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Essay About Being a Student: Top 5 Examples and Prompts

Read an essay about being a student to learn how you can write your paper about the topic. Here are essay prompts for anyone who doesn’t know where to start.

Life’s challenges are different when you are a student. Being a student isn’t only about focusing on academics or your future. It’s also about balancing your social life, health, and relationships. Sometimes, peer pressure can push you to make bad decisions. Other times, your years as a student will be your most memorable ones. 

We listed five essays to read for students who want to write essays about being a student.

For help with your essays, check out our round-up of the best essay checkers.

1. Essay on Student Life by Toppr

2. education and student life by lindsey buchanan, 3. short essay on the life of a student by bunty rane, 4. international student life by lillian thornton, 5. my life as… and international student by charlotte, 1. being a high school student, 2. using online learning tools, 3. relationships built as a student, 4. most popular sports among students, 5. being a student scholar, 6. peer pressure among students, 7. hollywood vs. reality: the high school experience, 8. being a student and a mom, 9. going back to finish school.

“One of the most exciting things about student life is getting to go on picnics and trips with your friends. You get to enjoy yourself and have a lot of fun. Even waiting for the exam result with friends becomes fun.”

This essay describes the essence of student life and what the writer learned from being a student. The essay includes many positive and negative experiences that are fun and worthwhile.

“Student life is the best part of an individual’s life. At this time, our main task is to study. We should stop thinking of anything else and concentrate on education.”

Buchanan discusses the importance of students and student life. She explains what students must do to survive this life, what they’ll typically undergo, and how to be a good student.

“Fun increases after real hard work, and you tend to enjoy [it] more than those who had been lazy and have wasted their time. I think this period of your life is [the] most wonderful period – full of spontaneity, dreams, and hope, not a care in the world, except for studying.”

Rane’s essay on being a student describes what students typically do, based on the writer’s experience. For example, students can get lucky, scolded, bored, and have fun. The essay also detailed how students respect teachers, pass exams, and learn discipline.

“Studying in America has a lot of advantages, such as we can learn [about] new cultures. But studying in [a] different country is a difficult thing for [a] teenager.”

Thornton is an international student from China who describes the difficulties of studying in the United States. In her essay, Thornton describes the advantages of being in the US and exposing herself to a new culture.

“Being an international student is kind of a double-edged sword. A lot of time, I love the attention.”

Charlotte’s essay focuses on her experience as a British student studying in the United States. She shares how being a student is like being a celebrity in negative and positive ways. She also shared the culture shock when she saw how different it was to study in another country.

9 Prompts on Writing and Essay About Being a Student

Are you ready to write an essay about being a student? Share your student experience through essay writing with the prompts below. Use them as your focus, theme, or starting point.

The years you spend in high school are often a memorable time for you. A high school student’s life revolves around the friendships they make, puberty, and peer pressure. Yet, most people don’t even remember their grades in high school when they reminisce about it.

Use this essay prompt to give life to your high school story as you remember it. If you’re still in high school, this topic is an excellent choice for you to describe how you feel like a high school student.

Essay About Being a Student: Using online learning tools

Using online tools for distance learning is one of the adaptations we had to make to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus. Today, many schools still use online learning resources, changing the experience of many students. 

How do you like online learning versus face-to-face classes? What are the pros and cons of each education style? Answer these questions in your essay about being a student in post-pandemic times.

The common relationship made in school is friendship. Some students find romantic relationships in school, but most people experience friendship. 

You can describe the different levels of relationships you’ve built in school as a student, whether as acquaintances or best friends with a person. You can also extend this to non-students, like the school staff and team or club members.

Many students make it through their education by maintaining athletic scholarships. Whether you’re an athlete or a sports-spirited student, you know which sports are most popular among the student body.

Describe the most popular sports in this essay and why they are so loved by students. You can also discuss how other sports programs might gain popularity and attract more athletes.

If you’re still stuck, check out our general resource of essay writing topics .

Student scholars are students who receive a scholarship that provides financial aid for their studies. Financial aid can come from the university or other organizations, covering tuition fees, learning equipment, and more. 

With this essay topic, you can detail what it’s like to be a student scholar. Describe the challenges you face and the benefits you receive.

Peer pressure is most powerful and influential to middle and high school students. This is because teenagers typically want to fit in and feel admired by their peers. Sometimes, it also extends to the college or university level. Discuss how you handled peer pressure, how it is so powerful to students, and how others could manage their reactions to it.

From Mean Girls to High School Musical, the Hollywood high school experience has been extremely exaggerated. In reality, the student hive doesn’t mindlessly idolize a queen bee, fall into specific stereotypes, or burst into song. 

Hollywood is abundant with unrealistic portrayals of the US high school experience. Debunk these tropes by writing about your high school experience.

Traditionally, women must finish their studies before they start a family. Many, but not all, female students who get unplanned pregnancies continue their pregnancy and raise their children in reality. Finishing one’s education is already a huge challenge in itself. 

The experience becomes even more challenging when a baby or young child gets added to the mix. If you’re a single mom and a student, this is the essay topic most suitable for you.

Not all students had the choice or privilege to finish their studies. Walt Disney didn’t finish high school, while Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs didn’t finish college. Instead, they pursued their dreams and found success. Other people don’t have the same luck or make the same choices. 

Others have risked school for bad decisions or miscalculations. No matter the outcome of leaving school, it’s still a good decision if you have come back to finish it. Use this essay topic to write about what it’s like to go back to school to finish it.

If you’re stuck picking your next essay topic, see the following essay topics about education .

essay on how to be a student

Maria Caballero is a freelance writer who has been writing since high school. She believes that to be a writer doesn't only refer to excellent syntax and semantics but also knowing how to weave words together to communicate to any reader effectively.

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12 Strategies to Writing the Perfect College Essay

College admission committees sift through thousands of college essays each year. Here’s how to make yours stand out.

Pamela Reynolds

When it comes to deciding who they will admit into their programs, colleges consider many criteria, including high school grades, extracurricular activities, and ACT and SAT scores. But in recent years, more colleges are no longer considering test scores.

Instead, many (including Harvard through 2026) are opting for “test-blind” admission policies that give more weight to other elements in a college application. This policy change is seen as fairer to students who don’t have the means or access to testing, or who suffer from test anxiety.

So, what does this mean for you?

Simply that your college essay, traditionally a requirement of any college application, is more important than ever.

A college essay is your unique opportunity to introduce yourself to admissions committees who must comb through thousands of applications each year. It is your chance to stand out as someone worthy of a seat in that classroom.

A well-written and thoughtful essay—reflecting who you are and what you believe—can go a long way to separating your application from the slew of forgettable ones that admissions officers read. Indeed, officers may rely on them even more now that many colleges are not considering test scores.

Below we’ll discuss a few strategies you can use to help your essay stand out from the pack. We’ll touch on how to start your essay, what you should write for your college essay, and elements that make for a great college essay.

Be Authentic

More than any other consideration, you should choose a topic or point of view that is consistent with who you truly are.

Readers can sense when writers are inauthentic.

