Parent Previews movie ratings and movie reviews

Find Family Movies, Movie Ratings and Movie Reviews

The Blind parents guide

The Blind Parent Guide

This christian film tells a heartfelt story of family, faith and redemption..

Theaters: This biopic tells the story of how Phil Robertson overcame alcoholism and the pain of his past to become a successful father and founder of a business empire.

Release date October 6, 2023

Run Time: 108 minutes

Get Content Details

The guide to our grades, parent movie review by kirsten hawkes.

A drunk walks into a bar and decides to buy it as a way to curb his drinking and spend more time with his kids. No, this isn’t the beginning of a bad joke: it’s just one chapter in the life of Phil Robertson, later to become the patriarch of the Duck Dynasty family .

Born into poverty in Louisiana, young Phil (Ronan Carroll) spends his childhood hunting to put food on the table while his father works on the oil rigs and his mother is repeatedly hospitalized for mental illness. He gains detailed knowledge of the woods and feels most truly at home there – a feeling that haunts him in university and while working after graduation. Despite his marriage to the devoted Miss Kay (Amelia Eve), Phil (now played by Aron von Andrian) remains restless. He struggles to focus on his teaching job and spends as much time as possible on the river and in the woods. Soon, Phil is drinking heavily which leads to unemployment, gambling, domestic violence, and neglect of his family as his life spirals ever closer to rock bottom.

The answer is in the movie’s name, which has a twofold meaning. First, it refers to a duck blind, a camouflaged shelter used by hunters so they will be less visible to their targets. Second, it refers to Phil’s own blindness regarding his life, specifically his spiritual blindness. When he experiences a religious conversion and returns to his outdoor roots, Phil finds hope, inspiration, and a clearer vision for supporting his family.

Regular readers of this website know that I frequently bemoan the quality of Christian films, but I don’t need to complain as much with this one. Yes, the frame narrative is wooden, the acting is occasionally flat, and the dialogue isn’t always believable, but this movie has heart and lacks the “plastic” feeling that is usually part of movies-with-a-message. Evangelical Christians will appreciate this representation of their faith and other Christians will find resonance too. Even if you’re not a religious believer, this story of personal redemption and its illustration of Christian conversion, shorn of politics and culture wars, is uplifting and hopeful. (Whether or not you want to stick around for Phil Robertson’s post-movie sermon is another matter.)

The biggest downside of The Blind is the negative content. Inevitably, a film about alcoholism will feature frequent bouts of excessive drinking, and this one adds cigarette smoking to the mix. Phil drives drunk, crashes his car, and abuses his wife - yelling, threatening, shoving and throwing things at her. Viewers with strong feelings about hunting or firearms will be unhappy about scenes of a child using a gun, and repeated images of birds being shot out of the sky. Parents will also be disturbed at the sight of children working in a bar, even if they aren’t serving alcohol.

I must admit that I expected to dislike this film, given that I loathe Duck Dynasty . Thankfully, this film eschews the culture wars of the TV series and tells a universal story of family resilience, redemption and growth. You don’t have to enjoy killing ducks to appreciate that message.

About author

Kirsten hawkes, watch the trailer for the blind.

The Blind Rating & Content Info

Why is The Blind rated PG-13? The Blind is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for thematic content and smoking

Violence: There are many hunting scenes where guns are fired and ducks fall from the sky. Dead birds are shown being carried by hunters. A mentally ill woman yells at and frightens her children. She later screams when she is taken to a mental hospital against her will. There are domestic violence scenes where a man yells at, threatens, shoves, and throws things at his wife. A drunk driver crashes his car into a tree. Sexual Content: A man and woman are seen kissing on a few occasions. A teenage girl gets pregnant before eventually marrying the father of her child. Profanity: The script contains a minor profanity and a scatological curse. Alcohol / Drug Use:   There are frequent scenes of adults drinking alcohol to excess. Alcoholism is a major theme of the movie and alcohol use is not glorified; in fact, its terrible consequences are clearly demonstrated. Adults smoke cigarettes.

Page last updated October 6, 2023

Related home video titles:

Another story of complicated relationships in a Christian family is The Hill , which is based on the true story of baseball player, Rickey Hill.

A real-life couple finds peace in their faith when they face a cancer diagnosis in I Still Believe .

Gospel music helps Aretha Franklin break free from her alcohol addiction in Respect.

Unbroken: Path to Redemption tells the story of Louis Zamperini, who endured a Japanese POW camp before returning home. This film covers is battles with alcohol and other challenges as he tries to adjust to civilian life.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Common Sense Media

Movie & TV reviews for parents

  • For Parents
  • For Educators
  • Our Work and Impact

Or browse by category:

  • Get the app
  • Movie Reviews
  • Best Movie Lists
  • Best Movies on Netflix, Disney+, and More

Common Sense Selections for Movies

focus on the family movie review the blind

50 Modern Movies All Kids Should Watch Before They're 12

focus on the family movie review the blind

  • Best TV Lists
  • Best TV Shows on Netflix, Disney+, and More
  • Common Sense Selections for TV
  • Video Reviews of TV Shows

focus on the family movie review the blind

Best Kids' Shows on Disney+

focus on the family movie review the blind

Best Kids' TV Shows on Netflix

  • Book Reviews
  • Best Book Lists
  • Common Sense Selections for Books

focus on the family movie review the blind

8 Tips for Getting Kids Hooked on Books

focus on the family movie review the blind

50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They're 12

  • Game Reviews
  • Best Game Lists

Common Sense Selections for Games

  • Video Reviews of Games

focus on the family movie review the blind

Nintendo Switch Games for Family Fun

focus on the family movie review the blind

  • Podcast Reviews
  • Best Podcast Lists

Common Sense Selections for Podcasts

focus on the family movie review the blind

Parents' Guide to Podcasts

focus on the family movie review the blind

  • App Reviews
  • Best App Lists

focus on the family movie review the blind

Social Networking for Teens

focus on the family movie review the blind

Gun-Free Action Game Apps

focus on the family movie review the blind

Reviews for AI Apps and Tools

  • YouTube Channel Reviews
  • YouTube Kids Channels by Topic

focus on the family movie review the blind

Parents' Ultimate Guide to YouTube Kids

focus on the family movie review the blind

YouTube Kids Channels for Gamers

  • Preschoolers (2-4)
  • Little Kids (5-7)
  • Big Kids (8-9)
  • Pre-Teens (10-12)
  • Teens (13+)
  • Screen Time
  • Social Media
  • Online Safety
  • Identity and Community

focus on the family movie review the blind

Explaining the News to Our Kids

  • Family Tech Planners
  • Digital Skills
  • All Articles
  • Latino Culture
  • Black Voices
  • Asian Stories
  • Native Narratives
  • LGBTQ+ Pride
  • Best of Diverse Representation List

focus on the family movie review the blind

Celebrating Black History Month

focus on the family movie review the blind

Movies and TV Shows with Arab Leads

focus on the family movie review the blind

Celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th Anniversary

Common sense media reviewers.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Drama about Duck Dynasty star has substance abuse, swearing.

The Blind Movie Poster: Amelia Eve rests her head on Aron von Andrian's chest as he looks down at her

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

It's important to choose compassion and empathy ev

Phil is overcome in his adult life by alcoholism,

Main characters are White. Two supporting Black ch

Scenes with domestic violence, including punching

A making-out scene.

Infrequent swearing includes "damn" and "s--t."

Phil Robertson is well known as the personality be

Many scenes depicting Phil in the throes of alcoho

Parents need to know that The Blind is a faith-centered biopic about Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson (Aron von Andrian). Through a religious lens, it focuses on the idea of redemption and forgiveness. Mature content isn't constant but includes strong language ("damn," "s--t") and many scenes with or…

Positive Messages

It's important to choose compassion and empathy even in hard circumstances. The importance of humility, gratitude, courage, and self-control are also in play, especially when it comes to overcoming addiction.

Positive Role Models

Phil is overcome in his adult life by alcoholism, self-loathing, and abusive tantrums, possibly due to trauma he faced in relation to his unstable mother. But compassion and empathy of others -- including his siblings, his wife Kay (Amelia Eve), his local pastor -- and compassion for himself allow him to grow into a better father and husband. Phil's humility and gratitude keep him grounded in his new, faith-driven life. Phil also learns how to control himself amid temptation to go back to his old habits. Even though Phil starts out rocky, he shows how someone can become a better person by confronting unhealthy habits and problematic coping skills.

Diverse Representations

Main characters are White. Two supporting Black characters have a few lines: a Black woman to whom Phil sells fish (for her family's restaurant) and a man at a bar Phil frequents who gambles with Phil. Both characterizations are mostly benign, with a lean toward positive representation in the case of the woman. But women other than the main character's wife, Kay, are largely left out of the film. Kay does grow throughout her turbulent years with Phil while he's in the grip of alcoholism; when he kicks her and their children out of their home, she becomes more independent and self-sufficient. But she's also portrayed as unrealistically angelic, steadfast, and understanding, even when Phil is at his worst.

Did we miss something on diversity? Suggest an update.

Violence & Scariness

Scenes with domestic violence, including punching walls, flipping tables, violently pushing someone against a refrigerator, and more. Scene of a drunken car accident (Phil runs his truck into a tree). Hunting scenes with guns. Scenes of emotional violence, including hurtful, violent tantrums.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Products & Purchases

Phil Robertson is well known as the personality behind Duck Dynasty and its related products.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Many scenes depicting Phil in the throes of alcoholism. Smoking.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that The Blind is a faith-centered biopic about Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson (Aron von Andrian). Through a religious lens, it focuses on the idea of redemption and forgiveness. Mature content isn't constant but includes strong language ("damn," "s--t") and many scenes with or of drinking -- including alcohol addiction -- and smoking. There are scenes that could be considered domestic abuse, such as slamming walls, intimidation, flipping tables, and violent pushing. And some scenes depict hunting (the use of guns) and a violent but non-fatal car crash. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

Where to Watch

Videos and photos.

The Blind Movie: Aaron Dalla Villa and Amelia Eve look despondent as they stand on the porch

Community Reviews

  • Parents say (1)
  • Kids say (2)

Based on 1 parent review

Great message

What's the story.

THE BLIND is based on the life of Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson (Aron von Andrian). It follows Robertson from childhood to adulthood, including his marriage to Kay (Amelia Eve). He must come to terms with his own turbulent childhood and his addiction to alcohol in order to regain himself, his family, and a renewed life.

Is It Any Good?

This is a compelling drama about the personal struggles and redemption of the man whose duck calls led to the popular hit reality series Duck Dynasty . Fans of that show might have already heard about Robertson's past issues related to addiction and the trauma of growing up with an unstable mother, but if you're new to his story, The Blind tells it with panache. The acting grabs you, especially as Robertson becomes more controlled by his dependency and self-loathing. As with any hero's journey, he must face his truest test -- himself -- to be able to come back from the brink.

Robertson has said that being baptized and finding God saved him from his various demons. This leads to proselytizing in the film that's both subtle and overt -- especially at the end, when the real Robertson, a Bible in his lap, talks to the camera about his personal journey, equating it to being in the grips of the devil, only to be saved by Jesus. If you're already religious or spiritual, you might feel comforted or recognize your own personal understanding of God in Robertson's words. But if you're not one for organized religion (or just don't like watching media that's intended as a preaching tool), The Blind might not be the best movie for you. Religion aside, however, The Blind can offer insight into the psychology that allows people like Robertson to feel renewed within the embrace of organized religion, especially if the message they find there helps them save themselves and their family.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about how religion is used in The Blind . Is this a faith-based film? Why, or why not?

How is Phil's dependency on alcohol depicted? Does it feel truthful? Are there realistic consequences? Why does that matter?

How is Kay characterized? Is her character realistic, or does she feel idealized?

How did Phil's childhood experiences affect his adult life? How does the film depict the way that people can grow from their prior experiences?

