to move from one slide to the next in an interesting way . This is called a "transition" and most of the phrases in this section will help you transition like a pro.

After all, who wants to listen to a speaker continue to say:  Next... Next.... Next... Next???

Here are some effective ways to transition from the introduction to the content of your presentation.

Remember, an effective presentation includes you serving your audience with a message they need.

Tell your audience up front what the message of the presentation is.

4. As a member of ___________ (refer to the group/team/association) you can relate to today's message of _____________

Example sentence: As a member of the ABC Digital Marketing team, I'm confident you can relate to today's message of knowing your audience.

5. As you are aware...

Example Sentence: As you are aware, it is important to keep up with the latest trends in your industry.

6. Let me start by providing some background information...

Example sentence: Let me start by providing some background information on the newest technology tools available.

Each of these above phrases are useful ways to engage your audience by giving them information at the beginning that they can relate to.

Now, let's explore how you can use different phrases that help with your transitions, provide more details, link to additional topics, emphasize your points, refer to your important information/data/numbers, explain charts/tables/graphs and restate your points.

Transitioning to the Next Topic

Before you move on to your next point, be sure to make it clear to your audience that you’re now starting a new topic. Let them know exactly what that new topic will be. The two phrases below are very similar in meaning, and they can both be used for transitions.

These are SO much better than saying "next..."

7. Turning our attention now to...

Example sentence: Turning our attention now to the second main issue today... 

8. Let's move on to...

Example sentence: Let’s move on to our second sales initiative.

Providing More Details

One of the essential parts of your message is to give more detail to some sections of your content because it will be helpful to your audience.

Remember, the key is that you only go into more detail because you know your audience will be interested in this detail, and they can use this information.

9. To elaborate on...

Example sentence: Let me elaborate on this idea...

10. I'd like to expand on...

Example sentence: I’d like to expand on this point about expanding our sales team.

Linking to Another Topic

As mentioned above, use linking words to create flow with your presentations. Effective presentations have flow.

When you think of flow, think of looking at the water in a river at a specific spot. The water is moving. The water was somewhere before it came to this spot and it will flow to a different place after it passes this spot.

This is the same in a presentation. You keep your audience engaged using flow, by telling them about topics you discussed earlier, and also that you will discuss later in the presentation.

As you can see, I used a linking phrase "as mentioned above" in the first words of the first paragraph of this section above. This is the example of using linking words in written form.

Below (another written linking word), you will see how you can use a different linking phrase when you are speaking. 

11. As stated earlier.. .

Example sentence: As stated a few minutes earlier, our industry is changing rapidly.

12. As mentioned earlier...

Example sentence: As I mentioned earlier in my presentation, the key to effective communication is knowing your audience.

13. As referenced earlier...

Example sentence: As referenced at the beginning of my talk today, preparation is critically important.

Each of these three phrases are self-explanatory and the linking phrases remind your audience that you discussed something earlier.

Again, you can create nice flow for your audience when you discuss a point and then later in your presentation, while referencing that same point, you remind your audience that you did discuss this point earlier.  It can also be used to emphasize a point or theme.

14. As I mentioned at the beginning...

Example sentence: As I mentioned at the beginning of the presentation, we’ll see a decrease in expenses if we implement this strategy.

15. As you may recall, this relates to my earlier point that...

This phrase will help you connect points in your presentation. It shows the connection between two different ideas.

Example sentence: As you may recall, this point relates closely to the earlier point about the importance of accountability.

16. This ties in with...  

Example sentence: This ties in with the point I made earlier regarding the expansion of our manufacturing facility.

Explaining to your audience that you will be discussing something later in your presentation is a key aspect of using flow.

17. This point will be mentioned in a few minutes...

Example sentence: In a few minutes, it will go into more detail about emphasizing a point.

18. This important point will be discussed later in detail...

Example sentence: This important point about having a great conclusion will be discussed later in my talk today.

The two above mentioned phrases are very effective in guiding your audience to where you are going in your presentation.

19. In a few minutes, you will hear this from ________ (one of your team members)...

Example sentence: In a few minutes, you will hear from Susan Jones, our CFO, about the importance of financial forecasting.

This is a really nice way of creating flow when you are able to reference another presenter that will speak after you.

Emphasizing a Point

An essential part of all presentations is creating emphasis. Everything in your presentation is important, but you need to emphasize the most important parts for your audience. These phrases below are excellent. 

20. This is significant because...

Significant is one of my favorite words. It is another word for important. One of the keys of being an excellent communicator in English is using different words that have similar meanings.

Example sentence: This is significant because we are planning to grow our workforce 20% this year. 

21. This is meaningful for the following reason(s)..

Example sentence: This is meaningful because the implementation of this recommendation will have an impact on multiple departments in our organization.

22. To reinforce this point...

Example sentence: Showing the significance of a better hiring process reinforces this point I am making with this data. 

23. Please draw your attention to…..

Example sentence: Please draw your attention to the revenue growth projections on this page.

Referring to Information, Data and Numbers

Let's turn our attention now to referring to information and data. In a presentation, you will often use data, facts, and studies that help support your message. These meaningful terms and phrases will help you refer to this significant information.

24. According to the ___ study, ...

Example sentence: According to the XYZ study, 84% of workforce efficiency is tied to a meaningful benefit package.

25. Based on our recent findings, ...

Example sentence: Based on our recent findings, only 22% of our clients continue to use our services after six months. 

 26. This data shows …

Example sentence: This data shows that more than 92% of our clients continue to be highly satisfied with our customer service one year after they received our product. 

Before moving on the next section, you might find this article on How to Naturally Say Numbers and Dates in Business English helpful for your next presentation.

Explaining Charts, Tables and Graphs

Most presentations use charts, tables or graphs to help support your message. Knowing how to use phrases describing these will create an effective presentation. 

27. To illustrate this point... 

The word “illustrate” is very effective and it is a great word to use when you are describing a chart, table or graph. 

Example sentence: This chart illustrates my earlier point about how more meaningful benefits impact worker satisfaction. 

28. This table provides a breakdown of …

A “breakdown” refers to the details within specific figures or numbers.  A breakdown is helpful to provide a more detailed picture of the situation. .

Example sentence: This table provides a breakdown of the 10 most important client feedback messages.

Explaining charts, tables and graphs often involves complex information.  Below is a short video from the English Leadership Academy's Executive Video Blog, titled What if You Were Able to Explain Complex Ideas in a Simple Way? that gives tips and strategies to make complex information more easily understandable by your audience.

Restating Your Point

Sometimes in order to emphasize your point, you have to state it in a way that’s easier for your audience to understand and remember.

This process is commonly referred to as paraphrasing. Paraphrasing is an essential skill for non-native English speakers that allows them to say the same thing with different words to enhance communication effectiveness.

This often involves rephrasing, clarifying or simplifying the point you are trying to make.

29. In fact, …

Use this phrase to restate your point in another way.

Example sentence: In fact, it is necessary that we make a change to our current policy to attain this goal.

30. In other words...

Example sentence. In other words, we don't stack up well against our competitors in this area.

31. To put it simply, …

Explaining complex messages in a presentation can lead to confusion. Your audience will benefit when you simplify complex messages. 

Example sentence: To put it simply, if we follow these recommendations, we'll achieve our goals six months sooner.

To summarize, by this point in the presentation, you have given your audience the message they needed or wanted.

You have emphasized the points that are especially important to them.

You are now ready to finish your presentation in the best way!

Now we reach a crucial aspect of the presentation and let's finish strong.

19

Concluding Your Presentation

Most people spend a lot of time working on the introduction and content of their presentation, but they do not spend any time preparing for their conclusion.

As stated earlier, you are presenting for your audience because they have a need or a want.

To emphasize this point, it is a great idea to challenge your audience to THINK in a different way. It is even better to challenge your audience to DO something different in the future.

In other words, create a call to action!

Let's now look at how you can summarize your presentation in a professional way.

32. In the final analysis...  

Example sentence: In the final analysis, it is critical that the company needs to immediately enhance our sales strategy to achieve our quarterly targets.

33. In conclusion, let me reiterate my message...

As part of your conclusion, you might want to emphasize your main points to leave the audience with a clear message of what you discussed. This is very effective to restate your main message!

Example sentence: In conclusion, let me reiterate my earlier message that time is of the essence for our team to solve this issue in the next 10 days.

34. I want to challenge you to do/think ….

Example sentence: You've heard the compelling arguments for a new mindset shift, and now I challenge YOU to begin making the necessary changes in the next five days!

Finally, as you reach the end of your presentation, you'll need a transition from the completion of your presentation to the Question and Answer (Q&A) portion of your presentation.

35. Thank you for your attention today, and we’ve got time for a few questions. Who would like to ask the first question?

This is a nice phrase that let's your audience know you have concluded your formal remarks and you are open to answering a few questions.

I appreciate your attention to this topic today and now I'd like to leave you with a challenge below.

My Challenge to You

I challenge you to begin preparing your future presentations in a different and more effective way.

Can you use at least three of these above-mentioned phrases in your next presentation?

You can do this!

Hello, I'm Grant!

I Want To Receive The First 6 Chapters Of The Book, Business English for CEOs 

 * No spam. Guaranteed.

Enter your email address and first name below to receive the download:

Grant Fenton

Executive Business English Coach

Ready to get started?

  • Inspiration

23 presentation examples that really work (plus templates!)

Three professionals engaged in a collaborative meeting with a Biteable video maker, a laptop, and documents on the table.

  • 30 Mar 2023

To help you in your quest for presentation greatness, we’ve gathered 23 of the best business presentation examples out there. These hand-picked ideas range from business PowerPoint presentations, to recruitment presentations, and everything in between.

As a bonus, several of our examples include editable video presentation templates from  Biteable .

Biteable allows anyone to create great video presentations — no previous video-making skills required. The easy-to-use platform has hundreds of brandable templates and video scenes designed with a business audience in mind. A video made with Biteable is just what you need to add that wow factor and make an impact on your audience.

Create videos that drive action

Activate your audience with impactful, on-brand videos. Create them simply and collaboratively with Biteable.

Video presentation examples

Video presentations are our specialty at Biteable. We love them because they’re the most visually appealing and memorable way to communicate.

1. Animated characters

Our first presentation example is a business explainer from Biteable that uses animated characters. The friendly and modern style makes this the perfect presentation for engaging your audience.

Bonus template:  Need a business video presentation that reflects the beautiful diversity of your customers or team? Use  Biteable’s workplace scenes . You can change the skin tone and hair color for any of the animated characters.

2. Conference video

Videos are also ideal solutions for events (e.g. trade shows) where they can be looped to play constantly while you attend to more important things like talking to people and handing out free cheese samples.

For this event presentation sample below, we used bright colours, stock footage, and messaging that reflects the brand and values of the company. All these elements work together to draw the attention of passers-by.

For a huge selection of video presentation templates, take a look at our  template gallery .

Business PowerPoint presentation examples

Striking fear into the hearts of the workplace since 1987, PowerPoint is synonymous with bland, boring presentations that feel more like an endurance test than a learning opportunity. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Check out these anything-but-boring business PowerPoint presentation examples.

3. Design pointers

This PowerPoint presentation takes a tongue-in-cheek look at how the speakers and users of PowerPoint are the problem, not the software itself.

Even at a hefty 61 slides, the vintage theme, appealing colors, and engaging content keep the viewer interested. It delivers useful and actionable tips on creating a better experience for your audience.

Pixar, as you’d expect, redefines the meaning of PowerPoint in their “22 Rules for Phenomenal Storytelling”. The character silhouettes are instantly recognizable and tie firmly to the Pixar brand. The bright colour palettes are carefully chosen to highlight the content of each slide.

This presentation is a good length, delivering one message per slide, making it easy for an audience to take notes and retain the information.

Google slides examples

If you’re in business, chances are you’ll have come across  slide decks . Much like a deck of cards, each slide plays a key part in the overall ‘deck’, creating a well-rounded presentation.

If you need to inform your team, present findings, or outline a new strategy, slides are one of the most effective ways to do this.

Google Slides is one of the best ways to create a slide deck right now. It’s easy to use and has built-in design tools that integrate with Adobe, Lucidchart, and more. The best part — it’s free!

5. Teacher education

Here’s a slide deck that was created to educate teachers on how to use Google Slides effectively in a classroom. At first glance it seems stuffy and businessy, but if you look closer it’s apparent the creator knows his audience well, throwing in some teacher-friendly content that’s bound to get a smile.

The slides give walkthrough screenshots and practical advice on the different ways teachers can use the software to make their lives that little bit easier and educate their students at the same time.

6. Charity awareness raiser

This next Google slide deck is designed to raise awareness for an animal shelter. It has simple, clear messaging, and makes use of the furry friends it rescues to tug on heartstrings and encourage donations and adoptions from its audience.

Pro tip: Creating a presentation is exciting but also a little daunting. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed — especially if the success of your business or nonprofit depends on it.

Prezi presentation examples

If you haven’t come across  Prezi , it’s a great alternative to using static slides. Sitting somewhere between slides and a video presentation, it allows you to import other content and add motion to create a more engaging viewer experience.

7. Red Bull event recap

This Prezi was created to document the Red Bull stratosphere freefall stunt a few years ago. It neatly captures all the things that Prezi is capable of, including video inserts and the zoom effect, which gives an animated, almost 3D effect to what would otherwise be still images.  

Prezi has annual awards for the best examples of presentations over the year. This next example is one of the 2018 winners. It was made to highlight a new Logitech tool.

8. Logitech Spotlight launch

What stands out here are the juicy colors, bold imagery, and the way the designer has used Prezi to its full extent, including rotations, panning, fades, and a full zoom out to finish the presentation.

business presentation in english example

Sales presentation examples

If you’re stuck for ideas for your sales presentation, step right this way and check out this video template we made for you.

9. Sales enablement video presentation

In today’s fast-paced sales environment, you need a way to make your sales enablement presentations memorable and engaging for busy reps.  Sales enablement videos  are just the ticket. Use this video presentation template the next time you need to present on your metrics.

10. Zuroa sales deck

If you’re after a sales deck, you can’t go past this example from Zuora. What makes it great? It begins by introducing the worldwide shift in the way consumers are shopping. It’s a global phenomenon, and something we can all relate to.

It then weaves a compelling story about how the subscription model is changing the face of daily life for everyone. Metrics and testimonials from well-known CEOs and executives are included for some slamming social proof to boost the sales message.

Pitch presentation examples

Pitch decks are used to give an overview of business plans, and are usually presented during meetings with customers, investors, or potential partners.

11. Uber pitch deck

This is Uber’s original pitch deck, which (apart from looking a teensy bit dated) gives an excellent overview of their business model and clearly shows how they intended to disrupt a traditional industry and provide a better service to people. Right now, you’re probably very grateful that this pitch presentation was a winner.

You can make your own pitch deck with Biteable, or start with one of our  video templates  to make something a little more memorable.

12. Video pitch template

This video pitch presentation clearly speaks to the pains of everyone who needs to commute and find parking. It then provides the solution with its app that makes parking a breeze.

The video also introduces the key team members, their business strategy, and what they’re hoping to raise in funding. It’s a simple, clear pitch that positions the company as a key solution to a growing, worldwide problem. It’s compelling and convincing, as a good presentation should be.

