Rare and Distinctive Collections – University of Colorado Boulder

University of Colorado Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors Program student theses collection

  • Printable PDF Generating
  • Collection Overview
  • Finding Aid View
  • Container List
  • View Digital Material
  • Theses item list for CU Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors Program student theses collection

Scope and Contents

The collection spans 53 years and includes 5,694 theses in 135 boxes. The list is order first in reverse chronological order of semester, and then in alphabetical order of last name within each semester. This means that box 1 contains the honors theses from 2012 whose author’s last names begin with an A, B or C. Each entry includes the full title of the thesis, the subject, the author’s name, and the semester.

  • Creation: 1959 - 2012

Conditions Governing Access

Collection is open for research.

Copyright Statement

The University Libraries do not own the copyright to this collection. Researchers are responsible for contacting the copyright holder(s) for this material and obtaining permission to publish or broadcast. The University Libraries will not grant permission to publish or broadcast this material and are not responsible for copyright violations resulting from such use.

Biographical / Historical

The University of Colorado has always rewarded exceptional academic performance. Before the mid-1920s the University awarded Latin honors to students with high grades. In 1926 the College of Arts and Sciences created an honors committee to design a program that awarded honors based on more than just grades. The resulting program was implemented in 1928. Students and faculty found the new system wanting however, so university President George Norlin approved a new Honors Program in 1931. The new program was entirely extra-curricular and required 200-300 extra hours of studying a year to complete. An extra workload without any credit hours displeased many of the honors students and additional changes were made to recognize the problem. By 1937 the program had been changed to allow students to receive up to 27 credit hours for their honors work. In 1940 Professor Fredrick Bramhall became the first chairman of the Honors Council. Faculty-recommended students with a GPA of 2.0 or higher, on a 3.0 GPA scale, were eligible to take both an oral and a written exam. Successful students graduated with ‘combined honors’. The system was still controversial among students and staff who felt that honors weren’t being awarded to the most deserving students and that extra honors work should be required to receive honors. In 1956 the Rockefeller Foundation awarded the University $26,000 to conduct a 3-year study on the honors program and to host a conference on “The Superior Student in the State University.” The Carnegie Corporation, impressed by the successful conference, created and funded a national agency, the Inter-University Committee on the Superior Student which was based in Boulder. Interest in collegiate honors culminated in the creation of the honors office in 1958, giving the program a physical presence on campus. In 1959 departmental honors and general honors were still considered distinct programs. At this time honors was rewarded based on GRE area test scores, successful completion of both an oral and written exam, and GPA of 3.0 or higher on the 4.0 scale which is used today. Departmental and general honors were merged into one department in 1968, and honors finally received its present form in 1981 when the department added a required senior thesis. The honors program has since expanded, both in the number of students involved in the program as well as the number of honors courses offered each year. In 2003 the number of courses expanded from 50 to 80, and in 2012, 300 students graduated with honors. As of April 2015, the mission of the honors program is “to provide special education opportunities for academically prepared, highly motivated undergraduate students.”

135 linear feet (135 record boxes )

Language of Materials

Additional description.

The University of Colorado Boulder College of Arts and Sciences’ Honors Program is one of the oldest honors programs in the United States. The undergraduate program has roots going back before the 1920s, with the first honors committee formed in 1928. The Honors Program underwent several changes, until it assumed a stable form in 1959. In 1959, a student could earn honors by maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or higher, scoring highly on GRE department exams, an oral test, and a three hour written test. Many students also wrote a thesis as part of their individual plan. In 1981, writing and defending a senior thesis was added as a requirement for achieving honors recognition. The Honors Program continued to expand over the ensuing decades, with 300 students graduating with honors in 2012. This collection contains senior honors theses dating from 1959 through 2012, however there are very few theses before 1981.

Physical Location

Located at offsite storage (PASCAL). Allow at least 5 days for delivery. Contact [email protected] for questions and requests.

Related Materials

CU Boulder Libraries has access a number of CU Master's and Doctoral theses and dissertations available. Please see this LibGuide for information on how to access.

Digital Material

Finding aid & administrative information, repository details.

Part of the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries, Rare and Distinctive Collections Repository

Navigate the collection

University of Colorado Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors Program student theses collection, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries, Collections of Distinction

Cite Item Description

University of Colorado Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors Program student theses collection, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries, Collections of Distinction https://archives.colorado.edu/repositories/2/resources/2569 Accessed July 20, 2024.

More about ArchivesSpace at CU Boulder

  • Rare and Distinctive Collections Reading Room Norlin Library University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
  • Visit the RaD Reading Room
  • [email protected]
  • 303-492-7242

Lyrasis Logo

  • Find: Dissertations & Theses
  • National & Global

WorldCat Logo

Search WorldCat and request materials through ILLiad. Learn more ...

Dissertations and Theses

Decorative keyboard

The University Libraries provide a number of tools and methods for retrieving disserations and theses authored at CU and beyond.

