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110+ Exceptional Education Research Topics Ideas

Letters that make up the words of education

Topics for education research usually comprise school research topics, research problems in education, qualitative research topics in education, and concept paper topics about education to mention a few.

If you’re looking for research titles about education,  you’re reading the right post! This article contains 110 of the best education research topics that will come in handy when you need to choose one for your research. From sample research topics in education, to research titles examples for high school students about education – we have it all.

Educational Research Topics

Research title examples for college students, quantitative research titles about education, topics related to education for thesis, research titles about school issues, ph.d. research titles in education, elementary education research topics, research title examples about online class, research titles about modular learning, examples of research questions in education, special education research titles.

The best research titles about education must be done through the detailed process of exploring previous works and improving personal knowledge.

Here are some good research topics in education to consider.

What Are Good Research Topics Related to Education?

  • The role of Covid-19 in reinvigorating online learning
  • The growth of cognitive abilities through leisure experiences
  • The merits of group study in education
  • Merits and demerits of traditional learning methods
  • The impact of homework on traditional and modern education
  • Student underdevelopment as a result of larger class volumes
  • Advantages of digital textbooks in learning
  • The struggle of older generations in computer education
  • The standards of learning  in the various academic levels
  • Bullying and its effects on educational and mental health
  • Exceptional education tutors: Is the need for higher pay justifiable?

The following examples of research titles about education for college students are ideal for a project that will take a long duration to complete. Here are some education topics for research that you can consider for your degree.

  • Modern classroom difficulties of students and teachers
  • Strategies to reform the learning difficulties within schools
  • The rising cost of tuition and its burden on middle-class parents
  • The concept of creativity among public schools and how it can be harnessed
  • Major difficulties experienced in academic staff training
  • Evaluating the learning cultures of college students
  • Use of scientific development techniques in student learning
  • Research of skill development in high school and college students
  • Modern grading methods in underdeveloped institutions
  • Dissertations and the difficulties surrounding their completion
  • Integration of new gender categories in personalized learning

These research topics about education require a direct quantitative analysis and study of major ideas and arguments. They often contain general statistics and figures to back up regular research. Some of such research topics in education include:

  • The relationship between poor education and increased academic fees
  • Creating a social link between homeschool and traditional schoolgoers
  • The relationship between teacher satisfaction and student performance
  • The divide between public and private school performance
  • The merits of parental involvement in students’ cognitive growth.
  • A study on child welfare and its impact on educational development
  • The relationship between academic performance and economic growth
  • Urbanization in rural areas and its contribution to institutional growth
  • The relationship between students and professors in dissertation writing
  • The link between debt accumulation and student loans
  • Boarding schools and regular schools: The role these two school types play in cognitive development

Educational-related topics used for a thesis normally require a wide aspect of study and enough educational materials.  Here are some education research topics you can use for write my thesis .

  • The difficulties of bilingual education in private universities
  • Homework and its impact on learning processes in college education
  • Dissertation topic selection: Key aspects and research obligations
  • Social media research topics and their educational functions
  • A detailed educational review of student learning via virtual reality techniques
  • Ethnicities in universities and their participation in group activities
  • The modern approach to self-studying for college students
  • Developing time management skills in modern education
  • Guidelines for teacher development in advanced educational institutions
  • The need for religious education in boarding schools
  • A measure of cognitive development using digital learning methods

A research title about school issues focuses on activities surrounding the school environment and its effects on students, teachers, parents, and education in general. Below are some sample research titles in education, relating to school issues.

  • Learning English in bilingual schools
  • A study of teachers’ role as parent figures on school grounds
  • Addressing the increased use of illegal substances and their effects in schools
  • The benefits of after-class activities for foreign students
  • Assessing student and teacher relationships
  • A study of the best methods to implement safety rules in school
  • Major obstacles in meeting school schedules using boarding students as a case study
  • The need for counseling in public and private schools: Which is greater?
  • Academic volunteering in understaffed public schools
  • Modern techniques for curbing school violence among college students
  • The advantages and disadvantages of teacher unions in schools

As you create your proposed list of research topics in education, consider scientific journals for referencing purposes. Here are some Ph.D. research titles for education.

  • The modern methods of academic research writing
  • The role of colleges in advanced mental care
  • The merits and demerits of Ph.D. studies in Europe and Africa
  • Interpersonal relationships between students and professors in advanced institutions
  • A review of community colleges: merits and demerits
  • Assessing racism in academic ethnic minorities
  • The psychological changes of students in higher education
  • The questionable standards of student loan provisions
  • The merits of personalized teaching techniques in colleges
  • The wage gap between private and public university teachers
  • Teacher responsibilities in private universities versus public universities

The research topics in elementary education in 2023 are very different from the elementary education research topics from five or ten years ago. This creates interesting grounds for different research titles for elementary education.

Here are some elementary education title research ideas.

  • Assessing quick computer literacy among elementary school pupils.
  • The role of video games in childhood brain development
  • Male vs female role models in early education periods
  • The advantages of digital textbooks in elementary schools
  • The impact of modern curriculums on elementary education
  • Lack of proper school grooming is a cause of violence.
  • Should elementary school children be taught about LGBTQ?
  • A review of the need for sexual education in elementary schools
  • The effects of emotional dependence in early childhood learners.
  • The need for constant technology supervision of elementary school students
  • Advantages of computer-guided education in elementary schools

Here are some research title examples for students taking online classes.

  • The academic difficulties experienced by online students.
  • A study of decreased attention in online classes
  • The upsides and downsides of online education
  • The rising fees of online and traditional education in universities
  • A detailed study on the necessity of college internships
  • The need to provide college scholarships based on environmental achievements
  • How online education terminates university fraternities and sororities.
  • The role of academic supervisors in career selection
  • Why interactive assignments improved learning capabilities during the pandemic
  • Merits of education in online learning environments
  • Why online lessons are the least effective for some college students

The modular learning approach focuses primarily on learning outcomes. Here are some examples of research titles about modular learning.

  • Modular learning and the role of teachers in its execution
  • Teaching techniques of religious institutions
  • Potential risks of accelerated learning
  • Modular learning on students’ future performances
  • The general overview of modular learning amongst students
  • The modern Advantages and disadvantages of inclusive classes
  • Observing student developments in modular learning
  • Music therapy for fostering modular learning techniques
  • The creation of a personalized curriculum for students.
  • Applications of modular learning both in home-schooling?
  • The benefits of modular learning towards creating a more holistic educational system

These research title examples about education answer important questions and they can also be argumentative essay topics .

Here are some titles of research about education questions.

  • What impacts do learning approaches provide for students?
  • How can schools manage their increasing gender differences?
  • What fosters the provision of learning needs?
  • What are the best educational recruitment methods?
  • How can cognitive development improve education?
  • How can you assess the moral growth of institutions?
  • What are the primary causes of educational differences in geographical locations?
  • How can institutions address increasing mental health needs?
  • Why is early intervention essential in students with mental health setbacks?
  • What are the characteristics of mental health deterioration among students?
  • What techniques are acceptable in regulating the violence of students in institutions

Some of the research title examples about education include:

  • How do schools create more personalized learning methods?
  • Evaluating mental health setbacks during education
  • The impact of modern technology on special education
  • The cognitive improvements via specialized learning in dyslexic children
  • The psychological link between dyslexia and bullying in high school
  • Impact of social isolation in special education classes
  • The difficulties in providing specialized learning environments
  • A study of orphan students with disabilities and their aptitudes for learning
  • How special classes improve the self-esteem of disabled students.
  • How to use modern teaching techniques in unique learning environments.
  • A study of the application of digital games to autistic learning

Final words about education research topics

We have provided some reliable examples of a research topic about education you can use for write my thesis . You can use these research titles in education to cultivate your ideas, create inspiration, or for online research. Remember always to select a topic that you’re naturally passionate about and do diligent research, and reach out to our professional writing services if you need any help.