Inauthenticity could mean the use of overly flowery language that no one would ever use in conversation, or it could mean choosing an inconsequential topic that reveals very little about who you are.

Use your own voice, sense of humor, and a natural way of speaking.

Whatever subject you choose, make sure it’s something that’s genuinely important to you and not a subject you’ve chosen just to impress. You can write about a specific experience, hobby, or personality quirk that illustrates your strengths, but also feel free to write about your weaknesses.

Honesty about traits, situations, or a childhood background that you are working to improve may resonate with the reader more strongly than a glib victory speech.

Grab the Reader From the Start

You’ll be competing with so many other applicants for an admission officer’s attention.

Therefore, start your essay with an opening sentence or paragraph that immediately seizes the imagination. This might be a bold statement, a thoughtful quote, a question you pose, or a descriptive scene.

Starting your essay in a powerful way with a clear thesis statement can often help you along in the writing process. If your task is to tell a good story, a bold beginning can be a natural prelude to getting there, serving as a roadmap, engaging the reader from the start, and presenting the purpose of your writing.

Focus on Deeper Themes

Some essay writers think they will impress committees by loading an essay with facts, figures, and descriptions of activities, like wins in sports or descriptions of volunteer work. But that’s not the point.

College admissions officers are interested in learning more about who you are as a person and what makes you tick.

They want to know what has brought you to this stage in life. They want to read about realizations you may have come to through adversity as well as your successes, not just about how many games you won while on the soccer team or how many people you served at a soup kitchen.

Let the reader know how winning the soccer game helped you develop as a person, friend, family member, or leader. Make a connection with your soup kitchen volunteerism and how it may have inspired your educational journey and future aspirations. What did you discover about yourself?

Show Don’t Tell

As you expand on whatever theme you’ve decided to explore in your essay, remember to show, don’t tell.

The most engaging writing “shows” by setting scenes and providing anecdotes, rather than just providing a list of accomplishments and activities.

Reciting a list of activities is also boring. An admissions officer will want to know about the arc of your emotional journey too.

Try Doing Something Different

If you want your essay to stand out, think about approaching your subject from an entirely new perspective. While many students might choose to write about their wins, for instance, what if you wrote an essay about what you learned from all your losses?

If you are an especially talented writer, you might play with the element of surprise by crafting an essay that leaves the response to a question to the very last sentence.

You may want to stay away from well-worn themes entirely, like a sports-related obstacle or success, volunteer stories, immigration stories, moving, a summary of personal achievements or overcoming obstacles.

However, such themes are popular for a reason. They represent the totality of most people’s lives coming out of high school. Therefore, it may be less important to stay away from these topics than to take a fresh approach.

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Write With the Reader in Mind

Writing for the reader means building a clear and logical argument in which one thought flows naturally from another.

Use transitions between paragraphs.

Think about any information you may have left out that the reader may need to know. Are there ideas you have included that do not help illustrate your theme?

Be sure you can answer questions such as: Does what you have written make sense? Is the essay organized? Does the opening grab the reader? Is there a strong ending? Have you given enough background information? Is it wordy?

Write Several Drafts

Set your essay aside for a few days and come back to it after you’ve had some time to forget what you’ve written. Often, you’ll discover you have a whole new perspective that enhances your ability to make revisions.

Start writing months before your essay is due to give yourself enough time to write multiple drafts. A good time to start could be as early as the summer before your senior year when homework and extracurricular activities take up less time.

Read It Aloud

Writer’s tip : Reading your essay aloud can instantly uncover passages that sound clumsy, long-winded, or false.

Don’t Repeat

If you’ve mentioned an activity, story, or anecdote in some other part of your application, don’t repeat it again in your essay.

Your essay should tell college admissions officers something new. Whatever you write in your essay should be in philosophical alignment with the rest of your application.

Also, be sure you’ve answered whatever question or prompt may have been posed to you at the outset.

Ask Others to Read Your Essay

Be sure the people you ask to read your essay represent different demographic groups—a teacher, a parent, even a younger sister or brother.

Ask each reader what they took from the essay and listen closely to what they have to say. If anyone expresses confusion, revise until the confusion is cleared up.

Pay Attention to Form

Although there are often no strict word limits for college essays, most essays are shorter rather than longer. Common App, which students can use to submit to multiple colleges, suggests that essays stay at about 650 words.

“While we won’t as a rule stop reading after 650 words, we cannot promise that an overly wordy essay will hold our attention for as long as you’d hoped it would,” the Common App website states.

In reviewing other technical aspects of your essay, be sure that the font is readable, that the margins are properly spaced, that any dialogue is set off properly, and that there is enough spacing at the top. Your essay should look clean and inviting to readers.

End Your Essay With a “Kicker”

In journalism, a kicker is the last punchy line, paragraph, or section that brings everything together.

It provides a lasting impression that leaves the reader satisfied and impressed by the points you have artfully woven throughout your piece.

So, here’s our kicker: Be concise and coherent, engage in honest self-reflection, and include vivid details and anecdotes that deftly illustrate your point.

While writing a fantastic essay may not guarantee you get selected, it can tip the balance in your favor if admissions officers are considering a candidate with a similar GPA and background.

Write, revise, revise again, and good luck!

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About the Author

Pamela Reynolds is a Boston-area feature writer and editor whose work appears in numerous publications. She is the author of “Revamp: A Memoir of Travel and Obsessive Renovation.”

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7 Qualities of a Successful College Essay

Bonus Material:  30 College Essays That Worked

The college essay is one of the most important aspects of a student’s application.

It gives applicants an opportunity to articulate their personal values, character traits, and perspectives. It’s also a chance to add more value to your application, simply by demonstrating who you are outside of your resume and transcript.

A “successful” college essay is one that makes the most of these opportunities and, in many cases, earns an acceptance.

We’ve demystified what most admissions officers look for in college applications . But what are these officers looking for in the college essay itself? What are the top qualities of a successful application essay?

In analyzing various essays of admitted applicants, we’ve come up with a list of the characteristics that most of these pieces have in common. We’ll be referring to some of these pieces throughout the post.

Plus, we give you access to 30 college essays that earned their writers acceptance into Ivy League schools. Grab these below.

Download 30 College Essays That Worked

Here’s what we cover:

  • What is The College Application Essay (in a nutshell)?
  • 7 Qualities of a Successful Essay
  • Bonus: 30 College Essays That Worked

The College Application Essay In a Nutshell

Most students applying to a college or university in the U.S. must submit an application essay (or “personal statement”) with their application.

Depending on the application platform the college uses (typically either Coalition or the Common App ), students have 500-650 words to craft a response. While each of these platforms has college essay prompts, it’s helpful to view these prompts as general guidelines as to what colleges are looking for in a response.

Based on these prompts and our own experience coaching college essay students , the application essay is:

  • the chance to say what the rest of your application doesn’t say
  • a demonstration of your character, values, and/or voice
  • the platform to show who you are outside of a resume/transcript
  • an introspective personal essay

The college essay is NOT :

  • a rehashing of your resume
  • an excuse or explanation of other components of your application
  • a formal, five-paragraph essay
  • what you think “colleges want to hear”

A standard college application includes an academic transcript, recommendation letters, extracurricular / activities section, an optional resume, and standardized test scores. The essay is an addition  to these 4 general components, so it makes sense that it should complement them by saying something new.