Search For Dissertations

Try searching: title or author name AND "Name of school"

  • ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global Provides abstracts of dissertations and some master's theses from the United States, Canada, Great Britain and, to a lesser and more selective extent, other countries.
  • ABI/INFORM Collection (ProQuest) This database contains the full-text of over 10,000 dissertations in business and management. Under "publication type," select "dissertations."
  • WorldCat.org Contains all the records cataloged by OCLC member libraries. Limit results by "subtype limits: any content" to "thesis/dissertation."

CU Faculty, staff and students may request theses and dissertations identified through the above resources through the CU Libraries' Interlibrary Loan service.

  • Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações
  • Theses Canada Portal (National Library of Canada)

Central America

  • Central American Theses and Dissertations
  • Sudoc (Système universitaire de documentation)
  • Thèses-en-ligne
  • dissonline.de: Digitale Dissertationen im Internet

Great Britain

  • Electronic Theses Online (ETHOS)

South Africa

  • South African national E theses portal

Switzerland

  • << Previous: Local
  • University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
  • Research Guides
  • Research Strategies
  • Last Updated: Jul 11, 2024 11:39 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.colorado.edu/strategies/theses
  • © Regents of the University of Colorado

The Honors Program Q & A

The Honors Program Q & A

What does it mean to be an honors student at CU Boulder? The Honors Program encompasses many different fields, and this post will help you navigate through it so you can know all the opportunities available to honors students!  

For starters, CU doesn’t have an honors college, but an honors program that offers many different ways for eligible students to craft their own honors experience.  

How do I know if I am an honors student?  

There is no application process for the Honors Program. As an incoming freshman, if you are within the top 10% of the incoming class, you were automatically invited to join the Honors Program. If you have been a student at CU Boulder for at least one full semester and have a GPA of 3.3 or higher, you are honors-qualified.  

How do I join the Honors Program as a transfer student?  

If you have a GPA of 3.3 or higher from your previous college/university, you are honors-qualified.  

What does it mean to be honors-qualified?

As an honors qualified student — meaning you were either in the top 10% of the incoming class your freshman year or your CU GPA is 3.3 or higher — you are eligible to register for Honors Program courses, live in the Honors Residential Academic Program, join the Honors Scholars Program where you attend Honors events and more, and/or write an honors thesis.  

What are Honors Program courses?

It’s completely optional to take honors courses, but is a great option to have smaller classes (class size limited to 17 students) and get to know your fellow honors professors and students alike. Most courses fulfill the Arts and Sciences General Education (and Core Curriculum) requirements and offer intellectual preparation for individual research opportunities.

Course descriptions can be found here: https://www.colorado.edu/honors/courses .  

What is the Honors RAP (Residential Academic Program)?

Smith Hall, home of the Honors RAP , is located in Kittredge Village. You don’t have to live in the dorm to participate in the Honors Program, but Honors RAP students have the opportunity to take honors courses in their dorm, while other honors students take their classes in Norlin Library.  

What is the Honors Scholars Program?

The Honors Scholars Program is designed for undergraduate students with a major in the College of Arts and Sciences but is open to students from other colleges. Participating in the Honors Scholars Program gives students an opportunity to be involved in the Honors Program outside of writing an honors thesis, and is a significant achievement students can include on their resume.  

A list of requirements to graduate as an honors scholar can be found here and feel free to email   [email protected] if you have more questions.  

How do I write an Honors Thesis?

To graduate with Latin Honors , students must write and defend an honors thesis, written either within their department or as general honors . To write an honors thesis, students need to find a thesis advisor and create a committee to review their work. More information can be found here .  

What if I am not honors-qualified, but want to be an honors student?

There are personal review opportunities available if you are an incoming student. For more information, email the program at [email protected] .  

Click here for more opportunities to get involved in the honors community, like submitting to the Honors Journal (open to all undergraduates).  

Follow us on Instagram and Like us on Facebook for more updates on Honors Scholars program events and opportunities.  

Share this:

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)

About Alexis Reich

Lexi is double majoring in English and Journalism and is graduating this May. Outside of the Honors Program Student Advisory Board, she is the president of the Yoga Club at CU, a member of the Honors Writing Club, teaches yoga at the CU Rec Center, and is the Editorial Manager for both CO YOGA + Life Magazine and Spoke + Blossom Magazine. She just returned from a semester studying international journalism in Morocco and is excited to become a full-time journalist and creative writer post-graduation.

You also might be interested in

Honors Program Student Advisory Board Statement

Honors Program Student Advisory Board Statement

Featured Student: Andi Bonato

Featured Student: Andi Bonato

What are you studying at CU? I'm a junior and[...]

Honors Scholars Program Refresher

Honors Scholars Program Refresher

This time of the semester for undergraduate students is often[...]

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

About the Blog

Follow along, like us on facebook.

Following along on Instagram!