13. Fyre Festival pitch deck

The most epic example of a recent pitch deck is this one for Fyre Festival – the greatest event that never happened. Marvel at its persuasion, gasp at the opportunity of being part of the cultural experience of the decade, cringe as everything goes from bad to worse.

Despite the very public outcome, this is a masterclass in how to create hype and get funding with your pitch deck using beautiful imagery, beautiful people, and beautiful promises of riches and fame.

Business presentation examples

Need to get the right message out to the right people? Business presentations can do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.

Simply press play and let your video do the talking. No fumbling your words and sweating buckets in front of those potential clients, just you being cool as a cucumber while your presentation does the talking.

Check out two of our popular templates that you can use as a starting point for your own presentations. While they’re business-minded, they’re definitely not boring.

14. Business intro template

Modern graphics, animations, and upbeat soundtracks keep your prospects engaged as they learn about your business, your team, your values, and how you can help them.

15. Business explainer template

Research presentation examples.

When you’re giving a more technical presentation such as research findings, you need to strike the perfect balance between informing your audience and making sure they stay awake.

As a rule, slides are more effective for research presentations, as they are used to support the speaker’s knowledge rather can capture every small detail on screen.

With often dry, complex, and technical subject matter, there can be a temptation for presentations to follow suit. Use images instead of walls of text, and keep things as easy to follow as possible.

16. TrackMaven research deck

TrackMaven uses their endearing mascot to lighten up this data-heavy slide deck. The graphs help to bring life to their findings, and they ensure to only have one bite-size takeaway per slide so that viewers can easily take notes.

17. Wearable tech research report

Obviously, research can get very researchy and there’s not a lot to be done about it. This slide deck below lays out a ton of in-depth information but breaks it up well with quotes, diagrams, and interesting facts to keep viewers engaged while it delivers its findings on wearable technology.

Team presentation examples

Motivating your team can be a challenge at the best of times, especially when you need to gather them together for….another presentation!

18. Team update template

We created this presentation template as an example of how to engage your team. In this case, it’s for an internal product launch. Using colorful animation and engaging pacing, this video presentation is much better than a static PowerPoint, right?

19. Officevibe collaboration explainer

This short slide deck is a presentation designed to increase awareness of the problems of a disengaged team. Bright colors and relevant images combine with facts and figures that compel viewers to click through to a download to learn more about helping their teams succeed.

Recruitment presentation examples

Recruiting the right people can be a challenge. Presentations can help display your team and your business by painting a dynamic picture of what it’s like to work with you.

Videos and animated slides let you capture the essence of your brand and workplace so the right employees can find you.

20. Company culture explainer

If you’re a recruitment agency, your challenge is to stand out from the hundreds of other agencies in the marketplace.

21. Kaizen culture

Showcasing your agency using a slide deck can give employers and employees a feel for doing business with you. Kaizen clearly displays its credentials and highlights its brand values and personality here (and also its appreciation of the coffee bean).

Explainer presentation examples

Got some explaining to do? Using an explainer video is the ideal way to showcase products that are technical, digital, or otherwise too difficult to explain with still images and text.

Explainer videos help you present the features and values of your product in an engaging way that speaks to your ideal audience and promotes your brand at the same time.

22. Product explainer template

23. lucidchart explainer.

Lucidchart does a stellar job of using explainer videos for their software. Their series of explainers-within-explainers entertains the viewer with cute imagery and an endearing brand voice. At the same time, the video is educating its audience on how to use the actual product. We (almost) guarantee you’ll have more love for spiders after watching this one.

Make a winning video presentation with Biteable

Creating a winning presentation doesn’t need to be difficult or expensive. Modern slide decks and video software make it easy for you to give compelling presentations that sell, explain, and educate without sending your audience to snooze town.

For the best online video presentation software around, check out Biteable. The intuitive platform does all the heavy lifting for you, so making a video presentation is as easy as making a PowerPoint.

Use Biteable’s brand builder to automatically fetch your company colors and logo from your website and apply them to your entire video with the click of a button. Even add a  clickable call-to-action  button to your video.

Share your business presentation anywhere with a single, trackable URL and watch your message turn into gold.

Make stunning videos with ease.

Take the struggle out of team communication.

Try Biteable now.

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  • Mini English Lessons
  • Business English

How to Ace Your Business Presentation in English

young woman giving a presentation to coworkers in 2021 08 27 11 10 39 utc

So, you need to make a business presentation in English.

First of all, congratulations! To be in your position, you must have invested a huge amount of time and effort in your English language skills. You should be proud.

That said, we totally understand that giving a presentation in a second language can be a challenge. You may be worried that your audience won’t understand your accent. Perhaps you are wondering whether you need to use specific vocabulary. Maybe you’re not sure how best to handle questions from your audience.

If this sounds like you, don’t worry. In this post, we’re going to run through our top tips for acing your business presentation in English. Even if you’ve already made a few presentations in the language, we’re sure you’ll find these suggestions helpful.

So, read on to learn more. And before we start, let us wish you the very best of luck in delivering your next presentation.

Understand your audience

As with all forms of communication, it’s vital that you understand who your audience is. Even in the business world, you can find yourself speaking to very different groups of people.

For example, if you are giving a presentation to members of another company, you would certainly be more formal than when you give a presentation to members of your own team. In each case, you need to think about what your audience will expect from your presentation.

So, before you write a word, ask yourself these questions about your audience. Who are they? What interests them? What do they need to know? What do you want them to do as a result of your presentation?

One useful tip for writing your presentation is to imagine your audience is a single person. It’s easier to write convincingly if you have a single person in mind. Try it!

Mind your language

Most audiences will expect you to give your presentation using formal Business English . Don’t make the mistake of confusing Business English with business jargon .

Successful Business English uses language that is simple, direct, professional and easy to understand. Business jargon on the other hand, relies on obscure phrases, clichés, and acronyms. In many cases, business jargon is complex, not very precise and a barrier to good communication .

We have some useful resources on Business English on this page . However, if in doubt, keep the language of your presentation as simple and clear as possible. It’s also a good idea to use sentences with the active, rather than the passive voice. This allows you to use fewer words, which makes your sentences shorter and more engaging.

To give an example, this is a sentence in the passive voice:

The interview was failed by over one third of applicants.

Now compare this sentence, which is in the active voice.

Over one-third of applicants failed the interview.

To learn more about the active and the passive voice, check out this explainer from the British Council.

Practise, practise, practise

If English isn’t your first language, it’s more important than ever to practise your presentation before delivering it. By practising, you’ll feel more comfortable using English in a business setting. You’ll be able to work on any words or phrases you find difficult to pronounce, or you can change them to words or phrases you are more comfortable with.

Ideally, you should practise giving your presentation in front of someone else. That way you can get useful feedback on what works well, and what doesn’t. If that’s not possible, make a video of yourself giving your presentation. When you see yourself on screen, it will give you helpful insights into ways you can improve your delivery.

Don’t forget to introduce yourself

It may sound obvious, but don’t forget to introduce yourself at the very beginning of your presentation. It not only breaks the ice , but it’s an opportunity to get the audience on your side. If you are presenting to native English speakers, you may wish to tell them that English is not your first language – but don’t apologise for it! If anything, your audience will be impressed that you can give a presentation in a second language.

Have a clear structure

When people learn to teach in the UK, they are often told to structure their lessons in this simple way:

  • Say what you’re going to say
  • Say what you’ve said

In other words, introduce the session by explaining what you intend to talk about. This sets the audience’s expectations – they know what’s going to happen.

You then use main part of the session to make your presentation. There are many effective ways of doing this, and we’ll cover some of these soon.

Finally, finish by summarising the most important points of your presentation. This helps your audience to remember them clearly.

One other tip, if you plan to let the audience ask questions, it’s a good idea to tell them you’d prefer to answer them at the end of the presentation. This will discourage them from interrupting your presentation at the wrong moment.

Use storytelling

People love stories. If you can capture your audience’s imagination with a story, you can make a very powerful impression.

For example, imagine you are giving a presentation about how to commission new advertisements for your company. You want to make the point that good copywriting as just as important as good visual design.

You can either make your point directly, like this:

“Successful adverts rely on good writing as well as good design. If you change the wording of an advert, it can often result in extra sales – or fewer. Therefore, the words we choose are as important as the images we use.”.

Or you could begin with a story, like this:

“I want you to imagine it’s the year 1907. A man called Louis Victor Eytinge is in prison, convicted of murder. He’s a drug addict, suffering from tuberculosis. He’s unlikely to live, never mind get out of jail. Yet, by 1923 he walked free into a well-paid advertising job and a career as a Hollywood screenwriter. How? He had written his way to freedom. I want to use his story to show you why, if we want successful adverts, we need to commission powerful writing as well as good design.”

Which version of the presentation would you rather listen to?!

Remember pace and pitch

One useful tip for acing your business presentations in English is to vary the pace and pitch of your delivery.

While you don’t want to speak too fast, it’s a good idea to use a different pace for different parts of your presentation. For example, when you want to communicate a key point, speaking more slowly will help people understand that you think it is important.

Equally, it’s a good idea to vary the pitch of your voice. Try and keep this as natural as possible, but experiment with using a higher pitch when asking questions and a lower pitch when beginning your sentences. One good way to learn how to vary your pitch is to listen to UK news broadcasts – news presenters are expert at varying the tone of their voice to keep listeners interested.

Add a call to action

Most business presentations are given for a specific purpose. You may want to convince another company to work with you. Or you may want to convince your own firm to invest in a new kind of product. You may simply be explaining to colleagues how a new training scheme will work.

Whatever the purpose of your presentation, always remember to tell your audience what you want them to do. This is a ‘call to action’. Do you want your audience to email you their ideas? Or send you a funding proposal? Or arrange a meeting?

No matter what you need your audience to do, don’t forget to tell them. And at the very end, be sure to thank them for their time!

More business presentation tips

There are many other tips we could share with you on how to ace a business presentation in English. For example, it’s never a good idea to read your presentation from a piece of paper – it’s not engaging and it means you can’t easily make eye contact. It’s also tempting to rely too heavily on visual aids like PowerPoint, but if you get it wrong your audience will read your slides instead of listening to you. On the other hand, it can really engage an audience if you ask them to work together in small groups to share ideas or solve problems.

However you choose to make your presentation, if you prepare well, speak clearly and work hard to connect with your audience, you are very likely to succeed. And if you’d like to improve your presentation skills even further, why not try live online classes with English Online ? They can help you succeed in any career where using English is essential.

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Blog > English Presentation Structure (Introduction, Closing) & useful Phrases

English Presentation Structure (Introduction, Closing) & useful Phrases

02.21.20   •  #powerpoint #presentation #english.

When giving a presentation in english, there are certain guidelines you should follow. Maybe you haven't got a lot of experience presenting - or you would simply like to refresh your already existing knowledge - we're here to teach you the basics about presenting and provide you with a free list of useful phrases and the basic structure you can in your presentation!

business presentation in english example

1. Structure

The general structure of a presentation is the following:

  • Introduction

It is up to you to design these three parts. Using videos or everyday-examples can be a great way to introduce the audience to the topic. The important thing is that you capture the audience's attention from the beginning by making an interesting introduction. The main part is where you present your topic, ideally divided into sections. You can be creative with it - incorporate images, videos, stories or interactive polls . We generally recommend using different kinds of elements, as that makes the presentation more lively. Make sure your main part is well structured, so your audience can follow. In the conclusion, you should give a short summary of the points you made without adding any new information. You can also make an appeal to your audience in the end.

2. Useful Phrases

Here you'll find several phrases that you'll need in every presentation. Of course, you should adapt them and use them in a context that is suitable for your setting. The phrases are divided into subcategories so you can find what you're looking for more easily.

business presentation in english example

Starting your Presentation

In your introduction, you should:

Welcome your audience

Good morning/afternoon/evening everyone!

Ladies and gentlemen, I welcome you to my presentation about...

Introduce yourself

I am ... (from company ...) and today I would like to introduce you to the topic of ...

My name is ... and I am going to talk about ... today.

Icebreakers (for audience engagement)

Icebreaker polls are an amazing way to engage your audience instantly. They function as a fun and playful element at the beginning, giving you the perfect start you need to give a successful presentation. Click here to read our detailed post about icebreaker polls!

Mention the presentation topic and the reason for giving the presentation

I am grateful to be here today and tell you you about...

I would like to take this opportunity to talk about ...

I am here today to talk to you about ...

The reason why I am here today to talk about ... is ...

The purpose of this presentation is to ...

My goal today is to ...

Hopefully, by the end of the presentation, you will all know more about ...

Give a short overview of the content

To make it as understandable as possible, I divided my presentation into ... parts. In the first part, I will concentrate on ..., the second part will be about ..., ...

First of all, I will give you a short introduction, then we will move on to ...

... and finally, I will give you some insights to ...

business presentation in english example

Here are a few phrases that you could use during the whole presentation, but especially in the main part.

Engage your audience

In order to raise the audience's attention and improve their engagement, it is extremely important to make contact with them. A great way to do so is by adding interactive elements such as polls. If you would like to know more about this topic, read our article on How To Boost Audience Engagement . You can also use a software like SlideLizard , which allows you to conduct live polls, do Q&A sessions with your audience, share your resources and many more benefits that take your presentation to the next level.

Please raise your hand if you ...

Have you ever thought about ... ?

I would like to do a poll about ...

Please ask any questions as soon as they arrive.

On one hand, … on the other hand…

Comparing … with …, we can see that…

Clearly, … makes more sense than …

Whereas Option A is …, Option B is …

Making new points

Firstly,… Secondly,…

What also has to be mentioned is…

Next, I would like to bring up the topic of…

That being said, now we are going to take a look at…

Let's move on to the next topic.

On the next slide,…

The last thing I would like to mention is…

business presentation in english example

We made a whole blog post about how to pose questions in your presentation: The Right Way to do a Question Slide .

Talking about images or videos

In this image you can clearly see that ...

We are now going to take a look at a picture/video of ...

I'm going to show you a video by ... about ... now.

I've prepared a video about ...

Talking about statistics and charts

I am now addressing this graph that refers to the results of study XY.

In the graph on this slide, you can see that ...

The average is at ...

This graph clearly shows that the majority ...

According to this graph, the focus should be on ...

What that study tells us for practice is that we should ...

Emphasizing

I would like to emphasize the importance of ...

Moreover, it has to be said that ...

I want to stress the importance of ...

We always have to remember that ...

This is of high significance because ...

That part is especially important because ...

When something goes wrong

I am sorry, but it seems like the projector isn't working.

Could someone please help me with ...?

Is anybody here who knows how to ...?

Could someone give me a hand with ...

I would like to apologize for ...

I apologize for the technical problems, we are going to continue in a minute.

I am sorry for the inconvenience.

End of Presentation

In the conclusion, you should...

Sum up the main points

In conclusion I can say that…

To sum up the main points,…

With all mentioned aspects taken into consideration, I can say that…

Make an appeal

So please, in the future, try to be conscious about...

Please take a moment to think about...

I would like to encourage you to...

Thank your audience and say goodbye

It was a pleasure being here today.