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Research Topics & Ideas: Education

170+ Research Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

Topic Kickstarter: Research topics in education

If you’re just starting out exploring education-related topics for your dissertation, thesis or research project, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’ll help kickstart your research topic ideation process by providing a hearty list of research topics and ideas , including examples from actual dissertations and theses..

PS – This is just the start…

We know it’s exciting to run through a list of research topics, but please keep in mind that this list is just a starting point . To develop a suitable education-related research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , and a viable plan of action to fill that gap.

If this sounds foreign to you, check out our free research topic webinar that explores how to find and refine a high-quality research topic, from scratch. Alternatively, if you’d like hands-on help, consider our 1-on-1 coaching service .

Overview: Education Research Topics

  • How to find a research topic (video)
  • List of 50+ education-related research topics/ideas
  • List of 120+ level-specific research topics 
  • Examples of actual dissertation topics in education
  • Tips to fast-track your topic ideation (video)
  • Free Webinar : Topic Ideation 101
  • Where to get extra help

Education-Related Research Topics & Ideas

Below you’ll find a list of education-related research topics and idea kickstarters. These are fairly broad and flexible to various contexts, so keep in mind that you will need to refine them a little. Nevertheless, they should inspire some ideas for your project.

  • The impact of school funding on student achievement
  • The effects of social and emotional learning on student well-being
  • The effects of parental involvement on student behaviour
  • The impact of teacher training on student learning
  • The impact of classroom design on student learning
  • The impact of poverty on education
  • The use of student data to inform instruction
  • The role of parental involvement in education
  • The effects of mindfulness practices in the classroom
  • The use of technology in the classroom
  • The role of critical thinking in education
  • The use of formative and summative assessments in the classroom
  • The use of differentiated instruction in the classroom
  • The use of gamification in education
  • The effects of teacher burnout on student learning
  • The impact of school leadership on student achievement
  • The effects of teacher diversity on student outcomes
  • The role of teacher collaboration in improving student outcomes
  • The implementation of blended and online learning
  • The effects of teacher accountability on student achievement
  • The effects of standardized testing on student learning
  • The effects of classroom management on student behaviour
  • The effects of school culture on student achievement
  • The use of student-centred learning in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on student outcomes
  • The achievement gap in minority and low-income students
  • The use of culturally responsive teaching in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher professional development on student learning
  • The use of project-based learning in the classroom
  • The effects of teacher expectations on student achievement
  • The use of adaptive learning technology in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher turnover on student learning
  • The effects of teacher recruitment and retention on student learning
  • The impact of early childhood education on later academic success
  • The impact of parental involvement on student engagement
  • The use of positive reinforcement in education
  • The impact of school climate on student engagement
  • The role of STEM education in preparing students for the workforce
  • The effects of school choice on student achievement
  • The use of technology in the form of online tutoring

Level-Specific Research Topics

Looking for research topics for a specific level of education? We’ve got you covered. Below you can find research topic ideas for primary, secondary and tertiary-level education contexts. Click the relevant level to view the respective list.

Research Topics: Pick An Education Level

Primary education.

  • Investigating the effects of peer tutoring on academic achievement in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of mindfulness practices in primary school classrooms
  • Examining the effects of different teaching strategies on primary school students’ problem-solving skills
  • The use of storytelling as a teaching strategy in primary school literacy instruction
  • The role of cultural diversity in promoting tolerance and understanding in primary schools
  • The impact of character education programs on moral development in primary school students
  • Investigating the use of technology in enhancing primary school mathematics education
  • The impact of inclusive curriculum on promoting equity and diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of outdoor education programs on environmental awareness in primary school students
  • The influence of school climate on student motivation and engagement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of early literacy interventions on reading comprehension in primary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student achievement in primary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of inclusive education for students with special needs in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of teacher-student feedback on academic motivation in primary schools
  • The role of technology in developing digital literacy skills in primary school students
  • Effective strategies for fostering a growth mindset in primary school students
  • Investigating the role of parental support in reducing academic stress in primary school children
  • The role of arts education in fostering creativity and self-expression in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of early childhood education programs on primary school readiness
  • Examining the effects of homework on primary school students’ academic performance
  • The role of formative assessment in improving learning outcomes in primary school classrooms
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on academic outcomes in primary school
  • Investigating the effects of classroom environment on student behavior and learning outcomes in primary schools
  • Investigating the role of creativity and imagination in primary school curriculum
  • The impact of nutrition and healthy eating programs on academic performance in primary schools
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on primary school students’ well-being and academic performance
  • The role of parental involvement in academic achievement of primary school children
  • Examining the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior in primary school
  • The role of school leadership in creating a positive school climate Exploring the benefits of bilingual education in primary schools
  • The effectiveness of project-based learning in developing critical thinking skills in primary school students
  • The role of inquiry-based learning in fostering curiosity and critical thinking in primary school students
  • The effects of class size on student engagement and achievement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of recess and physical activity breaks on attention and learning in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of outdoor play in developing gross motor skills in primary school children
  • The effects of educational field trips on knowledge retention in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of inclusive classroom practices on students’ attitudes towards diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of parental involvement in homework on primary school students’ academic achievement
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different assessment methods in primary school classrooms
  • The influence of physical activity and exercise on cognitive development in primary school children
  • Exploring the benefits of cooperative learning in promoting social skills in primary school students

Secondary Education

  • Investigating the effects of school discipline policies on student behavior and academic success in secondary education
  • The role of social media in enhancing communication and collaboration among secondary school students
  • The impact of school leadership on teacher effectiveness and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of technology integration on teaching and learning in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of interdisciplinary instruction in promoting critical thinking skills in secondary schools
  • The impact of arts education on creativity and self-expression in secondary school students
  • The effectiveness of flipped classrooms in promoting student learning in secondary education
  • The role of career guidance programs in preparing secondary school students for future employment
  • Investigating the effects of student-centered learning approaches on student autonomy and academic success in secondary schools
  • The impact of socio-economic factors on educational attainment in secondary education
  • Investigating the impact of project-based learning on student engagement and academic achievement in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of multicultural education on cultural understanding and tolerance in secondary schools
  • The influence of standardized testing on teaching practices and student learning in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior and academic engagement in secondary education
  • The influence of teacher professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of extracurricular activities in promoting holistic development and well-roundedness in secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models on student engagement and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of physical education in promoting physical health and well-being among secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of gender on academic achievement and career aspirations in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of multicultural literature in promoting cultural awareness and empathy among secondary school students
  • The impact of school counseling services on student mental health and well-being in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of vocational education and training in preparing secondary school students for the workforce
  • The role of digital literacy in preparing secondary school students for the digital age
  • The influence of parental involvement on academic success and well-being of secondary school students
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on secondary school students’ well-being and academic success
  • The role of character education in fostering ethical and responsible behavior in secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of digital citizenship education on responsible and ethical technology use among secondary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of educational technology in promoting personalized learning experiences in secondary schools
  • The impact of inclusive education on the social and academic outcomes of students with disabilities in secondary schools
  • The influence of parental support on academic motivation and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of school climate in promoting positive behavior and well-being among secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of peer mentoring programs on academic achievement and social-emotional development in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of teacher-student relationships on student motivation and achievement in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning programs in promoting civic engagement among secondary school students
  • The impact of educational policies on educational equity and access in secondary education
  • Examining the effects of homework on academic achievement and student well-being in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of different assessment methods on student performance in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of single-sex education on academic performance and gender stereotypes in secondary schools
  • The role of mentoring programs in supporting the transition from secondary to post-secondary education