That’s why we like to define the essay as a “demonstration of character, values, and/or voice.” True, these elements can be inferred from other components of the application. But the essay is your opportunity to clearly and personally demonstrate what matters to you, who you are at the core, and/or your essential perspectives of the world.

For this reason, the college essay is introspective and personal. Colleges want to hear that “I” voice in the application essay, loud and clear, and they want active, intelligent reflection.

You can see this in action in the 30 college essays that worked, which you can download below.

( Note: Some colleges might require applicants to submit supplemental essays in addition to their personal statement. These often have very specific prompts and different word lengths. Here are 8 great tips for approaching supplemental essays . )

 7 Qualities of a Successful College Essay

We’ve assessed several college essays of applicants admitted to a wide range of schools, including Ivy League institutions. While extremely diverse, these pieces generally had the following characteristics in common.

1. Introspective and reflective

Many English teachers tell their students not to use the first-person “I” in their essays. While this might be the standard for some academic essays, the college essay  should  include that “I.” What’s more, it should include a  lot  of that “I”!

This can be understandably uncomfortable for students, many of whom may simply not be used to talking about themselves openly and declaratively on a page. It can also feel awkward from a stylistic point of view for students who are not used to writing in the first-person.

Yet colleges want to hear your words in your own voice, and they are especially interested in learning more about your perspectives on the world and insights gleaned from your various life experiences. That’s why many successful college essays are highly introspective, full of the writer’s active reflections on what they’ve learned, how they view the world, and who they are.

We typically see the bulk of such introspection at the  end  of an essay, where the writer summarizes these reflections (although this is by no means standard), as we can see in the conclusion to Erica’s essay here, which describes her earlier attempt to write and publish a novel:

Sometimes, when I’m feeling insecure about my ability as a novelist I open up my first draft again, turn to a random chapter, and read it aloud. Publishing that first draft would have been a horrible embarrassment that would have haunted me for the rest of my life. Over the past half-decade, I’ve been able to explore my own literary voice, and develop a truly original work that I will be proud to display. This experience taught me that “following your dreams” requires more than just wishing upon a star. It takes sacrifice, persistence, and grueling work to turn fantasy into reality.

In her personal statement, Aja reflects deeply on what she specifically learned from an experience described earlier on in the piece:

I found from my experiment and questioning within my mind that my practices distinguished me from others, thereby allowing me to form relationships on the basis of common interest or personality, rather than cultural similarities, that summer. I valued the relationships more, and formed a deep connection with my lab partner, whom I had found was similar to me in many ways. 

Notice how both of these selections contain a lot of that first-person voice, which is critical to elaborating perspectives, learning points, and introspective thoughts. And did we mention that admissions officers are  looking for  those specific perspectives, learning points, and thoughts that compose who you are?

2. Full of a student’s voice

An academic transcript can be revealing to admissions officers. The same goes for recommendation letters and resumes. But it’s hard to convey an individual voice in these application components. The college essay is your prime vehicle for speaking directly to colleges in your own words  about what matters to you.

Successful college essays thus veer away from the formal voice many students employ when writing academic essays. Rather, they showcase a student’s unique way of expressing themselves on a page, which can be, for example, humorous, informal, intimate, lyrical, and/or speculative.

Voice is at the forefront of Elizabeth’s essay about her love for “all that is spicy:”

I am an aspiring hot sauce sommelier. Ever since I was a child, I have been in search for all that is spicy. I began by dabbling in peppers of the jarred variety. Pepperoncini, giardiniera, sports peppers, and jalapeños became not only toppings, but appetizers, complete entrées, and desserts. As my palate matured, I delved into a more aggressive assortment of spicy fare. I’m not referring to Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, the crunchy snack devoured by dilettantes. No, it was bottles of infernal magma that came next in my tasting curriculum.

Notice how Elizabeth’s descriptions of her passion for spice are rich with her voice: playful, intelligent, and humorous. This also gives us insight into a specific aspect of her character–that’s the power of voice when it comes to personal essay writing, and college admissions officers are very interested in applicants’ characters.

3. Descriptive and engaging

You don’t have to be a natural creative writer to compose a successful college essay. Yet competitive essays aren’t afraid to dive deeply into a subject and describe it, whether that description relates to imagery, emotions, perspectives, or insights. A college essay shouldn’t leave the reader guessing in any way–it should be highly specific and it should tell your story in an engaging fashion.

Harry’s more intellectual essay presents his views on common values in society. He is careful to be very specific and descriptive in these views, incorporating both a relevant incident from history and his own direct relationship to the issue:

Admittedly, the problem of social integration is one I feel can be widely overstated – for example, when I was looking into some research for a similar topic a couple of years ago, I found numerous surveys indicating that ethnic minorities (especially Islam) identify much more closely with Britain than do the population at large. Still though, I, like many others, find myself constantly troubled by the prospect of the war from within that seems to be developing. This fear is fuelled by events such as the brutal killing of the soldier Lee Rigby at the hands of two British Muslims a couple of years ago.

In her essay, Amanda is extremely detailed in describing her experience as a caretaker for a difficult child. The result is a clear portrait of the challenge itself and Amanda’s relationship to this challenge, told from the perspective of an engaging storyteller:

Then I met Robyn, and I realized how wrong I was. Prone to anger, aggressive, sometimes violent (I have the scar to prove it). Every Sunday with Robyn was a challenge. Yoga, dancing, cooking, art, tennis – none of these activities held her interest for long before she would inevitably throw a tantrum or stalk over to a corner to sulk or fight with the other children. She alternated between wrapping her arms around my neck, declaring to anyone who passed by that she loved me, and clawing at my arms, screaming at me to leave her alone.

The successful college essays we see always  emerge from a place of honesty. Writing with honesty also is more likely to accurately convey a student’s unique voice, inspire reflection and introspection, and result in a descriptive, meaningful piece (all of the qualities listed in this post!).

Sometimes this means adopting a candid or direct voice on the page. James starts his essay frankly in this singular statement:

Simply put, my place of inner peace is the seat of that 50 foot sliver of carbon and kevlar called a rowing shell, cutting through the water in the middle of a race.

Or it might mean describing a challenge, vulnerability, or perspective truthfully, as Martin does in his essay about the experiences that have molded his character over the years:

Looking back, I have never been the “masculine boy” as society says my role to be. I have always thought I do not fit the social definition of a male as one who is “manly” and “sporty” and this alienating feeling of being different still persists today at times. However, I also have become more comfortable with myself, and I see my growth firsthand throughout high school.

Given that many universities value “truth” in their own mission statements and mottos, admissions officers will prioritize those essays that ring with a student’s honest voice.

5. Unconventional & distinct

This is by no means a requirement of a successful college essay. But many of the essays that earn students acceptance at their dream schools veer away from the predictable or expected, as we saw in Elizabeth’s essay above (“I am an aspiring hot sauce sommelier”). They are, in a nutshell, 100% unique.