How accurate do you think the movie is to the facts of Phil's life? Why might filmmakers choose to adjust real events when making a movie based on real events?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : September 28, 2023
  • On DVD or streaming : November 14, 2023
  • Cast : Aron von Andrian , Amelia Eve , John Ales , Connor Tillman
  • Director : Andrew Hyatt
  • Inclusion Information : Female actors
  • Studio : Fathom Events
  • Genre : Drama
  • Character Strengths : Compassion , Courage , Empathy , Gratitude , Humility , Self-control
  • Run time : 108 minutes
  • MPAA rating : PG-13
  • MPAA explanation : thematic content and smoking
  • Last updated : December 5, 2023

Did we miss something on diversity?

Research shows a connection between kids' healthy self-esteem and positive portrayals in media. That's why we've added a new "Diverse Representations" section to our reviews that will be rolling out on an ongoing basis. You can help us help kids by suggesting a diversity update.

Suggest an Update

Our editors recommend.

Four Good Days Poster Image

Four Good Days

Want personalized picks for your kids' age and interests?

Beautiful Boy

Breakthrough Poster Image

Breakthrough

The Shack Poster Image

Faith-Based Movies

Movies that promote self-control, related topics.

  • Self-control

Want suggestions based on your streaming services? Get personalized recommendations

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

Daily Citizen

  • DC Morning Headlines
  • Weekly Newsletter
  • Daily Headlines
  • Religious Freedom
  • Homosexuality
  • Sexuality/Marriage
  • Transgender
  • Contributors

Select Page

Duck Dynasty Film ‘The Blind’ Hits Home Theaters After Record-Breaking $16.8 Million Release

Posted by Zachary Mettler | Nov 6, 2023 | Culture

Duck Dynasty Film ‘The Blind’ Hits Home Theaters After Record-Breaking $16.8 Million Release

The new film The Blind broke records as the most successful release in Fathom Events’ history earning over $16.8 million in ticket sales at the box office.

The movie is a Christian biographical drama that details the lives of Phil and Kay Robertson. It follows them from childhood through marriage and portrays their deep struggles as a young family.

Phil founded the hunting and outdoor recreation company Duck Commander in 1972. Phil and Kay have four sons – Jase, Al, Willie and Jep. Their lives and stories were revealed to the nation through the hit reality TV show Duck Dynasty , which aired from 2012 to 2017.

The Blind : The True Story of the Robertson Family was released on September 28, 2023, in nearly 2,000 theaters. According to Deadline , the film was originally set to run for eight days in theaters before its run was extended twice due to extremely high demand.

Now, The Blind is available on streaming platforms including Amazon Prime, Apple TV, Fandango and Google Play, among others, and will be released on Blue-ray and DVD on November 14.

Miss Kay told the Washington Examiner that it wasn’t easy to let people see the turmoil of her story.

“I still dream about it. Like you know, the bad. And then I’m so glad I wake up because then that’s not true,” she said, adding,

We wanted to help people, and I know for a fact that’s what the film is doing. It’s helping people, and that was the main goal behind the movie. And I’m excited about that. I really am.

You can watch a trailer for The Blind here:

While The Blind may tell the story of the Robertson family’s redemption, as Phil and Kay make clear in the movie – it wasn’t them doing the redeeming.

God was the one who redeemed and restored the Robertson family. And He’s ready and willing to redeem and restore each and every one of us, if we choose to cooperate and turn to Him.

“ He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. For you were straying like sheep, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls ” (1 Peter 2:24-25, ESV).

You can read Focus on the Family’s Plugged In movie review of The Blind by clicking here .

To speak with a family help specialist or request resources, please call us at 1-800-A-FAMILY (232-6459).

Phil and Kay Robertson recently appeared on an episode of the Focus on the Family Broadcast “ Hunting for Hope and Happiness ” to share their inspiring story of love and redemption. You can listen to them reflect on their tumultuous first years of marriage, and how God transformed their relationship, by clicking here .

If your marriage is struggling, Focus on the Family offers  Hope Restored Marriage Intensives .  Hope Restored is a biblically based, Christian counseling experience for couples facing a crisis moment in their marriage or suffering from years of disconnection and relationship decay .  You can find out more about  Hope Restored  here .

Related articles and resources:

Counseling Consultation & Referrals

Hope Restored

Focus on the Family: Faith

Plugged In Review: The Blind

Hunting for Hope and Happiness

Celebrating Christmas as a Family

Embracing God’s Grace for a Past Abortion

Finding Peace of Mind in Christ

Photo from The Blind .

About The Author

Zachary Mettler

Zachary Mettler

Zachary Mettler works as a staff writer and communications liaison for the Daily Citizen at Focus on the Family. In his role, he writes about current political issues, U.S. history, political philosophy, and culture. Mettler earned his Bachelor’s degree from William Jessup University and is an alumnus of the Young Leaders Program at The Heritage Foundation. In addition to the Daily Citizen, his written pieces have appeared in the Daily Wire, the Washington Times, the Washington Examiner, Newsweek, Townhall, the Daily Signal, the Christian Post, Charisma News and other outlets.

Related Posts

Starbucks Problem with Porn, How the Nation’s Largest Coffee Chain Is Hesitant to Filter Its Wi-Fi

Starbucks Problem with Porn, How the Nation’s Largest Coffee Chain Is Hesitant to Filter Its Wi-Fi

January 30, 2019

The Humility and Integrity of George HW Bush

The Humility and Integrity of George HW Bush

December 5, 2018

Eulogies for President George H.W. Bush

Eulogies for President George H.W. Bush

Baseball, Racism and Healing

Baseball, Racism and Healing

February 19, 2019

Woman being interviewed with the text parental right are under attack printed to her left

Recent Posts

  • Meta Takes Steps to Prevent Kids From Sexting
  • To Radicals, Every Day is Doomsday
  • Scottie Scheffler: ‘I Believe in Jesus. That’s What Defines Me Most.’
  • Is Richard Dawkins One Step Closer to a Christian Conversion?
  • Philadelphia Legislators Tackle Drug Crisis, Face Opposition from Harm Reduction Groups
  • Classic Citizen
  • Election 2022
  • Focus Foundations Series
  • Free Resources
  • Free Speech
  • Government Updates
  • How to Get Involved
  • FTC Disclosure
  • Privacy Policy

Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer

  • Book Blogger Hop
  • _Grab a Button!
  • Midnight Horror
  • _Author Interview
  • _Review Requests
  • _Saturday Takeover!
  • _Sponsored Posts

Wednesday, September 27, 2023

[review] — "the blind" is a dramatic journey into the marriage of phil and kay robertson — {giveaway}.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Giveaway Details

10 comments:.

focus on the family movie review the blind

I am a super fan of the Duck Dynasty tv show and can not wait to see this movie it looks amazing! heather hgtempaddy

I would like to see this with my husband.

This looks really good.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Looks like a great film!@

focus on the family movie review the blind

This is another movie that I would be interested in seeing.

I do like to view movies that are inspirational.

I would enjoy seeing this movie on a Sunday afternoon.

focus on the family movie review the blind

I look forward to seeing this loved Duck Dynasty. Thanks for sharing.

I find movies hold my interest when they are about real life people.

I really should have watched Duck Dynasty when it was popular.

I adore reading reader feedback! I will, however, remove all spam and pointless comments. Please take note that I have the right to delete comments from this site. Please only post constructive and respectful feedback.

My photo

This Week's Hop

Featured post, [review] — harlan ellison's "greatest hits".

focus on the family movie review the blind

Upcoming ROCKSTAR Blog Tours

Upcoming ROCKSTAR Blog Tours

Get new posts by email:

Help support this blog.

focus on the family movie review the blind

2024 Reading Goals

2024 reading challenge.

2024 Reading Challenge

Book Reviews

Movie reviews, blog archive.

Creative Commons License

ALLHORROR.COM

ALLHORROR.COM

Visit These Authors and Bloggers

  • Martha Woods: Paranormal Romance Author

Recent Comments

focus on the family movie review the blind

Movie Review: A Duck Dynasty’s origin myth is related in “The Blind”

focus on the family movie review the blind

If Oprah taught us anything, it’s that we’re all the heroes of our own narrative and entitled to speak our “Truth.”

So let’s give Louisiana’s Robertson clan, who brought camo, duck calls, huntin’ and fishin’ and Z.Z. Top beards into vogue during the run of their sometimes controversia l 2012-2017 TV “reality” series , a movie to spin their own origin myth.

It’s hard to overstate the impact this rowdy crew of “redneck millionaires” and swamp s—kickers had on pop culture — at least for a spell. Fans tuned in each week to a white Southern Protestant family’s “Beverly Hillbillies” nouveau riche cavorting with cash, with its patriarch’s duck call and Duck Commander brand the source of their wealth

The show had its critics, especially when that patriarch, Phil Robertson, let his “traditional” Southern Christian conservative beliefs get out off camera — homophobia and patronizing racism included. That didn’t get the show canceled, but it made the decision easier to wrap it up and usher them more or less off the air in 2017.

“The Blind” lets Phil and matriarch Kay tell their stories — mostly Phil’s — as related in a mid-life chat held with a friend in a duck blind, years before TV entered the picture.

It’s a fictionalized, family-authorized “true story” that’s equal parts “Where the Crawdads Sing” and classic Christian redemption story of the “Sergeant York/Apostle” variety.

The film, which ends with a post-sermon homily by Robertson himself, let’s us see the irresponsible, selfish, childish hellion he was before alcoholic rages and the near end of his marriage led him to Jesus.

Movie versions notwithstanding, this is a classic narrative of white Southern culture and remains wildly attractive to people with hard lives who recognize the turning point faith might have offered them and other “lost souls” they know.

The film, a choppy, sometimes amateurish affair that stumbles into as many questions as it answers, lets the Robertsons have it both ways. It establishes Phil’s s—kicker bonafides, which is a vital part of the family brand, and ties his success in life to his Baptism, also a big part of the family brand.

There was a lot of talk about the “fake” nature of reality TV when this series was at its peak, with every week serving up a “Dog the Bounty Hunter,” “Honey Boo Boo” or “Duck Dynasty” “what they’re REALLY like off camera” scandal. So one can’t vouch for the veracity of the Robertson family lore related here.

But here’s what they, or the screenwriters and the actors playing younger versions of them, tell us happened.

Black-beared Phil ( Aron von Adrian ) relates to a friend the hardscrabble life he ( Ronan Carroll plays him as a tween, Matthew Erik White plays Phil as a teen) and his siblings endured, daddy “away on a job” (oil rigs in the Gulf), mom ( Kerry Knuppe ), stressed, broke and furiously losing her grasp of reality in their dire situation.

We see how Phil met the local grocery store owner’s daughter Kay ( Scarlett Abinante and Brielle Robinard play her as a tween and teen), the “woman I was gonna marry,” zeroing in on her lack of judgment about their different stations in life and her kind contribution of groceries to the starving Robertsons.

There’s an account of Phil’s athletic prowess, which got him into Louisiana Tech, that seems only slightly exaggerated. No, he probably didn’t tell future Hall of Famer Terry Bradshaw “It’s your turn” when he dropped out off the team because “It was huntin’ season,” and he’d married young Kay and started a family.

Years pass, jobs change, and taking ownership of a bar does nothing to help Phil’s yearning for self-employed/self-sufficient “freedom” and indifferent parenting.

The narrative shifts points of view every so often as we see the years and trials caused by Phil’s refusal to stick to school teaching, preferring a life of fishing and hunting, his taking up smoking and drinking thanks to a school administrator buddy ( Connor Tillman ) and Kay’s struggles with this irresponsible absentee lout who got violent any time his drinking and shiftlessness were brought up.

And then there’s the preacher ( John Ales ) who gives Kay a lifeline, and eventually reaches out to Phil when he hits rock bottom, as such stories ordain that he must.

The script skips forward in leaps and bounds, leans too heavily on Phil’s voice-over narration, misses some touching moments and fails to move us in others.

The acting is indifferent, the production values single-wide/swamp skiff/wrecked pickup cheap, with a score built on plaintive violin solos and cut-rate covers of pop hits from a couple of eras, with I think Billy Gibbsons covering his “La Grange” for a version for use in the film’s 1970s scenes.

A cynic might note that given Phil Robertson’s unenlightened attitudes on race, the script made sure to get Black folks into two scenes.