Thank you for listening and goodbye.

Thank you for being such a great, engaged audience. Goodbye.

Thank you so much for listening, see you next time.

What is the structure of a presentation?

Your presentations should always have an Introduction, a Main part and a Conclusion.

What is a good way to begin a presentation?

You can start by introducing yourself, giving an overview of your topic, telling a little story or showing the audience an introductory video or image.

What are good phrases to use in English presentations?

There are many phrases that will make your presentation a lot more professional. Our blog post gives you a detailed overview.

Related articles

About the author.

business presentation in english example

Pia Lehner-Mittermaier

Pia works in Marketing as a graphic designer and writer at SlideLizard. She uses her vivid imagination and creativity to produce good content.

business presentation in english example

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The big SlideLizard presentation glossary

Hybrid event.

When an event consist of both virtual and in-person parts, this is called a hybrid event. This type of event is popular as it combines the benefits of both online and live events.

Break-out-Room

In live online training, it is sometimes useful to divide the students into small groups for certain exercises, as it would be impossible to have conversations at the same time. Break-out-rooms are used so that people can talk to each other without disturbing the others. When the exercise is over, they are sent back to the main room.

Audience Demographics

Audience Demographics are the characteristics of listeners like age, gender, cultural backgrounds, group affiliations and educational level. The speaker has to consider all these characteristics when adapting to an audience.

Informative Presentations

An information presentation is created when no solution is currently available. Facts, data and figures or study results are presented and current processes are described.

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Business English for Executives

Coaching Business Owners, CEOs and Executives to Communicate Confidently in English

35 Best Business English Presentation Phrases [Executive English]

35 best business english presentation phrases.

Executive leaders do not give many presentations, but being confident in the 35 best business English presentation phrases will make each presentation memorable.

You know that feeling as your throat gets tight and dry. You swallow… g ulp.

And then you begin to have those feelings that you know so well, as you start to feel…

Can you relate to that terrible feeling of having to give a presentation in English?

You are a business executive, and you know you are not supposed to feel this way as a leader of your company. But, just the thought of an upcoming presentation significantly raises your stress level.

Giving a great presentation in any language is difficult.

Undoubtedly, giving a great presentation in English as a non-native English business executive is a more difficult task. The good news is that there are many SKILLS you can learn to become a very effective presenter.

Although there are a few key components of every good presentation, this article will focus on the importance of using  The 35 Most Effective Business Presentation Phrases.

Let’s first take a moment and look at what makes an effective presentation.

An Effective Presentation

It is important to realize that there are a few essential components for an effective presentation. The first step is great preparation for your upcoming presentation.

Preparation

Preparation is the most significant part of every presentation. Before you give any presentation, you must have a plan for success.

The first step is to Know Your Audience. Who are you presenting to?

What is the Message Your Audience Needs or wants to hear from you?

Finally, what Call to Action do you want to leave your audience with?

Only after you have planned your presentation, it is time to move on to the actual presentation, which will include the following three sections:

3 Essential Components of a Presentation

Introduction

As stated earlier, this article will focus on the 35 Most Effective Business Presentation Phrases . This list will create great transitions and allow your presentation to flow naturally so that your audience is engaged in each step of the process.

Engage and Relate in Your Presentation Introduction

Beginning with your Introduction

Most important, your goal for the beginning of your presentation is to connect and engage with your audience.

At this point, you have prepared by getting to know your audience and now you want to introduce your message to your audience in a way that your audience can RELATE to your message.

Please do not start your presentation with

“Hi, my name is ______”

As you are aware, I’m a believer in beginning your presentation in a way that will connect and engage with your audience. Let’s look at three great ways to start your presentation.

Presentation Introduction of Story Question or Statistic

An effective presentation will begin in one of these ways:

After you have started your presentation in this way, you can now greet your audience and introduce yourself, if necessary. 

1. It is a pleasure to be here with the _______ (group/team/association) this morning/afternoon/ evening…

Example Sentence: it is a pleasure to be here with the Digital Marketing Association this morning.

2. A special welcome to the _________ (group/team/association)…

Example Sentence. A special welcome to the XYZ Manufacturing Association. 

Following your good start of your effective presentation with a question/story/statistic, you will say something like…

3. I’m ___________ and I’m so excited to be here with the ________________ (group/team/association).

Example Sentence: I’m John and I’m so excited to be here with the sales team today.

Remember, do not use the “I’m ____ and I’m going to talk about____” as your first words – you only can do this after you have made an engaging introduction!

After you have successfully introduced your presentation and engaged your audience, it is time to begin discussing the content of your presentation.

Presentation Content Deliver With Feeling and Flow

Transition from the Introduction to the Message

After you have given an engaging introduction and connected with your audience, you are ready to begin speaking about your topic.

Don’t just read your slides to your audience. They will not be engaged. Instead, use your slides as a guide and the key is to move from one slide to the next in an interesting way . This is called a “transition” and most of the phrases in this section will help you transition like a pro.

After all, who wants to listen to a speaker continue to say:  Next… Next…. Next… Next, as they move from slide to slide???

Here are some effective ways to transition from the introduction to the content of your presentation.

Remember, an effective presentation includes you serving your audience with a message they need.

Tell your audience up front what the message of the presentation is.

4. As a member of ___________ (refer to the group/team/association) you can relate to today’s message of _____________

Example sentence: As a member of the ABC Digital Marketing team, I’m confident you can relate to today’s message of knowing your audience.

5. As you are aware…

Example Sentence: As you are aware, it is important to keep up with the latest trends in your industry.

6. Let me start by providing some background information…

Example sentence: Let me start by providing some background information on the newest technology tools available.

Each of these above phrases are useful ways to engage your audience by giving them information at the beginning that they can relate to.

Now, let’s explore how you can use different phrases that help with your transitions, provide more details, link to additional topics, emphasize your points, refer to your important information/data/numbers, explain charts/tables/graphs and restate your points.

Transitioning to the Next Topic

Before you move on to your next point, be sure to make it clear to your audience that you’re now starting a new topic. Let them know exactly what that new topic will be. The two phrases below are very similar in meaning, and they can both be used for transitions.

These are SO much better than saying “next…”

7. Turning our attention now to…

Example sentence: Turning our attention now to the second main issue today… 

8. Let’s move on to…

Example sentence: Let’s move on to our second sales initiative.

Providing More Details

In short, one of the essential parts of your message is to give more detail to some sections of your content because it will be helpful to your audience.

Remember, the key is that you only go into more detail because you know your audience will be interested in this detail, and they can use this information.

9. To elaborate on…

Example sentence: Let me elaborate on this idea…

10. I’d like to expand on…

Example sentence: I’d like to expand on this point about expanding our sales team.

Linking to Another Topic

As mentioned above, use linking words to create flow with your presentations. Effective presentations have flow.

Whenever you think of flow, think of looking at the water in a river at a specific spot. The water is moving. The water was somewhere before it came to this spot and it will flow to a different place after it passes this spot.

In the same manner, this is true in a presentation. You keep your audience engaged using flow, by telling them about topics you discussed earlier, and also that you will discuss later in the presentation.

As can be seen, I used a linking phrase “as mentioned above” in the first words of the first paragraph of this section above. This is the example of using linking words in written form.

Below (another written linking word), you will see how you can use a different linking phrase when you are speaking. 

11. As stated earlier.. .

Example sentence: As stated a few minutes earlier, our industry is changing rapidly.

12. As mentioned earlier…

Comparatively, here is an example sentence: As I mentioned earlier in my presentation, the key to effective communication is knowing your audience.

13. As referenced earlier…

Example sentence: As referenced at the beginning of my talk today, preparation is critically important.

Each of these three phrases are self-explanatory and the linking phrases remind your audience that you discussed something earlier.

Again, you can create nice flow for your audience when you discuss a point and then later in your presentation, while referencing that same point, you remind your audience that you did discuss this point earlier.  It can also be used to emphasize a point or theme.

14. As I mentioned at the beginning…

Example sentence: As mentioned at the beginning of the presentation, we’ll see a decrease in expenses if we implement this strategy.

15. As you may recall, this relates to my earlier point that…

This phrase will help you connect points in your presentation. Significantly, it shows the connection between two different ideas.

Example sentence: As you may recall, this point relates closely to the earlier point about the importance of accountability.

16. This ties in with…  

Example sentence: This ties in with the point I made earlier regarding the expansion of our manufacturing facility.

After all, explaining to your audience that you will be discussing something later in your presentation is a key aspect of using flow.

17. This point will be mentioned in a few minutes…

Example sentence: In a few minutes, I will go into more detail about emphasizing a point.

18. This important point will be discussed later in detail…

Example sentence: This important point about having a great conclusion will be discussed later in my talk today.

The two above mentioned phrases are very effective in guiding your audience to where you are going in your presentation.

19. In a few minutes, you will hear this from ________ (one of your team members)…

Example sentence: In a few minutes, you will hear from Susan Jones, our CFO, about the importance of financial forecasting.

The above sentence is a very effective way of creating flow when you are able to reference another presenter that will speak after you.

At this point, do you see how you might use some of these 35 best business English presentation phrases when you give your next talk?

Emphasizing a Point

An essential part of all presentations is creating emphasis. Everything in your presentation is important, but you need to emphasize the most significant parts for your audience. These phrases below are excellent. 

20. This is significant because…

Significant is one of my favorite words. It is another word for important. One of the keys of being an excellent communicator in English is using different words that have similar meanings.

Example sentence: This is significant because we are planning to grow our workforce 20% this year. 

21. This is meaningful for the following reason(s)..

In the same manner, here is an example sentence: This is meaningful because the implementation of this recommendation will have an impact on multiple departments in our organization.

22. To reinforce this point…

Example sentence: Showing the significance of a better hiring process reinforces this point I am making with this data. 

23. Please draw your attention to…..

Example sentence: Please draw your attention to the revenue growth projections on this page.

Referring to Information, Data and Numbers

Let’s turn our attention now to referring to information and data. In a presentation, you will often use data, facts, and studies that help support your message. These meaningful terms and phrases will help you refer to this significant information.

24. According to the ___ study, …

Example sentence: According to the XYZ study, 84% of workforce efficiency is tied to a meaningful benefit package.

25. Based on our recent findings, …

Example sentence: Based on our recent findings, only 22% of our clients continue to use our services after six months. 

 26. This data shows …

Example sentence: This data shows that more than 92% of our clients continue to be highly satisfied with our customer service one year after they received our product. 

Before moving on the next section, you might find this article on How to Naturally Say Numbers in Business English helpful for your next presentation.

Explaining Charts, Tables and Graphs

Of course, most presentations use charts, tables or graphs to help support your message. To clarify, knowing how to use phrases describing these will create an effective presentation. 

27. To illustrate this point… 

Also, the word “illustrate” is very effective and it is a great word to use when you are describing a chart, table or graph. 

Example sentence: This chart illustrates my earlier point about how more meaningful benefits impact worker satisfaction. 

28. This table provides a breakdown of …

A “breakdown” refers to the details within specific figures or numbers.  A breakdown is helpful to provide a more detailed picture of the situation. 

Example sentence: This table provides a breakdown of the 10 most important client feedback messages.

Another key point is that explaining charts, tables and graphs often involves complex information.  Below is a short video from the English Leadership Academy’s Executive Video Blog, titled What if You Were Able to Explain Complex Ideas in a Simple Way? that gives tips and strategies to make complex information more easily understandable by your audience.

Restating Your Point

Sometimes in order to emphasize your point, you have to state it in a way that’s easier for your audience to understand and remember.

Specifically this process is commonly referred to as paraphrasing. Paraphrasing is an essential skill for non-native English speakers that allows them to say the same thing with different words to enhance communication effectiveness.

This often involves rephrasing, clarifying or simplifying the point you are trying to make.

29. In fact, …

Use this phrase to restate your point in another way.

Example sentence: In fact, it is necessary that we make a change to our current policy to attain this goal.

30. In other words…

Example sentence. In other words, we don’t stack up well against our competitors in this area.

31. To put it simply, …

Explaining complex messages in a presentation can lead to confusion. Your audience will benefit when you simplify complex messages. 

Example sentence: To put it simply, if we follow these recommendations, we’ll achieve our goals six months sooner.

To summarize, by this point in the presentation, you have given your audience the message they needed or wanted.

You have emphasized the points that are especially important to them.

You are now ready to finish your presentation in the best way!

Now we reach a crucial aspect of the presentation and let’s finish strong.

Presentation Conclusion Needs Call to Action

Concluding Your Presentation

Most people spend a lot of time working on the introduction and content of their presentation, but they do not spend any time preparing for their conclusion.

As stated earlier, you are presenting for your audience because they have a need or a want.

To emphasize this point, it is a great idea to challenge your audience to THINK in a different way. It is even better to challenge your audience to DO something different in the future.

In other words, create a call to action!

Let’s now look at how you can summarize your presentation in a professional way.

32. In the final analysis…  

Example sentence: In the final analysis, it is critical that the company needs to immediately enhance our sales strategy to achieve our quarterly targets.

33. In conclusion, let me reiterate my message…

As part of your conclusion, you might want to emphasize your main points to leave the audience with a clear message of what you discussed. This is very effective to restate your main message!

Example sentence: In conclusion, let me reiterate my earlier message that time is of the essence for our team to solve this issue in the next 10 days.

34. I want to challenge you to do/think ….

Example sentence: You’ve heard the compelling arguments for a new mindset shift, and now I challenge YOU to begin making the necessary changes in the next five days!

Finally, as you reach the end of your presentation, you’ll need a transition from the completion of your presentation to the Question and Answer (Q&A) portion of your presentation.

35. Thank you for your attention today, and we’ve got time for a few questions. Who would like to ask the first question?

This is a nice phrase that let’s your audience know you have concluded your formal remarks and you are open to answering a few questions.

In addition to the above phrases, you might find this article helpful as well 25 Powerful English Presentation Phrases to Impress Your Audience.

I appreciate your attention to this topic today and now I’d like to leave you with a challenge below.

My Challenge to You

I challenge you to begin preparing your future presentations in a different and more effective way.

Above, you have been provided with 35 best business English presentation phrases.  Can you use at least three of these above-mentioned phrases in your next presentation?

You can do this!

Additional articles and videos related to 35 Best Business English Presentation Phrases:

Confidently Speak English As A CEO in 4 Steps

How To Improve Your Executive Business English in 12 Steps

How to Be the Same Highly Effective Leader in English That You are in You Native Language  [free ebook]

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101 Business English Presentation Phrases

In business, first impressions are everything. That’s why it’s so important to use the right phrases when communicating with clients, customers, and business associates. If you’re looking to get ahead in your career, learning some business English presentation phrases can be a real asset. These phrases are designed to help you communicate more effectively in a business setting, and they can be used in a variety of situations.

By familiarizing yourself with these phrases, you can make a positive impression and improve your chances of success in an upcoming presentation. In this blog, we’ll walk you through some of the best phrases for non-native speakers. From introducing yourself to wrapping up your presentation, we’ve got you covered. So whether you’re giving a sales pitch or delivering a keynote speech, be sure to bookmark this page and refer back to it for the public speaker’s needs.

101 Phrases for Presentations

Greeting your audience.

