How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

Background Image

After weeks of heavy job searching, you’re almost there!

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send in your application and call it a day, you remember that you need to write a cover letter too.

So now, you’re stuck staring at a blank page, wondering where to start...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think. 

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve.

We're going to cover:

What Is a Cover Letter?

  • How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter, Step by Step
  • 15+ Job-Winning Cover Letter Examples

Let’s get started.

A cover letter is a document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume or CV.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, it should be around 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter is supposed to impress the hiring manager and convince them you’re worth interviewing as a candidate.

So, how can your cover letter achieve this?

First of all, it should complement your resume, not copy it. Your cover letter is your chance to elaborate on important achievements, skills, or anything else that your resume doesn’t give you the space to cover. 

For example, if you have an employment gap on your resume, the cover letter is a great place to explain why it happened and how it helped you grow as a person. 

If this is your first time writing a cover letter, writing about yourself might seem complicated. But don’t worry—you don’t need to be super creative or even a good writer .

All you have to do is follow this tried and tested cover letter structure:

structure of a cover letter

  • Header. Add all the necessary contact information at the top of your cover letter.
  • Formal greeting. Choose an appropriate way to greet your target audience.
  • Introduction. Introduce yourself in the opening paragraph and explain your interest in the role.
  • Body. Elaborate on why you’re the best candidate for the job and a good match for the company. Focus on “selling” your skills, achievements, and relevant professional experiences.
  • Conclusion. Summarize your key points and wrap it up professionally.

Now, let’s take a look at an example of a cover letter that follows our structure perfectly:

How to Write a Cover Letter

New to cover letter writing? Give our cover letter video a watch before diving into the article!

When Should You Write a Cover Letter?

You should always include a cover letter in your job application, even if the hiring manager never reads it. Submitting a cover letter is as important as submitting a resume if you want to look like a serious candidate.

If the employer requests a cover letter as part of the screening process, not sending one is a huge red flag and will probably get your application tossed into the “no” pile immediately.

On the other hand, if the job advertisement doesn’t require a cover letter from the candidates, adding one shows you went the extra mile.

Putting in the effort to write a cover letter can set you apart from other candidates with similar professional experience and skills, and it could even sway the hiring manager to call you for an interview if you do it right.

Need to write a letter to help get you into a good school or volunteer program? Check out our guide to learn how to write a motivation letter !

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

Now that you know what a cover letter is, it’s time to learn how to write one!

We’ll go through the process in detail, step by step.

#1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, stylish template?

cover letter templates for 2024

Just choose one of our hand-picked cover letter templates , and you’ll be all set in no time!

As a bonus, our intuitive AI will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter as you write it. You’ll have the perfect cover letter done in minutes!

cover letter templates

#2. Put Contact Information in the Header

As with a resume, it’s important to start your cover letter with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter’s header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text.

Contact Information on Cover Letter

Here, you want to include all the essential contact information , including:

  • Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top.
  • Job Title. Match the professional title underneath your name to the exact job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Email Address. Always use a professional and easy-to-spell email address. Ideally, it should combine your first and last names.
  • Phone Number. Add a number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country, no need for more details.
  • Relevant Links (optional). You can add links to websites or social media profiles that are relevant to your field. Examples include a LinkedIn profile , Github, or an online portfolio.

Then it’s time to add the recipient’s contact details, such as:

  • Hiring Manager's Name. If you can find the name of the hiring manager, add it.
  • Hiring Manager's Title. While there’s no harm in writing “hiring manager,” if they’re the head of the department, we recommend you use that title accordingly.
  • Company Name. Make sure to write the name of the company you're applying to.
  • Location. The city and state/country are usually enough information here, too.
  • Date of Writing (Optional). You can include the date you wrote your cover letter for an extra professional touch.

matching resume and cover letter

#3. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed all the contact information, it’s time to start writing the content of the cover letter.

The first thing you need to do here is to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager.

In fact, you want to address the hiring manager personally .

Forget the old “Dear Sir or Madam” or the impersonal “To Whom It May Concern.” You want to give your future boss a good impression and show them that you did your research before sending in your application.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes something sticks with their generic approach

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager?

First, check the job ad. The hiring manager’s name might be listed somewhere in it.

If that doesn’t work, check the company’s LinkedIn page. You just need to look up the head of the relevant department you’re applying to, and you’re all set.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer.

Here’s what you should look for on LinkedIn:

linkedin search cco

And there you go! You have your hiring manager.

But let’s say you’re applying for a position as a server . In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager” or “food and beverage manager.”

If the results don’t come up with anything, try checking out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Make sure to address them as Mr. or Ms., followed by their last name. If you’re not sure about their gender or marital status, you can just stick to their full name, like so:

  • Dear Mr. Kurtuy,
  • Dear Andrei Kurtuy,

But what if you still can’t find the hiring manager’s name, no matter where you look?

No worries. You can direct your cover letter to the company, department, or team as a whole, or just skip the hiring manager’s name.

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear [Company Name]

Are you applying for a research position? Learn how to write an academic personal statement .

#4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Hiring managers get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The biggest problem with most opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Here’s an example:

  • My name is Jonathan, and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a Sales Manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

And do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start with some of your top achievements to grab the reader’s attention. And to get the point across, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

Your opening paragraph should also show the hiring manager a bit about why you want this specific job. For example, mention how the job relates to your plans for the future or how it can help you grow professionally. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not just applying left and right—you’re actually enthusiastic about getting this particular role.

Now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Dear Mr. Smith,

My name’s Michael, and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked as a Sales Representative with Company X, another fin-tech company , for 3+ years, where I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month and beat the KPIs by around 40%. I believe that my previous industry experience, passion for finance , and excellence in sales make me the right candidate for the job.

The second candidate starts with what they can do for the company in the future and immediately lists an impressive and relevant achievement. Since they’re experienced in the same industry and interested in finance, the hiring manager can see they’re not just a random applicant.

From this introduction, it’s safe to say that the hiring manager would read the rest of this candidate’s cover letter.

#5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details

The next part of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what sets you apart as a qualified candidate for the job.

The main thing you need to remember here is that you shouldn’t make it all about yourself . Your cover letter is supposed to show the hiring manager how you relate to the job and the company you’re applying to.

No matter how cool you make yourself sound in your cover letter, if you don’t tailor it to match what the hiring manager is looking for, you’re not getting an interview.

To get this right, use the job ad as a reference when writing your cover letter. Make sure to highlight skills and achievements that match the job requirements, and you’re good to go.

Since this part of your cover letter is by far the longest, you should split it into at least two paragraphs.

Here’s what each paragraph should cover:

Explain Why You’re the Perfect Candidate for the Role

Before you can show the hiring manager that you’re exactly what they’ve been looking for, you need to know what it is they’re looking for.

Start by doing a bit of research. Learn what the most important skills and responsibilities of the role are according to the job ad, and focus on any relevant experience you have that matches them.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. The top requirements on the job ad are:

  • Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of $10,000+ / month
  • Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  • Excellent copywriting skills

So, in the body of your cover letter, you need to show how you meet these requirements. Here’s an example of what that can look like:

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $40,000+ . As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. I created the ad copy and images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

Our example addresses all the necessary requirements and shows off the candidate’s relevant skills.

Are you a student applying for your first internship? Learn how to write an internship cover letter with our dedicated guide.

Explain Why You’re a Good Fit for the Company

As skilled and experienced as you may be, that’s not all the hiring manager is looking for.

They also want someone who’s a good fit for their company and who actually wants to work there.

Employees who don’t fit in with the company culture are likely to quit sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary , so hiring managers vet candidates very carefully to avoid this scenario.

So, you have to convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about working with them.

Start by doing some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company’s product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the company’s culture like?

Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or on job-search websites like Jobscan or Glassdoor.

Then, pick your favorite thing about the company and talk about it in your cover letter.

But don’t just describe the company in its own words just to flatter them. Be super specific—the hiring manager can see through any fluff.

For example, if you’re passionate about their product and you like the company’s culture of innovation and independent work model, you can write something like:

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features, such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2, were real game changers for the device.

I really admire how Company XYZ strives for excellence in all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone who thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I’ll be a great match for your Product Design team.

So, make sure to do your fair share of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying to that specific company.

Is the company you want to work for not hiring at the moment? Check out our guide to writing a letter of interest .

#6. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Finally, it’s time to conclude your cover letter.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't make in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? If there’s any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision, mention it here. If not, just recap your key selling points so far, such as key skills and expertise.
  • Express gratitude. Politely thanking the hiring manager for their time is always a good idea.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. This means you should ask the hiring manager to do something, like call you and discuss your application or arrange an interview.
  • Remember to sign your cover letter. Just add a formal closing line and sign your name at the bottom.

Here’s an example of how to end your cover letter :

I hope to help Company X make the most of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your Facebook marketing goals. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided email address or phone number so that we may arrange an interview.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alice Richards

Feel free to use one of these other popular closing lines for your cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Once you’re done with your cover letter, it’s time to check if it meets all industry requirements. 

Give our handy cover letter writing checklist a look to make sure:

Does your cover letter heading include all essential information?

  • Professional Email
  • Phone Number
  • Relevant Links

Do you address the right person? 

  • The hiring manager in the company
  • Your future direct supervisor
  • The company/department in general

Does your introductory paragraph grab the reader's attention?

  • Did you mention some of your top achievements?
  • Did you use numbers and facts to back up your experience?
  • Did you convey enthusiasm for the specific role?

Do you show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

  • Did you identify the core requirements for the role?
  • Did you show how your experiences helped you fit the requirements perfectly?

Do you convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the company you’re applying to?

  • Did you identify the top 3 things that you like about the company?
  • Did you avoid generic reasons for explaining your interest in the company?

Did you conclude your cover letter properly?

  • Did you recap your key selling points in the conclusion?
  • Did you end your cover letter with a call to action?
  • Did you use the right formal closing line and sign your name?

15 Cover Letter Tips

Now you’re all set to write your cover letter! 

Before you start typing, here are some cover letter tips to help take your cover letter to the next level:

  • Customize Your Cover Letter for Each Job. Make sure your cover letter is tailored to the job you're applying for. This shows you're not just sending generic applications left and right, and it tells the hiring manager you’re the right person for the job.
  • Showcase Your Skills. Talk about how your skills meet the company’s needs. And while your hard skills should be front and center, you shouldn’t underestimate your soft skills in your cover letter either.
  • Avoid Fluff. Don’t make any generic statements you can’t back up. The hiring manager can tell when you’re just throwing words around, and it doesn’t make your cover letter look good.
  • Use Specific Examples. Instead of saying you're great at something, give an actual example to back up your claim. Any data you can provide makes you sound more credible, so quantify your achievements. For example, give numbers such as percentages related to your performance and the timeframe it took to accomplish certain achievements.
  • Research the Company. Always take time to learn about the company you're applying to. Make sure to mention something about them in your cover letter to show the hiring manager that you're interested.
  • Follow the Application Instructions. If the job posting asks for something specific in your cover letter or requires a certain format, make sure you include it. Not following instructions can come off as unattentive or signal to the hiring manager that you’re not taking the job seriously.
  • Use the Right Template and Format. Choose the right cover letter format and adapt your cover letter’s look to the industry you’re applying for. For example, if you’re aiming for a job in Law or Finance, you should go for a cleaner, more professional look. But if you’re applying for a field that values innovation, like IT or Design, you have more room for creativity.
  • Express Your Enthusiasm. Let the hiring manager know why you're excited about the job. Your passion for the specific role or the field in general can be a big selling point, and show them that you’re genuinely interested, not just applying left and right.
  • Address Any Gaps. If there are any employment gaps in your resume , your cover letter is a great place to mention why. Your resume doesn’t give you enough space to elaborate on an employment gap, so addressing it here can set hiring managers at ease—life happens, and employers understand.
  • Avoid Quirky Emails. Your email address should be presentable. It’s hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is “[email protected].” Just use a [email protected] format.
  • Check Your Contact Information. Typos in your email address or phone number can mean a missed opportunity. Double-check these before sending your application.
  • Mention if You Want to Relocate. If you’re looking for a job that lets you move somewhere else, specify this in your cover letter.
  • Keep It Brief. You want to keep your cover letter short and sweet. Hiring managers don’t have time to read a novel, so if you go over one page, they simply won’t read it at all.
  • Use a Professional Tone. Even though a conversational tone isn’t a bad thing, remember that it's still a formal document. Show professionalism in your cover letter by keeping slang, jargon, and emojis out of it.
  • Proofread Carefully. Typos and grammar mistakes are a huge deal-breaker. Use a tool like Grammarly or QuillBot to double-check your spelling and grammar, or even get a friend to check it for you.

15+ Cover Letter Examples

Need some inspiration? Check out some perfect cover letter examples for different experience levels and various professions.

5+ Cover Letter Examples by Experience

#1. college student cover letter example.

college or student cover letter example

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#2. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Middle Management Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a project manager cover letter here.

#3. Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#4. Career Change Cover Letter Example

Career Change Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to a career change resume and cover letter here.

#5. Management Cover Letter Example

Management Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a management cover letter here.

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an executive resume here.

9+ Cover Letter Examples by Profession

#1. it cover letter example.

IT Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

#2. Consultant Cover Letter Example

Consultant Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#3. Human Resources Cover Letter

Human Resources Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a human resources cover letter here.

#4. Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business cover letter here.

#5. Sales Cover Letter Example

Sales Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales cover letter here.

#6. Social Worker Cover Letter

Social Worker Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a social worker cover letter here.

#7. Lawyer Cover Letter

Lawyer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a lawyer cover letter here.

#8. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an administrative assistant cover letter here.

#9. Engineering Cover Letter Example

Engineering Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineer cover letter here.

#10. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist cover letter here.

Need more inspiration? Check out these cover letter examples to learn what makes them stand out.

Plug & Play Cover Letter Template

Not sure how to start your cover letter? Don’t worry!

Just copy and paste our free cover letter template into the cover letter builder, and swap out the blanks for your details.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Profession]

[Your Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

[Your Location]

[Your LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

[Your Personal Website URL (optional)]

[Recipient's Name, e.g., Jane Doe],

[Recipient's Position, e.g., Hiring Manager]

[Company Name, e.g., ABC Corporation]

[Company Address]

[City, State/Country]

Dear [Recipient's Name],

As a seasoned [Your Profession] with [Number of Years of Experience] years of industry experience, I am eager to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my experience in [Your Industry/Sector] and the successes I've achieved throughout my education and career, I believe I can bring unique value and creativity to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I've taken the lead on more than [Number of Projects/Assignments] projects, some valued up to $[Highest Project Value]. I pride myself on consistently exceeding client expectations and have successfully [Mention a Key Achievement] in just a [Amount of Time] through [Skill] and [Skill].

I've collaborated with various professionals, such as [List Roles], ensuring that all [projects/tasks] meet [relevant standards or objectives]. This hands-on experience, coupled with my dedication to understanding each [client's/customer's] vision, has equipped me to navigate and deliver on complex projects.

My key strengths include:

  • Improving [Achievement] by [%] over [Amount of Time] which resulted in [Quantified Result].
  • Optimizing [Work Process/Responsibility] which saved [Previous Employer] [Amount of Time/Budget/Other Metric] over [Weeks/Months/Years]
  • Spearheading team of [Number of People] to [Task] and achieving [Quantified Result].

Alongside this letter, I've attached my resume. My educational background, a [Your Degree] with a concentration in [Your Specialization], complements the practical skills that I'm particularly eager to share with [Company Name].

I'm excited about the possibility of contributing to [Something Notable About the Company or Its Mission]. I'd be grateful for the chance to delve deeper into how my expertise aligns with your needs.

Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

The Heart of Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application falls through.

After all, your cover letter is meant to complement your resume. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression in your cover letter, only for the hiring manager to never read it because your resume was mediocre.

But don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here, too.

Check out our dedicated guide on how to make a resume and learn everything you need to know to land your dream job!

Just pick one of our resume templates and start writing your own job-winning resume.

resume examples for cover letters

Key Takeaways

Now that we’ve walked you through all the steps of writing a cover letter, let’s summarize everything we’ve learned:

  • A cover letter is a 250 - 400 word document that’s meant to convince the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job.
  • Your job application should always include a cover letter alongside your resume.
  • To grab the hiring manager’s attention, write a strong opening paragraph. Mention who you are, why you’re applying, and a standout achievement to pique their interest.
  • Your cover letter should focus on why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you’re passionate about working in this specific company.
  • Use the body of your cover letter to provide details on your skills, achievements, and qualifications, as well as make sure to convey your enthusiasm throughout your whole cover letter.
  • Recap your key selling points towards the end of your cover letter, and end it with a formal closing line and your full name signed underneath.

At Novorésumé, we’re committed to helping you get the job you deserve every step of the way! 

Follow our career blog for more valuable advice, or check out some of our top guides, such as:

  • How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide
  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers [Full List]

cookies image

To provide a safer experience, the best content and great communication, we use cookies. Learn how we use them for non-authenticated users.

Read more

How it works

Transform your enterprise with the scalable mindsets, skills, & behavior change that drive performance.

Explore how BetterUp connects to your core business systems.

We pair AI with the latest in human-centered coaching to drive powerful, lasting learning and behavior change.

Build leaders that accelerate team performance and engagement.

Unlock performance potential at scale with AI-powered curated growth journeys.

Build resilience, well-being and agility to drive performance across your entire enterprise.

Transform your business, starting with your sales leaders.

Unlock business impact from the top with executive coaching.

Foster a culture of inclusion and belonging.

Accelerate the performance and potential of your agencies and employees.

See how innovative organizations use BetterUp to build a thriving workforce.

Discover how BetterUp measurably impacts key business outcomes for organizations like yours.

A demo is the first step to transforming your business. Meet with us to develop a plan for attaining your goals.

Request a demo

  • What is coaching?

Learn how 1:1 coaching works, who its for, and if it's right for you.

Accelerate your personal and professional growth with the expert guidance of a BetterUp Coach.

Types of Coaching

Navigate career transitions, accelerate your professional growth, and achieve your career goals with expert coaching.

Enhance your communication skills for better personal and professional relationships, with tailored coaching that focuses on your needs.

Find balance, resilience, and well-being in all areas of your life with holistic coaching designed to empower you.

Discover your perfect match : Take our 5-minute assessment and let us pair you with one of our top Coaches tailored just for you.

Find your Coach

Research, expert insights, and resources to develop courageous leaders within your organization.

Best practices, research, and tools to fuel individual and business growth.

View on-demand BetterUp events and learn about upcoming live discussions.

The latest insights and ideas for building a high-performing workplace.

  • BetterUp Briefing

The online magazine that helps you understand tomorrow's workforce trends, today.

Innovative research featured in peer-reviewed journals, press, and more.

Founded in 2022 to deepen the understanding of the intersection of well-being, purpose, and performance

We're on a mission to help everyone live with clarity, purpose, and passion.

Join us and create impactful change.

Read the buzz about BetterUp.

Meet the leadership that's passionate about empowering your workforce.

For Business

For Individuals

How to write a great cover letter in 2024: tips and structure

young-woman-checking-her-cover-lette

A cover letter is a personalized letter that introduces you to a potential employer, highlights your qualifications, and explains why you're a strong fit for a specific job.

Hate or love them, these brief documents allow job seekers to make an impression and stand out from the pile of other applications. Penning a thoughtful cover letter shows the hiring team you care about earning the position.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to write a cover letter — and a great one, at that.

What is a cover letter and why does it matter?

A professional cover letter is a one-page document you submit alongside your CV or resume as part of a job application. Typically, they’re about half a page or around 150–300 words.

An effective cover letter doesn’t just rehash your CV; it’s your chance to highlight your proudest moments, explain why you want the job, and state plainly what you bring to the table.

Show the reviewer you’re likable, talented, and will add to the company’s culture . You can refer to previous jobs and other information from your CV, but only if it helps tell a story about you and your career choices .

What 3 things should you include in a cover letter?

A well-crafted cover letter can help you stand out to potential employers. To make your cover letter shine, here are three key elements to include:

1. Personalization

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role.

2. Highlight relevant achievements and skills

Emphasize your most relevant skills , experiences, and accomplishments that directly relate to the job you're applying for. Provide specific examples of how your skills have benefited previous employers and how they can contribute to the prospective employer's success. Use quantifiable achievements , such as improved efficiency, cost savings, or project success, to demonstrate your impact.

3. Show enthusiasm and fit

Express your enthusiasm for the company and the position you're applying for. Explain why you are interested in this role and believe you are a good fit for the organization. Mention how your values, goals, and skills align with the company's mission and culture. Demonstrating that you've done your research can make a significant impression.

What do hiring managers look for in a cover letter?

Employers look for several key elements in a cover letter. These include:

Employers want to see that your cover letter is specifically tailored to the position you are applying for. It should demonstrate how your skills, experiences, and qualifications align with the job requirements.

Clear and concise writing

A well-written cover letter is concise, easy to read, and error-free. Employers appreciate clear and effective communication skills , so make sure your cover letter showcases your ability to express yourself effectively.

Demonstrated knowledge of the company

Employers want to see that you are genuinely interested in their organization. Mention specific details about the company, such as recent achievements or projects, to show that you are enthusiastic about joining their team.