And the whole religious part of the Robertsons” “Family, Faith and Ducks” creed reminds one that “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel” and “Religion is the hustlers’ last con.”

Whatever potential it had, the film just isn’t very good, with or without fact checking. That redemption story arc works for a reason. Done right, it touches people. Director Andreww Hyatt, who did the Caivezel “Paul, Apostle of Christ” picture a couple of years back, can’t make this version work and the script’s humorless, emotionally flat treatment of the material smothers “The Blind” in the crib.

But Robertson clan fans know about it, as a packed matinee showing I caught in rural Florida proved, and a rural Virginia’s ticket seller confirmed by mentioning to me that I could have any seat I wanted at their first “Creator” showing, because “everybody here’s getting tickets for ‘The Blind.'”

And that fanbase, showing up in beards and camo, can’t get enough of whatever the Robertsons are still selling.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Rating: PG-13, violence, smoking, profanity and duck shooting.

Cast: Aron von Adrian, Amelia Eve, Matthew Erik White, Brielle Robillard, Connor Tillman and John Ales and Phil Robertson.

Credits. Directed by Andrew Hyatt, scripted by Andrew Hyatt and Stephanie Katz. A Tread Lively release.

Running timer: 1:48

Share this:

' src=

About Roger Moore

11 responses to movie review: a duck dynasty’s origin myth is related in “the blind”.

' src=

Roger, you could have saved yourself a lot of time by shortening this review to simply, “I hate Christians.”

' src=

It’d be nice if you addressed the points made in the review. But yeah, I understand your need to make it about your faith, and not about your unsophisticated tastes and general lowbrow gullibility. Hard thing to face. It’s not a good movie, and it might have been. But you wouldn’t know the difference, would you? So you have to make yourself a martyr for your faith to avoid admitting your lack of discernment.

' src=

Might wanna research before writing instead of writing blindly and Bradshaw was backup quarterback came from Bradshaw’s mouth. Like the movie or not u have a moral problem there Roger and quick to judge blindly. hope all pray for this man

Dude, have somebody explain that sentence to you. I know what the “facts” are, just saying Phil’s magnanimous “It’s your turn” is bull. Got it?

' src=

You seem sad and delusional. I should have stopped reading your review on your first liner, starting it with something Oprah said—one of the most evil people out there. Sorry, you have such a terrible view of honest Christians, but stop pushing your division with this racism BS because if you actually knew anything about this family, you would know you are speaking complete lies. Have a great Sunday!

Thanks, Leigh, but I grew up in a “Duck” adjacent rural Southern White Christian culture, so I know these folks and you too well to let a poorly done “amateurish” movie set in that world slide by. Sorry if Phil’s BS and hypocrisy and narrow-minded ignorance is too easy for the rest of us to see through and call out. And if “Oprah” triggered you, then I must be doing something right. Every drive I make from Florida to Va., littered with “Christian” radio tirades sampled all through the Southland reminds me that this label you embrace so fervently doesn’t mean what it did when I was growing up in BFE Virginia. You folks and Phil and Falwellians up and down the dial have ruined that “brand.” The “delusional” one is you.

' src=

Roger, I feel sorry for you. You are such an angry person. Praying for you. Prov. 3:5-6

Stay in the dark, Sue. It suits your limited experience of the world.

' src=

So typical. “NORMAL” people scare you to death don’t they??? ROGER ???

So you’re the arbiter of “normal?” I don’t think so, sis.

Comments are closed.

Top Posts & Pages

  • Netflixable? Reindeer herders face a "Stolen" way of life in this Swedish thriller
  • Movie Review: The "Civil War" so many have been asking for, but here on The Big Screen
  • Movie Review: An ex-con, a sailor lass and a killer face their fates outside the "Breakwater"
  • Netflixable? Neighbors consider "Love, Divided" by a shared load-bearing wall
  • Classic Film Review: The toughest "To Have and Have Not" -- "The Breaking Point" (1950)
  • Movie Review: Tom Sizemore suffers through the Cinematically Interminable -- "Impuratus"
  • Movie Review: Perlman, Keitel, Koteas & Co. make "The Baker" everything a B-Movie Should Be
  • Movie Review: Korean experts on the uneasy dead? Call them "Exhuma"
  • BOX OFFICE: "Civil War" is a blockbuster...almost
  • Netflixable? Turgid titillating Italian Teen Tale teases its way to the Tube -- "The Tearsmith"

Find a Movie Review

Like Movie Nation on Facebook

Recent Reviews/Stories

  • An Evening with John Cleese and “The Holy Grail” at the Florida Film Festival
  • Movie Preview: Joel Edgerton, Jennifer Connelly and Alice Braga weigh the mystery of “Dark Matter”
  • Worst “Corpsing” or “Breaking” character in “SNL” Sketch history?
  • Classic Film Review: Schrader, George C. Scott, Calvinism and “Midwestern Values” are confronted with “Hardcore” (1979)
  • Netflixable? Neighbors consider “Love, Divided” by a shared load-bearing wall
  • February 2024
  • January 2024
  • December 2023
  • November 2023
  • October 2023
  • September 2023
  • August 2023
  • February 2023
  • January 2023
  • December 2022
  • November 2022
  • October 2022
  • September 2022
  • August 2022
  • February 2022
  • January 2022
  • December 2021
  • November 2021
  • October 2021
  • September 2021
  • August 2021
  • February 2021
  • January 2021
  • December 2020
  • November 2020
  • October 2020
  • September 2020
  • August 2020
  • February 2020
  • January 2020
  • December 2019
  • November 2019
  • October 2019
  • September 2019
  • August 2019
  • February 2019
  • January 2019
  • December 2018
  • November 2018
  • October 2018
  • September 2018
  • August 2018
  • February 2018
  • January 2018
  • December 2017
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • August 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • February 2016
  • January 2016
  • December 2015
  • November 2015
  • October 2015
  • September 2015
  • August 2015
  • February 2015
  • January 2015
  • December 2014
  • November 2014
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • rogermooresmovienation.fi…
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doo…
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sám…
  • theatlantic.com/health/ar…
  • wp.me/p30FOE-CJJ
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wro…
  • verifythis.com/article/ne…
  • greensboro.com/names-can-…
  • Deadline.com
  • Internet Movie Car Database
  • Internet Movie Database
  • The Hollywood Reporter

Follow Movie Nation by email

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Email Address:

Blogs I Follow

  • Movie Nation
  • Mann-ing Up
  • Action/Adventure Film & Screenplay Festival
  • Reel Time Flicks
  • From the Fourth Row!
  • keithandthemovies.wordpress.com/
  • Los Angeles feedback film festival
  • LOWLIFE MAGAZINE
  • The Watcher Blog

RSS Feeds — subscribe, or else

  • RSS - Posts
  • RSS - Comments

Tweets and more tweets

  • Max Von Sydow

Roger Moore's film criticism, against the grain since 1984.

Living in a Mann’s World

Get your short film showcased at the FEEDBACK Film Festival. Get your screenplay showcased at the Writing Festival.

Film reviews, news, previews and general insane ramblings of a film enthusiast!

Movies, Reviews,Trailers,Interviews and News

A monthly event... LAFeedbackFilmFestival.com

"Find what you love and let it kill you." – Charles Bukowski

Keeping an eye on all the latest mainstream films and television.

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

The Cinemaholic

The Blind: Is the 2023 Movie Based on the Life of Phil Robertson?

Shivangi Sinha of The Blind: Is the 2023 Movie Based on the Life of Phil Robertson?

‘The Blind’ delves into the life of Phil Robertson and offers a glimpse into his journey before achieving success as an entrepreneur and founding Duck Commander. The film aims to shed light on the challenges and hardships faced by the Robertson family as they navigated their path to success. It showcases the journey to success and the cost at which such success comes to those who chase after it.

Directed by Andrew Hyatt, the film is likely to captivate fans of the popular show ‘ Duck Dynasty ,’ which showcases the Robertson family as they manage their business and navigate life’s challenges. The film features exceptional performances from its cast which includes Aron von Andrian, Amelia Eve, and Matthew Erick White. Given the family’s prominence in the reality TV world, it’s understandable that viewers might wonder if the film is based on true events from their lives or if it has been fictionalized to fit a specific narrative. If you’re curious about the authenticity of the film and how closely it aligns with the Robertson family’s real-life experiences, we can provide you with the answers you seek.

The Blind’s True Story

As you might have heard, ‘The Blind’ is based on a true story. Set in 1960s Louisiana, the film delves into the early years of the Robertson family, with a particular focus on the life of Phil Robertson. It narrates the genuine events of his life and the numerous challenges he had to overcome to achieve the success he enjoys today. Written by Andrew Hyatt and Stephanie Katz, the film also highlights the marriage between Phil and Kay, showcasing a period in their lives when the couple faced significant hardships and had to work diligently to keep their family afloat. These trials ultimately contributed to the building of the Robertson family empire which stands as a testament to their resilience.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Phil Robertson was born in Vivian, Louisiana, into a family of modest means and grew up alongside six siblings. The Robertson family lived in rather challenging conditions during those years. Phil’s athletic prowess, particularly in sports like football, baseball, and track, opened up an opportunity for him to attend Louisiana Tech University in Ruston on a football scholarship during the late 1960s, where he played ahead of Terry Bradshaw. It appeared that he was on track for a potential football career, even having the opportunity to play professionally for the Washington Redskins. However, Phil’s true passion lay in hunting, and he ultimately declined the offer because of his strong preference for hunting over football. Robertson went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in physical education and later pursued a master’s degree in education.

Phil and Kay Robertson’s relationship began when they met in 1964 during Phil’s high school years. While Phil came from a family that had limited means, Kay came from a family of opulence. Against all adversity, they decided to tie the knot in 1966, a time when Kay was just 16 years old. Phil initially pursued a career as a teacher but eventually transitioned into becoming a commercial fisherman. However, this period of his life was marked by struggles, particularly with alcoholism . By 1975, he was even running a bar. During this challenging phase, their marriage faced severe strain and was on the brink of collapse. Fortunately, Phil found a path to turn his life around, and it involved embracing God and Christianity.

In a recent Instagram post, Phil wrote, “It’s embarrassing to think back to who I was for the first 10 years of my life with Miss Kay. She’s the best friend a man could have aside from Jesus, and I love her. We never imagined they’d make a movie about our lives, but now we’re about to see “The Blind” on the big screen. Our prayer is that people will see it and know there’s hope. It’s never too late to be saved.”

In 1972, Phil Robertson had amassed considerable experience in duck hunting but was discontented with the duck calls available at the time. This dissatisfaction prompted him to start experimenting with creating his duck calls to replicate the sounds made by ducks. By the end of that year, he successfully invented his first Duck Commander duck call and subsequently obtained a patent for it. The company Duck Commander was officially incorporated in 1973. However, it was only after Phil’s personal transformation and commitment to his faith that he focused on building the company into the multimillion-dollar conglomerate it has become today.

Aron von Andrian’s exceptional performance as Phil Robertson, coupled with the involvement of close family and friends in the film’s production, adds to the authenticity and depth of the storytelling. The film benefits from the insights and contributions of individuals like Zach Dasher, a nephew of Phil Robertson and one of the producers, as well as Willie Robertson, Phil and Kay’s son, who serves as an executive producer. In an interview , Willie said, “It’s powerful. It’s real. It’s, in some ways, was hard to watch for us. It’s hard to go back and highlight the darkest point of your life. I’m sure from my parents, that was the tough part.”

The film portrays a powerful message of redemption and the transformative power of forgiveness, emphasizing the importance of moving forward and not defining oneself solely by past actions. The true story of Phil Robertson, which is the story of a man who overcame adversity, found faith, and built an enduring legacy, instills in us the idea that there is always a way forward even though it does not seem likely. Through its characters and compelling storyline, the film explores the beauty and success that can be found in the journey of personal growth and renewal.

Read More:  Where Is The Robertson Family From Duck Dynasty Now

SPONSORED LINKS

The Cinemaholic Sidebar

  • Movie Explainers
  • TV Explainers
  • About The Cinemaholic

Log in or sign up for Rotten Tomatoes

Trouble logging in?

By continuing, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes.