Greeting your audience is an important part of building English Presentation skills . It sets the tone for the rest of your presentation, and it helps to create a connection with your audience. There are a few different ways to greet your audience, and the best option will depend on the situation. No matter how you choose to greet your audience, remember to smile and make eye contact, as this will help create a warm and welcoming atmosphere.

1. Thank you for being here today.

2. It’s great to see all of you.

3. I’m glad you could make it.

4. Thank you for your time and attention.

5. It’s a pleasure to be with you today.

6. I appreciate your interest in what I have to say.

Beginning your Presentation

Beginning your presentation is an important opportunity to set the tone and make a good first impression. There are a few key phrases and vocabulary for presentations that can be useful in this situation. By using these business English phrases , you can start your presentation in a confident and professional way.

7. I’m excited to share with you what we’ve been working on.

8. I know you’re busy, so I’ll get right to the point.

9. As you know, our company is-

10. I’d like to start by telling you a story about-

11. I have some innovative ideas that I think you’ll find interesting.

12. Let’s get started by talking about our goals.

Referencing Information and Sources

In business, it is important to be able to reference information and sources accurately. This means knowing how to cite sources correctly and providing a list of references at the end of a document or presentation. By being accurate and consistent in your communication skills, you will show that you are a credible and trustworthy business person.

13. According to-

14. As shown in-

15. Demonstrated by-

16. Verified by-

17. Reported by-

18. According to our research-

Give an Outline for the Presentation

When giving a presentation, it is important to be clear, concise, and organized. One way to achieve this is to provide an outline for the presentation. An outline helps to focus the presentation, keep it on track, and ensure that all the important points are covered. It also allows the audience to follow along and take notes if they wish. Providing an outline at the beginning of a business presentation can help set the stage for effective communication and informative delivery.

19. Here is an overview of what will be covered.

20. Focusing on the main points-

21. First of all-

22. I’m going to cover three main points today.

23. Let me start by giving some background information.

24. Allow me to give a brief outline of our discussion.

Explaining Visual Data

This involves more than just reading off numbers from customer surveys- it also requires an understanding of how the data is related and what conclusions can be drawn from it. For instance, someone who can explain visual data might point out that a particular chart shows an increase in sales over the past year, and then explain what factors in the sales strategy might have contributed to this increase. In today’s business world, being able to explain visual data is a valuable skill that can help you stand out from the crowd.

25. This chart shows-

26. As you can see from this graph-

27. As demonstrated by this diagram-

28. This table indicates that-

29. These results indicate that-

30. We can conclude from this information that-

Hypothesize

Businesses often use hypotheses to drive their research efforts and to focus their attention on specific areas of interest. By formulating hypotheses, businesses can hone in on the most promising leads and investigate them more thoroughly. This helps to ensure that valuable resources are not wasted on dead-end investigations. With the right hypothesis, you will have the ability to craft amazing presentations.

31. We think that [X] because of [Y]. For example, [Z].

32. It is possible that [X], and here’s why: [Y] and [Z].

33. We hypothesize that [X] is caused by/due to [Y].

34. Our theory is that [X] happens when/if [Y].

35. Based on what we know, we predict that [X].

36. We conjecture that [X] is the result of [Y].

Stating Your Point

When you state your point, you are effectively summarizing the main idea of the actual presentation in a single sentence. This sentence should be clear and concise, and it should directly address the question or issue at hand. In business English, stating your point is often seen as the most important part of a presentation or pitch. This is because investors and clients need to have a clear understanding of what they are trying to achieve to make a decision.

37. Therefore, we can conclude that-

38. Based on this information, we recommend that-

39. We suggest that you use-

40. This is why-

41. I strongly believe that-

42. What this means for our company is-

Beginning a New Section of the Main Body

These phrases signal to your audience that you are transitioning to a new topic, and help to keep your presentation flowing smoothly. By using these phrases, you can help to keep your audience engaged and ensure that you have a clear, well-structured presentation.

43. As we move on to the next part of our presentation, I want to remind you of our goal.

44. Now that we’ve covered X, let’s move on to Y.

45. Let’s transition now to the next section of our presentation.

46. Now is a good time to take a few minutes to transition to the next part of our presentation.

47. Are there any questions before we move on?

48. Before we continue, does anyone have any questions?

Delivering Main Presentation Points

When delivering a presentation, it is important to focus on the main points that you want to get across to your audience. This can be difficult to do, especially if you are nervous or have a lot of information to cover. However, there are some simple phrases that you can use to make sure that your main points come across loud and clear. 

49. The most important thing to remember is-

50. The key point to take away from this is-

51. What this means for you is-

52. The bottom line is-

53. To put it simply-

54. In other words-

Introduce Solutions

When you’re presenting business solutions to clients, colleagues, or upper management, it’s important to use language that is both clear and persuasive. This requires informal language and strong communication effectiveness. To that end, here are a few key phrases to keep in mind when introducing business solutions.

55. We have a solution that will-

56. Our team has come up with a solution that will-

57. We’ve developed a solution that will-

58. We have the perfect solution for your problem-

59. Introducing our newest solution-

60. Our latest and greatest solution is-

Useful Words and Phrases

Using these phrases can help to make your presentation more professional and polished. Additionally, they can also help to ensure that your audience understands the key points that you are trying to communicate. When selecting business English phrases for your presentation, be sure to choose ones that are appropriate for the level of formality desired.

61. As an example

62. In conclusion

63. To summarize

64. Thank you for your time

65. Furthermore

66. Moreover

Discussion Questions

When leading a discussion, it is important to ask open-ended questions that cannot be answered with a simple yes or no. These types of questions encourage others to share their opinions and experiences. In addition, discussion questions should be relevant to the topic at hand and should be framed in a way that promotes constructive dialogue. By asking thoughtful questions and actively listening to the responses, you can use discussions to foster understanding and collaboration within your team or organization. It also allows your audience to deconstruct any complex messages you have delivered.

67. How will this proposal impact our bottom line?

68. What are the risks associated with this plan?

69. What are the potential benefits of this plan?

70. How does this plan compare to other options?

71. What are the challenges associated with implementing this plan?

72. What are the next steps?

Interacting with the Audience

Interacting with your audience is key to keeping their attention during a presentation. There are several ways to do this, such as making eye contact, using gestures and body language, and speaking in a clear and engaging voice. Asking questions is also a great way to interact with your audience, as it not only helps to keep them engaged but also allows you to gauge their understanding of the material.

73. Does that make sense?

74. Do you have a goal in mind?

75. Are you following me so far?

76. Do you have any questions?

77. Have I painted a clearer picture?

78. I’m happy to answer any questions you might have.

Concluding Your Presentation

When you reach the end of your presentation, it’s important to conclude effectively in order to leave your audience with a strong impression. By using one of these business English phrases, you can conclude your presentation professionally and effectively.

79. We appreciate your interest in our company.

80. Your input is invaluable to us.

81. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or require further information.

82. Thank you for your time and attention.

83. Together, we can make a difference.

84. Time for questions.

Ending the Presentation

Ending the presentation is just as important as starting it. Your goal is to ensure that your audience has taken away the key points from your talk and to leave them with a positive impression of you and your business. This allows you to address any concerns they may have and leaves them with a positive impression of you as a business professional. By using these simple phrases, you can ensure that your presentation ends on a strong note.

85. We look forward to working with you in the future.

86. This concludes our presentation. Are there any questions?

87. Just a quick recap-

88. Thank you for your business.

89. We appreciate your interest.

90. I hope I was able to answer your questions.

Thank your Audience and Close your Presentation

When you thank your audience for listening to your presentation, you are showing your appreciation for their time and attention. This is a polite way to end your talk, and it can help to leave a positive impression. No matter how you choose to express your thanks, closing with this business English vocabulary will show that you are professional and courteous.

91. Thank you for your trust in us

92. Thank you for partnering with us.

93. Thank you for your efforts.

94. Thank you for choosing us.

95. Thank you for your time today.

96. Thank you for considering us as a partner.

Popular Business Presentation Phrases

Popular business presentation phrases are expressions that are commonly used in business presentations. They can be divided into two categories: those that are designed to engage the audience and those that are designed to convey information. These phrases help the presenter structure the information in a way that is easy for the audience to understand.

97. Let’s get started

98. As you can see

99. If we could have your attention.

100. As you can see from this chart

101. This data shows

10 Simple Steps to Effective Business Presentations

1. research thoroughly.

Whether you’re giving a presentation to potential investors or presenting new data to your colleagues, it’s essential that you research thoroughly and present effectively. Knowing how to research and present is a critical business skill.

To research thoroughly, you need to understand your audience and what they’re looking for. What questions do they have? What information do they need? Once you know what your audience is looking for, you can begin your research.

Start by looking for reputable sources of information. Check out books, articles, websites, and other materials that will help you learn more about your topic. When you’re doing your research, be sure to take good notes. This will help you keep track of the information you find and make it easier to organize your thoughts when you’re ready to start writing your presentation.

2. Plan Your Points

In business, first impressions are everything. If you’re giving a presentation, you want to come across as confident, knowledgeable, and professional.

The best way to do this is to plan your points carefully. Make sure you know what you’re going to say, and structure your points in a way that will be easy for your audience to follow. Use business English presentation phrases to make your points clearly and confidently. And don’t forget to practice before the big day! By taking the time to prepare, you’ll give yourself the best possible chance of success.

3. Gather Phrases and Jargon

Whether you’re giving a business presentation or delivering a speech, using the right phrases and jargon can help you to engage your audience and get your point across effectively. Here are a few tips on how to gather the right phrases and jargon for your next presentation:

  • Do your research. Before you start writing your presentation or speech, take some time to research your topic and audience. This will help you to identify the key points you need to make, and the jargon and phrases that will resonate with your audience.
  • Identify your purpose. What do you want to achieve with your presentation or speech? Once you know your purpose, you can choose the words and phrases that will help you to achieve it. For example, if you’re trying to sell a product, you’ll need to use language that is persuasive and compelling.
  • Keep it simple. Use language that is easy to understand, even if it means avoiding technical terms and jargon. Remember that your goal is to communicate effectively, not to impress with your vocabulary.
  • Be natural. The best presentations and speeches sound effortless as if the speaker is having a conversation with the audience. To achieve this natural tone, avoid reading from a script or teleprompter; instead, focus on memorizing key points and using language that feels natural to you.

4. Develop Visual Aids

Before you begin developing your visual aids, it is important to take a step back and consider your audience. What type of information are they looking for? How much detail do they need? Once you have a good understanding of your audience, you can start developing visual aids that are both informative and engaging.

There are a few key business English presentation visual tips that will help you to develop effective visual aids. For example:

  • Use clear and concise language
  • Focus on one main idea per slide
  • Avoid using too much text around the visual

By following these simple guidelines, you can ensure that your visual aids are easy to understand and visually appealing. Additionally, be sure to proofread your slides before sending them out or presenting them in front of a group. A few small typos can easily detract from an otherwise well-crafted presentation.

5. Practice Out Loud

When you’re preparing for business English vocabulary presentations, it’s important to Practice Out Loud as much as possible. This will help you get comfortable with the material and ensure that you deliver your points effectively. There are a few key business English presentation phrases that you can use to make sure that your presentation is polished and professional.

For example, beginning your presentation with a brief overview of what you’ll be covering is a great way to set the stage and engage your audience. As you move through your presentation, be sure to use clear and concise language.

And finally, conclude your presentation with a strong call to action or summary of the key points. By following these simple tips, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an effective business presentation.

6. Prepare for the Unexpected

Presenting to a group can be daunting, even for experienced speakers. The key to success is to be prepared for the unexpected. While it’s impossible to anticipate every possible scenario, there are some steps you can take to ensure that you’re ready for anything.

  • First, brush up on your business English presentation phrases. Knowing how to effectively communicate your message will help you stay calm and focused if something unexpected happens.
  • Second, make sure you know your material inside and out. If you’re well-versed in the subject matter, you’ll be able to think on your feet and address any questions or concerns that come up.
  • Finally, remember to breathe. Taking a few deep breaths before you start will help you relax and focus on delivering your best presentation.

By following these simple tips, you can prepare for the unexpected and give an outstanding performance.

7. Body Language

When giving a business presentation in English, it is important to use body language effectively to engage your audience and convey your message clearly. There are a few key things to keep in mind:

  • Make eye contact with individuals around the room; this shows that you are speaking to them directly and helps to build rapport.
  • Use gestures to emphasize key points ; avoid crossing your arms or fidgeting, which can make you appear nervous or untrustworthy. Finally,
  • Speak clearly and at a moderate pace ; if you speak too quickly, your audience may not be able to understand you, and if you speak too slowly, you may lose their attention.

8. Manage Your Nerves

Nerves are a perfectly normal response to presenting and public speaking. After all, you are basically putting yourself out there to be judged! The key is learning how to manage your nerves in a way that allows you to present effectively.

One way to do this is to focus on your business presentation phrases. This will help you to stay on track and sound confident, even if you are feeling nervous inside. Another tip is to take some deep breaths and relax your body before you start speaking. This will help to calm your nerves and allow you to focus on delivering your presentation.

Finally, remember that it is okay to be nervous. Embrace the feeling and use it to fuel your passion for the topic at hand. With these tips in mind, you will be sure to deliver an effective presentation.

9. Ask Questions

When you are asked to present in front of an audience, whether it is for business or academic purposes, it is important to ask questions to engage your audience and effectively communicate your message. Asking questions allows you to gauge your audience’s understanding of the material, ensure that they are paying attention, and elicit feedback.

Furthermore, questions can help to clarify points that may be confusing and provide opportunities for further discussion. However, it is important to ask questions in a way that is respectful and does not put your audience on the defensive. For example, avoid leading or loaded questions, and rephrase if necessary.

When used effectively, questions can be a powerful tool for making presentations more engaging and effective.

10. Be Open to Feedback

Giving a presentation can be nerve-wracking, but there are some things you can do to help ensure that it goes well. One of the most important things is to be open to feedback. This means being willing to listen to what other people have to say about your presentation, and then making changes based on their feedback.

It can be tempting to just stick with what you have, but if you’re not open to feedback, you’ll likely end up with a presentation that doesn’t quite hit the mark. So next time you’re getting ready to give a presentation, make sure you’re open to feedback, and you’ll increase your chances of giving a great talk.

This blog has provided 101 of the best English phrases to use in presentations, as well as tips and tricks for presenting effectively. These phrases have been grouped into categories, such as introducing yourself, dealing with difficult questions, and closing your presentation. By using these phrases, you can be confident that you are conveying your message clearly and professionally.

In addition, the tips and tricks included in this blog will help you to avoid common mistakes when giving presentations. By following these tips, you can ensure that your presentations are engaging and informative. Thanks for reading!

Frequently Asked Questions

Any good presentation skills training will tell you that there are five key elements to success: planning, preparation, delivery, design, and practice. By taking the time to plan your presentation, you can ensure that your ideas are well organized and that you have a clear objective. Preparation is also essential, and this means knowing your audience and understanding their needs. When it comes to delivery, it is important to be confident and to project your voice clearly. The design of your presentation should be clean and professional, and you should use practice slides to get a feel for the flow of the presentation. By following these simple tips, you can be sure that your next presentation will be a success.