Latest posts, resources for learning about the israel-palestine conflict.

Update: It has come to the attention of the Student Advisory...

Writing an Honors Thesis in Ecological Biology: Louis Balas

Writing an Honors Thesis in Ecological Biology: Louis Balas

This week we interviewed Louis Balas about his experience...

Recap of the Honors Sidewalk Symposium

Recap of the Honors Sidewalk Symposium

Dear Honors Scholars, This past Friday, April 21st 2023,...

© CU Honors Program. Boulder, CO. 2024 — Highend Theme Created with in London, UK.

Type and press Enter to search

Skip to Content

University of Colorado logo

  • Events and News
  • Faculty and Staff
  • Alumni Spotlight
  • Inclusion & Climate

CU Logo

  • Campus Directory
  • Events Calendar
  • Human Resources
  • Student Services
  • Auraria Library
  • CU Denver Police
  • University Policies

Schools and Colleges

  • College of Architecture and Planning
  • College of Arts & Media
  • Business School
  • School of Education & Human Development
  • College of Engineering, Design and Computing
  • Graduate School
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • School of Public Affairs

Campus Affiliates

  • CU Anschutz Medical Campus
  • CU Colorado Springs

Other ways to search:

  • University Directory

Quick Links

  • Degree Requirements
  • Tuition & Fees
  • Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE)

Course Performance

The Department of Philosophy at the University of Colorado at Denver offers honors recognition based on the student's GPA in conjunction with a two-semester Honors Thesis (described below):

  • Summa Cum Laude : 3.8 grade point average within the major, 3.7 overall grade point average
  • Magna Cum Laude : 3.6 grade point average within the major, 3.5 overall grade point average
  • Cum Laude : 3.4 grade point average within the major, 3.3 overall grade point average

Two-Semester Thesis Project

All students interested in graduating with Honors in Philosophy must complete the 36 credit hours required for the major and an  additional three to six thesis credit hours (PHIL 4950)  taken over a two-semester period. In order to register for PHIL 4950 students must have:

  • an overall GPA of 3.3
  • GPA of 3.4 in your major
  • at least 12 upper level philosophy credit hours in residence at UC Denver
  • approval of a written proposal for a thesis project

With an advisor, a student selects two department faculty members to supervise the thesis project and to serve as the project committee. One of those selected may be the student's advisor, but this is not required. To complete the requirements for honors, students must produce a passing thesis that presents the results of the research project and must pass an oral examination on that thesis before the project committee. Both the research project and oral examination must be judged worthy of honors by the committee.

  • Website Feedback
  • Privacy Policy
  • Legal Notices
  • Accreditation

© 2021  The Regents of the University of Colorado , a body corporate. All rights reserved.

Accredited by the Higher Learning Commission . All trademarks are registered property of the University. Used by permission only.

  • Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Associations Between Parent and Child Negative Emotionality and Parenting Public Deposited

Default

Negative emotionality is associated with psychopathology, such as mood and eating disorders, as well as other negative outcomes such as emotion dysregulation and psychological inflexibility. Thus, an improved understanding of the etiology of negative emotionality, specifically in childhood and adolescence, may inform the development of interventions designed to increase emotional stability in children. The present study uses an adoption design to address whether similarity in parents’ and children’s negative emotionality is due to genetic influences, environmental influences, or both, and whether negative or warm parenting mediates this association. This study examined longitudinal data from participants in the Colorado Adoption Study, including 637 adoptive and 783 non-adoptive parents, 331 adoptees, and 512 non adoptees. We evaluated whether associations between parents’ and children’s negative emotionality are consistent with environmental mediation or passive gene–environment correlation (passive rGE) and examined evidence for evocative gene–environment correlation (evocative rGE). Our results indicated that passive rGE may play a role in the association between parents’ and children’s negative emotionality, and there is some evidence that parents’ negative emotionality influences children’s negative emotionality via negative parenting. Specifically, negative parenting partially mediated the association between biological mothers’ negative emotionality and children’s negative emotionality, but no mediation was found for biological fathers. Additionally, our results showed no evidence for evocative rGE, as both genetically related and genetically unrelated sibling pairs were treated similarly for warm and negative parenting conditions. Our findings suggest the importance for future studies to consider how gene–environment correlations may influence the results, especially when they lack a genetically informed design.