Achievements and accomplishments

Highlight your relevant achievements and accomplishments that demonstrate your qualifications for the position. Use specific examples to showcase your skills and show how they can benefit the employer.

Enthusiasm and motivation

Employers want to hire candidates who are excited about the opportunity and motivated to contribute to the company's success. Express your enthusiasm and passion for the role and explain why you are interested in working for the company.

Professionalism

A cover letter should be professional in tone and presentation. Use formal language, address the hiring manager appropriately, and follow standard business letter formatting.

excited-woman-in-her-office-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

How do you structure a cover letter?

A well-structured cover letter follows a specific format that makes it easy for the reader to understand your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Here's a typical structure for a cover letter:

Contact information

Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the letter. Place your contact information at the beginning so that it's easy for the employer to reach you.

Employer's contact information

Opening paragraph, middle paragraph(s), closing paragraph, complimentary close, additional contact information.

Repeat your contact information (name, phone number, and email) at the end of the letter, just in case the employer needs it for quick reference.

Remember to keep your cover letter concise and focused. It should typically be no more than one page in length. Proofread your letter carefully to ensure it is free from spelling and grammatical errors. Tailor each cover letter to the specific job application to make it as relevant and impactful as possible.

How to write a good cover letter (with examples)

The best letters are unique, tailored to the job description, and written in your voice — but that doesn’t mean you can’t use a job cover letter template.

Great cover letters contain the same basic elements and flow a certain way. Take a look at this cover letter structure for ref erence while you construct your own.

1. Add a header and contact information

While reading your cover letter, the recruiter shouldn’t have to look far to find who wrote it. Your document should include a basic heading with the following information:

  • Pronouns (optional)
  • Location (optional)
  • Email address
  • Phone number (optional)
  • Relevant links, such as your LinkedIn profile , portfolio, or personal website (optional)

You can pull this information directly from your CV. Put it together, and it will look something like this:

Christopher Pike

San Francisco, California

[email protected]

Alternatively, if the posting asks you to submit your cover letter in the body of an email, you can include this information in your signature. For example:

Warm regards,

Catherine Janeway

Bloomington, Indiana

[email protected]

(555) 999 - 2222

man-using-his-laptop-while-smiling-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

2. Include a personal greeting

Always begin your cover letter by addressing the hiring manager — preferably by name. You can use the person’s first and last name. Make sure to include a relevant title, like Dr., Mr., or Ms. For example, “Dear Mr. John Doe.”

Avoid generic openings like “To whom it may concern,” “Dear sir or madam,” or “Dear hiring manager.” These introductions sound impersonal — like you’re copy-pasting cover letters — and can work against you in the hiring process.

Be careful, though. When using someone’s name, you don’t want to use the wrong title or accidentally misgender someone. If in doubt, using only their name is enough. You could also opt for a gender-neutral title, like Mx.

Make sure you’re addressing the right person in your letter — ideally, the person who’s making the final hiring decision. This isn’t always specified in the job posting, so you may have to do some research to learn the name of the hiring manager.

3. Draw them in with an opening story

The opening paragraph of your cover letter should hook the reader. You want it to be memorable, conversational, and extremely relevant to the job you’re pursuing. 

There’s no need for a personal introduction — you’ve already included your name in the heading. But you should make reference to the job you’re applying for. A simple “Thank you for considering my application for the role of [job title] at [company],” will suffice.

Then you can get into the “Why” of your job application. Drive home what makes this specific job and this company so appealing to you. Perhaps you’re a fan of their products, you’re passionate about their mission, or you love their brand voice. Whatever the case, this section is where you share your enthusiasm for the role.

Here’s an example opening paragraph. In this scenario, you’re applying for a digital marketing role at a bicycle company:

“Dear Mr. John Doe,

Thank you for considering my application for the role of Marketing Coordinator at Bits n’ Bikes.

My parents bought my first bike at one of your stores. I’ll never forget the freedom I felt when I learned to ride it. My father removed my training wheels, and my mom sent me barrelling down the street. You provide joy to families across the country — and I want to be part of that.”

4. Emphasize why you’re best for the job

Your next paragraphs should be focused on the role you’re applying to. Highlight your skill set and why you’re a good fit for the needs and expectations associated with the position. Hiring managers want to know what you’ll bring to the job, not just any role.

Start by studying the job description for hints. What problem are they trying to solve with this hire? What skills and qualifications do they mention first or more than once? These are indicators of what’s important to the hiring manager.

Search for details that match your experience and interests. For example, if you’re excited about a fast-paced job in public relations, you might look for these elements in a posting:

  • They want someone who can write social media posts and blog content on tight deadlines
  • They value collaboration and input from every team member
  • They need a planner who can come up with strong PR strategies

Highlight how you fulfill these requirements:

“I’ve always been a strong writer. From blog posts to social media, my content pulls in readers and drives traffic to product pages. For example, when I worked at Bits n’ Bikes, I developed a strategic blog series about bike maintenance that increased our sales of spare parts and tools by 50% — we could see it in our web metrics.

Thanks to the input of all of our team members, including our bike mechanics, my content delivered results.”

5. End with a strong closing paragraph and sign off gracefully

Your closing paragraph is your final chance to hammer home your enthusiasm about the role and your unique ability to fill it. Reiterate the main points you explained in the body paragraphs and remind the reader of what you bring to the table.

You can also use the end of your letter to relay other important details, like whether you’re willing to relocate for the job.

When choosing a sign-off, opt for a phrase that sounds professional and genuine. Reliable options include “Sincerely” and “Kind regards.”

Here’s a strong closing statement for you to consider:

“I believe my enthusiasm, skills, and work experience as a PR professional will serve Bits n’ Bikes very well. I would love to meet to further discuss my value-add as your next Director of Public Relations. Thank you for your consideration. I hope we speak soon.

man-reading-carefully-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Tips to write a great cover letter that compliments your resume

When writing your own letter, try not to copy the example excerpts word-for-word. Instead, use this cover letter structure as a baseline to organize your ideas. Then, as you’re writing, use these extra cover letter tips to add your personal touch:

  • Keep your cover letter different from your resume : Your cover letter should not duplicate the information on your resume. Instead, it should provide context and explanations for key points in your resume, emphasizing how your qualifications match the specific job you're applying for.
  • Customize your cover letter . Tailor your cover letter for each job application. Address the specific needs of the company and the job posting, demonstrating that you've done your homework and understand their requirements.
  • Show enthusiasm and fit . Express your enthusiasm for the company and position in the cover letter. Explain why you are interested in working for this company and how your values, goals, and skills align with their mission and culture.
  • Use keywords . Incorporate keywords from the job description and industry terms in your cover letter. This can help your application pass through applicant tracking systems (ATS) and demonstrate that you're well-versed in the field.
  • Keep it concise . Your cover letter should be succinct and to the point, typically no more than one page. Focus on the most compelling qualifications and experiences that directly support your application.
  • Be professional . Maintain a professional tone and structure in your cover letter. Proofread it carefully to ensure there are no errors.
  • Address any gaps or concerns . If there are gaps or concerns in your resume, such as employment gaps or a change in career direction, briefly address them in your cover letter. Explain any relevant circumstances and how they have shaped your qualifications and determination.
  • Provide a call to action . Conclude your cover letter with a call to action, inviting the employer to contact you for further discussion. Mention that you've attached your resume for their reference.
  • Follow the correct format . Use a standard cover letter format like the one above, including your contact information, a formal salutation, introductory and closing paragraphs, and your signature. Ensure that it complements your resume without redundancy.
  • Pick the right voice and tone . Try to write like yourself, but adapt to the tone and voice of the company. Look at the job listing, company website, and social media posts. Do they sound fun and quirky, stoic and professional, or somewhere in-between? This guides your writing style.
  • Tell your story . You’re an individual with unique expertise, motivators, and years of experience. Tie the pieces together with a great story. Introduce how you arrived at this point in your career, where you hope to go , and how this prospective company fits in your journey. You can also explain any career changes in your resume.
  • Show, don’t tell . Anyone can say they’re a problem solver. Why should a recruiter take their word for it if they don’t back it up with examples? Instead of naming your skills, show them in action. Describe situations where you rose to the task, and quantify your success when you can.
  • Be honest . Avoid highlighting skills you don’t have. This will backfire if they ask you about them in an interview. Instead, shift focus to the ways in which you stand out.
  • Avoid clichés and bullet points . These are signs of lazy writing. Do your best to be original from the first paragraph to the final one. This highlights your individuality and demonstrates the care you put into the letter.
  • Proofread . Always spellcheck your cover letter. Look for typos, grammatical errors, and proper flow. We suggest reading it out loud. If it sounds natural rolling off the tongue, it will read naturally as well.

woman-writing-on-her-notebook-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Common cover letter writing FAQs

How long should a cover letter be.

A cover letter should generally be concise and to the point. It is recommended to keep it to one page or less, focusing on the most relevant information that highlights your qualifications and fits the job requirements.

Should I include personal information in a cover letter?

While it's important to introduce yourself and provide your contact information, avoid including personal details such as your age, marital status, or unrelated hobbies. Instead, focus on presenting your professional qualifications and aligning them with the job requirements.

Can I use the same cover letter for multiple job applications?

While it may be tempting to reuse a cover letter, it is best to tailor each cover letter to the specific job you are applying for. This allows you to highlight why you are a good fit for that particular role and show genuine interest in the company.

Do I need to address my cover letter to a specific person?

Whenever possible, it is advisable to address your cover letter to a specific person, such as the hiring manager or recruiter. If the job posting does not provide this information, try to research and find the appropriate contact. If all else fails, you can use a generic salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager."

Should I include references in my cover letter?

It is generally not necessary to include references in your cover letter. Save this information for when the employer explicitly requests it. Instead, focus on showcasing your qualifications and achievements that make you a strong candidate for the position.

It’s time to start writing your stand-out cover letter

The hardest part of writing is getting started. 

Hopefully, our tips gave you some jumping-off points and confidence . But if you’re really stuck, looking at cover letter examples and resume templates will help you decide where to get started. 

There are numerous sample cover letters available online. Just remember that you’re a unique, well-rounded person, and your cover letter should reflect that. Using our structure, you can tell your story while highlighting your passion for the role. 

Doing your research, including strong examples of your skills, and being courteous is how to write a strong cover letter. Take a breath , flex your fingers, and get typing. Before you know it, your job search will lead to a job interview.

If you want more personalized guidance, a specialized career coach can help review, edit, and guide you through creating a great cover letter that sticks.

Ace your job search

Explore effective job search techniques, interview strategies, and ways to overcome job-related challenges. Our coaches specialize in helping you land your dream job.

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

3 cover letter examples to help you catch a hiring manager’s attention

Chatgpt cover letters: how to use this tool the right way, write thank you letters after interviews to stand out as job applicant, use professional reference templates to make hiring smoother, send a thank you email after an internship to boost your career, character references: 4 tips for a successful recommendation letter, how to ask for a letter of recommendation (with examples), how to write an impactful cover letter for a career change, how to write a follow-up email 2 weeks after an interview, cv versus resume demystify the differences once and for all, how to create a resume with chatgpt, how and when to write a functional resume (with examples), what are professional references and how to ask for one (examples), how to politely decline a job offer (with examples), resume best practices: how far back should a resume go, 4 tips to respond to a job rejection email plus examples, how to put babysitting on a resume: 6 skills to highlight, a quick guide on how to list references on a resume, stay connected with betterup, get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research..

3100 E 5th Street, Suite 350 Austin, TX 78702

  • Platform Overview
  • Integrations
  • Powered by AI
  • BetterUp Lead™
  • BetterUp Manage™
  • BetterUp Care®
  • Sales Performance
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Case Studies
  • Why BetterUp?
  • About Coaching
  • Find your Coach
  • Career Coaching
  • Communication Coaching
  • Life Coaching
  • News and Press
  • Leadership Team
  • Become a BetterUp Coach
  • BetterUp Labs
  • Center for Purpose & Performance
  • Leadership Training
  • Business Coaching
  • Contact Support
  • Contact Sales
  • Privacy Policy
  • Acceptable Use Policy
  • Trust & Security
  • Cookie Preferences

Jobscan > Cover Letter Writing Guide

How To Write A Cover Letter in 2024 (Expert Tips and Examples)

Here’s a comprehensive guide on how to write a cover letter that will get you noticed by recruiters.

author image

Trusted by:

company logo

A survey revealed that 77% of recruiters prefer candidates who send in a cover letter, even if submitting it is optional. Additionally, 90% of executives consider cover letters invaluable when assessing job candidates.

So, if you think cover letters are no longer important and necessary in 2024, think again.

Here’s a comprehensive guide to help you write a cover letter that effectively sells your skills and professional experience, increases your chances of getting interviews, and gets your foot in the door.

Table of Contents

What is a cover letter and do you still need one in 2024?

A cover letter is a letter of introduction accompanying your resume that paints why you are the best person for the job, what you bring to the table, and how you can help move the company forward.

Is the cover letter dead? No! In fact, a recent study by ResumeLab revealed that 64% of job vacancies still require that you include a cover letter in your application and 83% of HR pros said that cover letters are important for their hiring decision.

The bottom line is that a cover letter is still a valuable piece of your job search collateral. Nail your cover letter and you could end up getting that dream job.

So what exactly do you need to accomplish in your cover letter?

What is the purpose of a cover letter?

According to 49% of HR managers , your cover letter is the second best way to call attention to your resume and distinguish yourself from other applicants.

So the main purpose of your cover letter is to compel the recruiter to read more about you on your resume and move you to the next part of the hiring process.

Further, according to award-winning resume expert Melanie Denny , your cover letter is your value proposition letter. It proves why you are the best candidate to address the company’s needs with the professional skills and qualifications to succeed in the job.

Here’s an example of a great cover letter:

cover-letter-writing-guide

Now let’s get into the details of what your cover letter needs to include.

Cover Letter Structure Checklist

Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to include in your cover letter.

  • Contact Details Name Address (or City, State with zip code) Phone number Email address
  • Greeting Whenever possible, address the hiring manager by name.
  • Opening Who are you? What are your relevant skills and accomplishments?
  • Body (1-2 paragraphs) What do you know about the company? Why are you applying for this job? What value can you bring to the company? Include measurable results when possible.
  • Closing Reiterate your interest. Add a Call to Action. Mention any attachments. Use a professional sign-off like “Best” or “Sincerely” before your full name.

Here’s an example for the visual learners out there:

cover-letter-writing-guide

Now that you know the basics of what to include in your cover letter, let’s go through the process from start to finish to see how you can write a cover letter that will make you stand out from the rest of the candidates.

How to write a cover letter in 9 steps

It can be intimidating to try to parse down all your best qualities into a few quick paragraphs for your cover letter.

Here are 9 steps you can take to make sure you’re headed in the right direction:

Step 1. Do your research

Before writing your cover letter, thoroughly read the job description and the requirements for the job.

Melanie Denny , award-winning resume expert, likens the job description to your cover letter cheat sheet. And when checking the job description, she says you need to consider the following:

  • What are the company’s priorities?
  • What are their goals for the role?
  • What outcomes and accomplishments in your previous roles match the goals?
  • What are the key phrases and verbiage the company uses?

This will help you customize your cover letter, angle yourself and your narrative to fit the role better, and impress the hiring manager.

Try reaching out to the recruiter, hiring manager, or someone working in the company if you want more in-depth information about the company and the position you are applying for.

Step 2. Customize your cover letter for every job

Make sure your cover letter matches the job you are applying for. Writing a generic cover letter is a missed opportunity as this will not appeal to the recruiter or hiring manager. According to research from ResumeGo , 81% of HR professionals value job-specific cover letters over generic ones. Jobseekers who had tailored cover letters received a 53% higher callback rate compared to those who had no cover letter.

Remember, your cover letter is your chance to prove that you are passionate about working for a given company, so take the time to write a tailored cover letter for each position . You can do this by mentioning your skills and experience that are directly related to what’s mentioned in the job description. If you’re applying for a data analyst role that requires expertise in Microsoft Power BI, cite an example of a Power BI dashboard you built and how it helped the company.

Read our full guide: How to Optimize Your Cover Letter

Step 3. Include all of your contact info

You should make it easy for the hiring manager to reach you. In your cover letter, list these three things:

  • Address (including zip code– for ATS purposes )
  • Phone number with area code
  • Email address
  • Name of the Hiring Manager
  • Name of the Company
  • Address of the Company

Traditionally, your contact information is included in the upper left corner of your cover letter if you’re writing in a document. If you’re writing an email, this can be included beneath your signature at the end of the message.

Cover Letter Header Example:

Jane Jobscan Seattle, WA 98101 (555) 555-5555 • [email protected] linkedin.com/in/jane-jobscan

February 25, 2024

Lavinia Smith Hiring Manager Media Raven, Inc. Plantersville, MS 38862

Step 4. Address your cover letter to a real person

According to Melanie Denny, resume expert and President of Resume-Evolution, addressing your cover letter to a real person and addressing them by their name feels more personal and shows recruiters and hiring managers that you took time and did the research.

You can usually find the hiring manager’s name by searching the company website or LinkedIn profile, or by calling the company and asking which hiring manager is assigned to the particular position.

Once you learn the name, a simple greeting of “John” or “Hello John” is all you need.

If you can’t find the hiring manager’s name, you can use any of the following:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear (Department) Team
  • To whom it may concern

Read our full guide: How to Address a Cover Letter

Step 5. Write a strong opening statement

Melanie Denny suggests that you start your cover letter with a bang. This will hook the hiring manager’s interest and show them how you can be a valuable addition to the team.

Here are things you can do:

  • Open with a thought-provoking question
  • Make a big claim about what you can do for the company
  • Say something relevant and specific to the company

For example,

“I want to bring the marketing department of Media Raven Inc. to the next level and help the company exceed goals and reach more customers as Marketing Manager.”

Step 6. Prove how your professional background and skills help the company in the body of your cover letter

Take advantage of this real estate and prove to the prospective employer how your background, values, and professional experiences position you as the best fit for what the role requires.

This is especially important if you are switching careers. Highlight your relevant accomplishments in your cover letter, showcase your transferable skills, and explain how you can help the company address its challenges and succeed.

For example:

“As the Director of Marketing at ABC Company since 2018, I directed all phases of both the creative and technical elements of marketing initiatives, including data mining, brand creation, print/web collateral development, lead generation, channel partner cultivation, customer segmentation/profiling, as well as CRM and acquisition strategies.

Perhaps most importantly, I offer a history of proven results, as evidenced by the following marketing accomplishments for my current employer:

  • Captured a 28% expansion in customer base since 2018, achieved during a period of overall decline in the retail industry.
  • Led national marketing campaign (comprised of trade shows, media, and PR initiatives) for my company’s newly launched technology services division
  • Developed and executed SEO strategy that achieved and sustained top 3 rankings on Google (organic, nonpaid results) for key product search terms.
  • Oversaw the creation of a new company logo and rebranded 100+ products to cement a cohesive corporate identity and support new company direction.”

Just like when writing a resume, your cover letter should only include the most relevant and positive information about you. To home in on the right skills and qualifications to mention, try scanning your cover letter .

Read our full guide: What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?

Step 7. Write a strong closing statement and a call to action

Use the closing of your cover letter to:

  • Thank the hiring manager for their time
  • Mention any attachments (resume, portfolio, samples)
  • Invite to schedule an interview
  • Let the hiring manager know that you will follow up

Keep the closing professional and try not to sound too eager since that can come off as desperate. You must also keep in mind the tone and personality of the company you’re communicating with.

“Given the opportunity, I’m confident I can achieve similar groundbreaking marketing results for Media Raven, Inc.

Ms. Smith, I would welcome the chance to discuss your marketing objectives and how I can help you attain them. Feel free to call me at (555) 555-5555 or email me at [email protected] to arrange a meeting. I look forward to speaking with you.”

Read our full guide: How to End a Cover Letter With a Call to Action

Step 8. End with a professional closing salutation

To finish out the closing , use a formal signature. You can use “Sincerely,” “Best,” “Regards,” “Yours,” or any other professional signoff.

Use your first and last name as your signature. If you’re sending your cover letter in the body of an email, make sure it’s your personal email account that does not list your current work signature beneath the email. Your other option is to write the cover letter in a word document, save it as a PDF, and attach it to your email.

Step 9. Optimize your cover letter for the ATS

The Applicant Tracking System or the ATS is a software that companies use to screen applications and shrink their pool of applicants. Through the ATS database, a recruiter or hiring manager can just search for specific skills and keywords and the ATS will return a list of the top candidates who match the search criteria.

To optimize your cover letter for ATS, you need to:

  • Carefully read the job description
  • Take note of skills and resume keywords frequently mentioned
  • Incorporate these keywords into your cover letter

Read our full guide: How to Optimize Your Cover Letter to Beat the ATS

Does your cover letter pass the test?

Scan your cover letter to see how well it matches the job you're applying for. Optimize your cover letter and resume with Jobscan to get more interviews.

Computer with resume

How to Format Your Cover Letter

A cover letter is a letter, but that doesn’t mean you should just plop everything onto the page in a stream-of-consciousness flow. After all, cover letter formats determine the order in which the hiring manager learns about you, which can significantly influence their first impression. Use the format order below as a guideline for building the structure of your cover letter.

cover-letter-writing-guide

Notice how the topics flow like a conversation? When you first meet someone, you introduce yourself, tell them your name and a little about yourself, and then leave the conversation open for future meetings.