We’ve seen some essays, for example, that follow more radical structures, such as list formats or experimental narratives. Others focus on unexpected subjects, like Shanaz’s piece on the relevance of Game of Thrones in her life and trajectory of learning.

And, time and again, successful college essays step away from what admissions officers already see in applications–academics, standardized tests, extracurricular activities, and classes. They may focus on something very specific (hot sauce or Game of Thrones ), seemingly ordinary (eating a kosher meal in public or working on a problem set), or personally interesting (a historic murder or wrestling game).

Regardless, the essays that “work” emphasize the unexpected, as opposed to the expected. Distinct essays will also feel as if they could not have been written by anyone else .

6. Well-written

This might also sound like an obvious quality of a successful essay, but it’s still worth mentioning. The most competitive application essays showcase strong writing skills, providing evidence of a student’s ability to tell a specific story artfully and well. 

Essays should also be error-free, grammatically precise, and stylistically on point. Successful pieces also might demonstrate versatility through varied sentence structure, word choice, and rhetorical or literary devices. Lastly, well-written essays typically adhere to a specific storytelling structure.

This excerpt from Justin’s essay about his experience in the California Cadet Corps, for example, displays a high command of language, word choice, and sentence structure:

Through Survival, I learned many things about myself and the way I approach the world. I realized that I take for granted innumerable small privileges and conveniences and that I undervalue what I do have. Now that I had experienced true and sustained hunger, I felt regret for times when I threw away food and behaved with unconscious waste. 

7. Meaningful

Above all, a successful college essay adds value to a student’s holistic college application. It is full of  meaning , in that it

  • showcases a student’s unique voice
  • elucidates an applicant’s particular perspective(s), character trait(s), and/or belief(s) and
  • honestly conveys a significant component of who a student is

It might be difficult to compress the entirety of who you are into 650 words. Yet it is most certainly possible to craft 650 words that add significant meaning to an overall application in terms of a student’s  personal potential for the future. This is exactly what admissions officers are looking for . 

What can you do to ensure that your college essay aligns with these successful qualities? You can check out examples of essays that do!

You can download 30 actual college essays that earned their writers acceptance into Ivy League schools, right now, for free.

essay on how to be a student

Kate is a graduate of Princeton University. Over the last decade, Kate has successfully mentored hundreds of students in all aspects of the college admissions process, including the SAT, ACT, and college application essay. 

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How To Become A Successful College Student (Essay/Paper Sample)

Table of Contents

How to become a successful college student

College can be an intense experience due to the numerous activities one has to assume and decisions to make without anyone’s push within limited time. Thus, to become successful, one needs to attend classes, utilize the school’s resources maximally, develop a rapport with the lecturers, be organized, develop a social life, and study.

First, one should ensure they are organized. The transition from high school to college bring about changes whereby one has to take control of their life and education by themselves without parents or a structured system making it easy to sail through. Therefore, a student striving for triumph has to learn to develop a schedule for their activities from classes, assignments, extra curriculum activities. Additionally, a student can utilize various tools such as applications in their smartphones that brings notifications for every event one is to conduct. Being organized ensures the planning of the most vital aspects of college life and reduces stress and confusion.

Secondly, the student has to attend classes. Going to class is the primary responsibility of a college, as this is where one learns, engages in discussions and makes a good impression on the professors. Failing to attend lectures results in loss of flow of a class and failure to understand the content as deliberations and examples made in class makes it comprehensible. Moreover, some professors grade students based on their attendance. Thus, one would not want to fail on this account. Teachers also appreciate students that show initiative and are likely to recommend them in future as they know and can vouch for them.

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Fourthly, a successful student should utilize all school resources. Colleges provide a broad array of readily available resources that makes a student an all-rounded individual. Resources such as libraries, writing centers, and career counseling offices provide free information that makes a student accomplished. To become successful, one has to utilize all these services as opposed to only attending classes as many opportunities such as career advice, internship placements among others, crucial to a student are available through these resources.

A student should also take the time to study. Succeeding in one’s education is pegged on the effort and time a student utilizes to prepare and review their notes. Studying for about two hours helps a student familiarize with class discussions, understand the content more and retain information. Studying in groups helps students support each other to review course materials and devise ways to excel in exams while acting as a support system in school.

Learning and attending classes in college makes up part of the experience. A social life is also crucial in making a student successful. Social aspects such as skills in associating with people, having interests and making connections contribute to the success of a student. Consequently, involving oneself in clubs and sporting activities helps a student unwind, and follow their passions that may not be in class. Cultural and athletics events help one expand their interests, and understanding of the college. Moreover, such events make excellent opportunities for students to develop friendships and meet new acquaintances.

In conclusion, becoming a successful student should be an easy and attainable undertaking. By organizing one’s life and activities, attending classes, developing a relationship with professors, having a social life, exploring college resources and studying will make college experience less challenging.

essay on how to be a student

How To Be A Successful College Student Essay

We often assume that successful students are smart, yet more they simply have discovered the keys for college success. Being college students is absolutely more challenged than being high school students. Therefore, they will need some bright keys to becoming a successful college student. Here are three essential keys to give college students’ success: study organization, learning skills, and extracurricular activities. One of the effective ways that lead students to success in college is getting organized.

First, students should choose their college classes wisely every semester. Therefore, students need to balance the easy subjects and the difficult subjects in each semester. In the first year of college, if students try to take too many difficult subjects, they quickly get exhausted. Another element of the organization that students should focus on is time management. Students should decide what to do in one semester and make a checklist about what they are planning. Next, they will need a mini calendar to check their works day by day and work by work.

Finally, students need to organize their school’s handouts all the time. For instance, students can use particular folders to separate various kinds of handouts from school work. In the same way, students can make different notebooks for the different subjects; for example, students can design the notebooks’ cover differently by different colors, images, and paintings which remind them of the subjects. Clearly, a student cannot hope to succeed if their study organization is not suitable. The second way to succeed in college is developing the beneficial learning skills.

Participating is one of the best ways to help students remember quickly what they have just learned in class. For example, students can try to answer the questions, raise their hand when the teacher asks for students to show their homework or write on the board, join in groups for discussing or doing assignments, and ask questions to make sense and solve what they misunderstand. The second simple skill is taking plentiful notes. To make good notes, students can use colorful pens or colorful notes for different information, and highlight the important words or ideas in notebooks and textbooks.

When students are expected to focus on the lesson, using initials, shorthand, and abbreviated symbols are also helpful to follow the class. In addition, making mind maps is an effective way to capture all the knowledge after every lesson. Students can create a mind map on paper or in an app on a tablet; furthermore, students can find out several useful software tools, which are available to buy or for free, on the Internet such as the mind map software tool of Tony Buzan, Xmind and so on. To this end, students can increase their success by taking notes, participating in class, and creating effective mind maps.