  • Geel, Lilia G.
  • Psychology and Neuroscience
  • Rhee, Soo H.
  • Gustavson, Daniel E.
  • Gustavson, Daniel
  • Colunga, Eliana
  • Hatch, Alison
  • Rhee, Soo H
  • University of Colorado Boulder
  • Skoler, Emma R.
  • In Copyright
  • English [eng]

Relationships

  • Arts and Sciences Honors Program
Thumbnail Title Date Uploaded Visibility Actions
2024-04-08 Public ' $('.canonical-image').after(template) $('.canonical-image').remove() }
  • Skip to Content
  • Catalog Home
  • Institution Home

University of Colorado Boulder

  • Courses A-Z /

Honors (HONR)

HONR 1001 (1) Honors Coseminar

Honors coseminars are designed to combine an honors seminar experience with the shared experience of an organized lecture course. Designed typically for 15 students, coseminars are taken for an additional 1 credit hour. Coseminars provide honors students with an opportunity to extend their common experience in the course lecture into an enriched interactive, critical thinking opportunity.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 4.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term. Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 1125 (3) Heroines and Heroic Traditions

Reevaluating global heroic traditions is critical to understanding power structures. In this course we will interrogate the concept of the monomyth and redefine what it means to be a hero/ine. The course will explore comparative mythology, folklore, literature, film and television in order to reinterpret and investigate heroic traditions in diverse communities.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: HONR 4025 Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Grading Basis: Letter Grade Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 1810 (3) Honors Diversity Seminar

Students will develop an appreciation for, and experience with, diverse perspectives. In particular this includes: racial/ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, and class perspectives, for constructing knowledge as they proceed through their undergraduate studies. Three themes provide the framework for the course: education for the next century, the 21st century citizen, and the modern individual in a diverse society. Topics explored include privilege, stigmatization, targeted and nontargeted grouping, and oppression. Engaging in independent research and experiential, empathetic experiences is required.

Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 2250 (3) Ethics of Ambition

Through selected readings in classical literature on ethics and through more contemporary readings and films, examines critical ethical issues relating to the competition of ambitions and the alternative styles of choosing between courses of action in a dangerous world. Uses biographies of those whose lives illustrate both the complexities of the struggles and the profundity of possibilities. Considers the unconscious metaphors of national visions and ambitions, the competing ethics of ends and means, the conflicting ambitions in a pluralistic society, and the transcendent ambitions of visionaries.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: FARR 2660 Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

HONR 2251 (3) Introduction to the Bible

Studies the major works, figures, and genres of the Bible and attempts to understand what they meant to their own time and why they became so important to Western civilization and contemporary America.

Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Historical Context Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

HONR 2500 (3) Open Topics

Variety of new courses at the 2000 level. See honors program announcements for specific contents.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 2820 (3) Future of the Spaceship Earth

Examines major ecological, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical issues that will shape the future. Students consider how their decisions influence the future, and reflect on fundamental values and ideals underlying the search for solutions to these complex problems.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: FARR 2820 Additional Information: Arts Sci Core Curr: Ideals and Values Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

HONR 2860 (3) The Figure of Socrates

Investigates why Socrates intrigued great writers like Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle and why, through his life and execution by the Athenian democracy, he still influences Western ethics, politics, and education and is central to cultural literacy.

Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Literature and the Arts Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities

HONR 3004 (3) Women in Education

Honors women in education and their legacy. Introduces women educators, beginning in the late 19th century, whose significant theories of education and work in teaching have had an impact on all of our lives, in history and in society. Explores the educational theories and methods of several representative women educators and analyzes them through an investigation of their professional and personal lives.

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: WGST 3004 Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 3220 (3) Advanced Honors Writing Workshop

Intensive practice of expository writing skills, particularly argumentation in longer forms. Course includes extensive practice in researching secondary sources, synthesizing large bodies of information, structuring cogent arguments for diverse sources, etc.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 9.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term. Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors). Grading Basis: Letter Grade Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Written Communication Arts Sci Gen Ed: Written Communication-Upper

HONR 3270 (3) Journey Motif in Women's Literature

Investigates literature thematically centered on forced migration, diaspora, and marginalized communities through novels, graphic novels, and short essays by women. Themes explored: feminism, identity, intersectionality, diaspora, issues of gender and borders, exile, ethnicity, and literary theory among others.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 3550 (1-6) Open Topics

Investigates special topics in humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Topics vary from semester to semester and from course to course. See Honors program announcements for specific contents. Open to Honors-qualified students beyond the freshman year. May be repeated for up to six credit hours for different topics.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 3810 (3) Privilege and Modern Social Construction

Examines social constructions that lead to productive interactions between and among American social communities. Using case studies and humanistic accounts, students analyze the lived experiences of a unique group or successful citizens who routinely evidence productive practices of multicultural engagement. Through interactions with policy makers and community practitioners, students design and enact activities that allow them to reconstruct their personal patterns of privilege practices of their peer groups in various settings.

Requisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 3900 (3) Honors Internship Course

Engages students in hands-on work in the community imparting practical knowledge and real-world experience. The course is designed to help students combine professional experiences with an academic component that involves critical thinking and interdisciplinary approaches to problem-solving. Benefits of the course include acquiring professional skills and knowledge, building a network of connections, developing insights on possible career options, and applying classroom material to real-world experiences.

Grading Basis: Letter Grade

HONR 4000 (3) Open Topics

Variety of new courses at the 4000 level, see Honors Program announcements for specific contents.

Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Requisites: Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Juniors or Seniors). Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 4025 (3) Heroines and Heroic Tradition

Given recent controversies about the roles of women in power, this course re-evaluates heroic traditions as the stories that ground our sense of public endeavor. What do we mean by heroic? What is a heroine? Are heroines different from heroes?

Equivalent - Duplicate Degree Credit Not Granted: HONR 1125 Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course Arts Sci Core Curr: Human Diversity Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Arts Humanities Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 4055 (3) Discourse Analysis and Cultural Criticism

Discourse analysis critically investigates the founding assumptions by which systems of meaning operate. Its practice is aimed at a rigorous, systematic analysis of both specific cultural issues and the dynamics by which structures of meaning may be maintained or transformed.

Requisites: Requires a corequisite course of HONR 4056 . Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 4056 (1-3) Service Practicum: Discourse Analysis and Cultural Criticism

Help communities in need, with credit hours varying according to time commitment. The practicum provides experiential and intellectual understanding of the discourses and dynamics that maintain major cultural hierarchies of values and of resource distribution.

Requisites: Requires a corequisite course of HONR 4055 . Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only. Additional Information: Arts Sciences Honors Course

HONR 4075 (3) Environmental Justice

Examines the experiences of people who face disproportionate environmental harms related to historical marginalization correlating with race, class, and gender. Covers the history, principles, and contemporary state of the environmental justice movement in its opposition to environmental inequalities.

Requisites: Enrollment allowed for first-year AS students invited into the Honors Program for the current academic year (not including Honors RAP students) and continuing AS students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.300. Recommended: Junior or Seniors with 57-180 credits completed. Grading Basis: Letter Grade Additional Information: Arts Sci Gen Ed: Distribution-Social Sciences Arts Sci Gen Ed: Diversity-U.S. Perspective

HONR 4490 (3) Capstone in Interdisciplinary Honors Studies

Explores the value of interdisciplinarity for conceptualizing, investigating, and solving problems. Critical analysis of interdisciplinarity across different fields will hone creative thinking, research, writing, and communication skills. Students will create a research project that encompasses multiple disciplines, informed by an appreciation of diverse points of view. Students will also examine how an interdisciplinary perspective is vital to being an engaged citizen.

Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of HONR 1810 (minimum grade C-).

HONR 4900 (1-6) Independent Study

HONR 4959 (3-6) Honors Thesis

Requires approval of Honors Program.

Print Options

Print this page.

The PDF will include all information unique to this page.

The PDF will include all pages of the 2024-25 CU Boulder Catalog.

Rose Library News

Rose Library News

Celebrating Student Researchers: The 2024 Rackoff and Schuchard Winners

Posted on July 16, 2024 Author Gaby Hale

by Shanna Early, Instruction Archivist

Congratulations to all students who submitted research projects for consideration for the 2024 Schuchard and Rackoff Undergraduate Research Prizes. The submissions this year show the efficacy of undergraduate humanities education at Emory, and we are thrilled that we get to be a part of it.   

Schuchard Prize  

Named for Goodrich C. White Professor Emeritus of English Ronald Schuchard, The Schuchard Prize is awarded annually to the best paper, project, or honor’s thesis using archival research that originated in a class offered by Emory’s Department of English.  

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

 The first-place winner of the Schuchard Prize this year is senior English and Creative writing major Oli Turner . Her paper, “Performing the AIDS Epidemic: From Warren to Higher Ground , Southern Playwright Rebecca Ranson Tells Stories of the Queer South,” was written for Dr Hannah Griggs’s Southern Literature class and features research from the Rebecca Ranson Papers. The judges were impressed by how archival research drove the project and by Turner’s passion for the subject. Of her experience learning in the Rose Library, Turner writes,  

“I combed through only a fraction of the boxes in the collection, finding manuscripts of Ranson’s plays, correspondence with friends and audience members, newspaper articles, and even lawsuits. The story was practically jumping out of the boxes fully-formed. And this story isn’t even on the internet. . . . I was able to research Ranson’s life solely because of the work of the archivists at the Rose Library who have stewarded and processed this collection. I am so grateful to every librarian who patiently pointed me toward the right boxes and showed me the ropes on the 10th floor of Woodruff Library.”  

Turner plans to continue researching Ranson’s papers for creative writing projects.  

Congratulations Oli!  

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

Carol Ann Duffy, from the Carol Ann Duffy papers at Rose Library

  Zoe Bailey is the runner-up for the Schuchard Prize. Her essay, “Empathizing with the Inspiration: A Case Study of the Drafting Process of Carol Ann Duffy’s ‘Recognition,’” was written for Professor Nathan Suhr-Sytsma’s Introduction to Poetry class. The judges were impressed by Bailey’s use of drafts and a clipping from the Carol Ann Duffy Papers to produce an excellent analysis of the poem “Recognition.”  