First, you want to make sure that you are well-prepared. This means having a clear understanding of your audience and your goals for the presentation. It also means having all of your materials ready to go, including slides, handouts, and any other visual aids. Second, you want to be sure to deliver your presentation with confidence. This means speaking clearly and confidently, making eye contact with your audience, and using body language to convey your points. Finally, you want to make sure that you leave a lasting impression. This can be done by ending on a strong note, providing follow-up materials, or even offering a call to action.

The best business presentations are those that are able to engage the audience and keep their attention focused on the speaker. There are a few key elements that can help to make a presentation more engaging. First, it is important to have a clear and well-organized structure. This will help the listener to follow the presentation and understand the main points. Second, it is helpful to use visual aids to illustrate key points. This can make the information more memorable and easier to understand. Finally, it is important to be passionate about the topic. When the speaker is enthusiastic, it can be contagious and make the audience more interested in what is being said. By keeping these things in mind, you can help ensure that your next business presentation is engaging and successful.

When giving a business English presentation, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, it is important to be clear and concise. This means using language that is easy to understand and getting straight to the point. It is also important to be respectful and professional. This means avoiding slang and casual language and maintaining a polite tone throughout the presentation. Finally, it is important to be well-prepared. This means having all of your materials ready in advance, and rehearsing your presentation so that you are confident and deliver smoothly. By following these tips, you can ensure that your business English presentation is successful.

A business presentation typically has four distinct stages: introduction, body, conclusion, and Q&A. The introduction is your opportunity to grab the audience’s attention and give them an overview of what you’ll be discussing. The body is where you provide more detailed information about your topic. The conclusion should summarize your key points and leave the audience with a strong impression. Finally, the Q&A section gives the audience a chance to ask questions and get clarification on anything they didn’t understand. By following these four simple steps, you can ensure that your business presentation is engaging, informative, and well-organized.

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Bethany MacDonald

Bethany MacDonald has contributed articles LillyPad.ai since 2020. As their Blog Lead, she specialises in informative pieces on culture, education, and language learning

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Free English Lessons

Presentations in english – video.

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Presentations in English thumbnail

In this lesson, you can learn how to make presentations in English.

Do you have to make presentations in english in your job imagine you have to give an important presentation in english tomorrow. how would you feel about it, this business english lesson will help you learn useful phrases and techniques to introduce yourself and your topic, keep your ideas organised, deal with problems, and respond to questions from audience members., quiz: presentations in english.

Now, test your knowledge of what you learned in the lesson by trying this quiz.

There are 20 questions, following the same order as the lesson.

You will get your score at the end, when you can click on ‘View Questions’ to see all the correct answers.

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1 . Question

For those who don’t ________ me, my name’s Elaine, and I work in the HR department.

Choose the missing word.

2 . Question

Write the words in the correct gaps. There is one word you don’t need to use.

Before we , let me myself : I’m Jenny and I’m the head of purchasing.

3 . Question

Put the words in order to create something you might say at the start of a presentation.

View Answers:

4 . Question

Put these sentences in order to create the introduction to a presentation.

  • Then I’ll explain what we believe are our greatest challenges.
  • Finally, I’ll suggest some solutions for how we might tackle them in the coming year.
  • I’ll begin by highlighting some of the issues that have faced the retail sector during the pandemic.

5 . Question

I’ll begin by lining out the policies, and then I’ll go on to highlight what they mean for you and your working habits.

The highlighted words are not used correctly; there should be one word (an -ing verb) instead. Write the correct word below.

6 . Question

Write the missing word to complete a common phrase used to introduce an interesting fact.

Did you that the average office worker in London spends more than two hours commuting to and from work?

7 . Question

Complete the gaps in Dale Carnegie’s famous quote about making presentations, using the verbs ‘say’ and ‘tell’ in the correct form.

“ the audience what you’re going to ; it, and then them what you’ve .”

8 . Question

Next, I’d like to talk about the new marketing drive to attract teens.

The highlighted words are an example of what?

  • signposting language
  • getting the audience’s attention
  • inviting questions
  • introducing yourself

9 . Question

Let’s move ________ and discuss the latest customer feedback report.

Choose the correct word.

10 . Question

At this , I’d to to the company’s performance on punctuality.

11 . Question

Put the words in order to create an example of signposting language.

12 . Question

Let’s examine this in more ________.

Choose the two words that are possible.

13 . Question

14 . question.

Write a two-word phrasal verb that’s used as signposting language at the end of a presentation. (You use the same phrasal verb to mean put paper around an item before giving it as a present).

To , let’s remind ourselves of why this should matter to everyone here.

15 . Question

So, you’ve heard what I have to say. What conclusions can you take ________ from this?

16 . Question

Which question is not an example of a filler phrase, which you might say if you need some thinking time?

  • Where was I?
  • So, what was I saying?
  • What’s the word in English again?
  • What’s your take on this?

The odd one out – in other words, the answer you’re looking for – is a question that asks for someone’s opinion.

17 . Question

Complete this signposting language with a seven-letter word that means ‘make something clear’. You might say this if you realise you need to explain something in a different way.

To , I wanted to say that …

18 . Question

Write the words in the correct gaps to create a sentence you might say to delay answering a question. There is one word you don’t need to use.

I’ve time for questions at the end of this session, so we’ll your idea later.

19 . Question

  • You’ve raised an important point there. What does everyone else think about this?

What technique is this an example of?

  • delaying the answer to a question
  • deflecting the answer to a question
  • dismissing a question

20 . Question

Thanks for your putting in , but I don’t see how that’s connected to what I’m saying.

The highlighted words are not used correctly; there should be a one-word noun instead. Write the correct word below.

1. How to Introduce Yourself and Your Topic

Presentations in English - woman speaking image

If some people in the audience don’t know who you are, you should introduce yourself and your position.

In a more formal setting, you could say something like this:

  • Good morning everyone. For those who don’t know me, my name’s Simon, and I work in the marketing department.
  • Hello everybody. Before we begin, let me introduce myself briefly: I’m Reese and I’m the head of HR.

If you work in a more informal company, you could say:

  • Hi guys; if you don’t know me, I’m Sylvia and I work in digital marketing.
  • Hello! I see some new faces, so I’ll introduce myself first: I’m Julia and I’m one of our customer service team.

Next, you need to introduce your topic.

If your presentation topic is simpler, you could just say one sentence, like this:

  • Today, I’m going to be talking about our new HR policies and how they affect you.
  • I’d like to talk to you today about quality control and why we’re all responsible for quality control, whichever department you work in.

If your topic is more complex, you might add more detail to break your idea into stages. For example:

  • Today, I’m going to be talking about our new HR policies and how they affect you. I’ll begin by outlining the policies, and then I’ll go on to highlight what they mean for you and your working habits. Finally, I’ll briefly discuss why we feel these new policies are necessary and beneficial for us all.

Here’s another example:

  • I’d like to talk to you today about quality control and why we’re all responsible for quality control, whichever department you work in. First of all, I’ll explain why ‘quality control’ has a broader meaning than you might expect. I’ll continue by giving examples of real quality control, and why this matters for all of us. To finish, I’ll be asking you to think of ways you can incorporate quality control into your working habits.

Here, you saw two examples. You can use these as templates to begin your presentation:

  • I’ll begin by… and then I’ll… Finally, I’ll…
  • First of all, I’ll… I’ll continue by… To finish, I’ll…

Okay, now you can practice! We’d like you to do two things.

First, practice introducing yourself informally, and explaining your topic in a simple way, with one sentence.

Then, practice introducing yourself formally, and explaining your topic in a more detailed way.

Pause the video and practice speaking. All the language you need is in this section.

Learn more about this topic with another free English video lesson from Oxford Online English: Greetings and Introductions .

Ready? Let’s move on!

2. How to Make a Strong Start

I’m sure that in your life, you’ve heard good speakers and bad speakers.

Good speakers grab your attention and don’t let go. You want to hear what they have to say. You feel interested and energised by listening to them.

Bad speakers are the opposite. Even if you try to make yourself listen, you find that your attention drifts away. Your eyelids feel heavy, and you have to struggle to stay awake.

So, here’s a question: what’s the difference between good speakers and bad speakers? And, how can you make sure you speak effectively when you make your presentation in English?

Here’s one way to think about it: bad speakers don’t think they have to earn your attention. Good speakers understand that no one has to listen to them, so they work hard to make you want to pay attention.

What does this mean for you, and your presentation?

Getting people’s attention starts from the beginning. You need to make it clear what people should expect from your presentation, and why they should care about what you have to say.

Sounds like a nice idea, but how do you do this?

Here are three techniques you can use.

One: establish a problem which many people in your audience have. Then, establish that you have a solution to their problem.

For example:

  • Have you ever felt unfairly treated at work, or felt that the work you do isn’t appreciated? We’ve been working to design new HR policies that will make sure all staff get fair recognition for their contribution to the company.

In this way, you take a boring-sounding topic like HR policies, and you make it more relevant to your audience. How? By connecting it with their experiences and feelings.

The second technique? Mention an interesting fact, or a surprising statistic to get people’s attention.

  • Did you know that the average office worker spends eight hours a day at work, but only does four hours of productive, useful work? I’m here to tell you about ‘quality control’, and how you can use this idea to make better use of your time.

Finally, you can engage people by telling a short story and connecting it to your topic. Stories are powerful, and they can add an emotional dimension to your topic if you do it well. For example:

  • I once met a young salesman—I won’t mention his name. He spent several weeks building a relationship with a potential client. He worked overtime, and he was working so hard that he was under severe stress, which started to affect his personal life. In the end, he didn’t close the deal—the clients signed with another firm. Today, I’m going to talk about confidence as a sales tool, and how you can avoid the traps that this young man fell into.

Use one of these three techniques in your introduction to connect with your audience and show them why they should be interested in what you have to say.

Here’s a question for you: which technique would you prefer to use, and why?

Okay, now you’ve introduced your topic and you have everyone’s attention. What next?

3. Using Signposting Language

Presentations in English - signpost image

There’s a famous quote about making presentations:

  • “Tell the audience what you’re going to say; say it, and then tell them what you’ve said.”

Have you heard this before? Do you know who said it?

This comes from Dale Carnegie , a very successful American salesman and writer. He lived a long time ago, but his advice is still relevant today.

So, here’s a question: what does the quote mean?

It means that your presentation shouldn’t just give information. You also need to show people how your information is organized.

To do this, you need signposting language.

Let me give you an example to explain.

Imagine you go to a website. The website is full of really useful, interesting information. But, the information is all on one page. There’s no organization, and you have to scroll up and down, up and down this huge page, trying to find what you need. Would you stay on that website?

Probably not. You’ll find a website which makes it easier for you to find the information you need.

What’s the point here?

The point is that having interesting or relevant information is not enough. How you structure and organize your information is equally important.

If you don’t structure your presentation clearly, people won’t pay attention, just like you won’t stay on a website if you can’t find the information you want.

So, how can you do this?

You use signposting language. This means using words and phrases to show the audience where your points begin and end, to show what’s coming next, and to remind them about things you talked about before.

  • Okay, that covers the new policies. Next, I’d like to move on and discuss what these policies mean for you.
  • Now that you’ve heard a bit about what not to do, let’s focus on positive advice to help you be more effective salespeople and close more of your leads.

When you say something like this, you aren’t giving people information about the topic of your presentation. Instead, you’re showing people where you are, and where you’re going next.

It’s a kind of signpost. You don’t need signposts to travel from one place to another, but they can make it easier.

What else can you use signposting language for?

You can use signposting language to move from one point to the next. For example:

  • Next, I’d like to talk about…
  • Let’s move on and discuss…
  • At this point, I’d like to turn to…

You can use signposting language to add detail to an idea:

  • Let me go into some more detail about…
  • Let’s examine … in more depth.
  • I’d like to elaborate on…

You can use signposting language to show that you’ve finished your main points, and you’ve reached your conclusion:

  • To wrap up, let’s remind ourselves of why this should matter to everyone here.
  • Let’s review the key points from this session.
  • So, you’ve heard what I have to say. What conclusions can you take away from this?

If you have an important presentation in English, practice using signposting language.

Use signposting language to move between points, to show when you’re giving a summary or going into more detail, and to signal that you’ve reached your conclusion.

Okay, but things don’t always go so smoothly in real life. We know that! Let’s look at some advice and language for dealing with problems during your presentation.

4. Dealing With Problems

Imagine you’re making your presentation in English. What could go wrong? What problems could you have?

There are many common problems:

You might forget where you were, or forget an important word. You might realise that you said something wrong, or you didn’t explain something clearly. You might forget to mention something important. Or, someone might ask you an awkward question, which you have no idea how to answer.

Of course, there are other possibilities!

Let’s think about these problems. What can you do, and more importantly, what can you say in these situations?

First of all, it’s a good idea to make a cue card with key points, as well as any important vocabulary you need. If you lose your place, or you forget a word, it could help.

However, you can’t prepare for everything. So, it’s useful to learn some phrases to deal with problems smoothly.

If you lose your place, and can’t remember what to say next, you can use a filler phrase like:

If you still can’t remember, look at your cue card with your main points.

Of course, forgetting something isn’t ideal. But, if you do, it’s better to keep talking, rather than just standing there in silence.

What if you make a mistake, or you realise that you didn’t explain something well?

You could say:

  • Let me rephrase that.
  • Actually, what I meant to say is…
  • To clarify, I wanted to say that…

In this way, you can correct yourself without admitting that you made a mistake!

What if you realise that you forgot to mention something important?

Use a phrase like this:

  • Let me just add one more thing:…
  • I’d like to add something to a point we discussed earlier.
  • Let me return to an earlier point briefly.

Again, this allows you to correct your mistake in a confident way, so you look like you’re in control.

Finally, what do you do if someone asks you a difficult question, which you can’t answer?

You have a few options. First, you can delay giving an answer. For example:

  • I’ve allocated time for questions at the end of this session, so we’ll address your idea later.
  • I’m not in a position to answer that right now, but I’ll get back to you later this week.

This gives you time to think of an answer and do some research if you have to!

Next, you can deflect the question, by asking a question back, or maybe by asking other audience members what they think. For example:

  • That’s an interesting question. Before I answer, I’d like to know: what’s your take on this?

Finally, if the question is irrelevant, you can dismiss the question and move on. For example:

  • Thanks for your input, but I don’t see how that’s connected to what I’m saying.
  • I don’t mean to be blunt, but I don’t think that’s relevant to today’s discussion.

Notice how you can use phrases like thanks for your input, but… or I don’t mean to be blunt, but… to make your language more indirect and polite.

So, for dealing with difficult questions, just remember the three d’s: delay, deflect, dismiss!

Thanks for watching!

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52 Phrases for Better Flowing English Presentations

/ Steven Hobson / Business English , English Presentations , Vocabulary

English Presentations - Impactful English

Do you give English presentations at work, but feel that you could communicate your message in a more objective, fluid way?

Maybe you have an English presentation coming up and want to make sure that your speech is clear and structured so that your audience doesn’t lose concentration and stays with you all the way to the end.

A technique that can help you achieve objective, clear, and structured English presentations, is to use linking phrases that join the separate parts of your presentation together.