Tertiary Education

  • The role of student support services in promoting academic success and well-being in higher education
  • The impact of internationalization initiatives on students’ intercultural competence and global perspectives in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of active learning classrooms and learning spaces on student engagement and learning outcomes in tertiary education
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning experiences in fostering civic engagement and social responsibility in higher education
  • The influence of learning communities and collaborative learning environments on student academic and social integration in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of undergraduate research experiences in fostering critical thinking and scientific inquiry skills
  • Investigating the effects of academic advising and mentoring on student retention and degree completion in higher education
  • The role of student engagement and involvement in co-curricular activities on holistic student development in higher education
  • The impact of multicultural education on fostering cultural competence and diversity appreciation in higher education
  • The role of internships and work-integrated learning experiences in enhancing students’ employability and career outcomes
  • Examining the effects of assessment and feedback practices on student learning and academic achievement in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty-student relationships on student success and well-being in tertiary education
  • The impact of college transition programs on students’ academic and social adjustment to higher education
  • The impact of online learning platforms on student learning outcomes in higher education
  • The impact of financial aid and scholarships on access and persistence in higher education
  • The influence of student leadership and involvement in extracurricular activities on personal development and campus engagement
  • Exploring the benefits of competency-based education in developing job-specific skills in tertiary students
  • Examining the effects of flipped classroom models on student learning and retention in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of online collaboration and virtual team projects in developing teamwork skills in tertiary students
  • Investigating the effects of diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus climate and student experiences in tertiary education
  • The influence of study abroad programs on intercultural competence and global perspectives of college students
  • Investigating the effects of peer mentoring and tutoring programs on student retention and academic performance in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effectiveness of active learning strategies in promoting student engagement and achievement in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models and hybrid courses on student learning and satisfaction in higher education
  • The role of digital literacy and information literacy skills in supporting student success in the digital age
  • Investigating the effects of experiential learning opportunities on career readiness and employability of college students
  • The impact of e-portfolios on student reflection, self-assessment, and showcasing of learning in higher education
  • The role of technology in enhancing collaborative learning experiences in tertiary classrooms
  • The impact of research opportunities on undergraduate student engagement and pursuit of advanced degrees
  • Examining the effects of competency-based assessment on measuring student learning and achievement in tertiary education
  • Examining the effects of interdisciplinary programs and courses on critical thinking and problem-solving skills in college students
  • The role of inclusive education and accessibility in promoting equitable learning experiences for diverse student populations
  • The role of career counseling and guidance in supporting students’ career decision-making in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty diversity and representation on student success and inclusive learning environments in higher education

Research topic idea mega list

Education-Related Dissertations & Theses

While the ideas we’ve presented above are a decent starting point for finding a research topic in education, they are fairly generic and non-specific. So, it helps to look at actual dissertations and theses in the education space to see how this all comes together in practice.

Below, we’ve included a selection of education-related research projects to help refine your thinking. These are actual dissertations and theses, written as part of Master’s and PhD-level programs, so they can provide some useful insight as to what a research topic looks like in practice.

  • From Rural to Urban: Education Conditions of Migrant Children in China (Wang, 2019)
  • Energy Renovation While Learning English: A Guidebook for Elementary ESL Teachers (Yang, 2019)
  • A Reanalyses of Intercorrelational Matrices of Visual and Verbal Learners’ Abilities, Cognitive Styles, and Learning Preferences (Fox, 2020)
  • A study of the elementary math program utilized by a mid-Missouri school district (Barabas, 2020)
  • Instructor formative assessment practices in virtual learning environments : a posthumanist sociomaterial perspective (Burcks, 2019)
  • Higher education students services: a qualitative study of two mid-size universities’ direct exchange programs (Kinde, 2020)
  • Exploring editorial leadership : a qualitative study of scholastic journalism advisers teaching leadership in Missouri secondary schools (Lewis, 2020)
  • Selling the virtual university: a multimodal discourse analysis of marketing for online learning (Ludwig, 2020)
  • Advocacy and accountability in school counselling: assessing the use of data as related to professional self-efficacy (Matthews, 2020)
  • The use of an application screening assessment as a predictor of teaching retention at a midwestern, K-12, public school district (Scarbrough, 2020)
  • Core values driving sustained elite performance cultures (Beiner, 2020)
  • Educative features of upper elementary Eureka math curriculum (Dwiggins, 2020)
  • How female principals nurture adult learning opportunities in successful high schools with challenging student demographics (Woodward, 2020)
  • The disproportionality of Black Males in Special Education: A Case Study Analysis of Educator Perceptions in a Southeastern Urban High School (McCrae, 2021)

As you can see, these research topics are a lot more focused than the generic topic ideas we presented earlier. So, in order for you to develop a high-quality research topic, you’ll need to get specific and laser-focused on a specific context with specific variables of interest.  In the video below, we explore some other important things you’ll need to consider when crafting your research topic.

Get 1-On-1 Help

If you’re still unsure about how to find a quality research topic within education, check out our Research Topic Kickstarter service, which is the perfect starting point for developing a unique, well-justified research topic.

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

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62 Comments

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Musarrat Parveen

Special education

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Research title related to school of students

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Research title related to students

My field is research measurement and evaluation. Need dissertation topics in the field

Ngirumuvugizi Jaccques

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Anangnerisia@gmail.com

You can find our list of nursing-related research topic ideas here: https://gradcoach.com/research-topics-nursing/

FOSU DORIS

Write on action research topic, using guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

Samson ochuodho

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Rhod Tuyan

Thank you for the information.. I would like to request a topic based on school major in social studies

Mercedes Bunsie

parental involvement and students academic performance

Abshir Mustafe Cali

Science education topics?

alina

plz tell me if you got some good topics, im here for finding research topic for masters degree

Karen Joy Andrade

How about School management and supervision pls.?

JOHANNES SERAME MONYATSI

Hi i am an Deputy Principal in a primary school. My wish is to srudy foe Master’s degree in Education.Please advice me on which topic can be relevant for me. Thanks.

NKWAIN Chia Charles

Every topic proposed above on primary education is a starting point for me. I appreciate immensely the team that has sat down to make a detail of these selected topics just for beginners like us. Be blessed.

Nkwain Chia Charles

Kindly help me with the research questions on the topic” Effects of workplace conflict on the employees’ job performance”. The effects can be applicable in every institution,enterprise or organisation.