Your cover letter is just a like having a conversation with someone for the first time. Keeping that in mind will help you to keep things simple and focus on the right information.

Below are some examples of how to format your cover letter for different types of applications.

How to format your cover letter for a job

  • State your name
  • Explain your work history
  • Tell them what you can do for their company
  • Say goodbye

How to format your cover letter for an internship

  • Explain your coursework history and education
  • Explain what you can gain professionally

How to format your cover letter with no experience

  • Explain your skillset and character qualities that make you well-suited for the role
  • Outline entry-level achievements

You can also check out our cover letter templates to help you as you write your own cover letter.

Do you want to save time and receive instant feedback on your cover letter? Check out Jobscan’s cover letter tool .

Read more : How to Write a Resume for Today’s Job Market

Cover Letter Examples

Here are some examples to help you create a cover letter that will make you stand out and give a strong first impression.

1. Internship Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

2. Career Change Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

3. Operations Manager Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

4. Communications Professional Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

5. Software Engineer Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

Cover Letter Do’s and Don’ts

Aside from the basic steps of how to write a cover letter, there are some things you definitely need to make sure you avoid – and things you can’t skip! Follow these do’s and don’ts for writing a cover letter, and you’ll end up with a much better result.

  • Use a cover letter unless one was requested.
  • Attach a cover letter directly to your resume unless requested to do so.
  • Use the same boilerplate cover letter for multiple job applications.
  • Over-explain your work history, employment gaps, or qualifications – save it for the interview.
  • Badmouth any of your past employers.
  • Use the cover letter to complain or tell about your job search journey.
  • Use non-standard formatting like tables, columns, or graphics. (ATS can’t read those and your cover letter copy might not be scannable by the system.)
  • Use long paragraphs.
  • Customize a cover letter for every job application that asks for one.
  • Incorporate the top skills or keywords from the job description in your cover letter.
  • Include the company name and address, the job title, and point of contact’s name on your cover letter.
  • Incorporate relevant and compelling measurable results in your cover letter.
  • Explain, briefly, any dramatic shifts in a career (i.e. you are changing industries or job titles).
  • Use company information to relate your interest in the job.
  • Keep your cover letter concise.
  • Convey WHY you are right for the position.

More Cover Letter Tips

  • When emailing your cover letter, be strategic with your subject line. Never leave the subject line blank, and double-check for specific instructions in the job posting. If possible, use the email subject line to sell yourself. For example: “Experienced Software Engineer Seeks Senior Level Mobile Position.”
  • Keep your cover letter brief and to the point. The hiring manager will be reading many cover letters. By carefully selecting your words and experiences to include, you can stand out from the crowd of applicants.
  • Be confident. Let the hiring manager know the reasons why you deserve this position, and make yourself believe them too!
  • Your cover letter should not be simply a rephrasing of your resume. Let your personality show and go into further detail about your most valuable skills and experiences.
  • Do your research on the company and position before writing the cover letter. It should be customized to that specific company’s values and needs. Hiring managers can spot a generic resume from a mile away.
  • Use the job posting as your guide for what topics, skills, and experience to focus on.
  • The best cover letters include keywords from the job posting. Applicant tracking systems may scan your cover letter along with your resume and will be using these keywords to sort through the applicants.
  • Check for spelling and grammar errors.
  • Send your cover letter as a PDF to avoid readability issues and to present the most professional application package.
  • Scan Your Cover Letter with Jobscan to make sure you’re checking all the boxes.

Optimize Your Cover Letter with Jobscan’s Cover Letter Scanner

In addition to resume scans, Jobscan Premium users can also scan their cover letters against a job description.

This generates a report of the top hard skills and soft skills found in the job description that should be included in your cover letter, plus additional checks for optimal length, contact information, measurable results, and more.

Here’s how it works:

Key Takeaways

Your cover letter gives recruiters, hiring managers, and prospective employers an overview of your professional qualifications and relevant accomplishments that position you as the best candidate for the job.

So you have to make your cover letter powerful and interesting enough to make the recruiter or hiring manager read your resume and move you to the next step of the hiring process.

Here are key pointers when writing your cover letter.

  • Make sure you’ve read the job description and done your research about the company.
  • Get to know the name of the recruiter or hiring manager so you can address your cover letter properly.
  • Include relevant and measurable accomplishments in the body of your cover letter to prove to the hiring manager that you have what it takes to succeed in the job.
  • Keep your cover letter short and concise.
  • Your cover letter is not a substitute for your resume so don’t just copy and paste whatever is in your resume into your cover letter.

One last important reminder!

Having a strong cover letter is not enough. You also need to create a killer resume to make sure you stand out and land job interviews.

Learn more about writing a cover letter

How to Address a Cover Letter-block

How to Address a Cover Letter

10 Tips for Writing a Cover Letter-block

10 Tips for Writing a Cover Letter

The Career Change Cover Letter: How to Get it Right-block

The Career Change Cover Letter: How to Get it Right

What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?-block

What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?

Is Your Cover Letter Robot-Approved?-block

Is Your Cover Letter Robot-Approved?

How to End a Cover Letter with a Call to Action-block

How to End a Cover Letter with a Call to Action

Frequently asked questions, what are the different types of cover letters.

There are four types of cover letters.

  • Application cover letter An application cover letter is what you send to the recruiter or hiring manager along with your resume.
  • Prospecting cover letter You send this when you want to inquire prospective employers about open positions in their company or put yourself top-of-mind when they do decide to hire.
  • Networking cover letter You will send this to professionals in your network in hopes of getting referrals, introductions, job search advice, and job opportunities.
  • Career change cover letter This is what you send when you are switching careers or industries.

What tense should I use when writing a cover letter?

It can be appropriate to change tenses throughout your cover letter.

For example, you can explain who you are in the present tense and explain important aspects of your work history in the past tense. You can switch to future perfect tense when discussing the ways you would perform if given the position.

Think of it like this, “I am ABC, I did XYZ previously, and I look forward to doing EFG in this position.”

What to include in a cover letter

Our cover letter guidelines above explain how to write a cover letter more deeply, but in summary, you should always include your name, relevant work experience, and reasons why you are right for the job in your cover letter.

When not to include a cover letter

  • When the job posting clearly states not to include a cover letter
  • When you don’t have the time and energy to customize your cover letter. It’s better not to send a cover letter than to send a half-baked and mediocre one.
  • When you are applying online and there is no field to upload your cover letter.
  • When your cover letter has a lot of typos and errors.

What should you send first: a cover letter or a resume?

Typically, your cover letter and resume will be sent as a pair, but your cover letter is meant to be an introduction to your resume. If it is an email, use the cover letter in the body and attach your resume, otherwise, attach both.

Pro Tip: Be sure to review all instructions in the job description to follow the hiring manager’s requests.

How long should a cover letter be?

According to 70% of recruiters, a cover letter should not exceed 250 to 300 words.

Although there is no hard and fast rule about this, the ideal cover letter length should be around half a page to one full page in length to keep your message concise, clear, and easy to digest.

Should a cover letter be sent as a file attachment?

If it is not specified in the job posting, a cover letter can be sent either as an attachment (PDF is best) or in the body of an application email with your resume attached.

How to share a cover letter with a potential employer

There are several methods of sharing a cover letter with potential employers, depending on their application process.

Cover letters can be written on a document and turned into a PDF to be uploaded to a job application website or attached to an email along with your resume.

In other cases, your cover letter can simply be written in the email message to a hiring manager, with your resume attached.

How to title and save your cover letter

The key in every aspect of job applications is to make yourself an easy “yes” for your potential employer. That means making it easy for the hiring manager to keep track of your application materials for later review. With this in mind, make sure your full name and the phrase “cover letter” are included in the file label. Other helpful details might include the job title you’re applying for or the year of your application.

Here are a few examples:

  • Your Name_Cover Letter_Job Title.pdf
  • Cover Letter_Your Name_Job Title.pdf
  • Job Title_Your Name_Cover Letter.pdf
  • Your Name_Cover Letter_2024.pdf
  • Cover Letter_Your Name_2024.pdf

Explore more cover letter resources

icons_resources

Cover Letter Formats

icons_resources

ATS-Optimized Cover Letter

icons_resources

Cover Letter Templates

Generate a personalized cover letter in as little as 5 seconds

Say goodbye to the stress of writing a cover letter from scratch. Our AI-powered cover letter generator uses GPT-4 technology to create a personalized and ATS-friendly cover letter in one click. Stand out from the competition and land more job interviews.

Computer with resume

How To Write A Cover Letter (Definitive Guide + Template)

Mike Simpson 0 Comments

what can i write in cover letter

By Mike Simpson

what can i write in cover letter

So you want to learn how to write a cover letter…

But let me ask you this:

Have you ever been on a blind date?

It can be overwhelmingly nerve wracking.

There you are, all dressed up in your finest, ready to sit down across the table from someone you know absolutely nothing about, and hopefully survive the meeting without too much trouble.

At the absolute best, you two hit it off.

Things are great and you discover through your first awkward meeting that you’re perfect for each other and destined for years of happy togetherness.

At the worst, you’re forced to sit across from someone you have absolutely nothing in common with.  

You spend the entire date suffering through what can feel like absolute eternity, stumbling through awkward starts and stops in the conversation..

But what if you each had a cheat sheet?

A sort of pre-blind date rundown of who you’re going to meet?

A cheat sheet that includes all sorts of vital information like who you are and what you can bring to the relationship. It would make things so much easier, right?

Now, what if you not only had this cheat sheet, but you got to look at it and decide if you even wanted to go on that date in the first place?  Even better, right?

FREE BONUS PDF CHEAT SHEET : Get our "Perfect Cover Letter" Cheat Sheet that gives you a Step-by-Step Process that will help you produce a perfect cover letter.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR CHEAT SHEET

In the business world, interviews are a lot like blind dates.

Employers sit down with potential employees and over the course of the meeting, both parties try to learn enough about each other to decide if working together is   good idea or a bad idea…just without the awkward hug/kiss thing at the end…hopefully.

See…not so far off from our blind date scenario from earlier…but there is ONE big difference.  

Did you know that companies do have those little cheat sheets on potential employees and that they do ‘pre-screenings’ before the offer to interview is even considered?

That’s right! They do.

Every single piece of information you send a company you’re applying to is going to be thoroughly looked at to determine your potential for compatibility, starting with your cover letter.

“But wait,” you say, “what’s a cover letter, and more importantly, why do I need to send one along with my resume?”

Don’t worry, we’re going to explain exactly what it is…and so much more.  

In fact, over the course of this article, we’re going to discuss a number of things you’ll need to know in order to make your cover letter not only right for who you are and what you bring to the table…but tailor it so it’s absolutely perfect for your first blind date…er, we mean…the job you’re applying for.

What Is A Cover Letter Anyway?

Before you learn how to write a cover letter, you first need to understand what it is!

A professional cover letter is a short, single page letter you should include with every application and/or resume you send out.  

It’s a quick way for you to introduce yourself to an employer and gives them a taste of you …not just your skills (which they will get by looking at your resume.)  

Not only does it act as an introduction, it will also let whoever is reading it (hiring managers) know exactly why you are sending them your information as well as potentially help open the door to future meetings…and interviews!  

Remember, first impressions count…even when they’re on paper, so let’s make sure yours is as perfect as possible. 

Why Do I Need One?

Okay, so I get what a cover letter is, but why do I have to write one?   Shouldn’t my resume be strong enough on its own?    

Ideally, yes, you want to make sure the resume you are submitting is as strong as possible and perfectly tailored to the job you’re applying for (more on tailoring in a bit) but simply sending it in without including a cover letter can work against you. 

As we outlined in our article “ How to Make a Resume 101 ,” a resume is a document that summarizes your skills, abilities and accomplishments.   A well made one should clearly spell out what you can do …but does little to explain who you are.  

That’s where a cover letter comes in. 

A good cover letter serves a multitude of purposes beyond simply letting the hiring manager know the proper way to spell your name.    

It gives potential employers information about you that they wouldn’t get just from looking at your resume alone. 

what can i write in cover letter

To bring it back to our dating analogy from earlier…a well written cover letter is a little bit like a friend meeting with your date and telling them all the best things about you before you even get there.  

It’s an opportunity for you to reach out as an individual, not just as an applicant .  

It should highlight your qualifications as well as demonstrate how you stand out from the rest of the hundreds (or thousands) of other qualified job seekers .  

It should also showcase why you’re the right choice for the position…what makes you the “ Perfect Candidate ”…and all this is accomplished before you’re invited to the date, er…I mean interview…

But what if I’m applying for a job that just asks me to send in my resume…do I still need to send in a cover letter? 

Absolutely!  

Sending in a resume without a cover letter is a missed opportunity you can’t afford to take in this competitive job market.  

Not only does a good cover introduce you and all your best qualities, it’s also an opportunity to help explain away any concerns a prospective employer might have about your ability to do the job they’re hiring for .  

The last thing you want to do is turn in a resume or application for a job you’re perfect for and have it get tossed before you even make it to the interview stage because there was something that made an employer question your abilities. 

Have a gap in employment on your resume?   – Use your cover letter as an opportunity to explain it:  

In the middle of switching careers and finding that your skills , while applicable to the job you’re applying for aren’t traditionally considered to be a match? Use your cover letter to detail why you should be considered anyway.  

These days submitting a cover letter is just good form!  

Many times employers expect cover letters even if they don’t explicitly ask for one.  

A job seeker who sends in a resume without a cover letter is essentially letting an employer know they’re happy doing just the bare minimum…and that’s just not the way we like to do things!

By writing a solid cover letter, even when not asked for one, you’re taking that extra step as a job seeker and reinforcing that you’re not only enthusiastic about the opportunity but that you’re also motivated to do what it takes to get in the door for that face to face meeting.

**A WORD OF WARNING …if a company specifically asks you NOT to send a cover letter…then don’t.   Always follow the instructions as outlined by a potential employer.

How To Format Your Cover Letter

“So I need to write a cover letter for a job application…what makes a good one?”

Because your cover letter is your first opportunity to demonstrate your communication skills to your potential employer, it’s critical that you make sure you’re doing everything you can to make your cover letter layout as flawless and business-appropriate as possible.

(This is why we spent a little extra time expanding on Cover Letter Format in our companion guide, “Best Cover Letter Format Guide.” Click the link to check it out now!)

The next question you might be asking yourself is, “How long should a cover letter be?”

Ideally you want to keep your letter between 3-5 paragraphs in length and definitely no longer than one page.

The eternal struggle regarding what to include in a cover letter continues to rage on.  In our opinion the best cover letter is informative without being overly long or rambling .  

Each paragraph should serve a purpose and shouldn’t be excessively lengthy or confusing.  

Remember, the hiring manager is going to be faced with potentially thousands of cover letters so your goal is to make sure yours is brief enough to still be read but detailed and interesting enough to make them want to learn more about you .

Speaking of standing out, this isn’t the time to get creative with fonts, designs, colored paper, or showcase your artistic talents with doodles on the margins.  

A cover letter, like every other piece of paperwork you submit to a potential employer, is a professional document and should look like one.  

Use fonts that are simple and professional like Arial , Times New Roman , or Verdana and be sure to set your font size between 10 and 12 points .

Let’s take a look at standard cover letter formatting:

  • Start by first including your personal contact information.   ( You want to make sure your future boss can contact you for that interview, right? )
  • Follow that by the date you are writing the letter and then the company contact information .   Be sure to separate each section with a space…it makes your letter easier to read. 

If you are mailing a hard copy of your letter, make sure when you get to the bottom and your salutation to double space .   It will give you room to sign your letter.   If you are emailing your letter, or submitting it electronically and can’t sign it with your autograph, it’s still important to leave that double space.

Here’s A Good Format Template

Your Address

City, State, Zip

Your Best Contact Phone Number

Your Professional Email

Your Personal Branding Website  

Employer Name

City, State, Zip Code

Dear Mr./Mrs. Last Name:*

PARAGRAPH 1:   Because this is your opening paragraph, you want to make sure it’s strong and draws the reader in.   Explain why you are writing.   Describe the job you are applying for, including the position and job title. 

PARAGRAPH 2:   Now we move into the actual text of the letter.   This is where you get to introduce yourself and tell your potential employer why you are qualified to do the job you are applying for.   This is your chance to let them know what you have to offer and why your skills and knowledge are perfect for the position.   Don’t forget to tailor based off your research! 

PARAGRAPH 3-4:   If needed, these are the paragraphs where you can explain away any concerns an employer might have about your ability to do the job. It’s also where you can share accomplishments , success stories, and any other bits of information that will help convince the hiring manager that they have to bring you in for an interview.

FINAL PARAGRAPH:   This is where you wrap up your letter.   Make sure to thank them for considering you for the job and let them know they should feel comfortable reaching out to you with any questions or concerns not addressed in your letter/resume.   This is also the paragraph where you let them know how you plan on following up with them.  

Finally, be sure to direct the hiring manager to your   Your Personal Branding Website so that they are able to get a feel for who you are as a person.  This simple step can land you way more interviews!

Sincerely (or any other closing comment),

Signature/Typed Signature Your Personal Branding Website

* You want to always try to address your cover letter to someone specific.   Unfortunately that information is not always available.   If you find yourself writing a letter and unsure of who to address it to, use “Dear Hiring Manager,” or “Dear Recruiter.”  

* Don’t use “To Whom it May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” as those are considered outdated and you run the risk of offending someone.   You can also call the company directly to ask to whom you should address your letter.

* In some instances you can completely forgo the opening salutation and just start with a subject line, but we suggest at least making an effort to find out who to address it to.   It makes the letter much more personal and shows your dedication to the position.

NOTE: For more information please read our “how to address a cover letter” article .

“Tailoring” Your Cover Letter

Now that we’ve covered the general format of a cover letter, it’s time to dive into the content!

Let’s pretend for a moment you’re the hiring manager and you’ve just gotten this letter:

     EXAMPLE OF A BAD COVER LETTER

To Whom It May Concern,

I recently came across your job post looking for a Production Office Coordinator for the educational television series, “Wonder Kids.”   I think my skills and experience would be a good match for the position and I am submitting my resume to you in the hopes of obtaining an interview.

For the past eight years I have worked as a Production Office Coordinator on a variety of other shows, providing crucial administrative support as well as maintaining and managing the day to day operations of a busy production office.   I am familiar with all aspects of production including contracts, budgets, proper paperwork distribution, and travel coordination.   I pride myself on my organizational skills as well as my ability to run an efficient staff of over 10 employees.    

I am attaching my resume which outlines all my past work experiences as well as a detailed listing of my qualifications and skills.   I look forward to the possibility of speaking with you about this position.

Blanche D. Oatmeal

dog

Zzzzzz. Oh, sorry. Was I napping? Ugh what a snoozer!

Although professional, this is a generic cover letter and if you ask me, pretty bland.

It reveals little about Blanche beyond the fact that she thinks she’s qualified for the job and that she’s been in the industry for over 8 years. A letter like this is the bare minimum when applying for a job… and you’re not the bare minimum .

Don’t forget, you’re the perfect candidate , and a good cover letter is a great first way to let potential employers know that!

Rather than submitting a snooze-worthy letter that will blend into every other letter the hiring manager is going to read, you’re going to tailor your letter and help make sure it really stands out.

If you’ve spent any amount of time reading our other blog posts or watching our videos, you’re probably familiar with our world-famous “ Tailoring Method “.

what can i write in cover letter

Now what you might not know, is that the Tailoring Method can actually apply to other parts of your interview as well, including how to write a great cover letter.

You see, there’s a tremendous amount of power in identifying what the company’s desired strengths and characteristics are for the employee they want to hire .

Because demonstrating that you have these Qualities is going to put you in the drivers seat in terms of getting an offer from your interview.

So you need to identify what those “ Qualities ” are, and infuse them into your cover letter and support them with a real example from your past (and where necessary, a success story ).

This is done by taking the time to do careful research of the company and the position .

Here, let’s spice up Blanche’s letter a bit…starting with paragraph one.

First thing you want to keep in mind is, those poor hiring managers are reading tens of hundreds of cover letters and after a while, they’re all going to start blending together…make your stand out…in a good way!

Dear Mr. Sorensen:

When I saw the job posting looking for a Production Office Coordinator for the educational television series, “Wonder Kids,” I knew I had to submit my resume. I am a hard-working and enthusiastic Production Office Coordinator with over eight years of practical hands on experience and am ready for my next adventure! I am currently looking for an opportunity to continue working within the industry and know my skills and experiences would be a good fit for the position and the “Wonder Kids” team overall.

Much better, right?

This is how you want to start a cover letter!  

Not only is it a break from the cookie cutter style cover letters that regularly flood a hiring manager’s desk, it shows that the applicant is excited to be applying for the job .  

It also lets the hiring manager know the applicant isn’t just looking for a job, but that they’re looking to be a part of a team.

The letter is also properly addressed to who is actually reading it.   Remember, “To Whom It May Concern,” and “Dear Sir or Madam” are too generic and can come across as lazy.  

While we’ve already said it is okay to use “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruiter,” going that extra mile can make all the difference with a weary reader.   Don’t forget, you want to stand out!