Email not verified

Let's keep in touch.

Rotten Tomatoes Newsletter

Sign up for the Rotten Tomatoes newsletter to get weekly updates on:

  • Upcoming Movies and TV shows
  • Trivia & Rotten Tomatoes Podcast
  • Media News + More

By clicking "Sign Me Up," you are agreeing to receive occasional emails and communications from Fandango Media (Fandango, Vudu, and Rotten Tomatoes) and consenting to Fandango's Privacy Policy and Terms and Policies . Please allow 10 business days for your account to reflect your preferences.

OK, got it!

Movies / TV

No results found.

  • What's the Tomatometer®?
  • Login/signup

focus on the family movie review the blind

Movies in theaters

  • Opening this week
  • Top box office
  • Coming soon to theaters
  • Certified fresh movies

Movies at home

  • Fandango at Home
  • Netflix streaming
  • Prime Video
  • Most popular streaming movies
  • What to Watch New

Certified fresh picks

  • Civil War Link to Civil War
  • Monkey Man Link to Monkey Man
  • The First Omen Link to The First Omen

New TV Tonight

  • The Sympathizer: Season 1
  • Our Living World: Season 1
  • Under the Bridge: Season 1
  • The Spiderwick Chronicles: Season 1
  • Conan O'Brien Must Go: Season 1
  • Orlando Bloom: To the Edge: Season 1
  • The Circle: Season 6
  • Dinner with the Parents: Season 1
  • Jane: Season 2

Most Popular TV on RT

  • Fallout: Season 1
  • Ripley: Season 1
  • 3 Body Problem: Season 1
  • Parasyte: The Grey: Season 1
  • Shōgun: Season 1
  • Sugar: Season 1
  • We Were the Lucky Ones: Season 1
  • Baby Reindeer: Season 1
  • X-Men '97: Season 1
  • A Gentleman in Moscow: Season 1
  • Best TV Shows
  • Most Popular TV
  • TV & Streaming News

Certified fresh pick

  • Fallout Link to Fallout
  • All-Time Lists
  • Binge Guide
  • Comics on TV
  • Five Favorite Films
  • Video Interviews
  • Weekend Box Office
  • Weekly Ketchup
  • What to Watch

Best Movies of 2024: Best New Movies to Watch Now

25 Most Popular TV Shows Right Now: What to Watch on Streaming

What to Watch: In Theaters and On Streaming

Awards Tour

Fallout : What It Gets Right, and What It Gets Wrong

CinemaCon 2024: Day 3 – Disney Previews Deadpool & Wolverine , Moana 2 , Alien: Romulus , and More

  • Trending on RT
  • Best TV 2024
  • Play Movie Trivia
  • CinemaCon 2024
  • Popular Movies

The Blind Reviews

focus on the family movie review the blind

Interesting back story of the "Duck Dynasty" patriarch.

Full Review | Original Score: 6/10 | Oct 6, 2023

focus on the family movie review the blind

Whatever potential it had, the film just isn’t very good, with or without fact checking.

Full Review | Original Score: 1.5/4 | Oct 1, 2023

focus on the family movie review the blind

A genuinely heartfelt, honest and inspirational emotional journey well worth taking.

Full Review | Sep 28, 2023

focus on the family movie review the blind

Phil Robertson’s fans will certainly gel to it. Viewers less familiar with the man may enjoy it too, as it offers insight into how and why he has struck a chord with millions of people.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/4 | Sep 27, 2023

  • Media Store
  • I Am Second Store
  • Live Second

Identity & Purpose

“The Blind” Movie Review: You’ve Heard the Story…But Not Like This

Doug bender.

September 28, 2023 | 3 minute read

focus on the family movie review the blind

I’d tell you there are spoilers here for the movie “The Blind: The True Story of the Robertson Family,” but you probably already know something about their unique story. Many of us watched 11 seasons of their lives on the hit reality television show, “Duck Dynasty.” They have written books, made podcasts, done countless interviews and more to tell you how Jesus saved their family. But no matter how often you’ve heard their story, trust me when I say that you have not heard it told like this. 

Beauty in the Swamps

Perhaps this stems from my days as a part-time photographer or my love of art, but I always value beautiful cinematography. The filmmakers behind "The Blind" have certainly achieved this beauty with their breathtaking capture of the Louisiana swamplands. So much so that you may want to add southern Louisiana on your next trip across the country.

Not only does it capture the backdrop of this heartwarming story, this movie also successfully transports viewers 50 years into the past to the 1960s. The sets and wardrobes are subtle but effective. It reels us into the early days before they were known as “The Robertsons.”

A Feel Good Movie Without the Cheese

I don’t mind a cheesy movie. In fact, many days it’s exactly what I want. But there is an art in telling a heartwarming story that doesn’t come across as flat and obvious. Even though I knew this story, the storytelling in “The Blind” still created doubt and wonder about how this struggling family would make it through all the challenges they faced. Despite my love of cheese (in all its wonderful forms), the honesty of this story created something more beautiful and compelling than I expected.  

Authenticity is perhaps this movie’s highest achievement. There are no attempts at hiding the depravity of this family’s past. The family patriarch, Phil Robertson, in particular, has his faults, sins and addictions on full display. The darkness of some of these scenes is unusually honest and revealing for a movie in this genre. It’s generally clean in the sense that there is almost no swearing, certainly no sex and violence is kept to a minimum. But enough is shown that you know what was really happening emotionally. This isn’t just a story about a man who “went through some hard times”; this is the story of a man who completely lost his way. But it’s precisely this honesty that makes this story so gripping and real.

Religion That’s Lived Not Explained

Some movies with a religious undercurrent can come across as preachy. There can be actual sermons and church services inserted into a film. But this movie is able to show you the power of faith without a sermon. There’s a preacher in the story, but his only sermon is how he lives his life. Phil and Miss Kay have deeply religious experiences throughout this story, but none come across as a religious agenda. In other words, the story came first. The filmmakers didn’t decide to give a sermon wrapped in a story. They decided to tell a great story that just so happened to contain people who had profound religious experiences. 

As a believer, I deeply appreciate this. I love a sermon. I’ve even given a few myself. But I don’t go to the movies to get a sermon. I expect to see a great story when I walk into the theatre. As someone who loves Jesus, I want people to know about my faith and the Jesus that I follow. But I don’t think it will be great sermons that will move most people. I think it will be compelling stories like “The Blind.”

Why This Story Is Important

Like myself and many others, you may already be familiar with the Robertson family story. But you really haven’t seen it like this. I tell you this as someone whose team at I Am Second helped capture a version of this story on film . I tell you this as an author who already wrote this story in a book . 

I knew this story, too.

But this movie is something else. 

It’s going to change lives. It might just be your life that changes. If nothing else, it’ll teach you what the Bible means when it says, “The blind will see…”

(And be sure and stick around for the credits for something special.)

Doug Bender

Doug Bender is an I Am Second writer and small groups coach. He developed many of the small group tools found at iamsecond.com and has coached churches, organizations, and individuals to use I Am Second groups to share the message of Jesus with their friends and family. He also works with I Am Second's parent organization, e3 Partners, as a church planter and pastor in countries such as Ethiopia, Colombia, and the US. Doug and his wife, Catherine, have four children: Bethany, Samuel, Isabella, and Jesse.

Follow Doug Bender

Related Content

Grief & Loss | Doug Bender

3 Seconds Who Fought For Their Dream (Kay Robertson, Cody Garbrandt, Blake Mankin)

Mental Health | Doug Bender

What Does ‘Fear of the Lord’ Mean?

Addiction | Alaina McLemore

Bryan Rucker’s Life Changed From the Influence of a Good Community

Search for what you’d like to read about.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Focus on the Family Movie Reviews, Empowering Families with Pre-Screening Insights

I n a world infused with relentless media and entertainment options, many parents find themselves adrift in a sea of movies, struggling to discern which ones align with their values and are suitable for their children. That’s where Focus on the Family steps in, offering a lighthouse for those navigating the treacherous waters of Hollywood productions. This evangelical group, with its diverse initiatives and meticulous review process, becomes a valuable compass for families striving to cultivate wholesome entertainment choices.

Understanding Focus on the Family

Established in 1977, Focus on the Family is a non-profit, evangelical entity rooted in the United States, with a mission to nurture and shield families across the globe. It represents a fortress of family values and is closely aligned with the American Christian right. Beyond their well-known projects like the Adventures in Odyssey radio show, Focus on the Family ventures into varied domains, including political advocacy and, notably, movie reviews through their website, Plugged In.

Despite their expansive influence, the organization has not been without controversy and criticism, with accusations of research manipulation and unwavering support for contentious figures like Mel Gibson during the dispute surrounding The Passion of the Christ.

A Guiding Light in Entertainment: Plugged In

Plugged In, the entertainment review arm of Focus on the Family, casts a discerning eye over a myriad of mainstream entertainment forms. The site features comprehensive evaluations of cinematic releases, TV shows, music, and more, serving as a beacon for families in search of morally upright entertainment.

Decoding the Structure of Reviews

Each movie review on Plugged In is meticulously crafted, encompassing seven crucial segments. It begins with an insightful introduction to the film’s narrative, followed by an exploration of the positive elements depicted, such as expressions of humanity and altruism. The reviews then delve into sexual content, violent imagery, and the use of crude language, providing detailed accounts of each. Additionally, there’s scrutiny of other negative components like substance use, culminating in a balanced conclusion reflecting on the film’s alignment with family values.

Diving into Examples: Cloverfield and Alien vs. Predator

To grasp the essence of Focus on the Family’s approach, consider their reviews of films like “Cloverfield” and “Alien vs. Predator.” The former is acknowledged for portraying commitment and sacrifice but criticized for its violence, subtle sexual content, and profanity. The latter, meanwhile, is rebuked for its harsh violent content, with its PG-13 rating deemed unsuitable by the organization.

Empowering Families with Pre-Screening Insights

For those who find resonance with the perspectives of Focus on the Family, Plugged In emerges as a significant time and sanity saver. By relying on their thoughtful analyses, parents can bypass the ordeal of pre-screening every piece of media their children consume, avoiding exposure to undesirable content and ensuring a harmonious entertainment experience.

Conclusion:

Focus on the Family, with its multifaceted endeavors and dedicated movie review platform, Plugged In, serves as a reliable guide for families navigating the extensive and often perplexing realm of entertainment. By offering nuanced, value-based insights into Hollywood’s myriad productions, the organization empowers parents to make informed, values-aligned entertainment choices, fostering a more harmonious and value-rich media landscape for families worldwide. Whether you’re on the lookout for enchanting tales like Peter Pan or Mary Poppins, or you’re venturing into the vast expanse of Hollywood’s offerings, Focus on the Family stands as a steadfast companion in your cinematic journey.

Guiding the Silver Screen: How Focus on the Family Lights the Way in Entertainment Choices

1.800.661.9800

Help us reach families across Canada

More from the blog

focus on the family movie review the blind

Mully coming to theatres October 4 and 12!

focus on the family movie review the blind

The fall 2017 TV season: trends to watch

Tomorrow is the last night to see mully in theatres.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Only 3 days left to order Trick or Treasure!

Encore showings of mully.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Exciting news on doubling your donation!

focus on the family movie review the blind

Another family has offered to match your donation! 

focus on the family movie review the blind

Your donation will be matched – dollar for dollar

focus on the family movie review the blind

Browse our new Christmas catalogue today!

focus on the family movie review the blind

Free Advent activity calendar!

Join us on november 26 to pray for religious freedom in canada.

focus on the family movie review the blind

TWU Law School: religious freedom before the Supreme Court

focus on the family movie review the blind

It's not too late to download this free Advent wreath!

focus on the family movie review the blind

Order today for Christmas! 

focus on the family movie review the blind

Find out how you can make a difference

Plugged in reviews of movies now in theatres.

There are lots of new movies in theatres and maybe your child has mentioned one or two of them to you. But what are these movies really about and how can you find out without having to go see them yourself? 

With Plugged In movie reviews, you'll find a detailed breakdown of up-to-date films, including spiritual content, sexual content, violent content, the amount of crude or profane language, content involving drugs and alcohol, other negative elements as well as positive aspects of the film. 