Kelvin Kells Grant

Greetings, I am a student majoring in Sociology and minoring in Public Administration. I’m considering any recommended research topic in the field of Sociology.

Sulemana Alhassan

I’m a student pursuing Mphil in Basic education and I’m considering any recommended research proposal topic in my field of study

Kupoluyi Regina

Kindly help me with a research topic in educational psychology. Ph.D level. Thank you.

Project-based learning is a teaching/learning type,if well applied in a classroom setting will yield serious positive impact. What can a teacher do to implement this in a disadvantaged zone like “North West Region of Cameroon ( hinterland) where war has brought about prolonged and untold sufferings on the indegins?

Damaris Nzoka

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration PhD level

Sadaf

I am also looking for such type of title

Afriyie Saviour

I am a student of undergraduate, doing research on how to use guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

wysax

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William AU Mill

Can i request your suggestion topic for my Thesis about Teachers as an OFW. thanx you

ChRISTINE

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education,PhD level

Aza Hans

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education

George

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l would like to request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

Ernest Gyabaah

I would to inquire on research topics on Educational psychology, Masters degree

Aron kirui

I am PhD student, I am searching my Research topic, It should be innovative,my area of interest is online education,use of technology in education

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request suggestion on topic in masters in medical education .

D.Newlands PhD.

Look at British Library as they keep a copy of all PhDs in the UK Core.ac.uk to access Open University and 6 other university e-archives, pdf downloads mostly available, all free.

Monica

May I also ask for a topic based on mathematics education for college teaching, please?

Aman

Please I am a masters student of the department of Teacher Education, Faculty of Education Please I am in need of proposed project topics to help with my final year thesis

Ellyjoy

Am a PhD student in Educational Foundations would like a sociological topic. Thank

muhammad sani

please i need a proposed thesis project regardging computer science

also916

Greetings and Regards I am a doctoral student in the field of philosophy of education. I am looking for a new topic for my thesis. Because of my work in the elementary school, I am looking for a topic that is from the field of elementary education and is related to the philosophy of education.

shantel orox

Masters student in the field of curriculum, any ideas of a research topic on low achiever students

Rey

In the field of curriculum any ideas of a research topic on deconalization in contextualization of digital teaching and learning through in higher education

Omada Victoria Enyojo

Amazing guidelines

JAMES MALUKI MUTIA

I am a graduate with two masters. 1) Master of arts in religious studies and 2) Master in education in foundations of education. I intend to do a Ph.D. on my second master’s, however, I need to bring both masters together through my Ph.D. research. can I do something like, ” The contribution of Philosophy of education for a quality religion education in Kenya”? kindly, assist and be free to suggest a similar topic that will bring together the two masters. thanks in advance

betiel

Hi, I am an Early childhood trainer as well as a researcher, I need more support on this topic: The impact of early childhood education on later academic success.

TURIKUMWE JEAN BOSCO

I’m a student in upper level secondary school and I need your support in this research topics: “Impact of incorporating project -based learning in teaching English language skills in secondary schools”.

Fitsum Ayele

Although research activities and topics should stem from reflection on one’s practice, I found this site valuable as it effectively addressed many issues we have been experiencing as practitioners.

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How can education systems improve? A systematic literature review

  • Published: 07 April 2022
  • Volume 24 , pages 479–499, ( 2023 )

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research question on education system

  • Ignacio Barrenechea   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-4673-3862 1 ,
  • Jason Beech 2 &
  • Axel Rivas 1  

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Understanding what contributes to improving a system will help us tackle the problems in education systems that usually fail disproportionately in providing quality education for all, especially for the most disadvantage sectors of the population. This paper presents the results of a qualitative systematic literature review aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of what education research can say about the factors that promote education systems’ improvement. This literature is emerging as a topic of empirical research that merges comparative education and school effectiveness studies as standardized assessments make it possible to compare results across systems and time. To examine and synthesize the papers included in this review we followed a thematic analysis approach. We identify, analyze, and report patterns in the papers included in this systematic review. From the coding process, four drivers for system improvement emerged: (1) system-wide approaches; (2) human capital; (3) governance and macro–micro level bridges; and (4) availability of resources.

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research question on education system

Background, Aims, and Theories of the Comparative Large-Scale Studies in Education

research question on education system

Background, Aims and Theories of the Comparative Large-Scale Studies in Education

research question on education system

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Barrenechea, I., Beech, J. & Rivas, A. How can education systems improve? A systematic literature review. J Educ Change 24 , 479–499 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-022-09453-7

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DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-022-09453-7

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Transforming education systems: Why, what, and how

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Rebecca winthrop and rebecca winthrop director - center for universal education , senior fellow - global economy and development @rebeccawinthrop the hon. minister david sengeh the hon. minister david sengeh minister of education and chief innovation officer - government of sierra leone, chief innovation officer - directorate of science, technology and innovation in sierra leone @dsengeh.

June 23, 2022

Today, the topic of education system transformation is front of mind for many leaders. Ministers of education around the world are seeking to build back better as they emerge from COVID-19-school closures to a new normal of living with a pandemic. The U.N. secretary general is convening the Transforming Education Summit (TES) at this year’s general assembly meeting (United Nations, n.d.). Students around the world continue to demand transformation on climate and not finding voice to do this through their schools are regularly leaving class to test out their civic action skills.      

It is with this moment in mind that we have developed this shared vision of education system transformation. Collectively we offer insights on transformation from the perspective of a global think tank and a national government: the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at Brookings brings years of global research on education change and transformation, and the Ministry of Education of Sierra Leone brings on-the-ground lessons from designing and implementing system-wide educational rebuilding.   

This brief is for any education leader or stakeholder who is interested in charting a transformation journey in their country or education jurisdiction such as a state or district. It is also for civil society organizations, funders, researchers, and anyone interested in the topic of national development through education. In it, we answer the following three questions and argue for a participatory approach to transformation:  

  • Why is education system transformation urgent now? We argue that the world is at an inflection point. Climate change, the changing nature of work, increasing conflict and authoritarianism together with the urgency of COVID recovery has made the transformation agenda more critical than ever. 
  • What is education system transformation? We argue that education system transformation must entail a fresh review of the goals of your system – are they meeting the moment that we are in, are they tackling inequality and building resilience for a changing world, are they fully context aware, are they owned broadly across society – and then fundamentally positioning all components of your education system to coherently contribute to this shared purpose.  
  • How can education system transformation advance in your country or jurisdiction? We argue that three steps are crucial: Purpose (developing a broadly shared vision and purpose), Pedagogy (redesigning the pedagogical core), and Position (positioning and aligning all components of the system to support the pedagogical core and purpose). Deep engagement of educators, families, communities, students, ministry staff, and partners is essential across each of these “3 P” steps.    

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Our aim is not to provide “the answer” — we are also on a journey and continually learning about what it takes to transform systems — but to help others interested in pursuing system transformation benefit from our collective reflections to date. The goal is to complement and put in perspective — not replace — detailed guidance from other actors on education sector on system strengthening, reform, and redesign. In essence, we want to broaden the conversation and debate.

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No. 1: Kids are right. School is boring.

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Out-of-school learning is often more meaningful than anything that happens in a classroom, writes Kevin Bushweller, the Executive Editor of EdWeek Market Brief. His essay tackling the relevance gap is accompanied by a Q&A with advice on nurturing, rather than stifling students’ natural curiosity. Read more.