Let’s keep reading…

As a Production Office Coordinator, my skills include scheduling, contracts, paperwork distribution, and budgeting.   I’m also comfortable dealing with vendors, hiring and managing staff, and ensuring the smooth day to day operations of a busy office.   My experience has included both small and large budget companies, and as a result, I am familiar with the need to be adaptable and find myself excited by the prospect of a challenge.

Again, personal , engaging , and dynamic . This letter helps the hiring manager know that the applicant is ready for any challenge and that they’re adaptable.

Now we get into the meat of the letter and where you can brag a bit about what you bring to the table.  Let’s say that through her research, Blanche discovered that the company she’s interviewing with really values someone who excels in (has the “ Quality “) “attention to detail.”

Well, she better darn make sure she highlights that Quality and supports it with an example or examples from her past .

I am proud of my attention to detail and as a result of my experiences with companies of different sizes and budgets, have been able to develop skills not normally associated with the more traditional Production Office Coordinator role, including graphic design, managing social media and web development.   I enjoy working with a wide variety of people and am a multitasker, diligent self-starter and eager team player. 

Nicely done, Blanche!  

A little bit of subtle bragging while showcasing something the applicant is proud of accomplishing for the company overall without coming across as arrogant or too boastful.

The next paragraph is where you can engage the company on a one on one level and show how much research you’ve done on them and their current projects .

I also wanted to take this opportunity to let you know that my interest in working for you extends beyond my desire to simply be a Production Office Coordinator.   I grew up on the show “Wonder Kids” and consider them to be a huge part of my early education.   I am a strong believer in quality children’s programming and have always felt that “Wonder Kids” provided not only entertainment, but educational value as well.   If hired, I would be proud to be a part of the “Wonder Kid” family and help continue that legacy for future generations.

The applicant is letting the hiring manager know that they’re not just blindly applying to the company but that they genuinely know a bit about them and that they have a passion for what the company does .

Okay, Blanche, time to bring it home.

Thank you for taking the time to review my resume and consider me for this position.   You can contact me with any questions by emailing me at [email protected] or by calling me at 555-555-5555.   I would also love if you could take a look at my website, blancheoatmeal.com.  

I look forward to the possibility of discussing this exciting opportunity with you.

When an applicant wraps up their letter this way, they’re outlining the next steps they hope the company will take (contacting them for an interview) and ensuring that the information they need to do that is right there in front of them.

By making it easy for them and including phone numbers and other contact information, a perfect candidate is empowering the employer to take the action the candidate wants.  

By including their personal branded website , the applicant is also inviting the hiring manager to get to know even more about them and what they bring to the table.

When wrapping up your letter with follow up information, tread lightly but confidently.   Whatever you do, don’t push too hard in this paragraph. You don’t want to appear manipulative or controlling.

Remember, you want a job interview…not a restraining order 😉

Warmest regards,

blanchedoatmeal.com

Now that is a great example of a cover letter that will get a hiring managers attention!

By keeping it short and sweet, you’re not overwhelming them with a ton to read…but at the same time by making it engaging, tailored , and personal, you’re ensuring that it stands out and highlights you in a positive way.

In our opinion this a wonderful example of how to end a cover letter that you should take into consideration when working on yours.

A good cover letter closing will leave a great taste in the hiring manager’s mouth and will go a long way to securing an interview.

If after sending your cover letter and your resume you don’t hear from the company in a couple of days, a quick “wanted to be sure you had received my application” email is an entirely appropriate follow-up, even without telling them that you will be following up first.

If you do end up needing to write a follow-up note, you absolutely should slip in a line like “I really think my (skills and talents that are relevant to the job) would be great for (the company), and want to make sure my application didn’t get lost or submitted incorrectly.”

You can also throw in something again about why you want to work at that company – mention some company values or exciting projects to show that you’ve done your research and are really interested in them specifically.

Sample Cover Letter Used Above

Cover Letter  Template Word

Here is the complete cover letter as written above if you would like to download it...

Top 10 Cover Letter Tips & Hacks

  • SHORT AND SWEET:   Your cover letter should never go over a single page.   Keep it clean and concise.   Keep your sentences focused and avoid using flowery words.
  • KNOW WHAT YOU WANT AND GO FOR IT:   Make sure you let your potential employer know exactly what you are bringing to the job.   They have a need and you are there to fill it.   Tell them how you are going to accomplish that.
  • TAILOR! TAILOR! TAILOR!:   Don’t be vague or generic.   Make sure your letter is clearly targeted to the job you are going for as well as the company you want to be hired by.   Do your research ahead of time.
  • COVER LETTERS ARE LIKE SNOWFLAKES – NO TWO ARE ALIKE:   Unless you’re launching a direct mail campaign, make sure you’re fine tuning each and every cover letter you sending out so it focuses on the specifics of the job you are applying for. 
  • KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE:   Make sure you are addressing your letter directly to the proper individual.   Do your research and find out who will be reading it…and absolutely make sure you have the proper spelling of their name.   If you can’t get a name, make sure to address it “Dear Hiring Manager,” or “Dear Recruiter.”   Don’t use “To Whom it May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” as those are considered outdated. 
  • PROOFREAD!:   The fastest way to end up in the circular file is by submitting a sloppy letter.   Double check to make sure your spelling and grammar are correct.    
  • THE KEY TO SUCCESS LIES WITH KEYWORDS:   Pay careful attention to what is said in the job postings.   Look for key words and phrases in the description and make sure to echo those in your letter but don’t overstuff your letter. 
  • BE PROFESSIONAL:   Keep the focus of your letter on the job you are applying for.   Introduce yourself but don’t go into too much detail or bring up anything unrelated to the job.   Do not speak badly of past employers or trash talk prior jobs.
  • LINK IT UP:   Make sure your letter includes a link to your personal branded website.   A cover letter is a great introduction into who you are and what you can bring, and by including a link to your personal website, you’re allowing a potential employer to really explore everything you potentially can bring to the position.
  • FOLLOW UP!:   Demonstrate your dedication to the position by making sure to follow up on all your contacts if possible.   Don’t become annoying, but at the same time, if you don’t reach out, you run the risk of being forgotten.

Common Mistakes

We’ve covered what what should be in a cover letter, but what should you NOT put in your cover letter?

  • Rule number one of cover letters is…proofread. Proofread. Proofread. Oh, and then proofread it again. We don’t care if you’re writing the cover letter to end all cover letters. If you’re serious about a job you’re applying for…take the time to read your letter before you send it off. This includes making sure that not only are you spelling things correctly and that your grammar and punctuation is spot on, but that you’re also double checking the basics like the company name and the position you’re applying for.
  • Lying about your past experiences or over inflating what you’ve done. Everyone’s allowed to brag a bit in their cover letter…as long as it’s true. Don’t lie to the company or yourself. If a company has nothing that appeals to you, you wouldn’t enjoy working there – and they’d rather not have you – so why bother applying?
  • Talking about why you quit your last job. Remember, this is sort of like a blind date. Nobody wants to hear about your ex…and absolutely DO NOT TRASH YOUR PAST EMPLOYERS.
  • Salary requirements. Save that for the interview.
  • Getting too personal. The letter is a great way to introduce yourself, but remember…keep it about the position and keep it professional. The paragraph where you talk about the company can contain tidbits about you (I grew up watching the “Wonder Kids”) but don’t let it get too personal (After my alcoholic parents divorced and my father left the country to join the Amsterdam Travelling Cat and Flea Circus, the “Wonder Kids” were the only steady and constant positive in my life.) Save that for your therapist.

The Different Types of Cover Letters

As a job seeker, you need to be aware that there are different types of cover letters that align to the different ways jobs are posted and how you’re involved in the application process .  

In most cases, the basic cover letter layout we went over earlier in this article can be used as a solid foundation for whatever you write…but we’re here to help you rise above the competition which means making that extra effort. 

You’re the Perfect Candidate and that means ensuring that your cover letter is exactly right for whatever type of posting you come across.

So let’s take a look at what you might come across in your job-seeking travels.

Job Posting

A job posting is when an employer advertises an opening within their organization that they would like to fill.  

This can be anything from a notice in a newspaper , to a posting on the company website . 

Make sure you read the posting carefully and pay close attention to the description of the job.  

This is when you will begin to start tailoring your cover letter!

Try to figure out exactly what Qualities (skills and abilities) the company values and make sure you highlight these in your cover letter.

As you go through the post, identify the key words and phrases that are used .  

When you write your cover letter, make sure you use these keywords and phrases (but don’t just copy and paste the ad word for word). 

As always, do your research beforehand and use that information to help tailor your letter and showcase how you would be a welcome addition to their team.

Application Cover Letter

For many entry level positions, the application process is fairly simple and straight forward.  

You’ll go into wherever it is you want to work and ask for an application.  

They’ll hand you a pre-printed form and you’ll sit down and fill it out before turning it back in.  

Many job seekers who are applying for these types of positions will simply turn in their application after filling them out. 

Submitting a well written cover letter along with your application will make you stand out to a prospective employer.  

You’re showing them that you are willing to do the work to get the job and that can go a long way towards getting hired.  

It’s also a great idea for individuals who are new to the job market and might not have prior employment history . 

You always want to start out your letter with a personal salutation, so if possible, when picking up an application, ask for a few days to fill it out before returning it as well as the name of the individual who will be reviewing it.  

While most employers are happy to let you take an application and bring it back later, there is always the possibility you will be asked to fill it out on the spot.   For situations like this, always make sure you bring a copy (or two) of a pre-prepared cover letter and resume with you so you can hand them in all together . 

Before heading out to pick up applications, make sure you have a few letters already typed up and pre-tailored to the locations you plan on applying to.  

Yes, it means taking a bit more time at the beginning of your application process, but it will be well worth it and again demonstrates to the employer that you are invested in the position.

Online Application Cover Letter

Many companies these days utilize online job posting websites like Brass Ring and Monster to advertise available positions.  

While this might seem like a convenience for you (hey, you can apply for jobs in your living room while wearing your pajamas all day!) it actually means your odds of getting an invitation to interview is going to be tougher than it would be if you were mailing in your information.

Why?   Three little letters…ATS.

What’s ATS?

ATS , or Applicant Tracking System , is a computer based screening program used to filter applicants.  

The program scans thousands of applications and quickly discards those that don’t fit the specific algorithm it’s been programmed with.  

While that might sound like a great way to streamline the hiring process, it also means that whatever you submit has to be carefully crafted to ensure that it makes it through this robotic filter.  

If not done properly, your submission could be discarded before ever being seen by a living human being…and we definitely don’t want that!

The first thing you want to do is wrap your head around the idea that you are going to first be facing a robot and that it’s been programmed to get rid of you.   Okay, maybe not you specifically (we’ll save the Terminator analogies for another post) but certainly your application.

So how do you beat the bot?   By thinking like one.

Start by reading the job description carefully.  

Because the computer is going to be programmed to select only the candidates that perfectly match what the company is looking for, you need to make sure you are the right fit.  

Re-read the posting until you clearly understand exactly what the company is looking for and that you are absolutely able to fill that spot with the skills , qualities , experience and education you have. 

Tailoring your letter is something you should do for every position you apply for, but when it comes to online applications that are likely to be run through ATS, it’s absolutely vital.  

You want to make sure that your cover letter is specific to the job you are applying for.

Clearly state the title you are applying for and verify that it matches the title in the posting .  

Pay extra attention to the details of the position and the description of the job.   Many of the key words the bot is programmed to respond to will be in there.  

Use those same descriptions and key words in your cover letter and resume, but do it judiciously.  

Try not to repeat them more than two times.   Stuffing your letter with keywords might seem like an easy way to guarantee success, but it’s more likely to result in your application being flagged by the program and rejected . 

Make sure to carefully check your letter for spelling and grammar errors.  

This is a basic rule you should follow no matter what, but in this case, it’s even more crucial that your submission material is flaw free.  

While a human can read a letter and usually figure out what you mean regardless of tiny problems or a misspelled word here or there, a bot is looking for exact matches…not “close enough.”  

Keep this in mind when using acronyms as well.   To avoid the risk of an acronym being rejected by the bot, use both the acronym as well as the spelled out words. 

Ultimately you want your application to make it through ATS and into the hands of an actual human.  

It’s a delicate balancing act between being specific enough to pass ATS and still engaging enough to catch the attention of the hiring manager.   It’s tough, but it can be done!

Cold Call Cover Letter

A cold call cover letter is a letter you send out along with your resume to a company you want to work for that has NOT advertised any openings .  

Generally this is something you do when you find a company that you really want to work for but they don’t have any openings that fit your skills or they’re not soliciting for applicants. 

Applying for a job that doesn’t exist can be a risky venture, but it can also be a smart one.  

If you’re the Perfect Candidate (and you are!) you could potentially gain early consideration for an opening that comes up down the road.   Best case scenario, they think you’re so absolutely amazing that they find a job for you! 

Keep in mind, you’re not the only person on this planet who has submitted a cold call cover letter and resume, and you’re asking a company for a job that doesn’t exist…which means you have to make sure beyond a shadow of a doubt that whatever you send in is absolutely perfect.

Remember, the company is NOT asking for people to submit to them , so you need to figure out what it is that you offer that makes you worth considering.   What can you bring to the table that they don’t already have and why should they take the time to look at your materials?

The first step for cold contacting a company is doing your research.  

Of course, as a student of The Interview Guys , you’re already well versed in the art of researching, but when it comes to a cold contact like this, you have to go above and beyond in your digging.  

You want your cover letter to contain knowledge of specific current situations within the company and how you can help .  

Just writing to a company and telling them how much you love them and want to work for them very rarely results in a job offer.  

You’re more likely to get a thank you note and a package of free corporate bumper stickers than an offer of employment. 

Open your letter with a solid salutation addressed to a specific individual.  

Because this is a cold contact, it’s absolutely imperative that you address your letter to exactly the right person.   You want to make sure that your information ends up with whoever is most likely to hire you.  

Open your letter with a generic salutation and you run the risk of it being either immediately tossed or passed onto someone who can’t do anything with it except send you that package of corporate bumper stickers.  

Make sure during your research that you determine exactly who should receive your information and address it to them.

The body of your letter is going to be critical to your success in this adventure.   You want to make sure that you open with a paragraph so strong, so focused, so dynamic, that whoever is reading it can’t help but keep reading.   You want the first paragraph your intended audience reads to hook their attention and draw them in, and this will come from your research. 

Have you found something in your digging that indicates that the company has a need you can fill?  

Are they preparing for an expansion and you know they’re going to need someone with your skills in the very near future?  

Is there an aspect of their business that is lagging and you know you can help strengthen it? 

** SIDE NOTE :   Make sure you are careful when addressing a failure within a company, even if you are offering them a solution.   You want them to see you as a viable answer to their problem, not an annoying upstart pointing out their flaws.  

It’s a delicate balance, but we have faith in you!

Follow up your opening paragraph by expanding on your key strengths and skills and how you plan on using them to benefit your target company .  

Try to include achievements and examples of how you’ve succeeded in the past and be prepared to back it up with proof should they reach out to you . 

Another great way to help strengthen your chances of securing an interview (and possibly a job) is to mention any connections you have to the company.  

Be sure you let whoever you are name dropping know that you’re doing this…you want to make sure if they get asked about you they have nothing but good things to say about you!   It’s a good idea to put this information early in your letter.   People are much more likely to read your letter if they see that you have a personal connection.

Close your letter out with options on how to move forward to the next step.  

While your ultimate goal with your letter and resume is a job interview, you might not feel comfortable straight out asking for one in a cold call situation.   Of course, if you are…more power to you…but if you feel that a softer approach is called for, try asking instead for information about their hiring practices, job fairs, a tour of the company or even for an informational interview .

What’s an informational interview?

An informational interview is one where you sit down with someone who works in a career or job you want to learn more about.   You’ll learn about what they do, what skills they need to have in order to succeed in their position and what it’s like to work where they work.  

It is NOT an interview for a job…but it could potentially lead to one down the road as whoever you are doing the interview with is now personally acquainted with you.

Remember, the key to success with a cold call cover letter depends on a number of factors including timing and how well you understand the company you are submitting to as well as how thorough your research is. 

Recruiter’s Ad Cover Letter

Many companies these days have turned their entire employee hiring process over to executive search firms staffed by highly trained recruiters.  

These recruiters might work with a number of companies (their clients) and are usually focused on a very specific category of job placement (e.g., engineers, paralegals, etc.).  

The recruiters will often place ads which allows them to pull together large numbers of qualified job candidates.  

Then they’ll go through those candidates and present the best of the best to their clients in the hopes that one of them (or more) will be hired.

To put it bluntly (and in keeping with our blind date analogy) recruiters are the matchmakers of the job world.   The companies tell the recruiters who they are looking for and the recruiters go through the piles of candidates they have on hand and try to find the best fit. 

When you respond to an ad placed by a recruiter and submit your cover letter and resume, you’re not usually submitting it for a specific job…rather you’re providing them with your information and skill set in the hopes that it matches up with a job assignment or opening they get from their corporate clients…and that means you have to take a totally different approach to how you write your cover letter.

Because a recruiter is looking for a specific set of skills to fill open positions , they will almost always start by first looking at your resume before ever looking at your cover letter.

Hang on, if they’re looking at my resume and ignoring my cover letter, then why even include one?

Don’t worry…your cover letter will get looked at…just not right away…which is why the information contained within it needs to be a little different than the information you would normally put into a cover letter.

If after reading your resume a recruiter decides you are a good fit for the position, they’ll turn to your cover letter for more information about you…and what they’re looking for is fairly specific .

A cover letter to a recruiter needs to quickly answer questions they might have about your eligibility and willingness to do the job they are pitching you for .  

You want to use your cover letter to explain what you can do, what you are qualified to do, and what you require in order to accept the job if it’s offered to you.

Start your letter out with a personal salutation.   You are essentially going to be represented by your recruiter so it’s a good idea to know who is passing your information around.

Your first paragraph should be a quick introduction into what you are and what you do.   They need to know what you are currently doing and where you are doing it.   You should also include in this section why you are looking for a new job and what you hope to get out of establishing a relationship with your recruiter.

The second paragraph should outline your skills and accomplishments as well as your background.   This is the paragraph where you lay out exactly why you believe you would be an asset to the recruiter’s clients. 

The third paragraph should cover the jobs and industries you are looking for employment in.   It’s also the paragraph where you discuss your salary history as well as your current salary range requirements. 

** SALARY SIDE NOTE :   Normally with cover letters you do NOT want to include salary information.   We’ll discuss this more in depth later on in this article, but for now, be aware, this is one of the few times when it’s not only acceptable, it’s necessary.

Make sure you also include whether or not you’d be willing to travel or relocate.  

Finally, make sure you include your availability and when you would be able to start a new job if offered.

Recruiter Cold Call Cover Letter

Submitting a cold call cover letter and resume to a recruiter is a lot like submitting a cold call cover letter to a company; you’re reaching out to someone who is not soliciting for applicants in the hopes of being considered for a position that may or may not exist .

When we went over Recruiter Ad cover letters, we told you that the recruiters would look at your resume first and your cover letter second…which in that scenario is true.  

In this scenario, where you are reaching out to them rather than responding to an ad or solicitation they’ve generated, they are absolutely going to look at your cover letter first…if for no reason other than to figure out who you are and why you’re contacting them. 

The best way to ensure that your letter and information gets a serious look is by doing your research on the recruiter you are contacting ahead of time.  

Recruiters are usually very specific about who they’re looking for and what they’re recruiting for, so it’s important that you contact someone who represents the field you are qualified to work in.

The first paragraph is where you introduce yourself.   Let the recruiter know who you are and what you are/what you do.   You also want to let them know what you would like to do and what sort of job you are looking for and why you are looking for a new job.   Make sure you are specific and provide any details you think might help them in matching you with the right company should an opportunity arise.

The second paragraph should outline your skills and accomplishments as well as your background.   This is the paragraph where you lay out exactly why you believe you would be an asset to the recruiter’s clients and should be included in their pile of potential pitches.   It’s also the paragraph where you let the recruiter know clearly what type of work you are interested in, be it full time, part time, permanent or freelance.   Make sure you decide ahead of time and stick with it.   A recruiter needs to know your level of commitment to the jobs they are submitting you for.

The third paragraph is where you discuss your salary history as well as your current salary range requirements. 

** SALARY SIDE NOTE PART DEUX :   As we said above with Recruiter Ad Cover Letters, discussing your salary in a cover letter is normally not done.   We’ll discuss this more in depth later on in this article, but for now, be aware, this is one of the few times when again it’s not only acceptable, it’s necessary.

Finally, make sure you include your availability and when you would be able to start a new job if offered. 

With a recruiter cold call letter, you don’t normally include how you plan to follow up with them.  

Recruiters are incredibly busy and are highly trained in what they do.   Although you might be tempted to reach out to them, hold off.   Bothering them isn’t going to get you anywhere.  

If they see something in you that warrants their attention, they will reach out to you.

Direct Mail Campaign Cover Letter

A Direct Mail Campaign is where a job seeker sends out hundreds of letters and resumes to potential employers in the hopes of securing an interview or position.  

Although similar to the Cold Call Cover Letter in that you are submitting to companies that aren’t currently advertising positions, it’s a much less focused process and involves you sending the same cover letter and resume out to everyone in the hopes that someone responds back.