English presentations normally consist of an introduction, the main body, individual parts of the main body, and the ending or conclusion.

To help maintain your audience’s attention, you need to signal when you are going from one part to another.

In this article, I teach you 52 phrases that do exactly this – linking the different parts together, and therefore, making your presentation flow better. You’ll find that these phrases will act as ‘signposts’ for the audience when you finish one part and start another.

business presentation in english example

52 Phrases to Improve the Flow of Your English Presentations

The introduction.

All good presentations start with a strong introduction.

There are a number of different ways you can begin your English presentation. Here’s a simple, but effective introduction structure which works for most types of business presentations:

Introduce – Introduce yourself and greet your audience. Introduce the presentation topic – Explain the reasons for listening. Outline – Describe the main parts of the presentation. Question policy – Make it clear to your audience when they can ask questions: during or at the end?

Here are some phrases which you can use to structure the introduction in this way:

1. Good morning/afternoon (everyone) (ladies and gentlemen). 2. It’s a pleasure to welcome (the President) here. 3. I’m … (the Director of …)

Introduce the presentation topic

4. By the end of the talk/presentation/session, you’ll know how to… / …you will have learned about… / 5. I plan to say a few words about… 6. I’m going to talk about… 7. The subject of my talk is…

8. My talk will be in (three parts). 9. In the first part… 10. Then in the second part… 11. Finally, I’ll go on to talk about…

Question Policy

12. Please interrupt if you have any questions. 13. After my talk, there will be time for a discussion and any questions.

Mini-course: fluency and confidence

 Main Body

Now that you have finished the introduction, we now need to transition to the main body, and its individual parts in a smooth way.

There are three parts of the main body of a presentation where linking phrases can be used:

Beginning the Main Body Ending Parts within the Main Body Beginning a New Part

Here are some phrases which you can use for these parts:

Beginning the Main Body

14. Now let’s move to / turn to the first part of my talk which is about… 15. So, first… 16. To begin with…

Ending Parts within the Main Body

17. That completes/concludes… 18. That’s all (I want to say for now) on… 19. Ok, I’ve explained how…

Beginning a New Part

20. Let’s move to (the next part which is)… 21. So now we come to the next point, which is… 22. Now I want to describe… 23. Let’s turn to the next issue… 24. I’d now like to change direction and talk about…

Listing and Sequencing

If you need to talk about goals, challenges, and strategies in your English presentation, listing phrases can help link these together and improve the flow of your speech. If you have to explain processes, sequencing phrases are helpful:

25. There are three things to consider. First… Second… Third… 26. There are two kinds of… The first is… The second is… 27. We can see four advantages and two disadvantages. First, advantages… 28. One is… Another is… A third advantage is… Finally…

29. There are (four) different stages to the process. 30. First / then / next / after that / then (x) / after x there’s y. 31. There are two steps involved. The first step is… The second step is… 32. There are four stages to the project. 33. At the beginning, later, then, finally… 34. I’ll describe the development of the idea. First the background, then the present situation, and then the prospect for the future.

After you have presented the main body of your English presentation, you will want to end it smoothly.

Here are typical sections transitioning from the main body to the ending of the presentation, and then inviting the audience to ask questions:

Ending the Main Body Beginning the Summary and/or Conclusion Concluding An Ending Phrase Inviting Questions and/or Introducing Discussion Thanking the Audience

Ending the Main Body

35. Okay, that ends (the third part of) my talk. 36. That’s all I want to say for now on (the 2017 results).

Beginning the Summary and/or Conclusion

37. To sum up… 38. Ok, in brief, there are several advantages and disadvantages. 39. To conclude… 40. I’d like to end by emphasizing the main points. 41. I’d like to end with a summary of the main points.

42. I think we have seen that we should… 43. In my opinion, we should… 44. I recommend/suggest that we… 45. There are three reasons why I recommend this. First, … / Second, … / Finally,…

An Ending Phrase

46. Well, I’ve covered the points that I needed to present today. 47. That sums up (my description of the new model). 48. That concludes my talk for today.

Inviting Questions and/or Introducing Discussion

49. Now we have (half an hour) for questions and discussion. 50. So, now I’d be very interested to hear your comments.

Thanking the Audience

51. I’d like to thank you for listening to my presentation. 52. Thank you for listening / your attention. / Many thanks for coming.

Linking phrases are like the skeleton which holds your presentation together.

Not only do they improve the flow and help guide the audience, but by memorizing them they can also help you remember the general structure of your presentation, giving you increased confidence.

To help you memorize, I recommend saying the linking phrases on their own from the beginning to the end of your presentation while you practice.

I also suggest memorizing the introduction word for word. By doing this, you will get off to a great start, which will settle your nerves and transmit a positive first impression.

business presentation in english example

Author: Steven Hobson

Steven is a business English coach, a certified life coach, writer, and entrepreneur. He helps international professionals build confidence and improve fluency speaking English in a business environment.

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How to Prepare a Presentation in English Successfully [+ FREE Presentation Checklist]

May 1, 2018 | Business Professional English , Free Resource , Public Speaking & Presentations

How to Prepare a Presentation in English without Stress

This lesson on how to prepare a presentation in English has been updated since its original posting in 2016 and a video has been added.

Giving a presentation is already difficult to do, even in your native language. But to give a presentation in English? Well, it can feel impossible, maybe even terrifying.

If you’re nervous, you might be worried about:

  • What if your audience doesn’t understand?
  • What if you use the wrong word or – worse – forget your words?
  • What if someone asks a question and you don’t understand?

These are all common questions about giving a presentation in English.  And the good news is: it is possible to give a presentation in English with confidence.

Whether you are presenting information about your company or presenting a proposal to a new client, presenting a new idea to your boss and colleagues or presenting to an audience at a conference, these are the strategies you need to best prepare for your next presentation in English.

These are exactly the same strategies native English speakers use to prepare for their presentations, too!

7 simple strategies to prepare a presentation in English.

Lesson by Annemarie

7 Strategies to Prepare a Presentation in English

Strategy 1: Plan, Plan, Plan

I know this sounds simple but this is maybe the most important step! That’s why I said it three times.

Before you do or write anything, spend some time thinking about what you want to say for this opportunity to present. You can use these two questions to help you:

  • Where is your audience now (before your presentation)? In other words: what do they currently know or not know? Is there something they are missing? Imagine your presentation is a map and Question 1 is your Point A.
  • Where do you want your audience to be after your presentation? What do you want your audience to know or do or think or believe after your presentation? On your presentation map, this is your Point B.

And now think of the steps you need to help your audience go from Point A to Point B.

Strategy 2: Know Your Who and Your What

Who is your audience?  You want to know the kind of people you will be speaking to so you can offer the right information, use the right language and think about the best visual aids.

For example: Imagine you design applications for smart phones. You’ve designed a great new application for children and you want to market/sell this application. As the designer you understand all the technical words and information about the application. And now you have the opportunity to present to a group of moms at a local school. It would be AMAZING if every mom in the audience bought your application.

How should you present to them? Do you want to use a lot of technical words? Will they understand them? Or should you use more common, everyday language that is clear and simple for everyone?

What is your purpose?  Generally, presentations are used to teach, to inform, to motivate. to persuade or to encourage action. When you understand the purpose of your presentation,  it will be easier for you to use the correct language and the correct style. It will also help you organize your presentation well.

“These are the seven strategies you need to prepare for a successful presentation in English, for any situation!”

Strategy 3: Get Organized

Presentations in English generally have 3 parts:

  • Opening (Introduction)
  • Body (Main Points and Details)
  • Closing (Summary)

In the next several weeks, you will learn exactly what you need for each section of your presentation. For now, it is important to think how you can organize your information into these 3 parts.

Important advice : Limit the number of main points in your presentation from 3 to 5 (no more than 5!). You want your audience to be well-informed but not overwhelmed.

Strategy 4: Show, Don’t Tell

In English, we love stories and pictures to help us remember information.

What about you? Have you ever listened to a presentation that has a LOT of numbers and statistics and data and dates? Do you remember any of that information now? Most people say no to that question.

In English, the expression “show, don’t tell” means  help your audience understand your main points through stories, visual aids and/or strong action words .

People remember stories, not numbers. When you can, use a story or a great visual aid to help your audience remember your key points.

For example: If you are presenting scientific information and you want to use a number to talk about how many cells are in the human body. According to an article by Smithsonian, there are 37.2 trillion cells in the human body!!! How many is that? I have no idea! Instead you could use a picture to help you. Imagine the largest sports stadium and every seat is filled. Show this picture and now tell people how many full stadiums you need for 37.2 trillion. With a picture, your audience can visualize this big number. And it will be easier to remember.

Strategy 5: Talk, Don’t Read

This one is so important. Please, please, please do not read your presentation.

For an audience, when someone reads a presentation it:

  • Shows you didn’t prepare well

Of course, you can use note cards to help you remember and to stay focused. But talk to your audience. Look at your audience. Move around. Be comfortable and natural.

The more you prepare, the more you practice, the easier this will be! And your audience will enjoy your presentation so much more!

Also, do not be afraid to go slow !

A good presentation does not mean speaking fast. Remember: this is the first time your audience is hearing this information. They need time to hear and to think about what you are saying. You will help them (and you!) if you speak slowly.

By speaking slowly, you will also have more time to think about what you want to say in your presentation, remember the key points and make fewer mistakes!

Strategy 6: Think Ahead

One of the scariest parts of a presentation in the Q&A ( = question and answer) part of the presentation. Most people fear they will not:

  • Understand the words of the question
  • Understand the accent of the person speaking
  • Know what to say
  • Remember the words they need

A Q&A session doesn’t always happen but if you have to do this, here is how you can calm your fears:

Review your presentation. Think about your audience (remember the  Who Are They  question!). Can you identify any likely questions?

Give your presentation to your peers, colleagues, friends, and family. Ask them what questions they have. It is possible they will have some of the same questions as your audience.

Now make a list of possible questions and prepare your answers ahead of time. Practice giving these answers when you practice your presentation.

The more prepared you are, the easier a Q&A session will be.

Strategy 7: Practice, Practice, Practice

I cannot say this enough. You must practice. Say your presentation out loud many times. Practice your presentation in front of your work colleagues, your friends, your family.

The more you practice, the more prepared and confident you will be.

And you can kiss some of those fears and nervous feelings goodbye !!* *[Idiom]  kiss something goodbye : to end or lose something. So, you can end your fears and end your nervous feelings!

Get the complete Presentations in English Series:

Part 1: How to Prepare for Your Presentation in English

Part 2: How to Start with a Great Introduction in Your Presentation

Part 3:  How to Organize Your Presentation in English

Part 4:  How to End Your Presentation Powerfully

Now that you’ve had time to review the lesson, I’d love to hear about your experience.

Have you had to prepare a presentation in English?

Please take a moment to share your advice on how to best prepare. What has helped you the most? You might have the perfect strategy for someone else in our Confident English Community.

You can share your advice and ideas in the comments section below. That is the best place to get feedback from me and learn from others.

Have a great week and thank you for joining me! ~ Annemarie

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guest

Thanks you for sharing your strategies to elaborate a presentation. I think this is very comprehensive and useful because it shows all the important steps to create a presentation. Very interesting.

Annemarie

I’m so glad to know it was helpful!

Pratibha Yadav

I am going to present my ppt for the college assignment and these are very wise advice which I’m sure they make my presentation more prepared.Tysm

Liliana Llanas

I love all your videos. Thanks for sharing!

Rizky Handy Wibowo

thank you for sharing about this. this is very helpful.

Jaywant Patil

Thank you so much for your great presentation tips which we will implement in our areas. I used to so much mistakes that I realized after watching your video… Thanks once again for your valuable guidance..

Regards, Jaywant Patil 9819282438

Daria

so far, I haven’t had any experience in creating a presentation. but I am sure that everything is ahead

Ludovic TCHIMOU

Hi, Very interesting your advices, sorry rigth now I haven’t give the presentation in english but I’m working to be confortable when I have to speak in english. You prononciation is very helpfull because I’m crying to repeat your video to improve my one. Very good video and so thank you

azhar uddin

I appreciate u for the seven strategies of presentation may his soul peace and rest

Priyantha

Thank you very much ,this is very useful for me

Rani Pandit

Hello Annemarie! You are doing a great job these seven strategies are very useful for us in a presentation I am one of the students who always nervous on the stage so I like the point of doing “practise and practise” is great of becoming a good presenter. Thank you so much.By sharing one thing that my pronouncing and my grammar is very bad so I also have to do so many practices to become a good in English. I am not from a good background my family is very poor so I am doing my best for my family.

Anne

I can relate to that.

Erin

Hi Annemarie,

Thank you so much for sharing your strategies. All the seven strategies look very important and helpful. I particularly strongly agree with the 7th one. Without practicing in advance, it seems for me to easily lose confidence while making a presentation. I might need to be more diligent to prepare all the things in advance.

Thanks again for your very useful lecture! Hope you have a great weekend.

You’re very welcome, Erin. I’m happy to know it was helpful to you! Best of luck as you continue to prepare for things in advance. 🙂

adalet

Thank you indeed.I am a syh person and I get excited easily.I should practise and record myself.

I LIKE YOUR PRONOUNCIATON

Thank you for your comment. I’m glad my lessons are useful to you. And I definitely recommend recording yourself. It’s a great way to make progress and overcomes fear.

Dzmitry

It’s very useful and done with the help of a clear and simple language, as usual. I’m agree with Tatyana, it’s real and nice presentation about “how to be ready to the presentation”. 🙂 I have a big expirience in the presentations but all of them were in my native language or with the help of an interpreter. To my mind this strategies are common for all the languages and the most important thing not to neglect them and not to be lazy to do all the steps you’ve spoken about. So I think in a few weeks I’m going …  Read more »

Great advice, Dzmitry! Thank you for sharing. And you’re right, these strategies are true no matter what language you’re presenting in and it’s essential not to neglect a single step. I love your advice on including a little joke to relieve the stress. 🙂

Leila

Dear Annemarie Actually I am university’s professor and I always use English texts for my teaching materials. Unfortunately I have no experience on giving presentation in English. I have been invited as an expert to give a talk in an academic conference in English and I don’t know can I do it perfectly or not? would you please give me some hints in this context. Ta

What an honor to be invited to speak as an expert! That’s great. Click here to find all my lessons on Giving Presentations in English . If you’re looking for more personalized assistance or one-on-one help, I provide that to students who purchase classes from me or join one of my courses .

Best wishes with your presentation!

Usama Altaf

Dear Annemarie I did a presentation in English in front of my class and my topic was “how to get confidence to speak in front of class?” I did gramatical mistakes but my respectful teacher helped me a lot. I m bery impress from you. You r doing very well.

khaled abo el magd

Dear Annemarie ..I did a presentation in English at course it talked about how to be happy .. I practiced my talking a lot but when I started I forgot a lot f notes cuz this is my first presentation and I wanted to make a creative end I chose to make audience dance about ‘macrena dance’ In the final of the presentation, I received positive feedback from audience and I felling I proud of my self

Wonderful, Khaled. And congratulations. Presentations are challenging but it sounds like you were well prepared. You deserve to feel proud of yourself.