Here are a few reviews of new releases you may want to read up on: 

Stronger (R)

The Lego Ninjago Movie (PG)

Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)

Friend Request  (R)

Mother! (R)

American Assassin (R)

True to the Game (R)

Home Again (PG-13)

Stay up to date with the Focus on the Family

More on ministry news View more

Watch how mully saved one little girl's life.

Mully, a new documentary coming to theatres October 4 and 12, tells the incredible true story of Charles Mully’s journey from street child to...

Become a Prayer Partner today!

Did you know we have a team of Prayer Partners dedicated to lifting up the needs of not only Focus on the Family Canada, but families across the...

Trick or Treasure is just around the corner!

Crystal Carder

The new Duck Dynasty Movie, The Blind comes to theaters September 28th

Experience the incredible true story of Phil & Kay Robertson from Duck Dynasty in the new movie, The Blind, coming to theaters on September 28th!

Many thanks to Tread Lively for providing a sample of the product for this review. All opinions are 100% my own. #TheBlindMIN #MomentumInfluencerNetwork

The new Duck Dynasty Movie, The Blind comes to theaters September 28th 11

A few weeks ago, we were at the Great Smoky Mountain Jeep Invasion in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, and our family met Mountain Man from Duck Dynasty. I was able to ask him a few questions and one of those questions was, will you be in the new Duck Dynasty movie? 

To which he replied something along the lines like, “No, the Robertstons won’t even be in the movie. Other people are playing them in the movie.”

We are a household of Robertson fans, so we kind of wondered how the movie would be without the Robertson family in it, but friends this movie was amazing! The Blind is a powerful true story that showcases God’s redemptive power to change our lives when we surrender to Him!

( FYI) Phil does show up at the end of the movie to give some wise advice. 

What is the movie “The Blind” About?

What's in This Post

The new Duck Dynasty Movie, The Blind comes to theaters September 28th 12

Long before Phil Robertson was a reality TV star, he fell in love, started a family, and began to spiral out of control. The Blind shares never-before-revealed moments in Phil’s life as he seeks to conquer the shame of his past, ultimately finding redemption in an unlikely place.

Watch the official  The Blind  movie trailer.

focus on the family movie review the blind

My Review of  The Blind  movie

While The Blind movie doesn’t come to theaters until September 28th, I got to watch an early screening of the movie with my family and my parents. We loved this movie and it showed a side of Phil, that -to be honest, shocked us. We couldn’t believe the religious Phil Robertson that you see on Duck Dynasty today was once an alcoholic who pushed his wife and children away! 

The Blind  movie focuses on Phil and Kay’s marriage while their boys were growing up. The movie does focus heavily on Phil’s alcoholism, so I personally wouldn’t expect to watch this movie with really young children, as the scenarios in this movie can be too mature for them.

The new Duck Dynasty Movie, The Blind comes to theaters September 28th 13

The Blind shows a vulnerable side of Phil and Kay’s life that I wasn’t expecting to see. This movie shows the power of what God can do in someone’s life and proves that no matter where someone has been or what they have done, they are NEVER too far away for God to reach them and use them. 

Buy tickets today to see The Blind only in theaters starting 9/28 !

Win a $10 Amazon Gift Card

Limited to US winners only. The giveaway winner will be contacted via the email address provided in the giveaway sign-up and have 24 hours to respond or will forfeit their prize. The giveaway ends at midnight on 10/4. 

Last Updated on 6 months by Crystal Carder

Other Posts You May LOVE

Crystal carder.

Crystal has been creating writing about her family, life, and adventures on Crystal Carder since 2016.

Hope for Kids Fall Festival is Coming to Silver Spring, Maryland

The old testament handbook review, related posts, watch karen kingsbury’s someone like you in theaters..., watch ordinary angels in theaters today 2/23, watch county rescue on the great american pure..., the action bible faith in action bible review..., staying comfortable with currex arch support insoles, the iron claw in theaters december 22, 2023, watch “prince of egypt” the musical digitally today, save 20% on harlem globetrotter tickets, “my christmas hero” review + giveaway, support the gift of gospel with the anm....

I would watch this with my daughter.

Love to see this with my son. thanks for hosting!

I want to see this movie with my best friend, this sure looks like a great film.

I would like to see this with my husband.

I will see this with my wife. We are both fans of the Robertson family.

I would watch this movie with my mother.

I would like to see with my dad he would enjoy this. I can’t wait.

Leave a Comment

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Notice: All forms on this website are temporarily down for maintenance. You will not be able to complete a form to request information or a resource. We apologize for any inconvenience and will reactivate the forms as soon as possible.

focus on the family movie review the blind

  • DVD & Streaming

The Blind Side

  • Comedy , Drama , Sports

Content Caution

focus on the family movie review the blind

In Theaters

  • November 20, 2009
  • Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy; Quinton Aaron as Michael Oher; Tim McGraw as Sean Tuohy; Jae Head as S.J. Tuohy; Lily Collins as Collins Tuohy; Ray McKinnon as Coach Cotton

Home Release Date

  • March 23, 2010
  • John Lee Hancock

Distributor

  • Warner Bros.

Movie Review

Michael Oher arrived at Wingate Christian like an overgrown moose: gigantic, lost and impossible to miss.

Weighing more than the average Toyota and towering over his classmates, Michael was recruited to the school for his athletic promise. But most of Wingate’s students are white, rich and ever-so-smart. Big Mike, as he’s been called, came from Memphis’ projects—a lumbering African-American teen with a messed-up past and microscopic GPA. He has no home to speak of. He carries his extra clothes—just a spare shirt, really—in a plastic bag, and he washes his clothes in the sink at a local Laundromat. Big man on campus? What a laugh. Michael would give anything to just blend in. Or disappear.

And he would’ve disappeared that cold November night if he could’ve as he walked, shivering, along the side of the road. But instead, he’s spotted by Leigh Anne Tuohy and her family, and before Michael knows it, all 300-plus pounds of him is ushered into the backseat and whisked away to the Tuohy mansion. Leigh Anne throws some sheets on the couch, bids Michael a cordial goodnight and walks upstairs.

“You don’t think he’ll steal anything, do you?” Leigh Anne asks her husband, Sean.

“I guess we’ll know in the morning,” Sean says.

The silver’s all intact when they wake up, and Leigh Anne asks Michael if he might want to stay. You know, for Thanksgiving, if he doesn’t have anywhere else to go. Maybe a little longer, if he wants to. Maybe she’ll buy him some new clothes. Maybe.

And so begins a classic Cinderella story—if Cinderella were a value-sized football player who’s traded his glass slippers for cleats. There are no pumpkins here, no Prince Charmings. But a generous, too-good-to-be-true godmother? Yeah, Leigh Anne’s got that role covered.

Positive Elements

The Blind Side is based on the life of Michael Oher, a one-time star for Briarcrest Christian School and now an offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens. While it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction in these “true to life” tales, the film suggests that his story has plenty of heroes—starting with Michael himself.

Surrounded by poverty and thuggery through much of his childhood, Michael could’ve been just a statistic—a life wasted on the mean city streets—had it not been for his gentle disposition. When he was a baby, his mother told him to shut his eyes when anything bad was going on. Before he was allowed to open them, she’d tell him, “The past is gone, the world is a good place, it’s all going to be OK.” He’s held firm to this odd little fairy tale, shutting his eyes completely to his painful past and allowing himself to accept both the present and future with a certain level of serenity. Is that kind of attitude more accurately defined as denial? Perhaps. But the result is him escaping the anger and bitterness that could’ve consumed him.

While Michael struggles in a host of areas, we learn that on an aptitude test he scored in the “98th percentile in protectiveness.” His protective nature, naturally, makes him an excellent offensive lineman (it’s his job to protect the quarterback) and a fantastic addition to the Tuohy family. He’s got their back through thick and thin, and when Michael and his new “brother,” S.J., get in an auto accident, Michael somehow manages to block the passenger-side airbag with his forearm, saving the undersized S.J. from breaking his face.

Leigh Anne is the grit to Michael’s gentleness. She manages the Tuohy family with the skill and gusto of a high-heeled Patton and, when Michael walks into the family’s life, she undertakes his betterment as her own personal mission. At first, perhaps, she gives Michael a place to stay because she feels she should. But slowly Michael turns from charity case to family member. When a friend of Leigh Anne’s tells her how wonderful it is that she’s changing this boy’s life, Leigh Anne smiles and says, “No. He’s changing mine.”

The rest of the Tuohy clan is no less supportive. S.J. becomes buds with Michael almost immediately, and the pint-sized mogul-in-the-making becomes Michael’s de facto agent when college coaches start calling. Collins, the Tuohy’s beautiful teen daughter, takes more time to warm to Michael, but eventually forsakes her stuck-up friends to study with him. Sean remains a jovial, paternal presence throughout. And Miss Sue, the tutor hired to help get Michael’s grades up to snuff, is both supportive and relentless—necessary qualities, under the circumstances.

By virtue of the fact that Michael is elevated, not demeaned by the story, expressions of racism included onscreen are designed to illustrate how ignorant prejudice is. Leigh Anne is troubled, for instance, when her friend asks whether her charity toward Michael is some sort of “white guilt thing,” and whether she’s concerned about having a big black man staying in the house with her teenage daughter. We’re meant to roll our eyes when a relative calls the Tuohys and asks, “Do you know there’s a colored boy in your Christmas card?”

Leigh Anne tells a college coach to not take Michael to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre .

Spiritual Elements

“You’re a fine Christian lady,” Michael’s biological mother tells Leigh Anne when she hears about all the Tuohys have been doing for her boy.

“Well, I try,” Leigh Anne says. And she means it.

The real Tuohys are evangelical Christians, and while their cinematic doppelgängers don’t preach or pray much, the family’s faith still finds some expression onscreen. They do clasp hands and say a prayer before Thanksgiving dinner. And Leigh Anne mentions that she’s in a Bible study. We never see her without a silver cross hanging around her neck. These cinematic Tuohys aren’t, by any means, a perfect family. But they are refreshingly three-dimensional, and we see into their souls just enough to know that faith in Jesus is a prime factor in their best, most generous tendencies.

Coach Cotton, the head of Wingate’s football program, wants Michael at the school because of his potential on the gridiron. But when he goes to the school’s board, he pushes for the boy’s admission under a glaze of Christian charity. He points to the word Christian in the school’s name and says, “We either take that seriously, or we paint over it.” Miss Sue confesses that though she’s a spiritual woman, she has “doubts.”

Sexual Content

In their pajamas and in bed, Sean and Leigh Anne cuddle and kiss before (implied) sex as Leigh Anne formulates plans on creating a non-profit. “You knew I was a multitasker when you married me, right?” she says.

Michael is one of 13 children, and his biological mother isn’t initially sure who fathered him. So it’s not especially surprising to hear some folks from Michael’s old neighborhood snidely suggest that he’s messing around with Leigh Anne, Collins, or perhaps both. (The suggestion of such impropriety sends Michael into a rage.)

Leigh Anne tells S.J. to not “go into the girls’ locker room again.” And she’s disappointed that a couple of college recruiters took Michael to “t-tty bars.” (We don’t see him go.) When the family drops Michael off at college, she warns him that if he gets a girl pregnant, she’ll come back to cut his penis off.

Men ogle cheerleaders, other coeds and Leigh Anne. The crude term “tap” is thrown around a couple of times.

Violent Content

Defending Leigh Anne’s and Collins’ honor, Michael smashes a couple of thugs into walls and furniture. When someone pulls a gun on him, Michael knocks the dude silly. (The gun fires harmlessly into the air.)

Later, Leigh Anne asks one of the thugs whether he’s seen Michael. When the guy insinuates that he might hurt Michael, Leigh Anne immediately gets in his face. “You threaten my son, you threaten me,” she scolds him, telling him that she’s a member of the National Rifleman’s Association, and she’s “always packing.”

Michael and S.J. get into a pretty bad auto accident, leaving both of them bloodied (but not critically injured).