When you do a Direct Mail Campaign Cover Letter, you want to avoid anything that would specifically apply to one company over another.  

Because you’re sending this same letter out to multiple companies, you want to be general enough for it to apply broadly, but not so general that it works against you.

Your cover letter should start out by introducing the reader to who you are and what you do as well as what job you are seeking. 

The next paragraphs should detail your skills and experience with the job you are seeking and why you are qualified to do it.

Finally, be sure to wrap your letter up with information on how the company can contact you if interested. 

**A WORD OF CAUTION WITH DIRECT MAIL CAMPAIGNS:   While it might seem like this method is more efficient than targeting and tailoring your information for specific companies and jobs, it can also work against you.   Most hiring managers can quickly recognize a direct mail letter and will discard it as ‘spam.’

Referral Cover Letter

A Referral Cover Letter is one you send after someone who works with the company or has contacts within the industry refers you .  

It is similar to any other company cover letter with the exception of the opening paragraph.

Make sure to introduce yourself and also mention the individual who referred you to the company or position.  

If possible, include anything specific your contact has told you about the position or the person you are reaching out to .

Once you have finished your introductory paragraph, use the rest of your letter to discuss your skills , education , background , training … anything that will help to show that you are a good fit for the position .

Finally make sure you close your letter with your plans for following up with them and how they might contact you with any questions.

Blind Posting Cover Letter

A blind job posting is one in which a company posts a job opening but decides to remain anonymous.  

A company might decide to blind post for a high profile position they don’t want to call attention to so as not to appear lacking in leadership.  

Other times it’s meant to build excitement and mystery to help increase the number of applicants. 

Submitting to a blind listing means tailoring your letter to the company is going to be difficult…but it doesn’t have to be impossible…and that extra bit of sleuthing can help really elevate your application above the rest of the entries. 

A good place to start is by taking a closer look at the posting.   Is there a fax number or email included?   Sometimes you can get lucky, and with a bit of internet digging, trace those backwards to find out what company those are attached to .   The same goes for a physical address or P.O. Box.

Look for key phrases as well.  

Is the company referencing anything specific like “we have been ranked number one in employee retention and satisfaction for the past five years.”?  

Type that phrase into your favorite search engine and see what pops up. 

Of course, the goal of figuring out who the company is isn’t so you can reveal how smart you are in your letter…rather, it’s to help with your tailoring process.  

Proving you’re a master detective could potentially backfire…especially if you’re wrong.   Instead of bragging about your digging skills, use what you learn to help show why you’re a perfect fit for the job.

How do you address a cover letter for a blind posting?  

Ideally you want to make sure your letter is personal and that means addressing it to a specific individual, but in a situation like this, you have to consider other options.  

In the event you figure out exactly what company is hiring for…and there is absolutely NO DOUBT about their identity, then you could potentially go online, look at their website and see who is overseeing hiring…but we’re going to strongly caution you against this.   Again…you could be wrong…or worse…look creepy and stalkerish.  

This is one instance when using “Dear Hiring Manager” is perfectly acceptable.

Once you get this all done, it’s time to tackle the content of your letter.   Again, because this is a blind posting, it’s going to be tough tailoring your information.  

That means you have to pay extra close attention to exactly what the posting says.  

Go over it carefully and pay attention to exactly what the company is looking for.  

Make sure you highlight exactly how you fit what they’re looking for and include examples demonstrating your skills, knowledge and experience .  

If the posting contains specific instructions, be sure to follow them to the absolute letter.   This is a good thing to do no matter what, but in a blind posting, it can be the make or break.

In a normal job posting where you know who you are applying to, your closing paragraph should always include how you plan on following up with the company.  

Unfortunately with blind job postings, that’s not possible.   Regardless, you want to make sure your final paragraph is strong and lets the hiring manager (whoever they are) know that you are looking forward to the possibility of discussing the position in greater detail at an in person interview.

Internship Cover Letter

An internship is a great way to get your foot in the door and learn more about a company/career you are thinking of pursuing.  

Just because it’s an internship and not an actual job doesn’t mean you shouldn’t treat it just as seriously.

Make sure when you’re addressing your letter that you’re sending it to the right individual.   Many times with internships they’re facilitated by the educational institution you’re attending and will provide you with specific contact information.  

If you are securing your own internship and not receiving university assistance with the process, make sure you do your research ahead of time and find out who will be reading your letter. 

Start out your letter by clearly stating your intent to secure an internship so there is no confusion and your letter ends up in the wrong pile…or worse, the trash.

Always include your educational background information ; what you’re studying and where .

As you continue into the body of your letter, don’t allow yourself to be intimidated by your lack of “work” experience.   When applying for an internship, it’s okay to have less experience than someone who is employed in the field you are entering.   In fact, it’s expected!  

An internship is an opportunity to learn.   Including a paragraph about what you hope to take away from this internship and how it will help you achieve your long term goals is a great way to show enthusiasm and set you apart from the crowd .

No Prior Work Experience Cover Letter

If you’re just entering the job market or a recent graduate, it can be intimidating writing cover letters without any experience.  

Not to worry!

It’s still absolutely essential to send out a cover letter…we just have to tailor it a bit differently. 

Writing a cover letter for an entry level position, or to a job you have no experience in is very similar to the letter you would write as an intern.   It’s perfectly fine to highlight your non-employment related experiences… if they are relevant to the job.

For recent graduates, make sure to include where you went to school and how what you’ve studied relates directly to the job you are applying for .

Volunteer experiences ,  internships ,  related classes , projects ,  leadership experiences ,  extracurricular activities  and your skills that pertain to the position you’re applying for all can and should be mentioned in your cover letter .

A lack of experience doesn’t mean you’re allowed to have a lack of knowledge about what you’re applying for and the company you’re applying to.  

That means you still have to do your research!  

Make sure you know everything you can about the company . Visit their website . Read their blog . Get inside their corporate heads and figure out how you and what you bring are the perfect fit !

If the job posting has buzzwords, be sure to include those in your letter and make sure they relate to the skills you’ve got.

Finally, as with any and all cover letters, be honest, be succinct, be professional.

Check out our new blog post that covers 12 great cover letter examples!

 Let’s Talk About Salary, Baby

As promised, we’re going to quickly discuss if and when you should bring up salary requirements in your cover letters.

Generally you DO NOT and SHOULD NOT include this information in your cover letters (with the exception of the two Recruiter specific letters we discussed above).  

If an employer does not require you to include any salary information (including history, requirement or range) then don’t put it in there.  

There is a time and a place for the salary discussion and we cover that in our article “ How To Negotiate Salary During The Interview Process. ” 

If an employer asks you for your salary information but doesn’t require it, hold off on passing that information on until it becomes an actual requirement.

But what do you do if an employer says you must include this information in order to apply?  

One way to tackle this tricky subject is to give a salary range.   Make sure you do your research ahead of time to determine what your job is worth and be sure to make your range realistic.   Also make sure that you are able to be flexible within that range should your employer decide to negotiate. 

Another way to answer this question is to state that your requirements are negotiable and that you are willing to factor in things like benefits and the actual position itself.

No matter what you put down, be sure to state clearly that your salary requirements are flexible and open to discussion. The last thing you want to do is lock yourself into a rate that is so high you lose the job or so low you find yourself being offered far less than what you’re worth .

Keep in mind that although most employers have a salary range for a position already figured out before you even walk through the door, it’s not set in stone.   If you are the Perfect Candidate (and you are!) a good employer will figure out how to pay more for you if they feel that will get you to accept the job…  

This won’t happen, however, if you lock yourself into a number too early in the game.    

So why is it okay to tell a recruiter my salary history and range but not a potential employer?

When you give an employer salary information, you are limiting your ability to negotiate.   Without the ability to negotiate, you run the risk of being offered or accepting a job for less than you deserve.

A recruiter, however, needs to know your salary information so they can use that information when pitching you for jobs to their clients.  

A recruiter is paid only after they fill a position for a client, and that fee is covered by the client themselves.  

Usually that fee amounts to a percentage of whatever the first year’s compensation for the new employee ends up being which means it’s in the recruiter’s best interest to try to get you as high a rate as possible. 

Recruiters also need to know this information so they can avoid pitching you for jobs that are lower than your range .  

It doesn’t do them any good to have an employer offer to hire you and have you turn it down because you aren’t happy with the salary. 

However, to prevent yourself from being locked into a situation where you are again faced with being offered too little or asking for too much, keep your answers in range form and base those numbers off of real world examples and your research.

Cover Letter Samples

Ok, so we’ve basically covered everything you could ever need to know about cover letters.   But I know what you might be thinking…

“Can I get a cover letter sample or two please Mike?   I’m basically an expert now but it would be much easier if I could just start with a cover letter template.”

Look, we covered a ton of stuff in this article so I don’t blame you.   So what we decided to do is enlist the help of our friends over at vault.com who have a treasure trove full of great cover letter samples that you can use as a guideline for your own letter.

But here’s the deal.   Hiring managers are smart AND have access to these websites as well, so you don’t want to simply choose a sample cover letter and then just completely rip it off.   Take the time to make it your own, because it will pay off in the long run.

Copying a cover letter example word for word will only make you sound like someone other than yourself, and that is not what we are trying to do here!

Ok so Vault separates their cover letter templates into four distinct categories, so go ahead and click the link below that applies to your situation the most:

Cold Call Cover Letters

Direct mail cover letters, response to ad cover letters, referral letters.

Those four categories above should give you enough examples of cover letters to get you prepared for writing your own!

If after sending your cover letter and your resume you don’t hear from the company within a couple of days, a quick “wanted to be sure you had received my application” email is an entirely appropriate follow-up, even without telling them that you will be following up first.

If you do end up needing to write a thank you note , you absolutely should slip in a line like “ I really think my (skills and talents that are relevant to the job) would be great for (the company), and want to make sure my application didn’t get lost or submitted incorrectly. ”

You can also throw in something again about why you want to work at that company – mention some company values or exciting projects to show that you’ve done your research and are really interested in them specifically.

And don’t forget to study as many cover letter examples as you can!  Especially the cover letter example that we laid out for you in detail in this article.

So there you have it!   How To Write a Cover Letter 101 .  

By following what we’ve laid out here for you, your cover letter is going to be a single paged professional introduction aimed at getting you in the door and on your way to an interview .  

By using our tailoring method and infusing the body of your letter with keywords and the qualities the employer is looking for, you’ll be positioning yourself for a spot at the top of their list of potential candidates.

Just remember, dating analogies aside, it’s probably a good idea to leave the flowers and chocolates at home.

FREE : "Perfect Cover Letter" PDF CHEAT SHEET

Get our handy "Perfect Cover Letter" cheat sheet.

In it you'll get a step-by-step process that will let you craft the perfect cover letter.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE CHEAT SHEET

what can i write in cover letter

Co-Founder and CEO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Mike is a job interview and career expert and the head writer at TheInterviewGuys.com.

His advice and insights have been shared and featured by publications such as Forbes , Entrepreneur , CNBC and more as well as educational institutions such as the University of Michigan , Penn State , Northeastern and others.

Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

About The Author

Mike simpson.

' src=

Co-Founder and CEO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Mike is a job interview and career expert and the head writer at TheInterviewGuys.com. His advice and insights have been shared and featured by publications such as Forbes , Entrepreneur , CNBC and more as well as educational institutions such as the University of Michigan , Penn State , Northeastern and others. Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

Copyright © 2024 · TheInterviewguys.com · All Rights Reserved

  • Our Products
  • Case Studies
  • Interview Questions
  • Jobs Articles
  • Members Login

what can i write in cover letter

The 46 Best Cover Letter Examples: What They Got Right

Amanda Zantal-Wiener

Published: May 22, 2024

I’ve sent plenty of cover letters throughout my career, so I know it isn’t usually fun to write one. Fortunately, the cover letter examples I painstakingly gathered below show that it’s possible to have a little fun with your job search — and maybe even make yourself a better candidate in the process.

 person types of a cover letter

I was shocked upon learning 45% of job seekers don’t include a cover letter when applying for a job. I definitely don’t recommend following the crowd on this matter because your cover letter is a chance to tell the stories your resume only outlines.

→ Click here to access 5 free cover letter templates [Free Download]

It’s an opportunity for you to highlight your creativity at the earliest stage of the recruitment process.

Are you ready to showcase your unique skills and experience? Or are you looking for more tips and cover letter inspiration?

Keep reading for 40+ cover letter examples, then check out tips for cover letter formatting and what makes a cover letter great.

what can i write in cover letter

5 Free Cover Letter Templates

Five fill-in-the-blank cover letter templates to help you impress recruiters.

  • Standard Cover Letter Template
  • Entry-Level Cover Letter Template
  • Data-Driven Cover Letter Template

Download Free

All fields are required.

You're all set!

Click this link to access this resource at any time.

Table of Contents

Customizable Cover Letter Examples

Best cover letter examples, short cover letter examples, creative cover letter examples, job cover letter examples, career cover letter examples, what’s on a cover letter, what makes a great cover letter.

In a hurry for a cover letter example you can download and customize? Check out the ones below from HubSpot’s cover letter template kit .

1. Standard Cover Letter Example

what can i write in cover letter

what can i write in cover letter

18. General Email Inquiry Cover Letter Example

what can i write in cover letter

In an increasingly digitized world, where customer-centric strategies are vital for business success, I am thrilled to apply for the [Job Title] position at HubSpot."

Unhelpful Cover Letter Introduction:

"To Whom it May Concern,

I am applying for the [Job Title] position at HubSpot. I have some experience in marketing and can help your clients grow their businesses."

Relevant Professional Experience

It can be tempting to use the same cover letter for every job. After all, it‘s about your experience, isn’t it? But it's not enough to rephrase the work history in your resume.

Recruiters and hiring managers are looking to fill a specific role, so you need to show how your experience translates to their unique needs.

So, the body of a great cover letter should showcase the specific professional experiences that are relevant to the job you're applying for. Emphasize your accomplishments and skills that directly relate to what the job needs.

To speed up this part of the cover letter writing process, start by creating a list of your transferable skills . Drafting this list can help you quickly focus on the skills to highlight in your cover letter.

Then, use AI tools to summarize job descriptions and narrow in on where your experience and the needs of the role you're applying for overlap. This post is full of useful AI assistant tools if you're new to AI.

Helpful Cover Letter Experience:

“At [Company Name], I had the opportunity to assist a global ecommerce retailer in enhancing their online customer experience. By conducting in-depth market research and customer journey mapping, I identified pain points and areas of improvement in their website navigation and user interface.”

Unhelpful Cover Letter Experience:

“I also worked with an ecommerce retailer to improve the customer experience. We did some surveys and training, and they were happy with the results.”

Useful Examples

To make your cover letter stand out, add specific examples that show how you've solved problems or gotten results in past roles.

Quantify your accomplishments whenever possible, using data to give the reader a clear understanding of your impact.

Helpful Cover Letter Example:

“I lead a team of five content writers while increasing website traffic by 18% year-over-year.”

Unhelpful Cover Letter Example:

“I have a great track record of leadership and achieving fantastic results.”

Research and Company Knowledge

Hiring teams aren‘t hiring anyone with the skills to do the job. They’re hiring a person they'll work alongside at their specific company.

So, to show that you‘re not just looking for any job anywhere, share your knowledge of the company’s industry, values, and culture in your cover letter.

Spend some time on the company website and take notes on what makes this business interesting to you and why you would want to work there.

Then, explain how your skills align with the company's mission and goals and explain how you could add to their chances of success. This will showcase your interest in the company and help them see if you are a good cultural fit.

Helpful Cover Letter Research:

“I was particularly drawn to HubSpot not only for its industry-leading solutions but also for its exceptional company culture. HubSpot's commitment to employee development and fostering a collaborative environment is evident in its recognition as a top workplace consistently. I strongly believe that my passion for continuous learning, self-motivation, and dedication to contributing to a team will make me a valuable asset to HubSpot.”

Unhelpful Cover Letter Research:

“I have been inspired by HubSpot's commitment to inbound marketing and its comprehensive suite of solutions. HubSpot's dedication to providing valuable content and fostering meaningful relationships aligns with my own values and aspirations.”

Clear Writing

Your cover letter needs to pack in a lot of important information. But it's also important that your cover letter is clear and concise.

To accomplish this, use professional but easy-to-understand language. Be sure to remove any grammar or spelling errors and avoid lengthy paragraphs and avoid jargon or overly technical language.

You may also want to use bullet points to make your letter easier to skim. Then, proofread your cover letter for clarity or ask a friend to proofread it for you.

  • Guide to Becoming a Better Writer
  • Tips for Simplifying Your Writing

Helpful Cover Letter Writing:

"In addition to my academic accomplishments, I gained valuable practical experience through internships at respected law firms.

Working alongside experienced attorneys, I assisted in providing legal support to clients. This hands-on experience helped me develop a deep understanding of client needs and enhanced my ability to effectively communicate complex legal concepts in a straightforward manner."

Unhelpful Cover Letter Writing:

"Furthermore, as a complement to my academic accomplishments, I have garnered invaluable practical experience through internships at esteemed law firms.

Throughout these placements, I actively collaborated with seasoned attorneys to conduct due diligence and furnish clients with comprehensive legal support. Notably, these experiences fostered a profound comprehension of client necessities, whilst honing my legal acumen to articulately convey intricate legal principles within a lucid and concise framework, adhering to applicable precedents and statutes of limitations."

Genuine Interest and Enthusiasm

Find ways to convey your passion for the role and how excited you are to contribute to the company you're applying to. At the same time, make sure your interest feels authentic and outline how it aligns with your career goals.

Your ultimate goal is an enthusiastic letter that feels honest and leaves a lasting positive impression.

Showing excitement in writing doesn't come naturally for everyone. A few tips that can help you boost the genuine enthusiasm in your letter:

  • Record audio of yourself speaking about the role, then use voice-to-text technology to transcribe and add these sections to your letter.
  • Choose your words carefully .
  • Write in active voice.

Helpful Cover Letter Tone:

“I am genuinely enthusiastic about the prospect of joining [Company/Organization Name] as an accountant. My combination of technical proficiency, eagerness to learn, and strong attention to detail make me an ideal candidate for this role. I am confident that my dedication, reliability, and passion for accounting will contribute to the continued success of your organization.”

Unhelpful Cover Letter Tone:

“Honestly, I can hardly contain my excitement when it comes to reconciliations, financial statement analysis, and tax regulations! Engaging in spirited discussions with professors and classmates has allowed me to foster an unbreakable bond with the fascinating world of accounting, and I'm positively bursting with enthusiasm at the prospect of applying my skills in a professional setting.”

Memorable Conclusion

End your cover letter on a strong note. Summarize your top qualifications, restate your interest in the position, and express your interest in future communication.

Then, thank your reader for their time and consideration and include your contact information for easy follow-up.

To make your conclusion memorable, think about what parts of your letter you‘d most like the hiring manager to keep top of mind. Then, consider your word choice and phrasing. If you’re feeling stuck, this list of ways to close an email can help.

Helpful Cover Letter Conclusion:

"Thank you for considering my application. I am excited about the opportunity to further discuss how my qualifications align with the needs of Greenpeace. Please feel free to contact me at your convenience to arrange an interview.

Together, let's make a lasting impact on our planet.

[Your Name]"

Unhelpful Cover Letter Conclusion:

"Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of discussing my qualifications further and how I can contribute to Greenpeace's mission. Please feel free to contact me at your convenience to arrange an interview.

I’d like to add another stage to the job search: experimentation.

In today’s competitive landscape, it’s so easy to feel defeated, less-than-good-enough, or like giving up your job search.

But don’t let the process become so monotonous. Have fun discovering the qualitative data I’ve discussed here — then, have even more by getting creative with your cover letter composition.

I certainly can’t guarantee that every prospective employer will respond positively — or at all — to even the most unique, compelling cover letter. But the one that’s right for you will.

So, get inspired by these examples and templates. Write an incredible cover letter that shows the hiring team at your dream job exactly who you are.

Editor's note: This post was originally published in October 2020 and has been updated for comprehensiveness. This article was written by a human, but our team uses AI in our editorial process. Check out our full disclosure to learn more about how we use AI.

Professional Cover Letter Templates

Don't forget to share this post!

Related articles.

How to Write an Internship Cover Letter [Expert Advice & Examples]

How to Write an Internship Cover Letter [Expert Advice & Examples]

How to Start a Cover Letter That Gets You Your Dream Job

How to Start a Cover Letter That Gets You Your Dream Job

General Cover Letter: 15 Cover Letter Templates to Perfect Your Next Job Application

General Cover Letter: 15 Cover Letter Templates to Perfect Your Next Job Application

Is a Cover Letter Necessary in 2024?

Is a Cover Letter Necessary in 2024?

Letter of Interest Tips, Templates & Examples [A 2023 Guide]

Letter of Interest Tips, Templates & Examples [A 2023 Guide]

The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Cover Letter

The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Cover Letter

Eight Cover Letter Greetings for Every Situation

Eight Cover Letter Greetings for Every Situation

7 Expert Cover Letter Tips to Get the Job

7 Expert Cover Letter Tips to Get the Job

Marketing software that helps you drive revenue, save time and resources, and measure and optimize your investments — all on one easy-to-use platform

How to Start a Cover Letter: 30 Creative Opening Sentences Recruiters Will LOVE

Getty Images

Wondering how to start a cover letter? Traditional cover letter wisdom might tell you to begin with something like, “Dear Hiring Manager, I am writing to apply for the marketing manager position with the Thomas Company.” But we say: A cookie cutter cover letter intro feels as outdated as a Hotmail address.