No. 2: Teachers have trust issues. And it’s no wonder why.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Many teachers may have lost faith in the system, says Andrew Ujifusa, but they haven’t lost hope. The Assistant Editor unpacks this year’s outbreak of teacher activism. And read an account from a disaffected educator on how he built a coalition of his own. Read more.

No. 3: Special education is broken.

Conceptual Illustration of a special education puzzle with missing pieces

Forty years since students with disabilities were legally guaranteed a public school education, many still don’t receive the education they deserve, writes Associate Editor Christina A. Samuels. Delve into her argument and hear from a disability civil rights pioneer on how to create an equitable path for students. Read more.

No. 4: Schools are embracing bilingualism, but only for some students.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Staff Writer Corey Mitchell explains the inclusion problem at the heart of bilingual education. His essay includes a perspective from a researcher on dismantling elite bilingualism. Read more.

No. 5: A world without annual testing may be closer than you think.

BRIC ARCHIVE

There’s agreement that we have a dysfunctional standardized-testing system in the United States, Associate Editor Stephen Sawchuk writes. But killing it would come with some serious tradeoffs. Sawchuk’s musing on the alternatives to annual tests is accompanied by an argument for more rigorous classroom assignments by a teacher-practice expert. Read more.

No. 6: There are lessons to be learned from the educational experiences of black students in military families.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Drawing on his personal experience growing up in an Air Force family, Staff Writer Daarel Burnette II highlights emerging research on military-connected students. Learn more about his findings and hear from two researchers on what a new ESSA mandate means for these students. Read more.

No. 7: School segregation is not an intractable American problem.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Racial and economic segregation remains deeply entrenched in American schools. Staff Writer Denisa R. Superville considers the six steps one district is taking to change that. Her analysis is accompanied by an essay from the president of the American Educational Research Association on what is perpetuating education inequality. Read more.

No. 8: Consent doesn’t just belong in sex ed. class. It needs to start a lot earlier.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Assistant Editor Sarah D. Sparks looked at the research on teaching consent and found schools and families do way too little, way too late. Her report is partnered with a researcher’s practical guide to developmentally appropriate consent education. Read more.

No. 9: Education has an innovation problem.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Are education leaders spending too much time chasing the latest tech trends to maintain what they have? Staff Writer Benjamin Herold explores the innovation trap. Two technologists offer three tips for putting maintenance front and center in school management. Read more.

No. 10: There are two powerful forces changing college admissions.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Some colleges are rewriting the admissions script for potential students. Senior Contributing Writer Catherine Gewertz surveys this changing college admissions landscape. Her insights are accompanied by one teacher’s advice for navigating underserved students through the college application process. Read more.

Wait, there’s more.

Want to know what educators really think about innovation? A new Education Week Research Center survey delves into what’s behind the common buzzword for teachers, principals, and district leaders. Take a look at the survey results.

A version of this article appeared in the January 09, 2019 edition of Education Week as What’s on the Horizon for 2019?

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research question on education system

Home Surveys Academic Research

Educational Research: What It Is + How to Do It

Educational research is collecting and systematically analyzing information on education methods to explain them better. Learn more.

Education is a pillar in modern society, it provides the tools to develop critical thinking, decision making, and social abilities. Education helps individuals to secure the necessary research skills to secure jobs or to be entrepreneurs in new technologies. This is where educational research takes an important place in the overall improvement of the education system (pedagogy, learning programs, investigation, etc.).

Educational research is the spectrum that involves multiple fields of knowledge that scope the different research problems of the learning system and provides a variety of perspectives to solve the issues and improve in general. Educators need ways to filter through the noise of information to find the best practices to better their jobs and deliver better students. This is why educational research that attaches to the scientific method and creates better ideas and new knowledge is essential. The classroom response system allowed students to answer multiple-choice questions and engage in real-time discussions instantly.

What is educational research?

Educational research is collecting and systematically analyzing information on education methods to explain them better. It should be viewed as a critical, reflexive, and professional activity that adopts rigorous methods to gather data, analyze it, and solve educational challenges to help advance knowledge.

Educational research typically begins with identifying a problem or an academic issue. From there, it involves the research of all the data, the information must be analyzed to interpret it. This process ends with a report where results are presented in an understandable form of speech, which can be used by both the researcher and the educational community.

Why is educational research important?

The primary purpose of educational research is to improve the knowledge it exists towards the pedagogy and educational system as a whole. Improving the learning practices and developing new ways of teaching can be achieved more efficiently when the information is shared by the entire community rather than guarded by one institution. Simply put, we can tell that the main three reasons to conduct educational research are:

  • To explore issues . Undertaking research leads to finding answers to specific questions that can help students, teachers, and administrators. Why is student experience design important in new university models? What is the impact of education on new generations? Why is the importance of language while redacting a survey for a Ph.D.?
  • To shape policy . This type of educational research is conducted to collect information to make sustained judgments that can be informed to societies or institutions to improve the governance of education.
  • To improve the quality . Trying to do something better than what is done now is a common reason for educational research to be done. What if we can improve the quality of education by adopting new processes; what if we can achieve the same outcomes with fewer resources? This is quite common in the educational system, but to adapt, institutions must have a base ground of information, which can be obtained by conducting educational research.

Educational Research Methods

Educational research methods are the tools used to carry out research to prove or not the hypothesis of the study.

     An interview is a qualitative research technique that allows the researcher to gather data from the subject using open-ended questions. The most important aspect of an interview is how it is made, typically, it would be a one-on-one conversation that focuses on the substance of what is asked.

Focus Group

Focus groups are also one of the best example of qualitative data in education or approach to gathering information. The main difference from an interview is that the group is composed of 6 – 10 people purposely selected to understand the perception of a social group. Rather than trying to understand a more significant population in the form of statistics, the focus group is directed by a moderator to keep the group in topic conversation. Hence, all the participants contribute to the research.

Observation

Observation is a method of data collection that incorporates the researcher into the natural setting where the participants or the phenomenon is happening. This enables the researcher to see what is happening in real time, eliminating some bias that interviews or focus groups can have by having the moderator intervene with the subjects.

A survey is a research method used to collect data from a determined population to gain information on a subject of interest. The nature of the survey allows gathering the information at any given time and typically takes no time, depending on the research. Another benefit of a survey is its quantitative approach, which makes it easier to present it comprehensively.

How to do educational research

Like any other type of research, educational research involves steps that must be followed to make the information gathered from it valuable and usable. 

  • Identifying the problem. The first step in the process is to identify the problem or formulate a research question. 
  • Formulating objectives and hypotheses. Research objectives are the goal intended for the research to take place, they must be explicit at the beginning of the research and related to the problem. The hypothesis is a statement of the research in the form of a question, it helps the researcher to decide which research method is going to be used as well as the data that needs to be collected.
  • Deciding the method of research. There are plenty of research methods, but deciding which one is the best for each case depends on the researcher’s objectives and hypothesis planted in the previous step.
  • Collecting the data. The research method determines how the data is going to be collected. Whether it’s going to be an interview, focus group, or survey depends on the research method.
  • Analyzing and interpreting the data. Arranging and organizing the data collected and making the necessary calculations. A correct translation/interpretation of the data is primordial for everyone to understand, not only the researcher.
  • Writing a report. After the analysis and interpretation of data, the researcher will form a conclusion, a result of his research which can be shared with everyone. This will be done through a report, or a thesis, which includes all the information related to the research. It will include a detailed summary of all his work and findings during the research process.