“I was enraptured by Carol Ann Duffy’s “Recognition” from the first read, so when I discovered I would get to examine its drafts in the Rose Library, I was thrilled with the opportunity. I was nervous about the assignment at first as it felt like uncharted territory, but I was excited to see what English research looked like. . . . One notable shift that is present between drafts is changing the characterization of the woman when she bumps into the mirror, making many shifts such as from “wild-eyed woman” to “dowdy matron” used at the end of the poem. . . . I wanted my grasp on Duffy’s intentions and internal processes to be as authentic as possible, so that was my main guiding force in implementing the strategies I chose to use.”  

Bailey is a sophomore Anthropology & Human Biology and Neuroscience & Behavioral Biology major, and we hope to see her back in the Rose Library to examine some of the historic science journals and medical texts we have in our rare book collection. Congratulations Zoe!  

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

Joseph Tang

 The judges also elected to award an honorable mention to Joseph Tang , whose project is especially impressive for a first-year student. Created for Professor Geraldine Higgins’s First Year Flourishing Seminar, Imagining Ireland, Tang’s project “The Sound of Teoswa” combines image in an artist’s book and sound in a podcast to meditate on imperialism and language. The judges were especially impressed by the depth of thought and creativity in this moving piece, which was inspired by a draft of Seamus Heaney’s poem “Broagh” from the Seamus Heaney Papers. Of his experience in the Rose Library, Tang writes,  

“My Freshman Irish Literature Seminar (ENG190) was my first introduction to the wonderful Irish Archive at Emory’s Rose Library. The physicality of the rare scripts, posters, and books there was astonishing. Engaging physically with these texts and materials offered a tangible connection to the past. Among these, the maps and posters issued by authorities, the handwritten script of Translations, and Seamus Heaney’s poem Broagh in his own script, all narrate a poignant narrative of the fate of the indigenous Irish language under English hegemony.”  

Keep it up, Joseph! We’re excited to see what you do during your Emory career, and we hope to see you in the Rose Library again this year!  

The Alan Rackoff Prize  

Emory alum Dr. Wayne Rackoff initiated this research prize, named for his late brother who was also an Emory alum. This prize is awarded each academic year for the best paper, project, or honor’s thesis using primary source material, excluding work submitted to classes in the Department of English.  

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

Klara Nitsche

 The first-place winner of the 2024 Rackoff Prize is newly-minted Emory graduate and Sociology and Integrated Visual Arts major, Klara Nitsche . Nitsche’s project, “‘If you could use un-punk colors that’s even more punk rock.’ : An Analysis of Materiality, Community Symbols, and Self-Presentation in Atlanta’s Hardcore Punk Scene,” was produced as an honors thesis in the Department of Sociology. Professor Timothy Dowd served as advisor for the project, and Professors Tracy Scott and Dana Haugaard rounded out the committee. Nitsche’s project makes use of one of the Rose Library’s coolest collections, the Atlanta Punk Rock Collection, examining how the concert posters in the collection “navigated rules of visual communication and representations of self within the bounds of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) material practices.” Of her research, Nitsche writes,  

  “I have always been drawn to materials bearing proof of others’ touch. As an artist and sociologist I am constantly tracing narratives communicated through visual, physical, and organizational structures. . . .Engaging with the physical materials offered in Emory’s Stuart A. Rose Library and exploring their variety of collections has centered archives in not just my research project but also my future academic endeavors. I hope to continue my work with archives in my graduate studies and broaden my personal research in material culture studies to include digital landscapes.”  

Having completed her degree here at Emory, Nitsche plans to continue studying in Colorado: “Much of my undergraduate work revolved around the study of physical materials in social contexts, particularly in theories of visual culture and material qualities as a measure of cultural analysis. Since my undergraduate interests were largely rooted in the analysis of tangible materials (paper, cloth, etc.) I’ve decided to spend the next two years of my academic career educating myself on the less tangible material of digitality. By attending CU Boulder’s ATLAS Institute in their Creative Technologies program, I will learn the structural coding and design that is responsible for upholding much of our digital landscape as well as direct my own creative projects to experiment new approaches towards conducting material culture research. I hope to expand my knowledge of materiality to encompass all types of materials and continue researching their effect in shaping culture!”   

Congratulations, Klara! We already miss seeing you during your regular appointments at the Rose, and we wish you all the best in graduate school!  

philosophy honors thesis cu boulder

Julia Nagel

 The runner-up for the Rackoff Prize this year is senior Music and Philosophy, Politics, and Law double major Julia Nagel . Her essay, “Analysis of John Hill Hewitt’s Music on Confederate Sentiments During the Civil War,” was written for Professor Laura Emmery’s Archival Documents Analysis class and explores the major themes in Hewitt’s music by carefully examining materials in the John Hill Hewitt Papers. Explaining how archival materials shaped her research, Nagel writes,  

“I started my process looking at online resources through the Emory Library’s databases, but after I discovered that the Emory Rose Library has a John Hill Hewitt Collection, I was inspired to explore the primary sources contained within the archives. I discovered, and was amazed by, the wide variety of materials in the Collection. Not only did it contain manuscripts for his musical works ranging from operas to ballads, but the Collection also gave me access to view Hewitt’s notebooks, correspondence, and poetry.”   