A cover letter is your chance to introduce yourself to a hiring manager—who you are, what you have to offer, and why you want the job—but you have an extremely limited amount of space to do it. If you really want to get noticed, you’ve got to start right off the bat with something that grabs your reader’s attention.

What do we mean? Well, we won’t just tell you, we’ll show you. Keep reading to find tips on how to start a cover letter, along with 30 creative cover letter opening lines and sentence examples.

Still looking for that perfect next role? One of these open jobs on The Muse just might be the one »

5 tips on how to start off a cover letter

Here are a few pointers to guide you as you use our example cover letter openings—we’re getting there, we promise!—to craft your own:

1. Avoid boring or overused openers

Recruiters have read cover letters that start with lines like “I’m excited to apply for the front-end engineering position,” or “Your job posting on The Muse prompted me to…” so often they could wallpaper their homes with them. While those are OK and still acceptable, you'll have a better shot at impressing potential employers with a less cliché opening line.

2. Be lively and personable

People like reading interesting, engaging stuff—the kind that paints a picture, tells a story, and maybe even makes them smile. People like it when you’re human, genuine, and memorable. So figure out something about yourself and your background that relates to the company or position you're interested in, and use that to build a connection.

3. Show what you bring the company

You’ll get more into the details after your opening paragraph, of course. But your cover letter opener should still tell the reader, “This person can do something for us,” rather than, “This job would really help them.”

4. Stick to the point

Your opener, while creative, should still be relevant to the job. Don’t begin by highlighting an unrelated accomplishment or recounting an anecdote that never connects back to why you’re applying for the job. Part of writing an effective cover letter is curating key information that relates to that specific job opportunity and shows the reader that you're a good fit for the role.

5. Don't start with “To Whom It May Concern”

Find an alternative to “ To Whom It May Concern .” Seriously, banish those five words from your cover letter vocabulary forever. Nowadays, this phrase is seen as outdated, overused, and even rude—especially when better options exist.

30 cover letter opening sentence examples

We’ve come up with 30 creative cover letter opening sentence examples and separated them by the method they use to grab the reader’s attention. We don’t recommend copying and pasting because, well, your cover letter should be unique to your stories, background, and interests.

But you can most definitely use these examples to get inspired for your next application. (If you’re looking to see what an entire cover letter might look like, check out our article on the best cover letter examples for every type of job seeker .)

Start with passion

Employers want to hire people who care about what they’re doing. If you start your cover letter off talking about your passions and how they relate to the job, you’re telling the reader that you’ll be an engaged and motivated employee who’s likely to stick around. Plus, it’s a good way to tell the company a bit about who you are as a person right off the bat. Just be honest and realistic.

If truly loving data is wrong, I don’t want to be right. It seems like the rest of the folks at [Analytics Company] feel the same way—and that’s just one of the reasons why I think I’d be the perfect next hire for your sales team.

I’ve been giving my friends and family free style advice since I was 10, and recently decided it’s time I get paid for it. That’s why I couldn’t believe it when I found an open personal stylist position at [Company].

After about three years of trying out different roles at early-stage startups around San Francisco, watching more “ find your passion “ keynotes than I’d like to admit, and assuring my parents that, yes, I actually do have a real job, I’m starting to come to terms with the fact that I’m happiest when I’m doing two things: writing great content and getting it out into the world.

The other day, I took a career assessment , which told me I should be a maritime merchant. I’m not quite sure what that is, but it did get me thinking: A role that combines my skills in business development with my lifelong passion for the ocean would be my absolute dream. Which is how I found this role at Royal Caribbean.

As a kid, I once gave up a day of a family vacation to transport an injured lizard I found by our hotel two hours each way to the nearest animal hospital (and talked my dad into driving me pre-GPS!). When I was a bit older, I found out I could care for animals every day for a living, and I’ve been working toward that goal ever since.

I am constantly checking my LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds—and not because of FOMO. Because I’m someone who wholeheartedly believes in the power of sharing ideas in online communal spaces, and I’m positive that I can help spark meaningful conversations as your next social media assistant.

When I was growing up, I wanted to be one of those people who pretend to be statues on the street. Thankfully, my career goals have become a little more aspirational over the years, but I still love to draw a crowd and entertain the masses—passions that make me the perfect community manager.

Start with admiration

Companies often want to hire people who already know, love, eat, and sleep their brand. What better to kick off your cover letter than a little flattery? Of course, remember when you’re telling a company why you love it to be specific and genuine. Because while everyone likes a compliment, no one likes obvious self-serving B.S.

I pretty much spent my childhood in the cheap seats at Cubs games, snacking on popcorn and cheering on the team with my grandfather. It’s that memory that’s shaped my career—from helping to establish the sports marketing major at my university to leading a college baseball team to an undefeated season as assistant coach—and what led me to apply for this position at the Chicago Cubs.

It was Rudy, my Golden Retriever, who first inspired me to apply to your operations assistant opening—not only have we used your app to find other dogs to play with in our neighborhood, he’s really excited about the prospect of coming to work with me every day. As I learned more about how [Company] is using modern tech to help pets thrive in cities, I couldn’t help but get excited to be part of it, too.

Example 10:

When I was seven, I wanted to be the GEICO gecko when I grew up. I eventually realized that wasn’t an option, but you can imagine my excitement when I came across your events manager position, which would have me working side by side with my favorite company mascot.

Example 11:

When I attended SXSW for the first time last month, I didn’t want to leave. So I decided I shouldn’t—and immediately went to check out job openings at the company.

Example 12:

If I could make the NYC apartment rental process better for just one person, I would feel like the horrors of my recent search would all be worth it. So a customer service role at [Apartment Search Company], where I could do it every day? I can’t think of anything more fulfilling.

Example 13:

[Vacation Rental Company] is synonymous with luxury and escape, known for spaces that inspire. I’ve felt this firsthand every time I’ve stayed at one of your properties—whether I was throwing a bachelorette party or working from home in a new locale—and I would love the chance to contribute to this reputation as your destination manager.

Example 14:

I was an hour out from hosting my first big dinner party when I realized I had forgotten to pick up the white wine. In a panic, I started Googling delivery services, and that’s when I first stumbled across [Delivery Service Company]. I’ve been hooked ever since, so I couldn’t help but get excited by the idea of bringing this amazingness to nervous hosts like me as your next social media and community manager.

Example 15:

Though I’m happily employed as a marketing manager, seeing the job description for your company’s PR director position stopped me in my tracks. I’ve been wearing your glasses for many years, and have always been impressed by the way the company treats its customers, employees, and the community at large.

Example 16:

A group of us IT folks were sitting around talking about our favorite Pacific Northwest companies this morning (coincidentally, over coffee). As you might figure, Starbucks was among the first names that came up. What makes you such a standout among Seattle-based corporations? Here’s the list we compiled:

Start with accomplishments

For any given job, you’re going to be competing with a lot of other job seekers—presumably, a lot of other similarly qualified people. A great way to stand out in your cover letter is to highlight something about yourself—a character trait, an accomplishment, a really impressive skill—that’ll quickly show how you stand out.

Example 17:

My last boss once told me that my phone manner could probably defuse an international hostage situation. I’ve always had a knack for communicating with people—the easygoing and the difficult alike—and I’d love to bring that skill to your open office manager position.

Example 18:

Among my colleagues, I’m known as the one who can pick up the pieces, no matter what amount of you-know-what hits the fan. Which is why I think there’s no one better to fill this customer service leader position.

Example 19:

Last December, I ousted our company’s top salesperson from his spot—and he hasn’t seen it since. Which means, I’m ready for my next big challenge, and the sales manager role at your company is exactly what I’m looking for.

Example 20:

After spending three years managing the internal communications for a 2,000-person company, I could plan a quarterly town hall or draft an interoffice memo in my sleep. What do I want to do next? Put that experience to work as a consultant for executives looking to level up their communications strategy.

Example 21:

While you won’t find the title “community manager” listed on my resume, I’ve actually been bringing people together online and off for three years while running my own blog and series of meetups.

Example 22:

If you’re looking for someone who can follow orders and doesn’t like to rock the boat, I’m probably not the right candidate. But if you need someone who can dig into data, see what’s working (and what’s not), and challenge the status quo, let’s talk.

Example 23:

I recently relocated my family to Texas. As we neared our new home, I noticed with intrigue the many wind turbines dotting the landscape. Suddenly, it hit me: “This is the career for me.” After unloading the moving van, I promptly researched companies in this sector that may benefit most from a skilled field engineer with expert electromechanical skills. And I discovered that [Company] is where I want to be.

Example 24:

You might be wondering what a 15-year veteran of the accounting world is doing applying to an operations role at a food startup. While I agree the shift is a little strange, I know you’re looking for someone who’s equal parts foodie and financial expert, and I think that means I’m your person.

Example 25:

Over the last 10 years, I’ve built my career on one simple principle: Work smarter. I’m the person who looks for inefficient procedures, finds ways to streamline them, and consistently strives to boost the productivity of everyone around me. It’s what’s earned me three promotions in the supply chain department at my current company, and it’s what I know I can do as the new operations analyst for [Company].

Start with humor and creativity

OK, before you read any of these, we have to stamp them with a big, blaring disclaimer: Do your homework before trying anything like this—learn everything you can about the company and the hiring manager to gauge whether or not they’d appreciate some comedic relief or a bit of snark. If it seems like they would, it’s a great way to make them smile (then call you). If they don’t? Try a different approach.

Example 26:

Have you ever had your mom call five times a day asking for a status update on how your job search is going, and then sound incredulous that you haven’t made more progress since the last phone call? That’s my life right now. But I’m hoping that soon my life will revolve around being your full-time social media manager. The good news is, I bring more to the table than just an overbearing mom. Let me tell you more.

Example 27:

Thank you so much for offering me the marketing manager position at [Company]! I wholeheartedly accept. OK, I know we’re not quite there yet. But if we were, here are just a few ideas for what I would do once in the role.

Example 28:

I considered submitting my latest credit card statement as proof of just how much I love online shopping, but I thought a safer approach might be writing this cover letter and describing all the reasons I’m the one who can take [E-Commerce Company]’s business to the next level.

Example 29:

I never thought that accidentally dropping my iPhone out of a second story window would change my life (it’s a funny story—ask me about it). But thanks to my misfortune, I discovered [Phone Repair Company]—and found my dream job as an expansion associate.

Example 30:

If we were playing “Two Truths and a Lie,” I’d say: I’ve exceeded my sales quotas by at least 20% every quarter this year, I once won an international pie-eating contest, and I have an amazing job at [Company]. The last, of course, is the lie. For now.

Frequently asked questions

How do you start off a cover letter.

When unsure how to open a cover letter, a good rule of thumb is to steer clear of clichés or overused opening lines. Instead, start by highlighting a passion or accomplishment relevant to the company or role you're applying for. You could also mention something about the company that caught your attention. Get creative, but keep it professional and make sure your narrative makes sense in that context.

How to start a cover letter greeting?

Try to find the hiring manager's name on LinkedIn or the company's website and address them directly, like “Dear Jane Doe”. If you can't find their name, “Dear Hiring Manager” is a good alternative. Avoid using “To Whom It May Concern” as it sounds outdated and impersonal.

How do I introduce myself in a cover letter?

Introducing yourself in a cover letter is straightforward: just share a bit about yourself. For example, “I'm a copywriter with seven years of experience in online content writing. At least officially. Since my first year of college I've been working on personal projects and keeping a track record of my accomplishments throughout the years.” No need to repeat your name since it's already in your contact information at the beginning of the letter.

How to start a cover letter without a name?

If you don't know the name of the person receiving your cover letter, start with “Dear Hiring Manager” or similar. Other possibilities include: “Dear Hiring Team”, “To the Hiring Team”, “To the Hiring Team”, “Dear Recruiter/Recruiting Team”, or “Dear Hiring Committee” if your industry evaluates cover letters and applications through a board.

Jenny Foss , Erica Breuer , Regina Borsellino , Amanda Cardoso also contributed writing, reporting, and/or advice to this article.

what can i write in cover letter

Protect your data

This site uses cookies and related technologies for site operation, and analytics as described in our Privacy Policy . You may choose to consent to our use of these technologies, reject non-essential technologies, or further manage your preferences.

Rewards for Good Icon

  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • Crafting Catchy Cover...

Crafting Catchy Cover Letters: A How-To Guide

10 min read · Updated on May 16, 2024

Marsha Hebert

Today, more than ever, having a catchy cover letter in your job-search toolkit is a must.

A lot of job seekers ask, “Do I really need a cover letter?” The answer is a resounding “Yes!” More often than not, writing a catchy cover letter is something people simply don't do because the overwhelming thought is that employers don't read them. That couldn't be further from the truth. 

On top of that, adding a catchy cover letter to your application can enhance the skills, achievements, and qualifications you include on your resume. Most importantly, though, a great cover letter makes you more human, more real, to the hiring manager reading your application. 

What's most critical is that your cover letter be engaging. Avoid using the same old boring content that everyone else is using. Instead, craft a catchy cover letter that grabs their attention. This is your how-to guide for doing that!

Cookie-cutter isn't the way to go

Everyone has seen cover letters that start like this, 

To Whom It May Concern:

I am writing to express my interest in the [POSITION TITLE] that I saw advertised for [COMPANY NAME].

It's a complete yawn-fest. It's boring. It's overdone. 

Since your cover letter is the first chance you get to make a solid introduction to a new employer, spice it up a bit. Use some humor, indicate that you're passionate about the job you're pursuing, and inject some of your personality to entice hiring managers to actually read what you have to say. 

What is a good opening line for a cover letter?

The main idea behind a great, catchy cover letter is that you want to tell a story. This doesn't mean you should regurgitate what's contained in your resume – no one wants to read the same things twice. It all starts at the beginning. The way you start your cover letter can make or break you.

Do you want the hiring manager to have a “Bleh” moment and toss your cover letter to the side?

Wouldn't you rather they be caught off-guard by your creativity and keep reading?

The best way to shake things up is to go off-script and write something that actually catches their attention. Here are some examples:

Show your passion: “Not too long ago, I came to the realization that my life's goals included giving back to my community through story-telling. After a lot of research, I discovered that a great way to do that was to go into Public Relations and Marketing to help connect consumers with companies to meet needs.”

Show some love: “I recently read an article about how [COMPANY NAME] was involved in improving our community by engaging employees in outreach events that…”

Prove your worth: “When I read about the job opening for [POSITION TITLE] at [COMPANY NAME], I knew I had to apply because I'd already saved my current company over $100K in logistics costs and I knew that I could do that for you, too.”

Highlight your personality: “A few years ago, I was exploring the mountain roads outside of Denver, and a stranded chicken jumped in my car – it's a funny story, I even have pictures. From that moment, I knew working with rescue animals was where I wanted my future to go.”

Now that you have their attention – write the body of your catchy cover letter

One thing to remember is that the introduction of your cover letter isn't supposed to be a monologue – keep that old adage that less is more in mind. The first paragraph of your cover letter is only meant to be a couple of sentences – just enough to pique the hiring manager's interest so they keep reading. Let's face it; it's not every day that some random chicken jumps in your car. That may be just the thing that entices the interviewer to call you in – so they can hear the story. 

The second paragraph of your catchy cover letter

The next part of your catchy cover letter should be a paragraph that transitions into how your introduction will make you a great part of their team. Without repeating all the great things you've written in your cover letter, highlight some of the skills and achievements from your career thus far to prove to them you have what it takes to be a valuable part of their team. 

The third paragraph of your catchy cover letter

You can actually write this third part as a paragraph or use bulleted achievement statements (like you'll see in the template later in this article). The idea here is to showcase your most impressive career achievements and your primary strengths. 

It's a good call to opt for bullets for this part of your catchy cover letter because if the hiring manager is skimming through your cover letter, it'll be easy for them to see what you bring to the table. Don't go crazy, though, and add a bunch of bulleted achievement statements. Stick to between three and five because you don't want the cover letter to go over one page. 

The closing of your catchy cover letter

Your last paragraph should close out the cover letter by reiterating your passion for the job and requesting an interview; this is called a call to action. After all, the whole point of writing a catchy cover letter is to get them to call you for a face-to-face meeting so you can win the job. 

The end of your cover letter is also a great place to explain faux pas in your resume or give details about why you're changing careers . You can even use this part to detail your desire to travel for work or indicate that you're relocating for this job. 

Here's what a catchy cover letter looks like

We know, instructions on how to do something is one thing, but seeing it all come together in an example is something even better. So, with that, here is a catchy cover letter example:

Contact Information

[Name][Company][Address]

Dear [Name],

Would [COMPANY NAME] benefit from having someone on their team who has generated $30K in revenue, increased blog traffic by 14%, and tripled social media ROI – all in one year? Then, I'm your person. Given my background in [EXPERIENCE RELATED TO FIELD] and [EXPERIENCE RELATED TO FIELD], I know I can repeat those results for you and feel that I would make additional significant contributions to the [POSITION TITLE] you currently have available.

Throughout my entire career, I have demonstrated consistent success [SOMETHING YOU HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO] to achieve high-reaching standards and goals. During my time with [COMPANY YOU CURRENTLY WORK FOR], I've built a reputation for [MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT]. On top of that, people often come to me from different departments because I'm known as someone who can [PICK A SKILL FROM THE JOB DESCRIPTION TO INJECT HERE]. 

Additional career experience and achievements include:

Achievement/accomplishment

I think it's a great idea for us to get further acquainted, and would truly value a moment of your time to discuss how my background aligns with your needs. If you agree we may have the basis for a mutually beneficial partnership; please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience. I'd love to learn more about your team and the [POSITION TITLE] opening.  

I appreciate the time you're taking to review my application, and until we meet, I hope you have a great day!

[Your Name]

Related reading: You can find some career-specific cover letter examples here .

Why this template works

This catchy cover letter starts by discussing quantifiable achievements , which hiring managers drool over. Whenever you can deliver tangible results, the new employer will immediately know what you have to offer. 

Also, the fact that this letter indicates the results are repeatable shows that the applicant has done their research, understands the market, and is confident in their abilities. It helps the employer get the sense that the writer is genuinely passionate about their job. 

There isn't a hiring manager alive who wants to hire someone who is simply interested in earning a paycheck. Employers want employees who are dedicated and care about doing a good job. 

The closing of the cover letter template is proactive, inviting further discussion and reinforcing the applicant's desire to work for the company. 

Tailor your cover letter

You've probably heard about applicant tracking systems , also known as ATS, that companies use to weed out job seekers. Did you know that the ATS also scans cover letters? 

These systems are programmed to search for the right keywords – relevant phrases from the job description – to ensure that you are a good match. So, your catchy cover letter has to get past the ATS before it can impress the hiring manager. 

Did you notice the placeholders in the template? They're there for a reason.

As you read the job description for the position you want to apply to, you'll need to update your catchy cover letter with language that resonates with the new job. Let's say the new company wants someone who can work as a member of a cross-functional team. The last sentence of the second paragraph of the template would be a great place to include that phraseology. 

“On top of that, people often come to me from different departments because I'm known as someone who can bring harmony to processes by working as a member of a cross-functional team.”  

Just like that, you've tailored a bit of your cover letter . 

Catchy cover letter final tips and advice

Since the goal of your cover letter is to work with your resume to land your dream job – one of the most important aspects of anyone's life – it's critical to get it right. Let's talk about a few more things you need to know to craft a catchy cover letter that makes a strong impression and helps you win interviews. 

Use a professional letter format. You're not writing a letter to Grandma to thank her for the gift she got you, so make sure it's professional. Avoid using slang or overly casual expressions. Also, don't pack your cover letter with a lot of jargon that may or may not be understood outside of your current work circle. 

Keep it Short and Simple (K.I.S.S.). Remember the one-page rule. You're not trying to tell the hiring manager everything you've ever done in your career, instead, you're trying to pique their interest so they have a reason to call you to ask you more questions. 

Revise, edit, and do it again. Did you know that the average typed document has an average error rate of 8% ? Proofread your work, then get a friend to proofread it. After that, read it out loud to make sure it all sounds good. Cover letters, and resumes, too, for that matter, should have a 0% error rate.

Follow up. Prove that you're really interested in the position by following up with the employer if you don't hear back from them. 

Learn more: Read 10 of the Worst Cover Letter Mistakes to Avoid to round out your knowledge about having a stand-out cover letter.

Stand out from the crowd, win the interview

It may take a bit of time, but writing a catchy cover letter that lands you an interview is definitely worth the effort. When you follow the tips and strategies in this how-to guide, you'll be able to effectively highlight your skills and achievements in a way that gets the attention of a hiring manager and intrigues them to the point of calling you for an interview.

If you feel like your cover letter is falling short, or you're sending it out and not hearing back from companies, let TopResume check it out for you. While we're at it, we can give your resume a once-over, too. Upload them both for a free review from a resume-writing expert. 