Educational research is crucial for the improvement of the education system, the improvement of the teaching/learning process relies on the information that’s available in the field. Statements without research evidence are nothing but opinions, the gathering and distribution of information are fundamental in order to improve what we have as an educational system, as it provides explanations to the big questions and provides a bigger picture for future generations. 

As stated before, educational research is crucial for improving the education system. In QuestionPro we believe in providing the best tools to academic researchers to keep creating valuable knowledge.

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  • Developing a Research Question

When you need to develop a research question, you want to ask yourself: what do you want to know about a topic? Additionally, you'll want to determine:

  • WHO you are researching,
  • WHAT you are researching,
  • WHEN your research topic takes place,
  • WHERE your research topic takes place, and
  • WHY you are researching this topic.

Try these steps to formulate a research question:

1. Start with your topic (Online learning in K-12) 2. Focus your topic (Ask who, what, where, when, why?) 3. Formulate a question to ask about your topic (How might online learning be implemented in middle school?) 4. Narrow your question if possible (Has VLACS been successful with middle schoolers in New Hampshire?)

Check out these links and the video below for more information:

  • How to Write a Research Question
  • Writing a Good Research Question

Have Questions? Browse all our FAQs  or ask a librarian by chat or email at  [email protected] !

  • << Previous: What is a Research Question?
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Research Questions About Education 2018

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@TeacherToolkit

What questions are the Department for Education currently researching about education in our schools?

This document is part of a broader engagement between the department and the research community and sets out areas where the DfE is interested in more research and new evidence.

The purpose of this Areas of Research Interest ( ARI ) is to raise awareness amongst the external research community of the main DfE research priorities. I've re-posted some of the questions highlighted in this document . It is important to look at this document for the full set

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7 thoughts on “ Research Questions About Education 2018 ”

A great read, and I agree with the questions you’ve added to your list. I think my question would be: ‘Are there any immediate adjustments that can be made to teacher terms, conditions, workload or progression that would signal sufficient benefits to retain teachers on the edge of leaving?’ And (sub question: ‘How do these compare in cost/impact terms to the provision of substantial tax-free bursaries to attract new teachers, or plans to introduce sabbaticals?’

That’s a great question Jo. Sabbatical is one answer, but at system level, nothing will change without significant funding and a teacher pay rise.

How can teachers improve instruction for ESL learners in mainstream classes using personalised learning(differentiation)

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  • The Research Process
  • Narrow a Topic

Develop a Research Question

  • Identify Search Terms
  • Access Resources
  • Evaluate Information Resources
  • Organize and Cite

illustration of question in mind

After choosing a topic and foundational searching, add focus with a research question.

  • Who am I researching?  (Age group, gender, profession, ethnicity, organization, etc.)
  • What am I researching? (Trend, event, social problem cause and effect, etc.)
  • When is/was the time period? (Specified year or range, significant event, historical vs. current, etc.)
  • Where is my topic taking place? (Geographical location, a particular environment, etc.)
  • Why does my topic matter? (What makes the topic important to you, your peers, your community, etc.)
  • How will I approach my topic? (A historical look, philosophical approach, certain point of view, etc.)
  • What aspect of the general topic will you explore?
  • Is the question clear and focused?
  • Is it complex to warrant researching it?
  • If you are making an argument, what will you say?
  • Why does your argument matter?
  • How will other researchers challenge your argument?
  • What kind of sources will you need to support your argument?

Sample Research Questions

Attributes to consider when developing your research question:

  • Unclear: Why are social networking sites harmful?
  • Clear: How are online users experiencing or addressing privacy issues on social networking sites like Facebook and SnapChat?
  • Unfocused: What is the effect of global warming on environment?
  • Focused: How is glacial melting affecting penguins in Antarctica?

Simple vs. Complex

  • Too simple: How are doctors addressing diabetes in the U.S.?
  • Appropriately complex: What are common traits of those suffering from diabetes in America and how can these commonalities be used to aid the medical community in the prevention of the disease?

Adapted from: George Mason University Writing Center. (2008) How to write a research question. Retrieved from http://writingcenter.gmu/?p=307.

More Examples:

Research Topic: Social determinants of health in the United States

Research Question 1: Does mental health care providers' perception of patients' social status influence the quality of mental health care service?

  • How do you assess social status?
  • How will the quality of mental health care be measured?
  • Which group of patients and which types of mental health care providers?

Research Question 2: What is the relationship between the mental health profile of female high school students in Raleigh, North Carolina and their level of physical activity?

  • When there isn't demographic data on your specific social group, you may have to extrapolate to a larger sample or collect the data yourself.

Research Question 3: How do social determinants of health in the United States, such as poverty (assessed based on income), affect the likelihood and severity of clinical depression in men and women over 50 years of age?

  • Thesis Statement: Social determinants of health in the United States have a moderate effect on the likelihood and severity of clinical depression in men and women over 50 years of age.
  • << Previous: Narrow a Topic
  • Next: Identify Search Terms >>
  • Last Updated: Jan 9, 2024 4:50 PM
  • URL: https://tcsedsystem.libguides.com/research_process

research question on education system

From crisis to choice: A modern history of education reform in America

A review of ‘the parent revolution’ by corey deangelis.

research question on education system

Editor’s Note: Corey DeAngelis, Ph.D., will be giving a speech and signing books at a Mackinac Center event on Tuesday, May 21.  

Most authors choose to dedicate their book to their spouse, their kids or at least their agent. But Corey DeAngelis dedicates his book, “ The Parent Revolution: Rescuing Your Kids from the Radicals Ruining Our Schools ,” to American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten and government teachers unions more broadly. DeAngelis, “public enemy #1 of the teachers unions,” writes of them:  “You’re doing more to advance freedom in education than anyone could have ever imagined. Thank you for overplaying your hand, showing your true colors, and sparking the Parent Revolution. ”

 The book mentions some distant history as well as some longstanding problems in the public educational system. But most of it focuses on the COVID-19 pandemic, the response from unions and their allies (in schools and legislatures), and the resulting backlash from parents.  

 The COVID-19 pandemic and officials’ responses to it were disasters for kids. Studies show dramatic drops in learning across the board, but especially for low-income students. Taxpayers got ripped off too. Spending on public schools skyrocketed, with little evidence it helped mitigate the spread of the virus or helped students recover academically.  

 The pandemic, however, may be the best thing that has ever happened to public education in America, according to DeAngelis. Why? Because it blew open the Overton Window for education policy and led to a dramatic increase in school choice. 

 Test scores plummeted in public schools during the pandemic, and schools have incurred many other problems. Private schools, however, have not been afflicted to nearly the same degree. Being responsive to parents, they were far more likely to weigh the risks and trade-offs of closing classrooms during the pandemic. They stayed open as much as possible.   

Why were public schools less responsive to parents? Many schools, DeAngelis argues, were not beholden to the students in the system, to their parents, or to taxpayers. Their chief concern rather was for the adults who run things — teachers unions and their elected political allies at the state and local level.  