Phyllis

Thank you so much Anne, iam grateful to this information. it is timely, I needed it. I give organization Presentations, but I must admit that iam still nervous.(stage freak) thank you I look forward to more guidance and skills stay blessed Phyllis

Hello Phyllis,

You’re very welcome. I’m happy to know this lesson was timely and useful for you. The key to overcoming stage fright and nerves is practice. 🙂

Sümeyye

Hi These are very usefull informations Annemarie thank you.In fact I have never give a presentation in English. It is so easy to understand your text and fortunately you use simple words for us.Buy the way i can apply your advices in my language too.I love your lessons and try to read all of them if i have time. See you😄👍

Dear Sümeyye,

Thank you so much for you kind comment! I’m thrilled to know these lessons are useful to you! And, if you do give a presentation in English in the future, don’t forget to use these lessons to help you prepare!

Can you tell me, what is your native language?

Thanks again Sümeyye! ~ Annemarie

Andras Gelley

Dear Annemarie, you shared the highlights of a good presentation, and it will be excellent to bear the ability to present it as a freely talk, without reading, or thinking about the next sentense, the next part of the topic or stucking in the next werb what doestn’t want arise in my mind . I would like to see the audience enjoing my talk because it is running fluently. I started to go on that way with your encourage. Thank you

Hello András,

Thank you so much for this comment. I’m thrilled to know this was useful to you. And yes, your improvements in English are growing every day!

Best, Annemarie

Tatyana

It’s very useful lesson for me! I don’t have a big experience in presentations, it’s quite scary for me especially the presentations in English! And it was very informative to read about main strategies which could help to prepare for presentations! It’s so clear and intresting, I have even a feeling of trying to do that, to practice a liitle)))) And thank you for new vocabulary, I love ” a killer presentation” and the idiom ” to kiss something goodbye”!) And in my opinion, your online lesson is also like a little presentation! I like how you focused on the …  Read more »

Dear Tatyana,

Thank you so much for your comment! And I am so glad it was useful even if you don’t have to give too many presentations. I think some of the guidance for a good presentation can also be useful for many other speaking situations in our daily life.

And I’m happy you liked the vocabulary expressions! They are great expressions to know!! 🙂

Thanks again for sharing your thoughts. ~ Annemarie

faiza

Thank you so much

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Starting a presentation in english: methods and examples.

  • By Jake Pool

business presentation in english example

If you’re going to make it in the professional world, most likely you’ll have to give a presentation in English at some point. No reason to get nervous!

Most of the work involved lies in the introduction. You may or may not need an English presentation PPT file, your topic, audience, or time limit may vary, but a strong opening is a must no matter what! Everything that follows can build from the opening outline you present to your audience.

Let’s look at some guidelines for starting a presentation in English. If you can master this part, you’ll never have to worry about the rest!

Opening in a Presentation in English

While it’s important to have your entire presentation organized and outlined, planning and organization are especially important in the introduction. This is what will guide you through a clear and concise beginning. Let’s look at how to start a presentation with well-organized thoughts .

Introduction Outline

  • Introduce yourself and welcome everyone.
  • State the purpose of your presentation
  • Give a short overview of the presentation

As we say, it’s as easy as 1-2-3. (No need for a more detailed English presentation script!) Let’s examine the first step.

1. Introduce Yourself & Welcome Everyone

The self-introduction is your opportunity to make a good first impression. Be sure to open with a warm welcome and use language that is familiar and natural. Based on your audience, there are a few different expressions you can use to start your presentation.

If you’re presenting to coworkers who may already know you:

  • Hello, [name] here. I would like to thank you all for your time. As you may know, I [describe what you do/your job title] I look forward to discussing [topic] today.
  • Good morning/afternoon/evening everyone. Thank you for being here. For those who don’t know me, my name is [name], and for those who know me, hello again.

If you’re presenting to people you’ve never met:

  • Hello everyone, it’s nice to meet you all. My name is [name] and I am the [job/title].
  • Hello. Welcome to [event]. My name is [name] and I am the [job/title]. I’m glad you’re all here.

There are certainly more ways to make an introduction. However, it’s generally best to follow this format:

  • Start with a polite welcome and state your name.
  • Follow with your job title and/or the reason you’re qualified to speak on the topic being discussed.

2. State the Purpose of Your Presentation

Now that your audience knows who you are and your qualifications, you can state the purpose of your presentation. This is where you clarify to your audience what you’ll be talking about.

So, ask yourself, “ What do I want my audience to get from this presentation? ”

  • Do you want your audience to be informed?
  • Do you need something from your audience?
  • Do you want them to purchase a product?
  • Do you want them to do something for the community or your company?

With your goal in mind, you can create the next couple of lines of your presentation. Below are some examples of how to start.

  • Let me share with you…
  • I’d like to introduce you to [product or service]
  • Today I want to discuss…
  • I want to breakdown for you [topic]
  • Let’s discuss…
  • Today I will present the results of my research on [topic]
  • By the end of this presentation, you’ll understand [topic]
  • My goal is to explain…
  • As you know, we’ll be talking about…

When talking about the purpose of your presentation, stick to your goals. You purpose statement should be only one to three sentences. That way, you can give your audience a clear sense of purpose that sets them up for the rest of the presentation.

3. A Short Overview of the Presentation

The final step in starting your presentation is to give a short outline of what you’ll be presenting. People like a map of what to expect from a presentation.

It helps them organize their thoughts and gives a sense of order. Also, it lets the audience know why they’re listening to you. This is what you’ll use to grab their attention, and help them stay focused throughout the presentation.

Here are some examples of how you can outline your presentation:

  • Today, I’m going to cover… Then we’ll talk about… Lastly, I’ll close on…
  • We’re going to be covering some key information you need to know, including…
  • My aim with this presentation is to get you to… To do that we’ll be talking about…
  • I’ve divided my presentation into [number] sections… [List the sections]
  • Over the next [length of your presentation] I’m going to discuss…

That’s it! It’s as simple as 1-2-3. If you have a fear of public speaking or are not confident about presenting to a group of people, follow these three steps. It’s a simple structure that can get you off to a good start. With that in mind, there are other ways to bring your introduction to the next level too! Read on for bonus tips on how to really engage your audience, beyond the basics.

For a Strong Presentation in English, Engage your Audience

Presentations aren’t everyone’s strongest ability, and that’s OK. If you’re newer to presenting in English, the steps above are the basics to getting started. Once you’re more comfortable with presenting, though, you can go a step further with some extra tricks that can really wow your audience.

Mastering the skill of engaging an audience will take experience. Fortunately, there are many famous speakers out there you can model for capturing attention. Also, there are some common techniques that English-speakers use to gain an audience’s attention.

*How and when you use these techniques in your introduction is at your discretion, as long as you cover the 3 steps of the introduction outline that we discussed earlier.*

Do or say something shocking.

The purpose of shocking your audience is to immediately engage them. You can make a loud noise and somehow relate the noise to your presentation. Or, you can say, “ Did you know that… ” and follow with a shocking story or statistic. Either way, the objective is to create surprise to draw their attention.

Tell a story

Telling a story related to your presentation is a great way to get the audience listening to you.

You can start by saying, “ On my way to [location] the other day… ” or “ On my way here, I was reminded of… ” and then follow with a story. A good story can make your presentation memorable.

Ask your audience to take part

Sometimes a good introduction that captures attention will involve asking for help from the audience. You can ask the audience to play a quick game or solve a puzzle that’s related to your presentation. Also, you could engage the audience with a group exercise. This is a great way to get people involved in your presentation.

There are many more ways to engage the audience, so get creative and see what you can think up! Here are some resources that will help you get started.

Also, if you want to get better at public speaking (and help your English speaking too!), a great organization to know about is the Toastmasters . The organization is dedicated to helping you be a better speaker, and there are many local groups in America. They offer free lessons and events to help you master your English speaking, and also offer additional help to paying members.

The Takeaway

A presentation in English? No problem, as long as your introduction sets you up for success . Admittedly, this can be easier said than done. Native speakers and non-native speakers alike sometimes struggle with getting a good start on their English presentation. But the advice above can help you get the confidence you need to lay a good foundation for your next speech !

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How to write an engaging and effective presentation script?

Explore expert tips and techniques to elevate your script, ensuring it resonates with your audience and enhances your message.

Bharti Jain

Delivering presentations

girl showing how to write presentation script to a colleague

In today's world, presentations are a crucial part of professional communication, whether for pitching a new idea, educating an audience, or persuading potential clients. However, the backbone of any successful presentation is its script. A well-crafted presentation script can captivate your audience and deliver your message effectively. In this blog, we’ll explore the intricacies of crafting such a presentation that not only delivers information but also engages your audience, drawing insights from the tools and strategies provided by Prezent.

What is a presentation script?

It is much more than a mere set of words to be read or spoken; it is a strategic narrative designed to communicate ideas effectively. It’s the roadmap of your presentation content, detailing every turn of your story, every fact you want to highlight, and every emotion you wish to evoke. A well-written script aligns with your visuals and delivery, creating a harmonious and impactful presentation.

Here’s an example of presentation script containing key points only:

business presentation in english example

What are the key elements of a compelling presentation script?

When we talk about crafting a presentation script that captivates and engages, it's essential to focus on the following elements.

1. Write a script with a clear objective

It's a common misconception that the sole purpose is just to relay whatever is on your mind. Every presentation has a specific goal, and it's crucial to identify this goal right from the start. Are you looking to inform, persuade, inspire, or motivate your audience?

For example, if your goal is to persuade your audience, you need an approach as if you're a lawyer making a closing argument. This means your script should be filled with strong, convincing evidence and delivered in a tone that's persuasive and compelling. On the other hand, if your aim is to inform, it should resemble a teacher's lesson plan: well-organized, clear, and educational. Here, the focus is on clarity and thoroughness.

2. Audience-centric approach

Tailoring your content to resonate with your audience's interests and level of understanding is crucial. It’s similar to a chef knowing his diners' preferences before crafting a menu.

For example, If your audience comprises young entrepreneurs, using startup success stories and Silicon Valley anecdotes can make your content more relatable and engaging.

Ignoring the audience’s background and interests is like serving a steak to a vegetarian – it just won’t connect. So you need to ensure that you get your audience to listen.

3. Need to write a strong narrative

A strong narrative structure in your script is essential – consider it the spine of your presentation. It should have a compelling introduction (like the opening scene of a gripping movie), an informative body (similar to the plot development of a novel), and a memorable conclusion (the final scene that leaves the audience thinking).

For instance, Steve Jobs’ iconic iPhone launch presentation in 2007 masterfully followed this structure in his presentation speech, captivating the audience from start to finish.

4. Emotional engagement

Creating an emotional connection with the audience can be achieved through storytelling , anecdotes, or humor.

Take, for instance, the iconic "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King Jr. His powerful storytelling and emotional appeal transformed statistical data about racial injustice into a palpable narrative that moved an entire nation.

Similarly, humor can play a significant role in keeping the audience engaged. Ellen DeGeneres' commencement speech at Tulane University in 2009 is a prime example. She skillfully blended humor with her personal life story, especially her struggles and achievements.

business presentation in english example

5. Simplicity and clarity

Conveying your ideas in a straightforward and understandable manner is vital. Think of it as the principle of KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid). Your presentation should be like clear, concise instructions, not a complex, hard-to-decipher manual. Avoid jargon and technical terms unless absolutely necessary.

Remember, Albert Einstein once said,

If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.

Your script should reflect clarity of thought and simplicity of expression.

How to write a presentation script that is effective?

Crafting an engaging presentation script is a multifaceted process that requires attention to detail, a deep understanding of your subject, and a keen sense of audience engagement. Here are some crucial strategies that you should know:

1. In-depth research

To lay a solid foundation for your presentation, start with comprehensive research. Dive deep into your topic to ensure every aspect of your script is well-informed and accurate. This doesn't mean just skimming through the top Google search results. Explore various sources, from scholarly articles to industry reports, to gather a rich array of information.

This depth of understanding not only boosts the credibility of your presentation but also prepares you to confidently handle any questions that might arise during or after your presentation.

2. Conversational tone

A key aspect of a good script is its tone. Aim for a conversational style – as if you're talking to a friend over coffee rather than memorising & lecturing in a formal setting. This approach makes your presentation more relatable and engaging. Avoid complex jargon and technical terms unless necessary, and instead, opt for simple language that flows smoothly. Think of it like storytelling with data.

Check this example to understand better:

Without conversational tone

“In today's discourse, we shall examine the multifaceted and intricate ramifications of digital transformation on global business paradigms."

With conversational tone

"Let's talk about how digital transformation is changing the way we do business around the world. It's pretty fascinating stuff!"

In the first sentence, the formal tone and complex language create a barrier, making the content feel distant and academic. The second sentence, conversational in nature, uses simple language and a friendly approach, inviting the audience into an engaging discussion.

3. Proper visual integration

Visuals are not just decorations; they are integral to reinforcing your message. While scripting, think about how each segment of your speech can be accompanied by relevant visual aids, whether it's a slide, an infographic, or a short video clip. For instance, when discussing a complex process, a diagram can make it easier for your audience to grasp. The key is to ensure that your visuals complement your words, adding clarity and keeping the audience visually engaged.

4. Interactive elements

Engaging your audience is crucial, and interactive elements can significantly boost this engagement. Incorporate rhetorical questions to provoke thought or invite audience participation at certain junctures. You might include a quick poll, a show of hands, or even a brief Q&A session. These elements transform your presentation from a monologue into a dialogue, making it a two-way interaction that keeps your audience actively involved.

5. Rehearse and practice your presentation

The final and perhaps most critical step for the presenter is to refine and rehearse the script several times . This is where you fine-tune your pacing, adjust your tone, and smooth out any rough edges. Rehearsing out loud, ideally in front of a mirror or a test audience, helps identify parts of the script that may need reworking. Pay attention to timing, pauses, and emphasis on key points. Remember, practice doesn’t just make perfect; it builds confidence, ensuring that when it's showtime, you deliver with poise and impact.

How to enhance the effectiveness of a powerpoint presentation through engaging designs?

The integration of engaging presentation designs in your presentation can significantly boost it's effectiveness. Thoughtfully chosen visuals and layout strategies not only grab attention but also make your message more impactful. Let’s delve into how to achieve this synergy:

1. Slide with complementary visuals

Utilize design elements like relevant images, charts, and infographics that reinforce your script’s message. For example, if you're discussing market growth, a well-designed graph can visually represent the data you're talking about, making complex information more accessible and engaging. The key is to choose visuals that directly support and enhance what you're saying.

business presentation in english example

2. Consistent theme

Maintaining a consistent design theme throughout your presentation helps in creating a visually cohesive experience and makes your brand image stronger. This includes consistent use of color schemes, fonts, and graphic styles that align with the tone and content of your presentation. A uniform theme not only looks professional but also helps in keeping the audience’s attention focused on your message.