Recommended reading: 

8 Tips to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market

Perfect Cover Letter Salutations: Start Strong

Resume vs Cover Letter: How They're Different

Related Articles:

How to Maximize Your Resume Action Words to Wow the Employer

Business Analyst Skills: Add to Improve Your Resume!

Cashier Skills: Add to Improve Your Resume!

See how your resume stacks up.

Career Advice Newsletter

Our experts gather the best career & resume tips weekly. Delivered weekly, always free.

Thanks! Career advice is on its way.

Share this article:

Let's stay in touch.

Subscribe today to get job tips and career advice that will come in handy.

Your information is secure. Please read our privacy policy for more information.

  • Copyright Information

Free All-in-One Office Suite with PDF Editor

Edit Word, Excel, and PPT for FREE.

Read, edit, and convert PDFs with the powerful PDF toolkit.

Microsoft-like interface, easy to use.

Windows • MacOS • Linux • iOS • Android

banner

Select areas that need to improve

  • Didn't match my interface
  • Too technical or incomprehensible
  • Incorrect operation instructions
  • Incomplete instructions on this function

Fields marked * are required please

Please leave your suggestions below

  • Quick Tutorials
  • Practical Skills

How to Write a Cover Letter [Tips with Examples]

As a writer, I did my fair share of job hunting. Despite my experience and expertise, I often struggled with impressing interviewers due to my lackluster cover letters. Limited resources and time constraints left my cover letters far from impressive. However, things changed when I mastered the art of writing compelling cover letters. Soon, I started receiving interview calls and eventually landed my dream job. In this article, I will share these cover letter writing techniques with you, so you too know how to write a cover letter and can effortlessly land the job of your dreams.

What is a Cover Letter and What does it Contain?

A cover letter is a one-page business letter that you submit along with your resume when applying for a job. Its primary purpose is to persuade the employer that you are an excellent candidate for the role. It complements your resume by clearly linking your experience and interests to the position you're applying for. Essentially, the cover letter is your chance to convince the employer to invite you for an interview.

A typical cover letter contains several key elements, each serving a specific purpose in showcasing your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Here’s a breakdown of what a cover letter typically includes:

Your Contact Information: Name, address, phone number, and email address.

Date: The date you are writing the letter.

Employer’s Contact Information: Name, title, company, and address of the person you are addressing the letter to.

2. Salutation

Address the letter to a specific person if possible (e.g., “Dear Mr. Smith,” or “Dear Hiring Manager,”).

3. Introduction

Opening Statement: A brief introduction mentioning the job you are applying for and how you found out about the position.

Hook: A compelling reason why you are interested in the job and the company.

First Paragraph: Explain why you are a good fit for the role. Highlight key qualifications and experiences that align with the job requirements.

Second Paragraph: Provide specific examples of your accomplishments and how they relate to the job. Use quantifiable achievements to demonstrate your impact.

Third Paragraph: Discuss your knowledge of the company and why you are excited about this particular opportunity. Show that you have researched the organization and explain how your goals align with its mission and values.

5. Conclusion

Closing Statement: Reiterate your enthusiasm for the position and the company. Summarize why you are a strong candidate.

Call to Action: Mention your desire for an interview and provide your contact information again. Indicate that you will follow up within a certain timeframe.

Thank You: Express gratitude for the reader’s time and consideration.

6. Signature

Closing Phrase: Use a professional closing, such as “Sincerely”, or “Best regards”.

Signature: Leave space for your handwritten signature (if submitting a hard copy) and then type your name below it.

How to Write a Cover Letter For a Job in 5 Steps!

Firstly, it’s crucial to streamline the process of crafting a cover letter, but that doesn’t mean using the same cover letter for every job position or even the same position at different companies. Customization is key to standing out.

Step 1. Research the Company- AIPal

Open the job listing you want to apply for, typically found on platforms like LinkedIn or Indeed. These platforms usually provide a detailed job description outlining the requirements and responsibilities.

To begin, I will write a cover letter for the Sales & Marketing Manager position at Pride Mile, which is a remote job listing I found on LinkedIn.

To proceed effectively, I will copy the job description and input it into AIPal to extract key keywords. These keywords are crucial as they highlight the skills and attributes the employer is seeking for the role.

Prompt: Extract keywords from this job description that I can in my cover letter.

To refine your keyword research, you can ask AIPal to extract keywords and categorize them into tiers.

Prompt: Extract keywords from this job description that I can in my cover letter. Assign them in three tiers ranging from the most important to least important.

This way, you'll identify the most critical keywords, which should be emphasized more in your cover letter, and less important keywords, which can be mentioned once or twice.

This approach will give me a comprehensive understanding of what the job entails and what qualities I should emphasize in my cover letter.

Step 2. Choose a template- WPS Office

Choosing a cover letter template is important because it gives you a clear structure to follow, saving you time and ensuring your letter looks polished. It guides you on what information to include, from your skills to your qualifications, making it easier to customize each letter for different job applications. Templates also help keep your letter organized and visually appealing, which is key to making a positive impression on employers.

WPS Office has been a godsend in this regard, offering plenty of cover letter templates. I followed these steps to find the desired cover letter for the Marketing Manager position:

Open WPS Office and click on "New" on the left side pane.

Next, simply click on the “All” tab in the left side pane. This will display numerous templates available on WPS Office for documents, spreadsheets, and presentations.

To save time browsing through all the options, simply search for "cover letter". This filters out irrelevant templates and helps find the right cover letter template for the job post in context.

Upon finding the suitable template for the job post, click on it to preview.

To start customizing the selected template, click the "Download" button at the top right corner, which will launch it in the WPS Writer interface for editing.

Header and Salutation

Headers and salutations are essential in a cover letter for their role in setting a professional tone. The header provides your contact details and the date, ensuring easy communication and formal presentation.

Salutations, like "Dear Hiring Manager," personalize your letter and demonstrate attention to detail, addressing the recipient directly and showcasing professionalism from the start.

One of the standout features of WPS templates is its ready-made header, which enhances the visual appeal of your cover letter. It includes sections for your contact information, the date, and the recipient's details.

Addressing the recipient by name whenever possible adds a personal touch; if that information isn't available, a generic greeting such as "Dear Hiring Manager" remains professional and appropriate. Ensuring the document is error-free further underscores your professionalism and attention to detail.

Step 3. Introduction- Your Opening Sentences

Starting your cover letter with a compelling introduction is crucial. It’s your chance to grab the hiring manager's attention and make a strong first impression. A well-crafted opening should highlight your enthusiasm, showcase your qualifications, and give a hint of your personality.

Here are a few key things to keep in mind to create an engaging and effective cover letter introduction:

Expressing genuine passion for the role or the company can make a strong impact. For example, in a sales manager position:

Dear Mr. Brown, my name is Anna and I’m excited about the opportunity to help your company exceed its sales targets. My five years of experience as a Sales Representative at XYZ Inc. have equipped me with the skills needed to drive results. Last year, we surpassed our KPIs by 50%, and I’m eager to bring this success to your team.

Referrals can add credibility to your application. For instance, in an architectural position:

I was thrilled to learn about this job opportunity from John Doe, who has been with your firm for five years. John and I collaborated on an architectural project for over a year, and he recommended I apply for this role, believing I’d be a great fit.

Demonstrating your knowledge about the company shows dedication. For example, in a social worker position:

I have always admired the work your organization does with vulnerable communities. Your commitment to social justice resonates with my professional values, and I believe my previous experience as a social worker aligns perfectly with your mission.

Starting with a significant accomplishment can immediately capture interest. For example, in a public relations position:

As a Public Relations Representative at Company XYZ, I enhanced the company’s reputation and public image, resulting in a 40% increase in customer satisfaction. I am eager to bring my proven track record of success to your organization as the Head of Communications.

Step 4. Body- the Most Important Part

The body of your resume is where you showcase your qualifications, experience, skills, and achievements to demonstrate why you're the ideal candidate for the job. Structuring this section effectively is crucial to capturing the attention of hiring managers and persuading them to consider you for the position.

Here’s how to craft a compelling resume body:

Start with a Strong Summary or Objective Statement:

Begin your resume with a concise summary or objective that highlights your career goals and what you bring to the table. This helps recruiters quickly understand your professional background and aspirations. For example:

Results-driven marketing professional with 8+ years of experience in digital marketing strategies and campaign management. Proven track record of increasing brand awareness and revenue growth through innovative marketing initiatives. Seeking to leverage my skills and expertise to contribute to the continued success of ABC Company.

Highlight Key Skills:

List relevant skills that align with the job requirements. Use bullet points to make them easy to scan. Focus on both technical skills (e.g., software proficiency, languages) and soft skills (e.g., communication, leadership). For example:

Digital Marketing Strategy

SEO/SEM Optimization

Content Management Systems (CMS)

Social Media Marketing

Analytical Skills

Team Leadership

Add Keywords:

In the body of the cover letter, it's crucial to incorporate keywords extracted from the job description. These keywords highlight your relevant skills, experiences, and attributes that align with what the employer is seeking. For example, if the job description emphasizes "digital marketing strategy," "customer acquisition," and "social media management," your cover letter should showcase your expertise in these areas.

My experience in developing and implementing robust digital marketing strategies, coupled with a proven track record in customer acquisition and social media management, aligns perfectly with the goals outlined for the Sales & Marketing Manager position at Pride Mile.

Detail Your Work Experience:

Include your work history in reverse chronological order, starting with your most recent position. For each job, provide the following details:

Job Title and Company: Clearly state your position and the organization you worked for.

Dates of Employment: Specify the period you worked there.

Key Responsibilities: Outline your main duties and responsibilities in concise bullet points. Focus on achievements and quantify results where possible. For example:

Managed a team of 5 digital marketers to execute SEO and PPC campaigns, resulting in a 30% increase in website traffic and a 25% growth in lead generation.

Achievements: Highlight specific accomplishments that demonstrate your impact. Use metrics to quantify your achievements whenever feasible. For example:

Led a successful rebranding campaign that increased brand recognition by 40% and led to a 15% increase in customer engagement.

Education and Certifications: List your educational background, including degrees, diplomas, and relevant certifications. Mention any honors or awards received. Include the name of the institution, degree/certification earned, and dates attended.

Skills and Expertise: Elaborate on any additional skills or expertise that are relevant to the job. This could include technical skills, industry-specific knowledge, or proficiency in certain tools or methodologies.

Professional Development: Include any professional development activities, workshops, or seminars you have attended that are relevant to your career.

Step 5. Closing & Salutation

A strong conclusion to your cover letter is essential to leave a positive and lasting impression on a prospective employer. It serves as your final opportunity to express enthusiasm, reinforce your qualifications, and prompt the hiring manager to take action. Here’s how to effectively end your cover letter.

Show self-assurance in your skills and how they align with the job requirements. This demonstrates to the employer that you are a competent and enthusiastic candidate. For example:

I am confident that my project management experience and problem-solving abilities make me a perfect fit for your team. I thrive in dynamic environments and am eager to contribute to your company's success.

Let your passion for the role and the industry shine through. Mentioning your enthusiasm can make you a more memorable candidate. For instance:

My lifelong passion for animal welfare drives my dedication to providing top-notch veterinary care. I am excited to bring this passion to your clinic and contribute to the well-being of your patients.

Highlight how your skills and experiences align with the job responsibilities. This helps the employer see the direct benefits of hiring you. For example:

With seven years of experience managing senior accounts, I am skilled at anticipating client needs and handling situations with discretion. I am eager to bring this expertise to your team and help grow your client base.

Share your career aspirations and how they align with the company’s growth. This shows your long-term interest in the organization. For example:

I look forward to leveraging my sales experience to identify new markets and build strong customer relationships. My goal is to grow within your company and eventually lead the account management team.

Align your personal values with the company’s mission to show you’re a cultural fit. For example:

I admire ArcherTech's commitment to supporting local businesses and have innovative marketing ideas to increase profitability in this sector. I am excited to discuss these ideas further.

Emphasize relevant technical skills, especially those mentioned in the job description. This highlights your readiness to contribute effectively. For example:

I bring extensive experience with CAD software and can create integrated 360-degree renderings for client presentations. My past successes in this area can help boost your sales by 150% over the next two quarters.

Encourage the employer to take the next step, such as scheduling an interview. Express gratitude and indicate your eagerness to discuss your application further. For example:

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing how my skills can contribute to your team. Please feel free to contact me at your convenience.

End your letter with a formal and courteous closing. Suitable options include "Best", "Sincerely", "Respectfully", and "Thank you".

Here's a template for Closing & Salutation:

This is the best approach I can suggest for writing a great cover letter, but I highly recommend using WPS Office templates for this. The AI features in AIPal and WPS Office can help extract keywords and assist with writing, while the templates provide pre-written content tailored to the position you're applying for. This approach minimizes effort and frustration, especially when a job requires a cover letter, ensuring your application meets all necessary requirements effectively.

Use Word, Excel, and PPT for FREE, No Ads.

Edit PDF files with the powerful PDF toolkit.

Microsoft-like interface. Easy to learn. 100% Compatibility.

Boost your productivity with WPS's abundant free Word, Excel, PPT, and CV templates.

How to Proofread your Cover Letter- WPS Office

WPS Office is an all-around solution for various tasks, including writing a cover letter and securing your dream job. Beyond helping you create a polished cover letter, WPS Office also excels in proofreading it. With its AI-powered Proofreader, WPS Office ensures your cover letter is error-free and impactful.

WPS AI: To assist you in polishing your content:

WPS AI Proofreader is an essential tool for perfecting your cover letter with ease and confidence. As you craft your application, WPS AI Proofreader ensures your writing is polished to perfection. It goes beyond simple spell checks, offering real-time error detection for grammar, punctuation, and clarity. This means you can focus on expressing your skills and achievements effectively, without worrying about typos or awkward phrasing. With customizable settings and intuitive correction options, WPS AI Proofreader tailors its suggestions to fit your writing style, ensuring your cover letter maintains professionalism and clarity.

AIPal Chatbot: For ideas and consultation

AIPal is a great web-assistant throughout the process of refining and perfecting your cover letter through its robust proofreading and consultation capabilities. This AI-powered tool not only identifies grammatical errors and punctuation issues but also provides insightful suggestions to enhance the clarity and effectiveness of your ideas. AIPal ensures that your cover letter maintains a cohesive flow and communicates your qualifications effectively to potential employers.

1. How long should a Cover Letter be?

A cover letter should ideally be between half a page and a full page in length, with a word count ranging from 250 to 400 words. It is typically divided into three to six paragraphs. It's important to keep it brief and focused on relevant details.

2. What tone should I use in my Cover Letter?

To effectively convey the right tone in your cover letter, aim for a balance that is both professional and friendly.

Avoid overly formal language while maintaining a polished demeanor.

Tailor your communication style to fit the company's culture, showing genuine enthusiasm for the position without coming across as boastful or overly eager.

Use confident and positive language to articulate your qualifications clearly, avoiding jargon, informal expressions, or humor that could be misinterpreted.

This approach will ensure your cover letter reflects professionalism and authentic interest in the position.

3. Should I include references in my cover letter?

Typically, you do not need to include references in your cover letter unless the employer specifically requires them. Concentrate on highlighting your relevant qualifications and explaining why you are a strong match for the position.

Create An Impactful Cover Letter With WPS Office

Creating a compelling cover letter can often be the decisive factor in securing your dream job. It needs to showcase your expertise clearly and coherently, leaving no doubt about your suitability for the role. WPS Office provides a reliable solution where you can gather all the necessary information for when you are figuring out how to write a cover letter and ensure your cover letter resonates at the right level.

From templates perfectly tailored to the job position to extracting crucial keywords and summarizing job descriptions, WPS Office equips you with everything essential for writing a successful cover letter. Download AIPal today to streamline your job hunting journey and alleviate some of the frustrations along the way.

  • 1. 9+ Printable Word Cover Letter Template Free Download
  • 2. Latest 10 Free Cover Letter Template for 2024
  • 3. Editable & Printable Sample Cover Letter for Job Application Word Format
  • 4. New Cover Letter Template Free Download 2024
  • 5. How to make a cover letter for a resume in WPS Office Word
  • 6. Editable & Printable Sample Cover Letter for Job Application Word Format

15 years of office industry experience, tech lover and copywriter. Follow me for product reviews, comparisons, and recommendations for new apps and software.

Cookies on GOV.UK

We use some essential cookies to make this website work.

We’d like to set additional cookies to understand how you use GOV.UK, remember your settings and improve government services.

We also use cookies set by other sites to help us deliver content from their services.

You have accepted additional cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

You have rejected additional cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

what can i write in cover letter

  • Health and social care
  • Public health
  • Health protection
  • Immunisation
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination programmes letter
  • NHS England
  • UK Health Security Agency

Introduction of new NHS vaccination programmes against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Published 24 June 2024

Applies to England

what can i write in cover letter

© Crown copyright 2024

This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: [email protected] .

Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned.

This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/respiratory-syncytial-virus-rsv-vaccination-programmes-letter/introduction-of-new-nhs-vaccination-programmes-against-respiratory-syncytial-virus-rsv

24 June 2024

  • chief executives
  • chief operating officers
  • medical directors
  • chief pharmacist
  • chief nurses
  • head of midwifery

Integrated Care Boards ( ICB ):

  • public health directors
  • clinical leads
  • accountable officers

For onward cascade to:

  • general practices
  • paediatricians
  • NHSE regional directors
  • NHSE regional chief midwives and heads of midwifery
  • NHSE regional medical directors
  • NHSE directors of nursing
  • NHSE regional directors of commissioning
  • NHSE regional directors of primary care and public health commissioning
  • NHSE regional heads of public health commissioning
  • NHSE regional heads of primary care
  • NHSE specialist commissioning teams
  • all directors of public health

Stakeholders:

  • Nursing and Midwifery Council
  • Royal College of Midwives
  • Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
  • Royal College of Physicians
  • Royal College of Nursing
  • Royal College of General Practitioners
  • Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
  • Faculty of Public Health
  • Local Government Association
  • Royal Pharmaceutical Society
  • Royal College of Emergency Medicine
  • Society of acute medicine

Dear Colleagues,

Introduction of new NHS vaccination programmes against respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV )

Following guidance from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation ( JCVI ), we are writing to systems to set out next steps for delivery of 2 new respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV ) vaccination programmes from 1 September 2024, for older adults and during pregnancy for infant protection.

RSV  is a common respiratory virus that that can cause serious lung infections. While RSV infection can occur at any age, the risk and severity of RSV and its complications are increased in older adults and in neonates and small babies, and it has a considerable impact on individuals and NHS services during the winter months.

Following successful completion of a competitive tender and with funding approved from the Department of Health and Social Care ( DHSC ), we are pleased to be able to provide further information about the programme. We ask that you share this with all local partners involved in commissioning and delivering the programme.

Programme for older adults aged 75 to 79 years old

All adults turning 75 years old on or after 1 September 2024 will be eligible for the routine programme and should be offered a single dose of the RSV vaccine on or after their 75th birthday. A one-off catch-up campaign for those already aged 75 to 79 years old on 1 September 2024 should be undertaken at the earliest opportunity with the aim of completing the majority by 31 August 2025. To offer the best protection, we are asking systems and providers to vaccinate as many people as possible during September and October 2024 prior to the expected RSV season. In line with JCVI guidance, individuals will remain eligible until the day before their 80th birthday, with the exception of people who turn 80 in the first year who have until 31 August 2025 to get vaccinated.

This campaign will be commissioned from general practice as an essential service, starting from 1 September 2024. In addition, NHS England ( NHSE ) will be commissioning a number of community pharmacies to deliver the programme. Further details will be shared in due course.

Programme for pregnant women to protect infants

All women who are at least 28 weeks pregnant (the eligible cohort) on 1 September 2024, should be offered a single dose of the RSV vaccine, through commissioned services. After that, pregnant women will become eligible as they reach 28 weeks gestation and remain eligible up to birth. The ideal opportunity to offer vaccination would be at the 28-week antenatal contact ( ANC ), following prior discussion at the 20-week ANC . Providers should aim to vaccinate those already eligible on 1 September as soon as possible.

Information provided in the annexes of this letter:

Annexe A : detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals about the RSV older adult offer.

Annexe B : detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals about the RSV vaccination offer for pregnant women to protect infants and the high-risk infant offer.

Annexe C : detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals – both programmes.

For any operational queries, please contact your NHS England Regional Public Health Commissioning Team. For clinical queries or queries about supporting programme resources, please email [email protected] .

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in commissioning and delivering the national immunisation programme in England.

Yours sincerely

Steve Russell, National Director of Vaccinations and Screening, NHS England

Dr Mary Ramsay CBE, Director of Public Health Programmes (including immunisation), UK Health Security Agency

Annexe A. Detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals – Older adult programme

The joint committee on vaccination and immunisation ( jcvi ).

In June 2023, based on impact and cost effectiveness modelling, the JCVI advised that an RSV immunisation programme, that is cost effective, should be developed for older adults aged 75 years old and above. The JCVI further advised it favoured a one-off campaign as the strategy for this programme with the initial offer covering several age cohorts and then a routine programme for those turning 75 years old, with its delivery and implementation to be determined through further consultation between NHS England, DHSC , UKHSA and the devolved administrations.