Congratulations Julia!  

Skip to Content

Honors Program

Professor Lewis O. Harvey, Jr., announces the honors graduates

The goal of the Honors Program is to acknowledge highly motivated students who excel both in the classroom and in research and to provide such students with special educational opportunities. This page describes the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Honors Program. Students interested in General Honors are referred to the University Honors Program .

Honors Council Members

Department Honors Council Representatives

Requirements

Maintain a high GPA . Guidelines adopted by the Honors Council are a 3.3 GPA for graduating “cum laude,” 3.5 GPA for “magna cum laude,” and 3.8 GPA for “summa cum laude.” These are guidelines and the Honors Council occasionally awards an honors designation inconsistent with these guidelines depending on the quality of the honors thesis. Students with a GPA of less than 3.3 who are interested should contact the Honors Director. Completing a research thesis is a rewarding experience whether or not one graduates with honors. Conducting research in collaboration with a professor is one of the most important educational opportunities uniquely available at a research institution like the University of Colorado.

Honors Thesis . Honors students must conduct an empirical research project under the supervision of a faculty member, write a thesis based on that research, and defend the thesis before a committee of three faculty members. The examining committee includes (a) the student's thesis advisor, (b) one of the departmental representatives to the Honors Council, and (c) a faculty member outside the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. It is up to the student to form the committee and to schedule the defense date.

Students intending to graduate with departmental honors must complete a registration packet, which can be obtained  online  or in person at the Honors Program office (Norlin Library M400L). The university deadline for completing this registration packet is around the middle of the semester before you intend to graduate. 

Students may also register for a maximum of 3 credits of Senior Thesis (PSYC/NRSC 4011) for the semester that they defend their thesis. To do so, students must complete a form available online or in the Advising Office (D260 Muenzinger). This form needs to be signed by your thesis advisor and by one of the departmental representatives to the Honors Council.

Important Dates

It is important that you inform us about your interest in graduating with honors as soon as possible. The university deadline for completing the application packet for graduation with Honors is around the middle of the semester before you intend to graduate. Note : Exact dates are available from the Honors Graduation Page (look under the Registration and Deadlines heading). The thesis defense may be completed anytime before the deadline.

Related Pages

  • Undergraduates
  • Resources for Undergraduates

Student Guide for Honors

Honors Graduates

  • Recipients by year

Department Calendar

Dept. Scheduler

Departmental Wikis

COMMENTS

  1. Accessing Honors Theses

    To request to view an honors thesis or to have a thesis photocopied or scanned, email [email protected]. Please include the title of the thesis, year it was defended, and the author's name. Photocopying and scanning may incur an additional fee. Honors theses from 2012-present are located online.

  2. Honors Degree in Philosophy

    If you have any questions, please contact the Philosophy Department Honors Council Representative at [email protected] or the Honors Program Office at: [email protected] or 303-492-6617. The Honors Program Office is located in Norlin Library, M400M. The Department of Philosophy, in conjunction with.

  3. Graduation with Latin honors

    The Arts and Sciences Honors Program, in coordination with departments within the College of Arts and Sciences, gives qualified undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences the opportunity to write and defend an honors thesis in an attempt to graduate with Latin honors: cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude.Most students undertake a thesis project within their major ...

  4. Find: Dissertations & Theses

    The Library Catalog treats theses and dissertations like books. This link will limit your search to theses and dissertations, and allow you to search by author, title, or keyword. The call number for CU Boulder theses and dissertations begin with the letter "T," followed by the year of the thesis and then a code matching the author's last name.

  5. Honors Program < University of Colorado Boulder

    It offers opportunities for intellectual engagement through Honors courses, academic-inspired events and Honors thesis research and creative work (through which student earn Latin Honors). CU Boulder incoming honors-qualified first-year and transfer students, and continuing undergraduates who have a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher, are eligible ...

  6. Arts and Sciences Honors Program // CU Scholar

    The Arts and Sciences Honors Program provides a community for highly motivated and academically prepared undergraduate students and offers opportunities for intellectual engagement through honors courses, academic-inspired events, and honors thesis research and creative work. ... A service provided by University of Colorado Boulder Libraries ...

  7. University of Colorado Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors

    Theses item list for CU Boulder, College of Arts and Sciences, Honors Program student theses collection ... This means that box 1 contains the honors theses from 2012 whose author's last names begin with an A, B or C. Each entry includes the full title of the thesis, the subject, the author's name, and the semester. Dates. Creation: 1959 - 2012

  8. Honors Scholars FAQs

    The Honors Scholars Program was designed to create community within the Honors Program in addition to the opportunities offered in the HRAP and Honors Thesis writing process. As an Honors Scholar, you have the opportunity to participate in a myriad of fun and informative events, give back to Boulder through community service, and graduate with ...