Success in school is not only trying to succeed in study work but also the college life. Joining in extracurricular activities also plays an important role in students’ success. This is another way of being successful that grades, test scores, and the academic classes cannot show. Many students have found that these kinds of activities can help them achieve various amazing things including scholarships from their college and a good background to get a good job after graduating from college.

Therefore, it is a good idea for students to seek extracurricular activities. Most importantly, students have to focus on personal unique skills. It is better if students take part in activities that support their major because students will get more experience for their school work and even their personal life when they follow their passion. The accomplishments outside the classroom show what students are passionate about and that they have qualities valued by colleges and the prospective employers.

In conclusion, organizing the school work intelligently, developing learning skills as well as satisfactory, and joining in extracurricular activities with an enormous passion. Furthermore, although each student has different ways to succeed in college, all of them still depend on students’ discipline or self-control. Hence, every college student who owns effective strategy in college life absolutely succeeds in their life. We often assume that successful students are smart, yet more they simply have discovered the keys for college success.

Being college students is absolutely more challenged than being high school students. Therefore, they will need some bright keys to becoming a successful college student. Here are three essential keys to give college students’ success: study organization, learning skills, and extracurricular activities. One of the effective ways that lead students to success in college is getting organized. First, students should choose their college classes wisely every semester. Therefore, students need to balance the easy subjects and the difficult subjects in each semester.

In the first year of college, if students try to take too many difficult subjects, they quickly get exhausted. Another element of the organization that students should focus on is time management. Students should decide what to do in one semester and make a checklist about what they are planning. Next, they will need a mini calendar to check their works day by day and work by work. Finally, students need to organize their school’s handouts all the time. For instance, students can use particular folders to separate various kinds of handouts from school work.

In the same way, students can make different notebooks for the different subjects. For example, students can design the notebooks’ cover differently by different colors, images, and paintings which remind them of the subjects. Clearly, a student cannot hope to succeed if their study organization is not suitable. The second way to succeed in college is developing the beneficial learning skills. Participating is one of the best ways to help students remember quickly what they have just learned in class.

For example, students can try to answer the questions, raise their hand when he teacher asks for students to show their homework or write on the board, join in groups for discussing or doing assignments, and ask questions to make sense and solve what they misunderstand. The second simple skill is taking plentiful notes. To make good notes, students can use colorful pens or colorful notes for different information, and highlight the important words or ideas in notebooks and textbooks. When students are expected to focus on the lesson, using initials, shorthand, and abbreviated symbols are also helpful to follow the class.

In addition, making mind maps is an effective way to capture all the knowledge after every lesson. Students can create a mind map on paper or in an app on a tablet; furthermore, students can find out several useful software tools, which are available to buy or for free, on the Internet such as the mind map software tool of Tony Buzan, Xmind and so on. To this end, students can increase their success by taking notes, participating in class, and creating effective mind maps. Success in school is not only trying to succeed in study work but also the college life.

Joining in extracurricular activities also plays an important role in students’ success. This is another way of being successful that grades, test scores, and the academic classes cannot show. Many students have found that these kinds of activities can help them achieve various amazing things including scholarships from their college and a good background to get a good job after graduating from college. Therefore, it is a good idea for students to seek extracurricular activities. Most importantly, students have to focus on personal unique skills.

It is better if students take part in activities that support their major because students will get more experience for their school work and even their personal life when they follow their passion. The accomplishments outside the classroom show what students are passionate about and that they have qualities valued by colleges and the prospective employers. In conclusion, organizing the school work intelligently, developing learning skills as well as satisfactory, and joining in extracurricular

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How To Being A Good Student Essay

Being a good student is a lot more than simply good grades. A lot of students would consider themselves an awesome student, so what does it mean to be a good student in the classroom and in the community? A good student will have a desire to learn and explore new things. They should be truthful academically. For instance, he or she would never present work done by others as if it were his or her work nor would they ever cheat on a test. There are several ways a student can set out from the rest of the class. These students are recognized by their attitude, intellectual skills, perception, and achievement. 

A good attitude is expected in the classroom setting. Attitude is a genuine desire to learn. It is also shown by how well you apply yourself to all subjects even in which case you do not really like the subject. Having a good attitude will help you perceive things in a different light. You will begin to understand that a good attitude can go a long way. Always be consistent, never miss a day of class. Doing your best in school should be your top priority. No one else can help reach the goal of having a good attitude, only you are to decide and make it a routine.

Intellectual skills are a must when being an excellent student. This skill includes being able to read and understand, effective study habits, and the ability to communicate clearly and fluently. Being able to comprehend while being taught will help you learn at a fast rate. Another commonly recognized intellectual skill is critical thinking which is the ability to analyze and interpret information. Other skills related to intellectual skills include setting goals and planning different ways to approach the problem. 

Perception is another useful aspect of being an awesome student in the classroom. He or she must be aware of the world around them. It should be important to be up to date on what is going on academically, politically, socially, and spiritually. Being aware and paying close attention as a wonderful trait to have. Its something you will need and maintain to learn and use.

Achievement is demonstrated by successful understanding. It gives you a sense of accomplishment and meaning. Having goals in a classroom setting, or a community setting, is always a smart idea. Good students ask questions and are curious. They are excited to be there and ready to flourish in whatever subject they are learning.  Students that are determined are easy to teach. Students that want to be at school, want to understand, want to be successful. 

Students are recognized by their attitude, intellectual skills, perception, and achievement. 

How to become a good student in the classroom and the environment is a competitive environment. Some of the skills throughout the essay can only be learned. Prioritizing your life is key. Always be sure to study, attend class, and have a good attitude about the subject being taught.

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  • How to Be a Good Student

How to Be a Good Student - Essay Example

How to Be a Good Student

  • Subject: Education
  • Type: Essay
  • Level: College
  • Pages: 3 (750 words)
  • Downloads: 40
  • Author: otis50

Extract of sample "How to Be a Good Student"

There are many responsibilities of being a good student, which are given in this paper. The first and foremost responsibility of a good student is to take interest in his studies as it is because of studies that a person gains the status of a student. As a student, the preference should be given to studies and it should be ensured that the student stands on a position in front of his teachers. A good student is one who studies devoted to the discipline of his/her choice and excels in the respective field.

He should be on time in submitting his assignments and papers. He should be hardworking and struggling (Ranarana 2009). Without hard work, success in studies is not possible.A good student should never cheat or copy his assignments. He should always struggle to produce original work according to the instructions of his teachers. By cheating or copying, a student is never able to get the qualification or ability, which he should have as a professional. Honesty is the best policy that is a famous quote and is applicable to students.

They should perform honestly in their educational assignments and papers. Along with not copying or cheating, a student is required to listen carefully to his teachers in order to perform better in their educational tenure. They should be attentive in classes (Cuesta College 2003). The instructions given by their teachers should never be considered negligible or unimportant. To be a good student, a person has to perform better in his studies with his own struggle and according to the instructions of his teachers.

The responsibilities of a good student also require a student to be supportive of his classmates. According to Ranarana (2009), the educational problems that are faced by students in their educational tenure should be resolved by other students who consider themselves as good or want to be good. Only hard work is not required by a good student but he along with being hardworking, a good student who has the responsibility to solve the issues of his classmates. By helping out his classmates, the capability of a good student will increase and not decrease.