 The evidence is immense, and DeAngelis does a good job showing his work. As his fans might say, “He has the receipts.” Among the worst:   

The Chicago Teachers Union leaders vacationed in Puerto Rico while fighting to keep the district closed. (This came after they tweeted that “the push to reopen schools is rooted in sexism, racism and misogyny.”)

AFT President Weingarten oversaw local unions that repeatedly fought to keep schools closed, but during congressional testimony in 2023, she claimed, “We spent every day … trying to get schools open.” (The reality was that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention often took its lead from the union in urging schools to stay shut to in-person learning).  

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolfe not only ordered all public and private schools to close during the pandemic, but he also closed online charter schools that served 37,000 students. Why? To “protect public schools from competition,” DeAngelis says.   

Districts and regions with stronger teachers unions stayed closed longer than those elsewhere. But even more politically conservative states got run over by unions and their allies. Arizona, North Carolina and Virginia shut their doors for education while, ironically, being open for day-care services.  

“Parent Revolution” gives a bit of a history lesson on education, but its emphasis is on the era from the start of the pandemic until now. Advocates for school choice had secured small wins over the decades, but the pandemic and the years since then greatly increased educational options.  

States’ and schools’ responses to the pandemic highlighted the extreme positions of teachers unions, state and federal bureaucrats and many school administrators. Parents saw firsthand how the public school system is often run in the interest of adults, rather than kids. This realization united a groundswell of opposition, in conservative and liberal areas alike. Major policy changes resulted, at both the local and state policy level.  

Three years after the start of the pandemic, in 2023, school choice programs in 20 states expanded. Fourteen states now have nearly universal school choice programs. In these states, nearly all parents can get financial support, such as a voucher or tax credit, to pick from a variety of private and public school options.  

 DeAngelis thinks the opposition to school choice is confusing and hypocritical. Opponents of choice make a great fuss about allowing students to take a voucher or a tax credit and spend it at any school option they want. DeAngelis points out that this has been allowed, without controversy, in many other parallel situations: Pell grants and the GI Bill; Head Start and state-funded pre-K programs; food stamps and housing subsidies; and a host of other public programs. In all of these, the government picks up the tab but allows the beneficiary to spend the money with private entities.  

 So, what drives the opposition to school choice for K-12 education? The same thing, DeAngelis supposes, that drove the opposition to schools re-opening: the system has long been built to benefit adults rather than kids. These adults are backed by public sector unions, who fund the campaigns of those officials who then pass the rules. The unions’ efforts often result in higher pay, more benefits, and contracts favorable to themselves, not taxpayers or children.

DeAngelis grew up attending public schools, as I did. Like me, he had a parent who worked in public schools. Like me, he had a mixed experience. And also like me, he came to learn that the United States runs its education system in a nonsensical fashion. So we both favor reforms to that system. He writes, “I came to the conclusion that in America, nowhere was the problem of monopoly power more pronounced — and more harmful to our society — than the nation’s government-run school system.”  

My wife and I received a public school education, from kindergarten through to high school graduation. Our school-age children are in local public schools. My father and mother, sister and brother all work or worked in the public school system. Still, I agree with DeAngelis and support school choice. Families and individual children are very different from each other, and they need a variety of options that fit their needs. The pandemic showed the full extent of the problem. Competition and choice will prevent it from happening again.  

Permission to reprint this blog post in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that the author (or authors) and the Mackinac Center for Public Policy are properly cited.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Education in America

Krista Kafer

Select a Section 1 /0

  • How many students are enrolled in public and private schools in the United States?
  • How do U.S. students fare on national assessments?
  • What percentage of students graduate from high school and college?
  • How much do Americans spend on education?
  • On average, how well are teachers paid?
  • What is the average class size?
  • What access do students have to computers and the Internet at school?
  • How do American schools compare with schools in other countries?
  • How much choice do parents have over their children’s schooling?

1. How many students are enrolled in public and private schools in the United States?

According to U.S. Department of Education estimates, there are 47.6 million students in public schools and 5.9 million in private schools. [1] As many as 2 million children are home-schooled. [2]

As of the 2000-2001 school year, there were 93,273 public elementary and secondary schools and as of 1999-2000 there were 27,223 private elementary and secondary schools. [3] As of January 2004, there were 2,996 charter schools. [4]

2. How do U.S. students fare on national assessments? According to the most recent NAEP assessments, only 31 percent of 4th graders are proficient in reading, while 32 percent are proficient in mathematics, 29 percent in science, and 18 percent in American history. Low-income students did half as well. In fact, over half of poor fourth graders failed to show even a basic level of knowledge in reading, science, or history. [5]

NAEP Graph

For state-level NAEP achievement data, see NAEP's "State Profiles" page .

3. What percentage of students graduate from high school and college?

Seventy percent of public school students graduate on time, and less than half of these students are qualified to attend four-year colleges or universities. Roughly half of black and Hispanic students graduate on time. [6] Twenty-six percent of Americans have a bachelor’s or higher degree. [7] Women earn more associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees and almost half of professional and doctorate degrees. [8]

4. How much do Americans spend on education?

Over the past 30 years, average per-pupil expenditures for public, elementary, and secondary schools have nearly doubled, rising from $ 3,931 in 1971-1972 to $ 7,524 in 2001-2002, in constant dollars. [9] Expenditures vary by state, with the District of Columbia spending the most at $12,046 and Utah the least at $4,674 per student. [10]

Total federal, state, and local spending for education, both public and private, climbed to $745 billion for the 2001-2002 school year. Sixty-one percent, or $454 billion, was spent on K-12 education. [11] Local funding accounts for approximately 44 percent of pending, state 49 percent, and federal 7 percent. [12]

The average private school tuition, according to a 2003 Cato Institute study, is $4,689. The average private elementary school tuition is less than $3,500, and the average secondary school tuition is $6,052. [13]

Percentage Change in Two Education Indexes, 1970 through 2000

Federal Funding

In 2002, taxpayers spent an estimated $108 billion on education at the federal level, of which about 43 percent went through the Department of Education. The Departments of Health and Human Services, Agriculture, Labor, Defense, and Interior also spent large amounts of money. [14]

Fifty-three billion dollars went to elementary and secondary school programs. Just under half of this amount was spent on programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (No Child Left Behind Act) and on special and vocational education. [15]

Total Federal K-12 Spending 1965 Through 2002

Higher Education

Over half of full-time undergraduates attending four-year colleges and universities receive federal loans or grants. While participation in federal higher education programs was higher among the poor, a quarter of undergraduates from families with incomes over $100,000 received financial aid. Discretionary programs alone cost taxpayers $22.6 billion in 2003. [16]

Tuition and fees at public and private four-year institutions have risen 38 percent in the past ten years. In the past 22 years, the cost of a public four-year college education has increased by 202 percent. The average tuition at a public four-year institution is over $4,000, and the average private college or university tuition is $18,000. [17]

All public post-secondary two-year institutions, 81 percent of public four-year institutions, and 63 percent of private four-year institutions offer remedial courses in reading, writing, or mathematics. [18]

Trends in Student Aid

Trends in Student Aid

Source: The College Board, “ Trends in Student Aid ,” updated Oct. 27, 2003.

Used with permission.