A Wingate official tells Michael that a man who fell off a bridge a couple of weeks earlier (we’re not sure in the film whether it was an accident, suicide or murder, though in real life it was ruled homicide) was actually Michael’s father. And Michael occasionally flashes back to his violent childhood in cluttered and unfocused images.

There’s also football-related violence and action. An opposing player kicks Michael in the head, and Michael is called for “excessive blocking” when he pushes a would-be tackler through the end zone and over a wall.

Miss Sue dissuades Michael from attending the University of Tennessee by telling him that the college keeps all of its corpses right underneath the football field, where disembodied hands are liable to burst through the turf at any moment and grab at players’ ankles.

Crude or Profane Language

Leigh Anne does not approve of swearing. “Don’t use the a-word,” she tells her husband. But she didn’t edit the screenplay for The Blind Side . Onscreen, we still hear “a‑‑” a half-dozen times, “b‑‑ch” and “h‑‑‑” four or five times each, “p‑‑‑” once and “d‑‑n” two or three times. God’s name is misused a handful of times. “T‑t” is said a couple of times. The racial slur “n-gger” is vocalized once by one of the thugs.

Drug and Alcohol Content

Michael’s biological mother, we learn, has had issues with drugs since Michael was a baby, and she’d often tell him to close his eyes when she wanted to use. The film suggests that she still isn’t clean: When Leigh Anne asks her if she wants to see her boy, Michael’s mom tells her, “Not like this.”

Characters, including Leigh Anne, drink wine. Michael’s given a beer by a neighborhood pal. He takes a swig but doesn’t seem to like it much. During a phone message, a relative tells the Tuohys that he’s had a bit too much to drink.

Other Negative Elements

Leigh Anne surreptitiously looks up Michael’s grades on the principal’s computer. She makes a reference to someone getting their “panties in a wad.” And some football fans hurl insults at Michael. The Tuohys respond by whispering about the “rednecks.”

Sports movies aren’t usually just about sports. In many ways they’ve become the morality plays of our time, preaching the importance of everything from individual effort to finding family in team. You don’t need to know about zone defenses to appreciate  Hoosiers or be an expert pitcher to enjoy The Rookie .

The Blind Side , though, is a sports movie that’s not really even about sports. It’s a football movie based on the story of a real-life (and really good) football player that often avoids football altogether. Only one game is singled out for special attention—Michael’s first for Wingate. Sure, they win Tennessee’s private school state championship. Sure, Michael’s shown, in classic Rocky style, working feverishly to get into shape and learn the game. But these are ancillary things: This film doesn’t feature a single hail Mary, a solitary goal line stand or any sort of nail-biting finale.

It sidelines all of those things to instead focus on the massive impact people can have in other people’s lives. It���s not a pristine portrayal, either artistically or ethically. But I was moved by the story and walked out of the theater smiling. Issues of class, race and family are all enthusiastically grappled with—and the good guys doggedly work their way to the end zone, making a couple of extra points to boot.

The Plugged In Show logo

Paul Asay has been part of the Plugged In staff since 2007, watching and reviewing roughly 15 quintillion movies and television shows. He’s written for a number of other publications, too, including Time, The Washington Post and Christianity Today. The author of several books, Paul loves to find spirituality in unexpected places, including popular entertainment, and he loves all things superhero. His vices include James Bond films, Mountain Dew and terrible B-grade movies. He’s married, has two children and a neurotic dog, runs marathons on occasion and hopes to someday own his own tuxedo. Feel free to follow him on Twitter @AsayPaul.

Latest Reviews

focus on the family movie review the blind

The Long Game

focus on the family movie review the blind

The Greatest Hits

Weekly reviews straight to your inbox.

Logo for Plugged In by Focus on the Family

Thrifty Nifty Mommy

The Blind Movie Review + Giveaway

By: Author Holly

Posted on Last updated: September 27, 2023

Man and a Woman - The Blind Movie Review

I have always been a fan of the TV series Duck Dynasty, so when I found out they made a movie about the story of Phil and Kay Robertson, I knew I had to see it. Ladies , this is the film to see with your friends or plan a date night with your husband. I genuinely think that this is a romance movie that he won’t mind going to see. Continue reading for my review of The Blind movie!

Many thanks to Tread Lively for providing a product sample for this review. As always, my opinions are 100% my own.

Man and a Woman - The Blind Movie Review

My Review Of The Blind Movie

Synopsis of the blind movie, overall thoughts of the blind movie, connect with the blind, related posts, enter to win an amazon gift card – flash giveaway.

I am not sure where to start because I am so excited to share my review on The Blind with you! This movie is a powerful, raw, true story that showcases God’s redemptive power to change our lives when we surrender to Him. The film executed that beautifully. Actors Aron Von Andrian and Amelia Eve nailed their performances as Phil & Kay Robertson.

While watching, it held my attention through the entire time and when the movie was over, I didn’t want it to end! There was not one point in the movie where I felt bored or that the story wasn’t moving along. It was such a beautifully imperfect love story and embodied just how important it is to have God a part of your marriage.

focus on the family movie review the blind

My favorite line was “My momma told me that one day I’d have to fight for my marriage, so here I am fighting.” Kay’s dedication and forgiveness to her husband is outstanding. I hope I am not giving too much away when I say this, but I commend Phil’s determination to turn his life around and be the husband and father his family needs. He may have made some terrible decisions but he didn’t give up on righting his wrongs.

Long before Phil Robertson was a reality TV star, he fell in love, started a family, and began to spiral out of control. THE BLIND shares never-before-revealed moments in Phil’s life as he seeks to conquer the shame of his past, ultimately finding redemption in an unlikely place.

focus on the family movie review the blind

This movie was a 10 out of 10 for me. Run, do not walk on getting your tickets today! Experience the incredible true story of Phil & Kay Robertson from Duck Dynasty in the new movie, The Blind, coming to theaters on September 28th! #TheBlindMIN #MomentumInfluencerNetwork

Trailer / Website / Facebook / Instagram

Read more of Thrifty Nifty Mommy’s reviews and enter giveaways here !

One lucky Thrifty Nifty Mommy reader will receive a $10 Amazon Gift Card. Open to the Continental US only, just enter the widget below for your chance to win. This is a flash giveaway that ends on October 4th, so enter today! Good luck!

focus on the family movie review the blind

Sunday 1st of October 2023

I do like that this is a true and inspirational story about a family overcoming their problems.

Saturday 30th of September 2023

I like that I know the ending and I get to see what they went thru to get there.

Friday 29th of September 2023

I love that it gives hope to broken people and broken families that they can do the impossible.

I like movies about family helping each other.

Tracy Robertson

Thursday 28th of September 2023

The battle with alcoholism is really interesting.

FOTF-Logo-Stretch-Color.png

Plugged In is a Focus on the Family publication designed to shine a light on the world of popular entertainment while giving families the essential tools they need to understand, navigate, and impact the culture in which they live.

Through our reviews, articles and discussions, we hope to spark intellectual thought, spiritual growth and a desire to follow the command of Colossians 2:8: “See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ.”

Each month, Plugged In is visited more than 1 million times by people looking for detailed information about what’s really in popular movies, videos, television episodes, songs and games. Entertainment industry ratings only tell you so much. We go deeper, diving into specific content and the meaning behind it. Our award-winning website also offers news and blogs.

two young girls on their cell phones

5 Tips for Keeping Your Kids’ Phone Time Under Control

Knowing how to approach phone time for your kids can be tricky. So here are some strategies for how to create a healthy environment for your kids.

guide to technology

A Parent’s Guide to Today’s Technology (Download)

Find out how kids are using their online and mobile devices, and how that participation can impact them physically, psychologically, emotionally and socially.

focus on the family movie review the blind

  • 1-800-A-FAMILY (232-6459)
  • [email protected]
  • 8605 Explorer Drive Colorado Springs, CO 80920-1051
  • Jobs & Volunteering
  • Press Center
  • Find a Counselor

Shows & Podcasts

  • Daily Broadcast
  • The Boundless Show
  • Adventures in Odyssey
  • Radio Theatre
  • Focus on Marriage Podcast
  • Focus on Parenting Podcast
  • Practice Makes Parent
  • All Shows >>
  • That the World May Know
  • The Truth Project
  • All Products >>
  • Make a Donation
  • Other Ways to Give
  • Manage My Donor Account
  • Donor Tax Statements

Sign Up for Our E-Newsletters

  • Get our updates straight to your inbox.

FULL INTERVIEW: Robertson Family talks about new movie, “The Blind”

MONROE, La. (KNOE) - Willie and Korie Robertson sat down with KNOE’s Sophia Ridley to talk about their movie, “The Blind.” The movie premiers in theaters on September 28.

RELATED STORY: “Robertson Family movie to hit theaters”

Copyright 2023 KNOE. All rights reserved.

Ford says in documents filed with U.S. safety regulators that fuel injectors can crack, and...

Ford recalls nearly 43,000 SUVs due to gas leaks that can cause fires, but remedy won’t fix leaks

Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office patrol unit.

RPSO reports two injured after shooting in Boyce

A married substitute teacher was arrested after allegedly being caught undressed with a...

Married substitute teacher caught undressed in car with student, deputies say

Police lights and crime tape generic

Woman in hospital after boyfriend reportedly shot into home

The mother allegedly went on a cruise while leaving her young children home alone.

Mom left kids home alone for several days while she went on a cruise, deputies say

Latest news.

Richard Berry Jr. was honored with the 17th marker on the Northeast Louisiana Music Trail.

17th Marker on the NELA Music Trail Unveiled

Switchfoot dares you to move and purchase tickets for their upcoming concert in Arkansas.

Switchfoot, Blue October, Matt Nathanson coming to Arkansas

The documentary "You Have No Idea," created by Alexander Jeffery, will be released on April 2,...

Family of a son with autism to be featured in new documentary on Amazon

The documentary "You Have No Idea," created by Alexander Jeffery, will be released on April 2,...

Jelly Roll to jam in Arkansas

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

Movie Reviews

Three eye-opening documentaries you can stream right now.

Linda Holmes

Linda Holmes

focus on the family movie review the blind

From the HBO documentary Brandy Hellville & The Cult of Fast Fashion. HBO hide caption

From the HBO documentary Brandy Hellville & The Cult of Fast Fashion.

True crime docs, scammer docs, serious docs ... one of the most notable developments of the streaming era of television is that there are new documentary films and series coming out constantly . The difficulty for someone who might want to check some of them out is that they go by in a blur, and a lot of them have similar-looking titles and promotion. There are still big-ticket entries — on April 21, HBO will premiere a follow-up series to its huge true-crime hit The Jinx — but there are also a lot of lower-profile projects flying by, so let's take a moment to check in with a few current ones.

What Jennifer Did

A feature-length film about a 2010 home invasion that killed a woman and left her husband in a coma, What Jennifer Did is mostly told from the point of view of the police who gradually zeroed in on the couple's daughter, who was home at the time. Police-side crime documentaries tend to be the least interesting to me, and in this case, it feels like there's a tremendous amount of context missing about the family in favor of a fairly simple "she wanted to be with her boyfriend" narrative. But I say that in part because I have read the 2015 piece by Karen Ho in Toronto Life that considers more broadly what led to this bizarre act. Netflix, available now.

Brandy Hellville & the Cult of Fast Fashion

I can honestly tell you I was not very familiar with the Brandy Melville brand before I watched this film, which tells the story of how social media helped make a juggernaut out of a whole lot of nondescript tiny shirts. (It's more complicated than that, and ... also not.) The story of the gross in-store culture (which reminded me a lot of parts of the Netflix film White Hot, about Abercrombie & Fitch ) is interesting and pretty lively, but I would have preferred a little more time spent on the fast-fashion element, which I do think is ripe for more documentary work. Max, available now.

The Synanon Fix

Sometimes, it feels like documentaries are their own expanded universe. I was just watching an entirely different show about the "troubled teen" industry and its dark history, and it mentioned how Synanon, which began in California as a program to treat addiction, influenced much of what became the "we will grab your badly behaved teenager from their bed, take them to some secluded location, allow them no contact with anybody, and turn them around" model. And now, Synanon has its own docuseries, which considers whether and when Synanon turned into what you would call a cult. (Was it the head-shaving? The mass weddings? The dictates about reproduction?) But what stands out the most is the consideration of how a program and a community can change shape, and it takes a while for people inside and outside it to register those changes. HBO, airing now.