By helping others, students help themselves. A good student is not required to pay attention to his studies only. He should not be a bookworm but a person who takes interest in all academic activities such as academic festivals, social gatherings, sporting events, and so on (Ranarana 2009). Involvement in other academic and social activities is able to make a student active due to which, he can give his best in his academics. A good brain is a healthy brain and the brain becomes healthy by engaging in diverse activities.

A good student should not only be devoted to getting good marks in his class but also moral education that is essential for the moral growth of a person (Classge 2008). A good student should be morally developed and should not cause troubles and problems for others but he should be helpful and supportive. Good students do not give credit for their doings to others. Good students always take accountability for their proceedings (Cuesta College 2003). If they are wrong somewhere, they accept it.

They are always the ones who are ready to fulfill their duties always without presenting any excuses. They should not feel restricted in taking help from others, as obtainment of knowledge from any source is always likable (Classge 2008). A good student is always responsive to his teachers and is ready for any kind of academic queries because of his interest in studies. Being responsive and dutiful is again the identification of a good student. It is quite clear that the responsibilities of a good student are many in number and it is not easy to be a good student.

A student is required to struggle continuously and help his classmates. He should be hardworking and honest. He should build his moral values. He should have a clear mind and he should take part in social and academic activities for a healthy brain. He should be ready to face any challenge in his educational tenure. Therefore, a student has to understand his responsibilities and perform his duties accordingly to be a good student.

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Law School Optional Essays: What to Know

Write optional essays only if they contribute to your case for admission.

Lawyer doing research on the internet using her laptop. Young woman working on a case. Female alone inside a library working on a project

A classic mistake applicants make is to write as much as allowed, hoping that something will stick. Applicants can best show their professionalism, communication skills and respect for the reader by writing efficiently and purposefully. (Getty Images)

Every law school requires applicants to submit a personal statement, typically limited to two or three double-spaced pages, along with a resume typically limited to two pages. These two documents provide applicants with their chief opportunities to detail their interests, goals and path to law school.

Beyond those core documents, many law schools allow other essays, usually optional but sometimes required. Most prominent is a type of essay that used to be called a diversity statement. 

Diversity, Perspective or Background Statements

Until recently, almost every law school offered an optional diversity statement. Prompts for diversity statements varied among law schools, but typically concerned an applicant’s identity and background, past hardships or potential to contribute to a diverse and inclusive campus environment.

After the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed race-conscious admissions policies in June 2023, law schools adapted diversity statements in different ways, which will likely continue to evolve over future admissions cycles.

Currently, most law schools offer one or more optional essay prompts that give applicants an opportunity to discuss their perspective, identity, personal adversity, experience interacting with diverse viewpoints or other topics related to diversity.

While it’s hard to generalize about all these essay prompts, they still differ from personal statements in many ways. They are more reflective, looking backward rather than forward. They often have tighter page or word limits.

The purpose of these optional statements is not solely for applicants to detail their unique background. Everyone is atypical in some ways . Rather, these optional essays are intended to free applicants from having to weave together their background and interests within the same two-page statement.

For example, imagine an Armenian American inspired by the trauma of the Armenian genocide to become an international human rights lawyer. This would make a great topic for a personal statement.

But what if that applicant actually feels most passionate about securities law? It would be counterproductive to force such a candidate to awkwardly cram genocide and securities law into the same essay. This is why schools allow applicants space to tell more complicated stories. 

Other Optional Law School Admission Essays

Beyond personal and diversity statements, some law schools also allow or require extra short essays. Most commonly, a school might ask about why an applicant would be a good fit for the school, often called a “Why this law school?” essay . These are almost always worthwhile to write.

Some schools have short-answer questions on topics like an applicant’s career goals or how an applicant aligns with the school’s values. A few schools, like Stanford University Law School in California and Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., have offbeat essay prompts that tend to vary from year to year.

Finally, some law schools provide dedicated space for applicants wishing to explain issues often covered by an addendum , like underperformance on standardized tests or in their transcripts. 

Are Optional Essays Worth Writing?

A classic mistake applicants make is to write as much as allowed , hoping that something will stick. Many law school applicants fear that if they fail to maximize every possible opportunity to write about themselves, they will appear lazy or disinterested. Therefore, they sabotage themselves by padding their application with redundant and repetitive text.

Applicants can best show their professionalism, communication skills and respect for the reader by writing efficiently and purposefully. Admissions officers have a limited amount of time, perhaps a matter of minutes, to review your application. Anything you write that does not contribute to a coherent argument for your admission risks wasting that time.

Thus, an optional essay is unnecessary if its key points are already adequately communicated through the personal statement or other materials. Optional essays should be used strategically to build your argument for admission. Don’t simply talk about yourself to fill space.

For example, if an optional essay prompt asks for your favorite book, there is no need to lie and claim that it is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

On the other hand, before you write about your love of "Harry Potter," consider whether and how that would bolster your application. Unless you can trace your interest in justice to Hermione’s efforts to emancipate house elves, you might be better off choosing another book or skipping the essay altogether.

In sum, optional essays should convey or emphasize something about you that your personal statement and other materials fail to address. If you cannot think of anything else that would strengthen your case, then forgo the essay. Like a lawyer, show meticulousness and fine judgment with restraint, not verbosity.

20 Law Schools That Pay Off

essay on how to be a student

Tags: law school , graduate schools , education , students

About Law Admissions Lowdown

Law Admissions Lowdown provides advice to prospective students about the law school application process, LSAT prep and potential career paths. Previously authored by contributors from Stratus Admissions Counseling, the blog is currently authored by Gabriel Kuris, founder of Top Law Coach , an admissions consultancy. Kuris is a graduate of Harvard Law School and has helped hundreds of applicants navigate the law school application process since 2003. Got a question? Email [email protected] .

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Machine Learning Who to Nudge: Causal vs Predictive Targeting in a Field Experiment on Student Financial Aid Renewal

In many settings, interventions may be more effective for some individuals than others, so that targeting interventions may be beneficial. We analyze the value of targeting in the context of a large-scale field experiment with over 53,000 college students, where the goal was to use “nudges” to encourage students to renew their financial-aid applications before a non-binding deadline. We begin with baseline approaches to targeting. First, we target based on a causal forest that estimates heterogeneous treatment effects and then assigns students to treatment according to those estimated to have the highest treatment effects. Next, we evaluate two alternative targeting policies, one targeting students with low predicted probability of renewing financial aid in the absence of the treatment, the other targeting those with high probability. The predicted baseline outcome is not the ideal criterion for targeting, nor is it a priori clear whether to prioritize low, high, or intermediate predicted probability. Nonetheless, targeting on low baseline outcomes is common in practice, for example because the relationship between individual characteristics and treatment effects is often difficult or impossible to estimate with historical data. We propose hybrid approaches that incorporate the strengths of both predictive approaches (accurate estimation) and causal approaches (correct criterion); we show that targeting intermediate baseline outcomes is most effective, while targeting based on low baseline outcomes is detrimental. In one year of the experiment, nudging all students improved early filing by an average of 6.4 percentage points over a baseline average of 37% filing, and we estimate that targeting half of the students using our preferred policy attains around 75% of this benefit.