5. On average, how well are teachers paid?

The average salary for public elementary and secondary school teachers is $44,367. Salaries in the 100 largest cities range from $25,409 to $84,310 . [19]

Generally, teachers earn more on an hourly basis than other educated professionals, including accountants, computer programmers, engineers, and architects. [20]

6. What is the average class size?

According to the most recent Department of Education statistics, the pupil-teacher ratio at public schools is 15.9 to one. The average class size is 21.1 for public elementary schools and 23.6 for public secondary schools. [21]

7. What access do students have to computers and the Internet at school?

As of 2002, 99 percent of public schools have access to the Internet. The ratio of students to computers with Internet access in public schools is approximately 4.8 to one. [22]

8. How do American schools compare with schools in other countries?

Despite higher than average per-pupil expenditures, American 8th graders ranked 19th out of 38 countries on the most recent international mathematics comparison, the Third International Mathematics and Science Study-Repeat (TIMSS-R) of 1999. American students scored 18th out of 38 countries in science. [23] In combined scores of mathematics and science literacy, 12th-graders in the United States ranked 18th out of 21 countries on the 1995 TIMSS assessment. [24]

On the most recent Program for International Student Assessment combined reading literacy scale tests, American 15-year olds scored near the average. Of the 27 countries that participated, Canadian, Finish, and New Zealand students had the highest scores. [25]

International Educational Spending and Math Achievement

9. How much choice do parents have over their children’s schooling?

Parental choice measures have passed in almost every state. [26]

In six states—Colorado, Florida, Maine, Ohio, Vermont, and Wisconsin—and the District of Columbia, students may use publicly funded scholarships to attend a private school of choice.

Six states offer tax credits or deductions for education expenses or contributions to scholarship programs.

Forty-one states and the District of Columbia have enacted charter school laws.

Fifteen states guarantee public school choice within or between districts. (Other states have choice programs that are optional for districts, target only specific populations, and/or require that parents pay tuition.).

Thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia have privately funded scholarship organizations that provide tuition assistance to more than 60,000 students.

In all 50 states, home schooling is legal. As many as 2 million students are home-schooled nationwide.

Twenty-one states have comprehensive dual-enrollment programs that enable high school students to attend college classes for high school and postsecondary credit at minimal or no expense to the student.

School Choice and Charter School Programs

Looking for more statistics? Visit the National Center for Education Statistics .

Krista Kafer is Senior Policy Analyst for Education at the Heritage Foundation.

[1] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics , 2002 , (NCES 2003-060), June 23, 2003 (cited hereafter as Digest 2002 ).

[2] Dr. Brian Ray, Worldwide Guide to Homeschoolin g and Stats on the Benefits of Home School 2002-2003 , Broadman & Holman Publishers, April 2002, p.7.

[3] Digest 2002 .

[4] See the Center for Education Reform, Charter Schools .

[5] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics .

[6] Jay P. Greene, Ph.D. and Greg Forster, Ph.D., &ldquo; Public High School Graduation and College Readiness Rates in the United States ,&rdquo; Manhattan Institute Education Working Paper No. 3, September 2003.

[7] U.S. Census Bureau, &ldquo; The Big Payoff: Educational Attainment and Synthetic Estimates of Work-Life Earnings ,&rdquo; July 2002 .

[8] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2003). Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2002 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2001-02 (NCES 2004-154), October 16, 2003 .

[9] Digest 2002 .

[10] See National Assessment of Educational Progress state profiles .  

[11] Digest 2002 .

[12] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education 2002 ,  (NCES 2002025), May 31, 2002 (cited hereafter as Condition 2002 ).

[13] David F. Salisbury, &ldquo; What Does a Voucher Buy? A Closer Look at the Cost of Private Schools ,&rdquo; Cato Institute Policy Analysis No. 486, August 28, 2003 .

[14] Digest 2002 .

[16] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics Fast Facts  and U.S. Department of Education, "Education Department Budget History Table: FY 1980-Present," updated February 5, 2004, at www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/history/edhistory.pdf .

[17] House Education & the Workforce Committee Fact Sheet: The Skyrocketing Cost of Higher Education , October 10, 2003 .

[18] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Condition of Education 2000 , p. 76 .

[19] F. Howard Nelson and Rachel Drown, Survey and Analysis of Teacher Salary Trends 2002 , American Federal of Teachers, Washington, D.C., 2003 .

[20] Michael Podgursky, &ldquo; Fringe Benefits ,&rdquo; Education Next , Summer 2003.

[21] Digest 2002 .

[22] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms : 1994-2002 (NCES 2004-011), October 2003, p. 3, 7.

[23] Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study home page (April 7, 2004).

[24] See TIMMS Mathematics and Science Literacy, February 1998, at  http://timss.bc.edu/timss1995i/TIMSSPDF/C_Hilite.pdf , (April 27, 2004) .

[25] U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Outcomes of Learning: Results from the 2000 Program for International Student Assessment [PISA] of 15-Year-Olds in Reading, Mathematics, and Science Literacy  (NCES 2002&ndash;115), November 2001 .

[26] Krista Kafer, School Choice 2003 , (Washington, DC: The Heritage Foundation, 2003) .

Former Senior Education Policy Analyst

Effective education policy includes returning authority to the states and empowering parents with the opportunity to choose a safe and effective education for their children.  

View the Curricula Resource Initiative : A collection of education resources for schools and families.  

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View the   Education Freedom Report Card : State Rankings for Parents

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Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal For Summer Research Internship

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal or IISER-B for short is a government science research and education institute of national importance, established in 2008 in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh (India). It offers a “Summer Research Internship” program to students interested in basic sciences, engineering sciences and economic sciences to promote research among students in the country. This article discusses this opportunity based on the details of the Summer Research Internship for the year 2024 at the institute.

Eligibility

Students who have completed or are currently studying in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th years of B.Sc/B.Tech/B.E or 1st year of M.Sc/M. Tech or an equivalent program are encouraged to apply at the time of application.

Application

The internship notification document is made available on the IISER-B website when the applications are invited for the year. Download the document once available. All the up-to-date details that the applicant should know before applying are given in this document. The link for the application portal is given in this document. Open the link when it is active as given in the document. (For example, for the year 2024, it was active from March 20 to April 21, 2024)

Follow the following steps for application –

  • Open the application portal when available.
  • Create an applicant-id using an email address (if not created already).
  • Login to your ID using your credentials.
  • Open the application form and (a) Enter the required details like name, mobile, academic performance, correspondence address, etc., (b) Upload a Passport photograph, (c) Enter a statement of Purpose (d) Upload a CV.
  • Finally, you need to select 3 projects that you are interested in working on in priority order and then submit the application. (The list of projects along with corresponding department, faculty, internship duration and project description is available while selecting.)

Before the final date, the applicant can edit and resubmit the application using the same ID.

Candidates are selected based on –

  • Academic Performance.
  • Write-up submitted with the application.

A list of selected candidates is made available on the website sometime after the application portal stops accepting applications. Selected candidates would be informed via registered email too.

Internship and Certificate

The selected candidates would participate in research carried out by the faculty at IISER Bhopal through research/reading projects under their supervision. Project duration is generally from 4 to 8 weeks, but the exact duration may vary (and available while selecting the project in the application as described in the application section).

The certificate will be provided by the concerned faculty once it is concluded that the intern has completed the assigned work successfully.

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