3. Focus on readability

Ensure that any text on your visuals is clear and easy to comprehend. Overloading slides with text can overwhelm your audience. Instead, opt for key phrases or bullet points that complement your spoken words. The text should be large enough to be easily readable from a distance, and the color contrast should make it stand out against the background.

business presentation in english example

4. Balanced layout

Achieving a balance between visual elements and white space is crucial for a clean and effective slide design. A cluttered slide can distract and confuse your audience, while too much white space may lead to a lack of visual interest. Aim for a layout that emphasizes key elements, using white space to highlight important information without making the slide feel overcrowded.

business presentation in english example

Expert tips for great presentation speech

Delivering a strong presentation is more than just writing; it involves a nuanced blend of delivery techniques, audience interaction, and adaptability. Here are some expert tips presentation style:

1. Dynamic pacing

Varying the pace of your delivery keeps your audience engaged. For example, slow down during complex topics for better understanding, and speed up during familiar or lighter segments to maintain energy. This dynamic pacing ensures that important points are emphasized and the audience remains attentive throughout.

2. Feedback loop

Gathering feedback on your script and presentation style can offer invaluable insights. It’s like holding a mirror to your performance. Present it  to a small group or a trusted colleague and solicit a honest feedback from your audience. Pay attention to their responses and suggestions - they can help you identify areas for improvement that you might not have noticed on your own.

3. Body language and voice modulation

Being conscious of your non-verbal cues and voice modulation can dramatically enhance the effectiveness of your delivery. Your body language should complement the tone of your message.

For instance, use open gestures for welcoming or inclusive points, and firmer gestures for strong, decisive statements. Similarly, modulate your voice to match the content - a softer tone for sensitive topics, or a stronger, more assertive tone for key arguments. This congruence between your words and your delivery makes your presentation more convincing and engaging.

4. Stay adaptable

Adaptability is crucial in presentations. Sometimes, despite all the planning, the audience's reaction may not be what you expected, or technical issues may arise. Be prepared to improvise your approach on the fly.

For instance, if a particular part of your presentation isn't resonating as expected, be ready to shift gears, perhaps by moving to an interactive Q&A earlier than planned.

Staying adaptable ensures that you maintain control of the presentation, no matter the circumstances.

What are the benefits of a good presentation script?

It enhances your ability to connect with the audience. It serves as a guide, ensuring that you deliver your message in a clear, engaging, and relatable way. When you have a well-crafted script, it's easier to explain complex topics in a way that's easy for everyone to understand. This not only keeps your audience attentive but also makes your presentation more memorable.

Additionally, as the presenter, you get confidence boost. Knowing that you have a solid foundation for your presentation helps reduce anxiety and allows you to focus on delivery. As a result, your message doesn't just get heard; it resonates with the audience, leaving them informed, inspired, and often impressed by the clarity and effectiveness of your communication.

How can Prezent help with great presentation scripts?

Prezent, the communication productivity platform for enterprise teams, can significantly enhance the process of writing and delivering presentation scripts in various ways:

1. Efficiency in slide creation: Prezent's AI capabilities streamline slide creation. With a library of over 35,000 slides , presenters can quickly find and customize them, allowing more time to focus on writing a script with great content and delivery.

2. Consistency and brand alignment: Prezent ensures that all slides adhere to brand guidelines , maintaining a professional and cohesive look throughout the presentation. This consistency is crucial for the visual elements.

3. Enhanced storytelling through visuals: The AI-driven slide creation tools in Prezent suggest visual storytelling elements relevant to the script. This enhances audience engagement and understanding, particularly when complex points need to be conveyed.

4. Best practice examples and learning: Prezent offers a feature of best practice examples – a curated collection of exemplary presentations. These examples showcase industry norms and creative approaches, providing valuable insights into effective presentation styles and structures.

5. Personalized insights with fingerprints: The ' Fingerprints ' feature in helps understand your and your audience's strengths, preferences, and areas for growth. This leads to personalized insights, enhancing communication skills and ensuring that the presentation resonates with the audience. Create your Fingerprint today !.

6. Adaptability to content: Prezent adapts slide design based on the script's content, suggesting appropriate charts for analytical sections or illustrative visuals for narrative parts, ensuring the slides are in perfect harmony.

7. Feedback and improvement suggestions: With its advanced AI capabilities, Prezent can offer feedback and improvement suggestions on both the content and design of the presentation, based on communication and design best practices.

Overall, Prezent acts as a comprehensive tool for enhancing presentation scripts, ensuring that the visual components effectively support and elevate the spoken content, while also offering insights and suggestions for continuous improvement. To see Prezent in action you can sign up for our free trial or book a demo today!

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20 Great Examples of PowerPoint Presentation Design [+ Templates]

Carly Williams

Published: January 17, 2024

When it comes to PowerPoint presentation design, there's no shortage of avenues you can take.

PowerPoint presentation examples graphic with computer monitor, person holding a megaphone, and a plant to signify growth.

While all that choice — colors, formats, visuals, fonts — can feel liberating, it‘s important that you’re careful in your selection as not all design combinations add up to success.

→ Free Download: 10 PowerPoint Presentation Templates [Access Now]

In this blog post, I’m sharing some of my favorite PowerPoint tips and templates to help you nail your next presentation.

Table of Contents

What makes a good PowerPoint presentation?

Powerpoint design ideas, best powerpoint presentation slides, good examples of powerpoint presentation design.

In my opinion, a great PowerPoint presentation gets the point across succinctly while using a design that doesn't detract from it.

Here are some of the elements I like to keep in mind when I’m building my own.

1. Minimal Animations and Transitions

Believe it or not, animations and transitions can take away from your PowerPoint presentation. Why? Well, they distract from the content you worked so hard on.

A good PowerPoint presentation keeps the focus on your argument by keeping animations and transitions to a minimum. I suggest using them tastefully and sparingly to emphasize a point or bring attention to a certain part of an image.

2. Cohesive Color Palette

I like to refresh my memory on color theory when creating a new PowerPoint presentation.

A cohesive color palette uses complementary and analogous colors to draw the audience’s attention and help emphasize certain aspects at the right time.

business presentation in english example

10 Free PowerPoint Templates

Download ten free PowerPoint templates for a better presentation.

  • Creative templates.
  • Data-driven templates.
  • Professional templates.

You're all set!

Click this link to access this resource at any time.

Tell us a little about yourself below to gain access today:

It‘s impossible for me to tell you the specific design ideas you should go after in your next PowerPoint, because, well, I don’t know what the goal of your presentation is.

Luckily, new versions of PowerPoint actually suggest ideas for you based on the content you're presenting. This can help you keep up with the latest trends in presentation design .

PowerPoint is filled with interesting boilerplate designs you can start with. To find these suggestions, open PowerPoint and click the “Design” tab in your top navigation bar. Then, on the far right side, you'll see the following choices:

business presentation in english example

This simplistic presentation example employs several different colors and font weights, but instead of coming off as disconnected, the varied colors work with one another to create contrast and call out specific concepts.

What I like: The big, bold numbers help set the reader's expectations, as they clearly signify how far along the viewer is in the list of tips.

10. “Pixar's 22 Rules to Phenomenal Storytelling,” Gavin McMahon

This presentation by Gavin McMahon features color in all the right places. While each of the background images boasts a bright, spotlight-like design, all the characters are intentionally blacked out.

What I like: This helps keep the focus on the tips, while still incorporating visuals. Not to mention, it's still easy for me to identify each character without the details. (I found you on slide eight, Nemo.)

11. “Facebook Engagement and Activity Report,” We Are Social

Here's another great example of data visualization in the wild.

What I like: Rather than displaying numbers and statistics straight up, this presentation calls upon interesting, colorful graphs, and charts to present the information in a way that just makes sense.

12. “The GaryVee Content Model,” Gary Vaynerchuk

This wouldn‘t be a true Gary Vaynerchuk presentation if it wasn’t a little loud, am I right?

What I like: Aside from the fact that I love the eye-catching, bright yellow background, Vaynerchuk does a great job of incorporating screenshots on each slide to create a visual tutorial that coincides with the tips. He also does a great job including a visual table of contents that shows your progress as you go .

13. “20 Tweetable Quotes to Inspire Marketing & Design Creative Genius,” IMPACT Branding & Design

We‘ve all seen our fair share of quote-chronicling presentations but that isn’t to say they were all done well. Often the background images are poor quality, the text is too small, or there isn't enough contrast.

Well, this professional presentation from IMPACT Branding & Design suffers from none of said challenges.

What I like: The colorful filters over each background image create just enough contrast for the quotes to stand out.

14. “The Great State of Design,” Stacy Kvernmo

This presentation offers up a lot of information in a way that doesn't feel overwhelming.

What I like: The contrasting colors create visual interest and “pop,” and the comic images (slides 6 through 12) are used to make the information seem less buttoned-up and overwhelming.

15. “Clickbait: A Guide To Writing Un-Ignorable Headlines,” Ethos3

Not going to lie, it was the title that convinced me to click through to this presentation but the awesome design kept me there once I arrived.

What I like: This simple design adheres to a consistent color pattern and leverages bullet points and varied fonts to break up the text nicely.

16. “Digital Transformation in 50 Soundbites,” Julie Dodd

This design highlights a great alternative to the “text-over-image” display we've grown used to seeing.

What I like: By leveraging a split-screen approach to each presentation slide, Julie Dodd was able to serve up a clean, legible quote without sacrificing the power of a strong visual.

17. “Fix Your Really Bad PowerPoint,” Slide Comet

When you‘re creating a PowerPoint about how everyone’s PowerPoints stink, yours had better be terrific. The one above, based on the ebook by Seth Godin, keeps it simple without boring its audience.

What I like: Its clever combinations of fonts, together with consistent color across each slide, ensure you're neither overwhelmed nor unengaged.

18. “How Google Works,” Eric Schmidt

Simple, clever doodles tell the story of Google in a fun and creative way. This presentation reads almost like a storybook, making it easy to move from one slide to the next.

What I like: This uncluttered approach provides viewers with an easy-to-understand explanation of a complicated topic.

19. “What Really Differentiates the Best Content Marketers From The Rest,” Ross Simmonds

Let‘s be honest: These graphics are hard not to love. I especially appreciate the author’s cartoonified self-portrait that closes out the presentation. Well played, Ross Simmonds.

What I like: Rather than employing the same old stock photos, this unique design serves as a refreshing way to present information that's both valuable and fun.

20. “Be A Great Product Leader,” Adam Nash

This presentation by Adam Nash immediately draws attention by putting the company's logo first — a great move if your company is well known.

What I like: He uses popular images, such as ones of Megatron and Pinocchio, to drive his points home. In the same way, you can take advantage of popular images and media to keep your audience engaged.

PowerPoint Presentation Examples for the Best Slide Presentation

Mastering a PowerPoint presentation begins with the design itself.

Get inspired by my ideas above to create a presentation that engages your audience, builds upon your point, and helps you generate leads for your brand.

Editor's note: This post was originally published in March 2013 and has been updated for comprehensiveness. This article was written by a human, but our team uses AI in our editorial process. Check out our full disclosure to learn more about how we use AI.

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    5. Salesforce Business Presentation Example . This is a great example of an informational presentation, made by the Salesforce team to share their research on customer experience (CX) with prospects and existing customers. Salesforce Business Presentation Example - Source: Salesforce. The slide deck errs on the lengthier side with 58 slides ...

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    Go to the file where your outline is stored. To the right of the File name field, switch from All PowerPoint Presentations to All Files. Click on your outline file and then click Open. PowerPoint creates a new presentation, with each paragraph of your outline in the title field of a new slide.

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    Here are some phrases which you can use to structure the introduction in this way: Introduce. 1. Good morning/afternoon (everyone) (ladies and gentlemen). 2. It's a pleasure to welcome (the President) here. 3. I'm … (the Director of …) Introduce the presentation topic.

  14. How to Start a Presentation: 12 Ways to Keep Your Audience Hooked

    1 Make a provocative statement. "I want to discuss with you this afternoonwhy you're going to fail to have a great career." One surefire way to get your audience's attention is to make a provocative statement that creates interest and a keen desire to know more about what you have to say. The presentation above, for example, does just that by ...

  15. How to Prepare a Presentation in English Successfully

    7 Strategies to Prepare a Presentation in English. Strategy 1: Plan, Plan, Plan. I know this sounds simple but this is maybe the most important step! That's why I said it three times. Before you do or write anything, spend some time thinking about what you want to say for this opportunity to present.

  16. Updated for 2024

    Effective - successful in producing a desired or intended result. Springboard - springboard is also something that provides an opportunity to achieve something. Handout - a document given to students or reporters that contains information about a particular subject. Q&A - an abbreviation for 'question and answer'.

  17. 37 Useful phrases for presentations In English

    In this advanced business English lesson, you will learn at least 37 useful phrases for presentations in English. Improve your business English skills and fe...

  18. Starting a Presentation in English: Methods and Examples

    Start with a polite welcome and state your name. Follow with your job title and/or the reason you're qualified to speak on the topic being discussed. 2. State the Purpose of Your Presentation. Now that your audience knows who you are and your qualifications, you can state the purpose of your presentation.

  19. How to Start a Presentation [+ Examples]

    Best for: Presentations that require "selling" your product or company to the audience. Some examples include sales meetings and investor pitches. 7. "Future of Trade 2021" Image Source. This is the opening slide for a presentation on the fourth edition of the Dubai Multi Commodity Centre's flagship report, "The Future of Trade."

  20. 25 Great Presentation Examples Your Audience Will Love

    Presentation Example #1: Colorful Slides. Draw your audience in by including a lot of bright colorful slides within your presentation. This colorful presentation example was created to showcase how fun and playful Adidas's boring presentation deck could actually be. Image Source.

  21. How to write an engaging and effective presentation script?

    Crafting an engaging presentation script is a multifaceted process that requires attention to detail, a deep understanding of your subject, and a keen sense of audience engagement. Here are some crucial strategies that you should know: 1. In-depth research. To lay a solid foundation for your presentation, start with comprehensive research.

  22. 20 Great Examples of PowerPoint Presentation Design [+ Templates]

    Watch on. A good PowerPoint presentation keeps the focus on your argument by keeping animations and transitions to a minimum. I suggest using them tastefully and sparingly to emphasize a point or bring attention to a certain part of an image. 2. Cohesive Color Palette.

  23. 50 Powerful English Presentation Phrases to Impress Your Audience

    The Top 3 Picks for Preparing Your Business Presentation in English 1. Have a Plan. When preparing a business presentation, ever have a draft. Spend some time think about not only what you're going go say but select you're going go how it. This lives the point at which thee should observe other people giving presentations.

  24. How to Write a Project Proposal (Examples & Templates)

    Example #5: Simple Business Proposal Template. This simple business proposal template cuts across a wide range of use cases. You can use it to secure buy-in for a short or long-term project or business. It features key sections like introduction, services, customer reviews, setup process, delivery timeline and pricing.

  25. Welcome to Claude

    Visit claude.ai! Claude is a family of large language models developed by Anthropic and designed to revolutionize the way you interact with AI. Claude excels at a wide variety of tasks involving language, reasoning, analysis, coding, and more. Our models are highly capable, easy to use, and can be customized to suit your needs.

  26. OpenAI unveils newest AI model, GPT-4o

    OpenAI on Monday announced its latest artificial intelligence large language model that it says will make ChatGPT smarter and easier to use. The new model, called GPT-4o, is an update from the ...