  9. Philosophy

    Students must take 33 to 45 credit hours in philosophy, no fewer than 18 of which must be upper division, earning 33 credit hours with a grade of C- or better in each course in philosophy and a C (2.000) average for all work attempted in philosophy. No fewer than 12 of the upper-division credit hours must be completed on the Boulder campus.

  10. Find: Dissertations & Theses

    Provides abstracts of dissertations and some master's theses from the United States, Canada, Great Britain and, to a lesser and more selective extent, other countries. ABI/INFORM Collection (ProQuest) This database contains the full-text of over 10,000 dissertations in business and management. Under "publication type," select "dissertations."

  11. Your Thesis Journey

    A departmental thesis is written on a topic in your major, while a general honors thesis is a more interdisciplinary work (substantive engagement with at least two disciplines) and does not have to involve your major. ... The Arts & Sciences Honors Program at CU Boulder acknowledges that the University sits upon land within the territories of ...

  12. Honors Thesis

    Apr 26, 2023. Dear Honors Scholars, This past Friday, April 21st 2023, students that defended an Honors Thesis celebrated their accomplishments by presenting their work … on the sidewalk!!! A collaboration between the Honors Scholars Program and the expert chalk artist, Kyle Banister (homage is also payed to the UROP quarters for connecting ...

  13. The Honors Program Q & A

    There is no application process for the Honors Program. As an incoming freshman, if you are within the top 10% of the incoming class, you were automatically invited to join the Honors Program. If you have been a student at CU Boulder for at least one full semester and have a GPA of 3.3 or higher, you are honors-qualified.

  14. The Team

    Undergraduate Researcher, Biological Sciences Initiative Scholar, Honors Thesis . Kristoffer Lauridsen —> CU Boulder Philosophy Graduate Program . Undergraduate Researcher, UROP Scholar. William Plantz. Undergraduate Researcher, UROP Scholar, Honors Thesis. Alex Barker —> Harvard Medical School.

  15. Arts and Sciences Honors Program

    The Arts and Sciences Honors Program provides a community for highly motivated and academically engaged undergraduate students and offers opportunities for intellectual engagement through honors courses, academic-inspired events, and honors thesis research and creative work.. We are an enrichment program for students who want to add something extra to their experience at the University of ...

  16. Honors

    The Department of Philosophy at the University of Colorado at Denver offers honors recognition based on the student's GPA in conjunction with a two-semester Honors Thesis (described below): Summa Cum Laude: 3.8 grade point average within the major, 3.7 overall grade point average

  17. Policies & Requirements < University of Colorado Boulder

    The Honors Program also sponsors the Honors Journal, a student-run publication which publishes works from all academic disciplines represented on the CU Boulder campus, and offers the certificate in Interdisciplinary Honors Studies, which allows undergraduate students to develop skills in interdisciplinary theory and practice that they can draw ...

  18. Submitting Theses to CU Scholar

    CU Scholar is the place for faculty, students, and staff to deposit their academic works created during their time at the university. The repository provides free and worldwide access to one's work and is maintained by the University Libraries. With CU Scholar, honors theses become part of CU Boulder's commitment to Open Access scholarship.. CU Scholar has recently undergone an upgrade in ...

  19. Undergraduate Honors Thesis

    Abstract. Negative emotionality is associated with psychopathology, such as mood and eating disorders, as well as other negative outcomes such as emotion dysregulation and psychological inflexibility.

  20. Honors (HONR) < University of Colorado Boulder

    Music - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Artist Diploma: Chamber Music Performance - Graduate Certificate; ... HONR 4959 (3-6) Honors Thesis. Requires approval of Honors Program. Repeatable: Repeatable for up to 6.00 total credit hours. Allows multiple enrollment in term. ... The PDF will include all pages of the 2024-25 CU Boulder Catalog.

  21. Celebrating Student Researchers: The 2024 Rackoff and Schuchard Winners

    The judges also elected to award an honorable mention to Joseph Tang, whose project is especially impressive for a first-year student.Created for Professor Geraldine Higgins's First Year Flourishing Seminar, Imagining Ireland, Tang's project "The Sound of Teoswa" combines image in an artist's book and sound in a podcast to meditate on imperialism and language.

  22. Ph.D. Program

    The Ph.D. program at CU Boulder Philosophy consists of approximately 2.5 years of coursework and 2.5 years of work on a dissertation, with 5 years of guaranteed funding (for details see Funding ). We are both a research and a teaching department; teaching appointments are not only the principal means of supporting graduate students but are also ...

  23. Honors Program

    Honors Thesis. Honors students must conduct an empirical research project under the supervision of a faculty member, write a thesis based on that research, and defend the thesis before a committee of three faculty members. ... Boulder, CO 80309-0345 Phone: 303-492-8662 Fax: 303-492-2967 [email protected]. Donate to Psychology & Neuroscience.