We're only scratching the surface of what's out there — Netflix's #1 show as I write this is their Unlocked: A Jail Experiment , about a "program" that gives incarcerated men more freedom. And I am 100% committed to finding time before it expires on April 20 to watch Menus-Plaisirs — Les Troisgros , the latest from the great documentarian Frederick Wiseman, which is available on PBS.

This piece also appeared in NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter so you don't miss the next one, plus get weekly recommendations about what's making us happy.

Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour on Apple Podcasts and Spotify .

Yes, these 5 Oscar-nominated documentaries take on tough topics — watch them anyway

Oscars 2024

Yes, these 5 oscar-nominated documentaries take on tough topics — watch them anyway.

  • documentaries

Celebrating the midnight movie, plus the best films to see in L.A. this week

A man with a robust head of hair stands mystified.

  • Show more sharing options
  • Copy Link URL Copied!

Hello! I’m Mark Olsen . Welcome to another edition of your regular field guide to a world of Only Good Movies.

One of the most exciting events at last weekend’s Los Angeles Festival of Movies was a talk between musician Kim Gordon and author Rachel Kushner on Los Angeles and how the city is depicted in the movies.

As guests entered the space — 2220 Arts + Archives — where the talk was to take place, the 1969 movie “Model Shop” played on a white-painted brick wall. Once Gordon and Kushner settled in, a revolving carousel of movie stills came on behind them: “Zabriskie Point,” “The Exiles,” “Car Wash,” “The Loved One,” “Body Double,” “Foxes,” “The Long Goodbye,” “A Woman Under the Influence,” “My Brother’s Wedding,” “American Gigolo,” Play It as It Lays” and “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!” Kushner noted how they had each chosen six titles.

As they talked their way through most of the movies on the list (they never did get around to “Zabriskie Point”), both Kushner and Gordon referenced Thom Andersen’s exhaustive 2003 essay film on Los Angeles and the movies, “Los Angeles Plays Itself.”

Two women have a conversation in front of an audience.

Gordon’s own L.A. childhood was a throughline. In talking about 1980’s “Foxes,” which depicts a group of San Fernando Valley teens who become involved in the world of Hollywood nightlife, Gordon noted, “I empathize with people who grew up in the Valley. I grew up in boring West L.A., so I always wanted to go up to Laurel Canyon or to Hollywood Boulevard, to hang out.”

Kushner noted that the street she now lives on in Angelino Heights has been a filming location for both “Chinatown” and the “Fast and Furious” movies.

“In thinking about movies in L.A. I started thinking about my own relationship to the city,” she noted. “The way that I talk about it is often meant to be a correction to people’s cliches of it.”

At one point Gordon added, “I feel like now, the whole myth of L.A. and California — it’s all been exported through streetwear and surf-skate culture and that it kind of lives a life outside of L.A. and California.”

A new doc festival, ‘This Is Not a Fiction’

A miner's family suffers during a union strike.

Already underway, “This is Not a Fiction” is a new festival launched by the American Cinematheque. The lineup of documentary films and attending filmmakers is quite impressive, showing both classics of the form as well as boundary-breaking newer works.

The series will also feature a number of fiction films that are documentary-adjacent, including Harmony Korine’s “Trash Humpers” and Christopher Guest’s mockumentary “Waiting for Guffman.” The outrageous action of Jeff Tremaine’s “Jackass: The Movie” should be a highlight of the program.

Among the events still to come are a panel talk on the 15th anniversary of ESPN’s “30 for 30” series, Terry Zwigoff’s “Crumb,” Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor’s “Leviathan” and “Sweetgrass,” Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky’s ’ “Brother’s Keeper” and “Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills,” Barbara Kopple’s “Harlan County, USA” and “American Dream,” Sandi Tan’s “Shirkers” and “Gourmet Baby,” Yance Ford’s “Power” and “Strong Island,” and Bill Morrison’s “Dawson City: Frozen Time.”

Many of the filmmakers will be present for their screenings. (I’m moderating a talk with Kirsten Johnson on Tuesday after a screening of “Cameraperson” and Times film editor Joshua Rothkopf will be speaking with Tan after “Shirkers.”)

A filmmaker slates a take of her documentary.

“It feels like it’s exploding and we have quite a big team now,” said Chris LeMaire, senior film programmer at the American Cinematheque, who put the series together with programmer Cindy Fernanda Flores. “And it all feels like in keeping with the goal that the Cinematheque has had for many years, which is to put on a year-round film festival.”

LeMaire added, “We approached it like we do every day at the Cinematheque, which is finding ways to bring repertory programming, the history of cinema, into kind of a collision course with what’s going on in the industry today.”

On Saturday night audiences will need to choose between heading to the Aero to see “Catching Fire: The Story of Anita Pallenberg,” a portrait of the one-time Rolling Stones muse, or driving to the Egyptian for “Gimme Shelter,” the devastating chronicle of the Stones’ ill-fated free concert at Altamont.

Two friends sit together.

Though “Gimme Shelter” is now widely accepted as one of the greatest documentaries of all time, in his initial 1971 review, Times critic Charles Champlin wasn’t convinced, writing, “Their view, I think, is that the documentarians’ role is to have the cameras in the right place at the right time, but otherwise not to suggest the filmmakers’ presence or shaping intelligence. … The fact is that ‘Gimme Shelter’ — insofar as it is a shaped documentary rather than a newsreel — is merely OK. Its strength is the Altamont debacle itself.”

Champlin added, “‘Gimme Shelter’ is both repellent and important, and its audience shouldn’t be limited to the chanting faithful.”

In putting together this ambitious program of documentary films and filmmakers, the Cinematheque’s LeMaire said, “Really our starting point was this idea of nonfiction filmmaking as its own art form.” He added that he hopes the program can “expand the concept and the way people think about documentary.”

Among the most exciting events of the festival is Sunday’s screening of Frederick Wiseman’s debut feature 1967’s “Titicut Follies,” a devastating look at the deplorable conditions in a mental hospital that the state of Massachusetts long sought to hide from public view. The screening will include a prerecorded Q&A with Wiseman, now 94 and still very much an active filmmaker winning awards .

In a 1981 interview with The Times, Wiseman gave a statement of purpose that likely still holds true today. He said, “My films are about pockets of life about which the audience has strong impressions but perhaps no first-hand experience. These films try to bring experiences to people who haven’t had them so they can participate and think through their own relationship to what they’re seeing and hearing. What I’m doing is a natural history of how we live — normal, everyday life — over a period of time.”

15 years of the American Genre Film Archive

Two armed fighters take shelter.

Beginning on the 15th, the USC School of Cinematic Arts will be presenting a tribute to 15 years of the American Genre Film Archive , the nonprofit that has rescued over 100 feature films from becoming lost.

The series will be able to take advantage of an Imax venue at USC for some shows, so movies such as Joe Dante’s notorious “The Movie Orgy” and works by Sarah Jacobson, Jon Moritsugu and Doris Wishman will be presented on likely the biggest screen they have ever been seen on.

“We feel these are shining examples of American indie filmmaking, regardless of genre,” said AGFA’s Bret Berg in an email. “If AGFA doesn’t preserve these movies in particular, there may not be anyone else who will.”

A baby doll stands on a corner next to a real woman.

Berg also noted, “Another through line which greatly satisfies us is the preservation of important subcultures through film. With ‘Gay Girls Riding Club,’ it’s about the legacy of drag. The punk underground is represented by Jon Moritsugu, Sarah Jacobson and Dave Markey. ‘She Freak,’ ‘Indecent Desires’ and ‘Boardinghouse’ are all ace examples of the grimy drive-in circuit vibe.”

Other highlights will include Andy Sidaris’ “Hard Ticket to Hawaii” with a Q&A with producer Arlene Sidaris, and the world restoration premiere of Dave Markey’s “Desperate Teenage Lovedolls.” (I’ll be moderating a Q&A with Markey and cast members Jennifer Schwartz, Tracy Lea Nash and Stephen Macdonald.)

Other points of interest

‘Eraserhead’ at the Academy

A man steps into a dark room.

The Academy museum has launched a series celebrating the midnight movie . As outlined in J. Hoberman and Jonathan Rosenbaum’s book “Midnight Movies,” this is about more than just seeing a movie in the middle of the night, but a whole sensibility and countercultural mind-set.

On Monday will be a 35mm screening of one of the ultimate midnight movies, David Lynch’s feature debut, 1977’s “Eraserhead.”

The program will also include Suzan Pitt’s 1979 animated film “Asparagus,” which was specifically acquired to play before “Eraserhead,” including during multiyear runs at New York’s Waverly Theater and Los Angeles’ Nuart Theatre.

I am reluctant to try to describe “Eraserhead” except to say that few filmmakers arrive as fully formed as Lynch. In 1977, reviewing the film’s midnight screening at L.A.’s Filmex festival, The Times’ Linda Gross wrote, “In his first feature, the talented young American filmmaker David Lynch successfully merges black comedy, kitchen sink reality and avant-garde obscurity and provides superior special effects, but ‘Eraserhead,’ about extremely nebbish young couple who have a monster baby, is not for the squeamish.”

Other titles still to come in the museum’s midnight program include “Up in Smoke,” “Donnie Darko,” “Glen or Glenda,” “House” in 35mm, “Hellbound: Hellraiser II” in 35mm and, of course, “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.”

‘The Raid: Redemption’ and ‘The Raid 2’

Two men have a confrontation with a gun.

On Monday the New Beverly will show the pulverizing double bill of Gareth Evans’ 2011 “The Raid: Redemption” and 2014’s “The Raid 2.” Both films star Iko Uwais as an Indonesian cop who finds himself facing seemingly insurmountable odds; both also feature truly dazzling close-quarters fighting and stunt choreography.

I spoke to the Welsh-born Evans for “The Raid 2,” a film on which he was was credited as director, writer, co-editor and action choreographer.

“For me it has to work as a story first,” Evans said. “It doesn’t work if the action is just kind of thrown in.... What I wanted to try to do in this one is make sure each action scene, each beat, would be in response to the plot and push the plot forward. There would be character arcs within the fight scenes.”

In other news

‘The People’s Joker’

A clown with green hair smokes a cigarette in a dressing room.

After a prolonged fight to clear the movie for release, Vera Drew’s “The People’s Joker” is finally in theaters. The movie transforms the saga of the comic book character of The Joker into an absurdist, deeply personal, unabashedly queer tale of self-actualization and making it in the comedy world.

Back when the film premiered at the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival, Drew described the film’s sensibility to Jen Yamato by saying, “My movie is about complicated relationships with your mom, which I think a lot of trans women have. But I also really wanted to make a movie that Joel Schumacher would like.”

The movie is playing now at the Nuart in L.A., with Drew in person for some showings. Starting on the 19th, it will be at the Alamo Drafthouse DTLA and Vidiots.

Reviewing “The People’s Joker” for The Times, Manuel Betancourt wrote , “Equally brazen and ambitious, Drew’s film is committed to embracing the zany undertones that have always bubbled under the surface of a comic book tale in which secret identities, arch performances and fabulous outfits (all worn in the dead of night, no less) have always felt like lifelines for queer and trans kids worldwide.”

‘Sasquatch Sunset’

Sasquatch creatures gather in a forest.

Nathan and David Zellner have been among the most eccentrically creative filmmakers working on the fringes of Hollywood for some time, always marrying an outsider’s sensibility with a touching, human heart.

Their latest film is “Sasquatch Sunset,” a startlingly emotional look at a year in the life of a family of Sasquatch, played by Nathan Zellner, Christophe Zajac-Denek, Jesse Eisenberg and Riley Keough, all rendered unrecognizable under their makeup and hairy costumes.

I sat down with the Zellners for a story that we’ll be publishing soon. As David told me, “From the script stage, we didn’t want anything to be winky or sensational. Even though absurd stuff happens in it, we wanted to normalize it in the same way that if you see an animal you wouldn’t be shocked that it was not wearing clothes. We just wanted to normalize it at all as though you’re seeing a pack of wolves or something like that.”