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Second Alabama Prisoner's Body Returned to Family With Missing Organs

The news comes a month after a deceased man was returned to his family without his heart.

Another family is taking action against the Alabama Department of Corrections after the body of a deceased relative who died in prison was returned to them with his organs missing.

As reported by ABC 33/40 , the family of Charles Edward Singleton said in court documents that a funeral home found that all of his organs, including his brain, were missing. Singleton died in November 2021. Before his death, he was housed at the Hamilton Aged and Infirmed and was sent to a hospital for end-of-life care.

The family said the UAB's Department of Pathology performed an autopsy on the body. When they requested his body be sent to a funeral home, they were informed that it "would be difficult to prepare his body for viewing" because it was in a "noticeable state of decomposition," which the director described as "advanced skin slippage." His family claimed that they were told that all of his organs, including his brain, had been removed. Typically, when an autopsy is performed, organs are placed in a bag but are later put back in the body before being sent to a funeral home.

"We do not comment on pending litigation. We only conduct autopsies with consent or authorization and follow standard procedures equitably for anyone consented to or authorized for an autopsy," the UAB said regarding the case. "The autopsy practice is accredited by the College of American Pathologists and staffed by credentialed physicians who are certified by the American Board of Pathology."

The court documents about Singleton come not long after a former inmate's family filed a lawsuit against the Alabama state prison system for returning his body to them with his heart missing. In a federal lawsuit, the family of Brandon Clay Dotson, who died at the Ventress Correctional Facility on November 16, 2023, said that his body was sent to them in a "severely decomposed" state.

"The Alabama Department of Corrections—or an agent responsible for conducting the autopsy or transporting the body to his family—had, inexplicably and without the required permission from Mr. Dotson's next of kin, removed and retained Mr. Dotson's heart," the lawsuit alleges. They also claimed the prison failed to protect Dotson from harm, as he alerted the staff that he needed help because he believed other inmates were trying to harm him over drug debts.

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  • How to structure an essay: Templates and tips

How to Structure an Essay | Tips & Templates

Published on September 18, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

The basic structure of an essay always consists of an introduction , a body , and a conclusion . But for many students, the most difficult part of structuring an essay is deciding how to organize information within the body.

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Table of contents

The basics of essay structure, chronological structure, compare-and-contrast structure, problems-methods-solutions structure, signposting to clarify your structure, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about essay structure.

There are two main things to keep in mind when working on your essay structure: making sure to include the right information in each part, and deciding how you’ll organize the information within the body.

Parts of an essay

The three parts that make up all essays are described in the table below.

Order of information

You’ll also have to consider how to present information within the body. There are a few general principles that can guide you here.

The first is that your argument should move from the simplest claim to the most complex . The body of a good argumentative essay often begins with simple and widely accepted claims, and then moves towards more complex and contentious ones.

For example, you might begin by describing a generally accepted philosophical concept, and then apply it to a new topic. The grounding in the general concept will allow the reader to understand your unique application of it.

The second principle is that background information should appear towards the beginning of your essay . General background is presented in the introduction. If you have additional background to present, this information will usually come at the start of the body.

The third principle is that everything in your essay should be relevant to the thesis . Ask yourself whether each piece of information advances your argument or provides necessary background. And make sure that the text clearly expresses each piece of information’s relevance.

The sections below present several organizational templates for essays: the chronological approach, the compare-and-contrast approach, and the problems-methods-solutions approach.

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The chronological approach (sometimes called the cause-and-effect approach) is probably the simplest way to structure an essay. It just means discussing events in the order in which they occurred, discussing how they are related (i.e. the cause and effect involved) as you go.

A chronological approach can be useful when your essay is about a series of events. Don’t rule out other approaches, though—even when the chronological approach is the obvious one, you might be able to bring out more with a different structure.

Explore the tabs below to see a general template and a specific example outline from an essay on the invention of the printing press.

  • Thesis statement
  • Discussion of event/period
  • Consequences
  • Importance of topic
  • Strong closing statement
  • Claim that the printing press marks the end of the Middle Ages
  • Background on the low levels of literacy before the printing press
  • Thesis statement: The invention of the printing press increased circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation
  • High levels of illiteracy in medieval Europe
  • Literacy and thus knowledge and education were mainly the domain of religious and political elites
  • Consequence: this discouraged political and religious change
  • Invention of the printing press in 1440 by Johannes Gutenberg
  • Implications of the new technology for book production
  • Consequence: Rapid spread of the technology and the printing of the Gutenberg Bible
  • Trend for translating the Bible into vernacular languages during the years following the printing press’s invention
  • Luther’s own translation of the Bible during the Reformation
  • Consequence: The large-scale effects the Reformation would have on religion and politics
  • Summarize the history described
  • Stress the significance of the printing press to the events of this period

Essays with two or more main subjects are often structured around comparing and contrasting . For example, a literary analysis essay might compare two different texts, and an argumentative essay might compare the strengths of different arguments.

There are two main ways of structuring a compare-and-contrast essay: the alternating method, and the block method.

Alternating

In the alternating method, each paragraph compares your subjects in terms of a specific point of comparison. These points of comparison are therefore what defines each paragraph.

The tabs below show a general template for this structure, and a specific example for an essay comparing and contrasting distance learning with traditional classroom learning.

  • Synthesis of arguments
  • Topical relevance of distance learning in lockdown
  • Increasing prevalence of distance learning over the last decade
  • Thesis statement: While distance learning has certain advantages, it introduces multiple new accessibility issues that must be addressed for it to be as effective as classroom learning
  • Classroom learning: Ease of identifying difficulties and privately discussing them
  • Distance learning: Difficulty of noticing and unobtrusively helping
  • Classroom learning: Difficulties accessing the classroom (disability, distance travelled from home)
  • Distance learning: Difficulties with online work (lack of tech literacy, unreliable connection, distractions)
  • Classroom learning: Tends to encourage personal engagement among students and with teacher, more relaxed social environment
  • Distance learning: Greater ability to reach out to teacher privately
  • Sum up, emphasize that distance learning introduces more difficulties than it solves
  • Stress the importance of addressing issues with distance learning as it becomes increasingly common
  • Distance learning may prove to be the future, but it still has a long way to go

In the block method, each subject is covered all in one go, potentially across multiple paragraphs. For example, you might write two paragraphs about your first subject and then two about your second subject, making comparisons back to the first.

The tabs again show a general template, followed by another essay on distance learning, this time with the body structured in blocks.