‘Civil War’

A photojournalist takes in the scenario.

Last week I included my interview with Kirsten Dunst and Cailee Spaeny about Alex Garland’s “Civil War.” The movie, about a near-future America torn apart by violence, opens this week and Joshua Rothkopf declares in his review that, “regardless of what may come ahead — at the movies and beyond — there won’t be a more important film this year.”

Rothkopf also says, “It’s the nowness of ‘Civil War’ that will be much discussed. ... For the most part, what Garland is after is less accusatory and more provocative, detached from the kind of red-state-blue-state binary that would trap ‘Civil War’ in amber before it had a chance to breathe. Do we deserve a democracy if we can barely speak to each other? This is a film set in a future when words no longer matter. Even the final words of power-grabbing leaders disappoint.”

Complete your Hollywood bookshelf

This week, the LAT published a list of the 50 best books on Hollywood , compiled from a survey of experts in the worlds of publishing and entertainment. Topping the list was Joan Didion’s 1970 novel “Play It as It Lays.”

As Matt Brennan wrote in the introduction to the list, “It’s been said that Hollywood is more an idea than a place, and no task punctuates the notion quite like asking people to choose the best Hollywood book of all time: ‘What do you mean,’ they inevitably ask, ‘by “Hollywood?’”

There are also essays on specific books, including “Play It as It Lays,” Julia Phillips’ “You’ll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again,” Carrie Fisher’s “Postcards From the Edge,” Pauline Kael’s “Raising Kane,” Steven Bach’s “Final Cut,” Donald Bogle’s “Toms, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films” and Peter Biskind’s “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls.”

Only good movies

Get the Indie Focus newsletter, Mark Olsen's weekly guide to the world of cinema.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

focus on the family movie review the blind

Mark Olsen writes about all kinds of movies for the Los Angeles Times as both a feature writer and reviewer.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Kirsten Dunst in 'Civil War'

In trying to hedge its politics, ‘Civil War’ betrays its characters — and the audience

This image released by A24 shows Kirsten Dunst in a scene from "Civil War." (Murray Close/A24 via AP)

Entertainment & Arts

‘Civil War’ unites moviegoers at box office

April 14, 2024

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE -- Episode 1861 -- Pictured: Host Ryan Gosling during Promos on Tuesday, April 9, 2024 -- (Photo by: Rosalind O’Connor/NBC)

On ‘Saturday Night Live,’ Ryan Gosling can’t stop cracking up as guest host

April 13, 2024

A clawed hand approaches a potential victim.

Review: ‘Blackout,’ a new take on one of horror’s oldest myths, is claws for celebration

April 12, 2024

  • Back to Focus on the Family Podcast Network
  • Movie Review: Lisa Frankenstein

Movie Review: Lisa Frankenstein

Lisa Frankenstein is a crawl-from-the-grave ‘80s-esque send-up with a comedic twist and a whole lot of foul content worms.

Read the Plugged In Review

If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give us your feedback .

Apple Podcasts podcast player logo

Recent Episodes

  • Movie Review: The Greatest Hits
  • TV Review: The Baxters
  • The Screen in Your Pocket: Video Gaming Benefits
  • Pop Culture Remix: The Inquisitor
  • Movie Review: Someone Like You
  • TV Review: Animal Control
  • The Screen in Your Pocket: Penny’s Big Breakaway
  • Pop Culture Remix: The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

IMAGES

  1. The Blind

    focus on the family movie review the blind

  2. Focus on the Family Movie Reviews

    focus on the family movie review the blind

  3. The Blind (2009)

    focus on the family movie review the blind

  4. Focus on the Family Movie Review

    focus on the family movie review the blind

  5. Focus on the Family Movie Review: The Best Movies for Families

    focus on the family movie review the blind

  6. Focus on the family movie reviews

    focus on the family movie review the blind

COMMENTS

  1. The Blind Movie Review for Parents

    The Blind Rating & Content Info . Why is The Blind rated PG-13? The Blind is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for thematic content and smoking . Violence: There are many hunting scenes where guns are fired and ducks fall from the sky. Dead birds are shown being carried by hunters. A mentally ill woman yells at and frightens her children. She later screams when she is taken to a mental hospital against ...

  2. The Blind Movie Review

    Parents need to know that The Blind is a faith-centered biopic about Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson (Aron von Andrian). Through a religious lens, it focuses on the idea of redemption and forgiveness. Mature content isn't constant but includes strong language ("damn," "s--t") and many scenes with or of drinking -- including alcohol addiction -- and smoking.

  3. The Blind

    Movie Review. Millions of reality TV fans made A&E's Duck Dynasty a surprise hit from 2012 to 2017. Now, The Blind tells the story of this famous clan's bearded patriarch, Phil Robertson. And while many may know of Phil's tenaciously outspoken faith now, they may not know the hard and twisting road he walked before surrendering—and that is the right word here—to Jesus.

  4. Home

    Plugged In exists to help you and your family make family appropriate entertainment choices. But the work we do is only made possible with donations from generous readers like you. Donate. April 5, 2024. April 5, 2024. April 4, 2024. April 3, 2024. April 2, 2024. March 28, 2024.

  5. Duck Dynasty Film 'The Blind' Hits Home Theaters After Record-Breaking

    You can read Focus on the Family's Plugged In movie review of The Blind by clicking here. To speak with a family help specialist or request resources, please call us at 1-800-A-FAMILY (232-6459). Phil and Kay Robertson recently appeared on an episode of the Focus on the Family Broadcast " Hunting for Hope and Happiness " to share their ...

  6. [Review]

    The Blind captivates viewers with its cinematography, immersing us in the years of Phil and Kay Robertson's marital journey. The Robertsons, stars of the television series "Duck Dynasty," are renowned for their unwavering faith, resilience, and devotion to family.However, this film delves deeper into Phil's battle with addiction, which poses a grave threat to their union.

  7. Movie Review: A Duck Dynasty's origin myth is related in "The Blind

    Rating: PG-13, violence, smoking, profanity and duck shooting. Cast: Aron von Adrian, Amelia Eve, Matthew Erik White, Brielle Robillard, Connor Tillman and John Ales and Phil Robertson. Credits. Directed by Andrew Hyatt, scripted by Andrew Hyatt and Stephanie Katz. A Tread Lively release.

  8. The Blind: Is the 2023 Movie Based on the Life of Phil Robertson?

    Shivangi Sinha. October 2, 2023. 'The Blind' delves into the life of Phil Robertson and offers a glimpse into his journey before achieving success as an entrepreneur and founding Duck Commander. The film aims to shed light on the challenges and hardships faced by the Robertson family as they navigated their path to success.

  9. The Blind

    The Blind Reviews. Interesting back story of the "Duck Dynasty" patriarch. Full Review | Original Score: 6/10 | Oct 6, 2023. Whatever potential it had, the film just isn't very good, with or ...

  10. "The Blind" Movie Review: You've Heard the Story…But Not Like This

    I'd tell you there are spoilers here for the movie "The Blind: The True Story of the Robertson Family," but you probably already know something about their unique story. Many of us watched 11 seasons of their lives on the hit reality television show, "Duck Dynasty." They have written books, made podcasts, done countless interviews and more to tell you how Jesus saved their family.

  11. Focus on the Family Movie Reviews, Empowering Families with Pre ...

    Focus on the Family, with its multifaceted endeavors and dedicated movie review platform, Plugged In, serves as a reliable guide for families navigating the extensive and often perplexing realm of ...

  12. Plugged In reviews of movies now in theatres

    With Plugged In movie reviews, you'll find a detailed breakdown of up-to-date films, including spiritual content, sexual content, violent content, the amount of crude or profane language, content involving drugs and alcohol, other negative elements as well as positive aspects of the film. Here are a few reviews of new releases you may want to ...

  13. The new Duck Dynasty Movie, The Blind comes to theaters September 28th

    My Review of The Blind movie. While The Blind movie doesn't come to theaters until September 28th, I got to watch an early screening of the movie with my family and my parents. We loved this movie and it showed a side of Phil, that -to be honest, shocked us. We couldn't believe the religious Phil Robertson that you see on Duck Dynasty today was once an alcoholic who pushed his wife and ...

  14. The Blind Side

    S.J. becomes buds with Michael almost immediately, and the pint-sized mogul-in-the-making becomes Michael's de facto agent when college coaches start calling. Collins, the Tuohy's beautiful teen daughter, takes more time to warm to Michael, but eventually forsakes her stuck-up friends to study with him.

  15. Review On The Blind Movie

    Continue reading for my review of The Blind movie! Many thanks to Tread Lively for providing a product sample for this review. As always, my opinions are 100% my own. Table of Contents. My Review Of The Blind Movie ... he fell in love, started a family, and began to spiral out of control. THE BLIND shares never-before-revealed moments in Phil ...

  16. 'The Blind' Ending Explained & Film Summary: What Happens To Phil

    Kay's mother disapproves of Phil since he is not as rich as them, and this causes the couple to break up temporarily. But when Kay's father passes away, and her mother starts drinking heavily, the couple starts getting back together through this turbulent time. They get married soon enough, and Kay gets pregnant while Phil goes to college.

  17. Plugged In

    Plugged In. Plugged In is a Focus on the Family publication designed to shine a light on the world of popular entertainment while giving families the essential tools they need to understand, navigate, and impact the culture in which they live. Through our reviews, articles and discussions, we hope to spark intellectual thought, spiritual growth ...

  18. The Blind (2023) Movie Reviews

    Buy Pixar movie tix to unlock Buy 2, Get 2 deal And bring the whole family to Inside Out 2; ... The Blind (2023) Fan Reviews and Ratings Powered by Rotten Tomatoes Rate Movie. Close Audience Score. The percentage of users who made a verified movie ticket purchase and rated this 3.5 stars or higher. Learn more. Review Submitted. GOT IT ...

  19. FULL INTERVIEW: Robertson Family talks about new movie, "The Blind"

    Published: Sep. 18, 2023 at 8:39 PM PDT. MONROE, La. (KNOE) - Willie and Korie Robertson sat down with KNOE's Sophia Ridley to talk about their movie, "The Blind.". The movie premiers in ...

  20. Episodes

    Take a minute to hear a family-friendly review of the hottest movie, YouTube video, streaming series, video game, or new technology to help you decide if it's a good choice for your kids and family. Hosted by Focus on the Family's media and culture analysts, these reviews for parents offer a fresh Christian perspective on entertainment from ...

  21. Movie Review: The Greatest Hits

    Take a minute to hear a family-friendly review of the hottest movie, YouTube video, streaming series, video game, or new technology to help you decide if it's a good choice for your kids and family. Hosted by Focus on the Family's media and culture analysts, these reviews for parents offer a fresh Christian perspective on entertainment from ...

  22. Movie Review: Migration

    Take a minute to hear a family-friendly review of the hottest movie, YouTube video, streaming series, video game, or new technology to help you decide if it's a good choice for your kids and family. Hosted by Focus on the Family's media and culture analysts, these reviews for parents offer a fresh Christian perspective on entertainment from ...

  23. Family-friendly movie reviews: Dennis Quaid in 'The Long Game,' bloody

    Plugged In is a Focus on the Family publication designed to shine a light on the world of popular entertainment while giving families the essential tools they need to understand, navigate, and ...

  24. What to watch: 3 eye-opening documentaries : NPR

    What Jennifer Did. YouTube. A feature-length film about a 2010 home invasion that killed a woman and left her husband in a coma, What Jennifer Did is mostly told from the point of view of the ...

  25. Celebrating the midnight movie, plus the week's best films

    On Monday the New Beverly will show the pulverizing double bill of Gareth Evans' 2011 "The Raid: Redemption" and 2014's "The Raid 2.". Both films star Iko Uwais as an Indonesian cop ...

  26. Movie Review: Lisa Frankenstein

    Take a minute to hear a family-friendly review of the hottest movie, YouTube video, streaming series, video game, or new technology to help you decide if it's a good choice for your kids and family. Hosted by Focus on the Family's media and culture analysts, these reviews for parents offer a fresh Christian perspective on entertainment from ...