  • Point 1 (compare)
  • Point 2 (compare)
  • Point 3 (compare)
  • Point 4 (compare)
  • Advantages: Flexibility, accessibility
  • Disadvantages: Discomfort, challenges for those with poor internet or tech literacy
  • Advantages: Potential for teacher to discuss issues with a student in a separate private call
  • Disadvantages: Difficulty of identifying struggling students and aiding them unobtrusively, lack of personal interaction among students
  • Advantages: More accessible to those with low tech literacy, equality of all sharing one learning environment
  • Disadvantages: Students must live close enough to attend, commutes may vary, classrooms not always accessible for disabled students
  • Advantages: Ease of picking up on signs a student is struggling, more personal interaction among students
  • Disadvantages: May be harder for students to approach teacher privately in person to raise issues

An essay that concerns a specific problem (practical or theoretical) may be structured according to the problems-methods-solutions approach.

This is just what it sounds like: You define the problem, characterize a method or theory that may solve it, and finally analyze the problem, using this method or theory to arrive at a solution. If the problem is theoretical, the solution might be the analysis you present in the essay itself; otherwise, you might just present a proposed solution.

The tabs below show a template for this structure and an example outline for an essay about the problem of fake news.

  • Introduce the problem
  • Provide background
  • Describe your approach to solving it
  • Define the problem precisely
  • Describe why it’s important
  • Indicate previous approaches to the problem
  • Present your new approach, and why it’s better
  • Apply the new method or theory to the problem
  • Indicate the solution you arrive at by doing so
  • Assess (potential or actual) effectiveness of solution
  • Describe the implications
  • Problem: The growth of “fake news” online
  • Prevalence of polarized/conspiracy-focused news sources online
  • Thesis statement: Rather than attempting to stamp out online fake news through social media moderation, an effective approach to combating it must work with educational institutions to improve media literacy
  • Definition: Deliberate disinformation designed to spread virally online
  • Popularization of the term, growth of the phenomenon
  • Previous approaches: Labeling and moderation on social media platforms
  • Critique: This approach feeds conspiracies; the real solution is to improve media literacy so users can better identify fake news
  • Greater emphasis should be placed on media literacy education in schools
  • This allows people to assess news sources independently, rather than just being told which ones to trust
  • This is a long-term solution but could be highly effective
  • It would require significant organization and investment, but would equip people to judge news sources more effectively
  • Rather than trying to contain the spread of fake news, we must teach the next generation not to fall for it

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Signposting means guiding the reader through your essay with language that describes or hints at the structure of what follows.  It can help you clarify your structure for yourself as well as helping your reader follow your ideas.

The essay overview

In longer essays whose body is split into multiple named sections, the introduction often ends with an overview of the rest of the essay. This gives a brief description of the main idea or argument of each section.

The overview allows the reader to immediately understand what will be covered in the essay and in what order. Though it describes what  comes later in the text, it is generally written in the present tense . The following example is from a literary analysis essay on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein .

Transitions

Transition words and phrases are used throughout all good essays to link together different ideas. They help guide the reader through your text, and an essay that uses them effectively will be much easier to follow.

Various different relationships can be expressed by transition words, as shown in this example.

Because Hitler failed to respond to the British ultimatum, France and the UK declared war on Germany. Although it was an outcome the Allies had hoped to avoid, they were prepared to back up their ultimatum in order to combat the existential threat posed by the Third Reich.

Transition sentences may be included to transition between different paragraphs or sections of an essay. A good transition sentence moves the reader on to the next topic while indicating how it relates to the previous one.

… Distance learning, then, seems to improve accessibility in some ways while representing a step backwards in others.

However , considering the issue of personal interaction among students presents a different picture.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

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  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

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The structure of an essay is divided into an introduction that presents your topic and thesis statement , a body containing your in-depth analysis and arguments, and a conclusion wrapping up your ideas.

The structure of the body is flexible, but you should always spend some time thinking about how you can organize your essay to best serve your ideas.

An essay isn’t just a loose collection of facts and ideas. Instead, it should be centered on an overarching argument (summarized in your thesis statement ) that every part of the essay relates to.

The way you structure your essay is crucial to presenting your argument coherently. A well-structured essay helps your reader follow the logic of your ideas and understand your overall point.

Comparisons in essays are generally structured in one of two ways:

  • The alternating method, where you compare your subjects side by side according to one specific aspect at a time.
  • The block method, where you cover each subject separately in its entirety.

It’s also possible to combine both methods, for example by writing a full paragraph on each of your topics and then a final paragraph contrasting the two according to a specific metric.

You should try to follow your outline as you write your essay . However, if your ideas change or it becomes clear that your structure could be better, it’s okay to depart from your essay outline . Just make sure you know why you’re doing so.

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    At College Essay Guy, we too like good stories well told. The problem is that sometimes students have really good stories … that just aren't well told. They have the seed of an idea and the makings of a great story, but the essay formatting or structure is all over the place. Which can lead a college admissions reader to see you as ...

  18. How To Become A Successful College Student (Essay/Paper Sample)

    How to become a successful college student Need an essay customized under your requirements? We can help you How to become a successful college student College can be an intense experience due to the numerous activities one has to assume and decisions to make without anyone's push within limited time.

  19. How To Be A Successful College Student Essay Essay

    Here are three essential keys to give college students' success: study organization, learning skills, and extracurricular activities. One of the effective ways that lead students to success in college is getting organized. First, students should choose their college classes wisely every semester.

  20. How To Being A Good Student Essay

    How To Being A Good Student Essay Being a good student is a lot more than simply good grades. A lot of students would consider themselves an awesome student, so what does it mean to be a good student in the classroom and in the community? A good student will have a desire to learn and explore new things. They should be truthful academically.

  21. College Essay Examples

    Essay 3: Showing the influence of an important person or thing. This essay uses a narrative structure to show how a pet positively influenced the student's values and character. In the weak draft, the student doesn't focus on himself, instead delving into too much detail about his dog's positive traits and his grandma's illness.

  22. I'm a Student. You Have No Idea How Much We're Using ChatGPT

    May 12, 2023. Look at any high school or college academic integrity policy, and you'll find the same message: submit work that reflects your own thinking, or face discipline. A year ago, this ...

  23. How to Be a Good Student

    Level: College Pages: 3 (750 words) Downloads: 40 Author: otis50 Extract of sample "How to Be a Good Student" There are many responsibilities of being a good student, which are given in this paper.

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    Write optional essays only if they contribute to your case for admission. A classic mistake applicants make is to write as much as allowed, hoping that something will stick. Applicants can best ...

  26. Machine Learning Who to Nudge: Causal vs Predictive Targeting in a

    In many settings, interventions may be more effective for some individuals than others, so that targeting interventions may be beneficial. We analyze the value of targeting in the context of a large-scale field experiment with over 53,000 college students, where the goal was to use "nudges" to encourage students to renew their financial-aid applications before a non-binding deadline.

  27. Second Alabama Prisoner's Body Returned to Family With ...

    Singleton died in November 2021. Before his death, he was housed at the Hamilton Aged and Infirmed and was sent to a hospital for end-of-life care. The family said the UAB's Department of ...

  28. How to Structure an Essay

    The basic structure of an essay always consists of an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. But for many students, the most difficult part of structuring an essay is deciding how to organize information within the body. This article provides useful templates and tips to help you outline your essay, make decisions about your structure, and ...