Funding and service arrangements

Routine NHS-funded vaccinations and immunisations are delivered as essential services under the GP Contract from the 1 September 2024, the RSV vaccination programme will be included, as set out in this letter. Details of how the service will be commissioned will be shared via an NHS England deployment note and relevant contracting arrangements will be put in place accordingly.

Practices will be required to undertake call/recall for patients as they become eligible for the programme from 1 September. Accurate and timely recording of all vaccines given, and good management of all associated documentation, is essential as per the standards set out in the GMS Regulations and Statement of Financial Entitlement ( SFE ).

Funding will be part of the Public Health Allocation to regional commissioners annually to disseminate, as required locally.

Vaccine coverage data collection

Single dose coverage of the RSV vaccination will be collected. GP practice-level RSV vaccine coverage will be based on data automatically uploaded via participating GP IT suppliers to the ImmForm website (a website used by UKHSA and NHS to collect data on vaccine coverage and provide vaccine ordering facilities for the NHS). For the maternal programme, data will be collected monthly with an 8 week lag to allow for transfer of records and recording of live births and immunisations in women’s records. For older adults, data will be collected quarterly.

From September 2024 data will be collected on the following:

For older adults:

Denominator: the number of patients in the relevant age bands registered with a participating GP on the data extraction date.

Numerator: the number of patients in the denominator that have received the RSV vaccine between 1 September 2024 and the extraction date.

The data will be validated and analysed by UKHSA to check data completeness, identify and query any anomalous results and describe epidemiological trends. Reports will be available on GOV.UK.

Annexe B. Detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals – pregnancy vaccination for infant protection programme

In June 2023, based on impact and cost effectiveness modelling, the JCVI advised that a RSV immunisation programme, that is cost effective, should be developed for infants. Further details can be found in the JCVI RSV statement .

Women should be offered RSV vaccination in each pregnancy from 28 weeks gestation. Infants at high risk of RSV disease should also receive passive immunisation against RSV in accordance with criteria in the Green Book, chapter 27a regardless of whether the mother was vaccinated during the pregnancy.

Where appropriate and in accordance with procurement legislation, the service may be provided under a variation to the NHS Standard Contract with current providers as determined by regional commissioners, based on population need and using the nationally provided template schedules. Where a new non-primary care provider is commissioned in accordance with procurement legislation, then the nationally provided standard contract templates must be used.

Opportunistic or on request GP delivery of immunisations will be commissioned as an essential service in the GP contract. Where commissioners may want general practice to routinely provide this service, this will need to be commissioned locally over and above the core opportunistic or on request offer and giving due regard to procurement legislation.

Funding will be provided as part of the Public Health Allocation to regional commissioners annually to disseminate, as required locally.

Vaccination event data recording

Vaccination events should be recorded using nationally agreed applications. Vaccinations provided in a GP setting will be recorded directly onto GPIT systems. Supporting information on vaccine event recording requirements will be provided to regional commissioners and commissioned providers.

Single dose coverage of the RSV vaccination will be collected.

For the maternal programme:

Denominator: the number of women registered with a participating GP on the data extraction date who delivered in the survey month regardless of gestational age at birth.

Numerator: the number of women in the denominator recorded as having received RSV vaccination between week 28 of pregnancy and delivery.

The data will be validated and analysed by UKHSA to check data completeness, identify and query any anomalous results and describe epidemiological trends.

Annexe C. Detailed information and guidance for healthcare professionals – both programmes

Vaccine supply.

The RSV vaccine Abrysvo® will be made available to order online via the ImmForm website . See the ImmForm helpsheet for information on registering for an ImmForm account. The vaccine is expected to be available to order from early August. The same Abrysvo® vaccine will be used for both the older adult and the infant programmes but will be separate items on ImmForm and the product should be managed independently where possible. Ordering controls may be in place to enable UKHSA to balance incoming supply with demand. Details on ordering will be available on ImmForm and in Vaccine Update in due course. Providers should plan to include Abrysvo® with their usual ImmForm vaccine orders rather than placing additional orders and ensure that local stocks of vaccine are rotated in fridges so that wastage is minimised. It is recommended that practices hold no more than 2 weeks’ worth of stock.

Patient Group Directions (PGDs)

A new RSV PGD template will be produced by UKHSA for NHS England areas to authorise for their commissioned services. This will be available from the PGD collection on GOV.UK.

Information and guidance for healthcare practitioners

Detailed clinical guidance on RSV and RSV vaccination is contained in chapter 27a of Immunisation Against Infectious Disease (the Green Book).

Healthcare practitioner information and guidance to support the RSV programme including an Information for Healthcare Practitioners document and a training slide set will be available from the RSV vaccination programme webpage .

Patient information materials

Patient information materials will be available on the RSV vaccination programme webpage .

All patient facing resources can be ordered free of charge from Health Publications . All users need to register to receive deliveries. If you register as a health professional, you can order 500 to 1,000 copies on the website. For larger quantities, please call 0300 123 1002.

Guidance on informed consent can be found in chapter 2 of the Green Book .

Black Triangle Scheme and reporting suspected adverse reactions

Abrysvo® is part of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency’s ( MHRA ) Black Triangle Scheme for new medicines and vaccines to allow rapid identification of new safety information. Health professionals and those vaccinated are asked to report suspected adverse reactions through the online Yellow Card scheme , by downloading the Yellow Card app or by calling the Yellow Card scheme on 0800 731 6789 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Is this page useful?

  • Yes this page is useful
  • No this page is not useful

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.

To help us improve GOV.UK, we’d like to know more about your visit today. Please fill in this survey (opens in a new tab) .

Watch CBS News

The Supreme Court ruled that Trump has immunity for official acts. Here's what happens next.

By Robert Legare , Melissa Quinn , Graham Kates

Updated on: July 2, 2024 / 3:41 PM EDT / CBS News

Washington — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled that former presidents are entitled to immunity from federal prosecution for official acts, a landmark decision that has major ramifications for former President Donald Trump.

The ruling dealt primarily with special counsel Jack Smith's case against Trump in Washington, D.C. While the court's 6-3 decision made some specific determinations about what conduct alleged in Smith's indictment cannot be brought to trial, the majority left much of the decision-making up to U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan, who is overseeing that case. Chutkan will have to decide whether much of the alleged conduct in the indictment was "official" or "unofficial" in nature. 

Trump faces a second federal case in Florida related to classified documents, and state charges in Georgia dealing with the 2020 election. He was also convicted on state charges in New York in May. The court did not address those cases in its decision, but the judge overseeing the New York case soon delayed Trump's sentencing to resolve a dispute stemming from the justices' ruling. The potential impact on the Georgia matter is less clear. Trump has pleaded not guilty on all charges.

Here's what the ruling could mean for each of Trump's criminal cases:

Trump's 2020 election case

The Supreme Court declined to dismiss the entirety of Smith's case against Trump in Washington, where he is charged with four counts stemming from his conduct after the 2020 election. Instead, the six conservative justices decided to send the case down to Chutkan's court and instructed her to review the indictment under the legal standard they established. This will all but certainly result in more hearings and legal briefs on each of the issues, followed by likely appeals that will further delay the start of the trial. The case has been on hold for months as the immunity issue weaved its way through the courts.

Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John Roberts divided presidential conduct into three categories: official acts that are part of presidents' "core constitutional powers"; other official acts that are outside their "exclusive authority"; and unofficial acts. Presidents have "absolute" immunity for the first category, "presumptive" immunity for the second and no immunity for the third.

Roberts wrote that the allegations in the indictment that accused Trump of working with Justice Department officials to push for investigations into certain state election results are off the table because they fall squarely under the umbrella of "official acts."

"The indictment's allegations that the requested investigations were 'sham[s]' or proposed for an improper purpose do not divest the President of exclusive authority over the investigative and prosecutorial functions of the Justice Department and its officials," Roberts wrote, essentially blocking Smith from introducing the allegations at trial.

As for prosecutors' contentions that Trump pressured then-Vice President Mike Pence to delay the certification of the Electoral College votes on Jan. 6, 2021, as Pence presided over the joint session of Congress, Roberts and the majority ruled Trump is "presumed" to have immunity and raised the bar for using evidence tied to that conduct at trial. The special counsel will now likely have to "rebut the presumption of immunity" to show that Trump is not entitled to legal protection.

The court wrote that Pence was acting at least in part as president of the Senate on Jan. 6, not solely as a member of the Trump administration. As a result, Smith "may argue that consideration of the President's communications with the Vice President concerning the certification proceeding does not pose 'dangers of intrusion on the authority and functions of the Executive Branch," the decision said.

The high court placed the burden on Smith to prove that prosecuting Trump for allegedly pressuring Pence would not "pose any dangers of intrusion on the authority and functions of the Executive Branch." Chutkan will then have to make a determination on the matter.

The majority also pointed to "a broad range of conduct" that the lower court will have to examine, including Smith's claims that Trump worked with state officials, private attorneys and his supporters outside the Capitol to subvert the transfer of presidential power.

For example, Smith charged Trump with pressuring Georgia election officials to "find votes" and said the former president and his allies tried to organize false slates of presidential electors. That conduct occupies a gray area that "cannot be neatly categorized as falling within a particular Presidential function," Roberts wrote Monday. 

According to the opinion, each allegedly criminal act as described in the indictment is "fact-specific" and requires further briefing with the lower court. Chutkan will have to decide "whether Trump's conduct in this area qualifies as official or unofficial." The justices offered her a roadmap to weigh the conduct against the risk of "enfeebling" presidential power when deciding the issues.

Under the application of the new standard set by the high court, each argument at the trial court level will require numerous written briefs and even some oral arguments. In some circumstances, even after Chutkan rules, her decisions are likely to be appealed to higher courts for review. 

The same process is likely to play out with regard to Trump's public comments and social media posts leading up to and during the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Roberts wrote that while "most" public comments "are likely to fall comfortably within the outer perimeter of his official responsibilities," a contextual analysis could prove otherwise in certain circumstances.

Trump called the ruling a victory. The special counsel declined to comment on the decision. 

The Trump documents case

A photo taken by the FBI included in a motion filed by special counsel Jack Smith on June 24, 2024, showing a blue box located in the

The other federal case brought against Trump by Smith involves his alleged mishandling of sensitive government records after leaving the White House in January 2021. Like in the D.C. case, Trump has argued that the charges should be tossed out on the grounds that he is entitled to sweeping immunity from prosecution. He pleaded not guilty to charges he willfully retained national defense information and obstructed the Justice Department's investigation into his handling of documents bearing classification markings.

U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon in Florida has not yet ruled on Trump's claims of presidential immunity. While it's not immediately clear how that case will be impacted, the former president's lawyers and Smith's team will likely submit additional filings to Cannon arguing their position is bolstered by the decision.

The special counsel has argued that the conduct alleged in the indictment — namely that Trump illegally retained national defense information — occurred after he left office, and therefore he is not entitled to legal protection.

But the former president has argued that he declassified the records at issue before leaving office. There are 32 separate documents that underlie the charges, and Trump could claim the broad power to declassify records is within a president's official duties. Trump has also claimed that he deemed the documents marked classified as personal and therefore could bring them with him after leaving office.

Notably, in a separate concurring decision on Monday, Justice Clarence Thomas waded into another legal argument currently pending before Cannon's court: whether Smith's appointment as special prosecutor was legal.

Trump has argued in various court hearings and filings that Smith's appointment was unlawful since he was neither appointed by the president nor approved by the Senate. The Justice Department has defended Attorney General Merrick Garland's decision to name Smith as special counsel, arguing legal and historical precedent supported the move. 

Cannon has yet to rule on the matter. 

In his opinion on Monday, Thomas said he wrote to "highlight another way in which this prosecution may violate our constitutional structure." 

The justice questioned whether Smith's office was "established by Law" and wrote that further examination of the appointment should proceed before trial in the D.C. case.

"If this unprecedented prosecution is to proceed, it must be conducted by someone duly authorized to do so by the American people," Thomas wrote. "The lower courts should thus answer these essential questions concerning the Special Counsel's appointment before proceeding."

Although his opinion was not binding, and no other justices signed onto his concurring opinion, Thomas' arguments have the potential to affect Cannon's ruling on the legality of Smith's appointment in the classified documents case. 

The Georgia case

In Fulton County, Georgia, prosecutors alleged that Trump and several of his allies engaged in a scheme to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Much of the conduct alleged in the indictment returned by a Fulton County grand jury is similar to what Smith has accused Trump of doing.

Trump has pleaded not guilty to all charges brought against him in Georgia. As in the federal prosecutions, he has argued the indictment should be dismissed on the grounds he is entitled to presidential immunity. The Fulton County judge overseeing Trump's case, Judge Scott McAfee, has not yet ruled on his bid to toss out the charges.

The case before the Supreme Court involved a federal prosecution, while the Fulton County case is a state prosecution. Still, it's likely McAfee will revisit the conduct alleged in the indictment and determine what actions are considered official or unofficial.

Some of the allegations in the federal indictment, cited by the Supreme Court, include Trump's interactions with people outside the Executive Branch, such as state officials, private parties and the public. The high court said it is now up to the federal district court overseeing Trump's case to determine whether that conduct qualifies as official or unofficial.

In Georgia, prosecutors have pointed to his conversation with Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and other high-ranking state officials to support their claim that he unlawfully plotted to overturn the election results, as well as his attempt to organize false slates of presidential electors to obstruct the certification of state electoral votes. Expect to see McAfee probe those actions and make a similar determination as to whether they qualify as official or unofficial conduct.

The New York case

The one criminal case against Trump to go to trial ended with a conviction. A unanimous Manhattan jury concluded on May 30 that Trump was guilty of 34 felony counts of falsifying business records in an effort to cover up reimbursements for a "hush money" payment to an adult film star. Trump signed off on falsifying the records while he was in the White House in 2017.

Sentencing in his New York case was scheduled for July 11. Shortly after the Supreme Court's decision was released on Monday, Trump's lawyers sent a letter to the judge saying they will seek to overturn the jury's verdict. Prosecutors responded that they wouldn't oppose delaying the sentencing while Justice Juan Merchan considered Trump's effort. 

Merchan decided on Tuesday to postpone sentencing until Sept. 18 and indicated he'll rule on the motion to overturn the verdict on Sept. 6.

Trump's letter to Merchan indicated his lawyers will cite a March 7 pretrial motion in which they demanded that certain testimony and evidence be barred, particularly pertaining to Trump's social media posts and public statements while in office that they said were made as official acts. 

"Official-acts evidence should never have been put before the jury," they wrote. 

"The verdicts in this case violate the presidential immunity doctrine and create grave risks of 'an Executive Branch that cannibalizes itself,'" they wrote, quoting the Supreme Court's ruling. The majority ruled that evidence about official acts cannot be introduced "even on charges that purport to be based only on his unofficial conduct."

The issue of whether the allegations in that case relate to official acts was litigated as part of an effort by Trump to move the case from state to federal jurisdiction.

In 2023, Trump and his legal team argued that the allegations involved official acts within the color of his presidential duties, and said a federal court was therefore the proper venue for a trial.

That argument was rejected by a federal judge who wrote that Trump failed to show that his conduct was "for or relating to any act performed by or for the President under color of the official acts of a president."

"The evidence overwhelmingly suggests that the matter was purely a personal item of the president — a cover-up of an embarrassing event," U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein wrote. "Hush money paid to an adult film star is not related to a president's official acts. It does not reflect in any way the color of the president's official duties."

Trump initially appealed that decision, but later dropped it. 

Robert Legare is a CBS News multiplatform reporter and producer covering the Justice Department, federal courts and investigations. He was previously an associate producer for the "CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell."

More from CBS News

Wisconsin Supreme Court allows expanded use of ballot drop boxes

Kansas Supreme Court rejects 2 anti-abortion laws

Full transcript of "Face the Nation," July 7, 2024

Biden campaign provided a list of approved questions for 2 radio interviews

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Great Cover Letter

    what can i write in cover letter

  2. Cover Letter Format: How to Format Your Cover Letter in 2023 (2023)

    what can i write in cover letter

  3. Free Cover Letter

    what can i write in cover letter

  4. Cover Letter Examples for 40+ Jobs [Updated for 2022]

    what can i write in cover letter

  5. How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter in 10 Minutes

    what can i write in cover letter

  6. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job Application

    what can i write in cover letter

VIDEO

  1. How to write Cover Letter for Foreign Job Application

  2. HOW TO WRITE COVER LETTER for CVs RESUMES//COVER LETTER FOR JOB APPLICATION

  3. How to write cover letter

  4. How to write cover letter for canada refused visa

  5. Letter To The Editor For Publishing Essay

  6. How to write a cover letter ? Cover letter kaise banai

COMMENTS

  1. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Middle paragraph (s) Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Show Transcript.

  2. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter #1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template #2. Put Contact Information in the Header #3. Address the Hiring Manager #4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction #5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details #6. Wrap It Up and Sign It Cover Letter Writing Checklist 15 Cover Letter Tips 15+ Cover Letter Examples 5 ...

  3. How to Write a Great Cover Letter in 2024 (+ Examples)

    1. Personalization. Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role. 2.

  4. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  5. How To Write the Perfect Cover Letter (With Template and Example)

    Include the name of the person to whom you are writing as well as the company name and address just above the salutation. In the salutation, greet the hiring manager by name. If you don't know the name of the person, consider greeting the hiring department or the department with which you would be working if hired. 3.

  6. How to Write a Cover Letter (Examples and Tips)

    Step 3: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager—preferably by name. The most traditional way to address a cover letter is to use the person's first and last name, including "Mr." or "Ms." (for example, "Dear Ms. Jane Smith" or just "Dear Ms. Smith").

  7. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Here are 9 steps you can take to make sure you're headed in the right direction: Step 1. Do your research. Before writing your cover letter, thoroughly read the job description and the requirements for the job. Melanie Denny, award-winning resume expert, likens the job description to your cover letter cheat sheet.

  8. How to Write a Cover Letter: Examples & Guide [2024]

    Place your name, city, state, ZIP code, phone number and email address in your cover letter heading. Your email address should be professional like "[email protected]," and not personal like "[email protected]." Include links to your LinkedIn profile or professional online portfolio if you have one.

  9. How to Write a Cover Letter: Guide + Examples

    Avoid addressing the recipient with "Dear Sir or Madam," which is outdated and impersonal. It's always best to address them by their title and name. For example: Good cover letter greeting examples: "Dear hiring manager,". "Dear [XYZ Company] team,". "Dear Customer Acquisition Hiring Manager,". Weak cover letter greeting examples:

  10. How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job [2024 Guide]

    Here's how to write a successful cover letter: 1. Stick to the Proper Cover Letter Format. Your cover letter should follow the best practices for writing business letters. Keep your cover letter short and to the point—in fact, your entire cover letter shouldn't be longer than 350 words.

  11. How to Write the Best Cover Letter (With Template and Sample)

    Include a postscript. 1. Use the proper formatting. There are several rules to follow when structuring your cover letter: Make sure everything is left-aligned. Use single line spaces within paragraphs and double spaces between sections or paragraphs. Include a one-inch margin on every side of your letter.

  12. What to Include in a Cover Letter (& What to Leave Out)

    A great cover letter consists of the following components: 1. Your name and contact information in a header. The hiring manager needs to have your contact information. Without these details, they have no way of inviting you for an interview. The most eye-catching way of adding your contact information to your cover letter is by creating a large ...

  13. How to write the perfect cover letter (With examples)

    To start your cover letter, introduce yourself. This means including your full name, your specific interest in the position and the reasons you've chosen to apply. If you got a referral to the job from another party, ensure to mention this in the first paragraph. 2. Mention your skills and qualifications.

  14. How To Write A Cover Letter (Definitive Guide + Template)

    Follow that by the date you are writing the letter and then the company contact information. Be sure to separate each section with a space…it makes your letter easier to read. If you are mailing a hard copy of your letter, make sure when you get to the bottom and your salutation to double space. It will give you room to sign your letter.

  15. What to Include in a Cover Letter in 2024 + Examples

    Your cover letter greeting is where you formally address your letter's recipient, in this case, a recruiter, hiring manager or employer. You should include the following details in this exact order: The date. The recipient's name and job title. The recipient's address. A formal greeting for the recipient ("Dear Ms. Jones") 3.

  16. The 46 Best Cover Letter Examples: What They Got Right

    This complexity can make cover letters really tough to write. Because cover letters are difficult to write, many come off as boring, basic, or confusing for hiring managers to read. But the tips below about the qualities that make a cover letter great can help you take your cover letter from basic to bright.

  17. How to Write a Cover Letter and Get Noticed

    1. Research the company. Visit the company's website and pay close attention to the "About Us" section. If the company has a careers section, read over any information about workplace culture. Consider what interests you—either about what the company does or how it does it—and note it to include in your letter. 2.

  18. How to Start a Cover Letter: 30 Creative Opening Sentences

    You'll get more into the details after your opening paragraph, of course. But your cover letter opener should still tell the reader, "This person can do something for us," rather than, "This job would really help them.". 4. Stick to the point. Your opener, while creative, should still be relevant to the job.

  19. 12 Ways to Start a Cover Letter: Examples & Tips

    12 winning ways to start your cover letter. Our sample cover letter introductions will help you learn how to open a cover letter in a way that stands out and boosts your chances of landing an interview. 1. Mention a contact within the company. If you were referred by a former coworker, classmate, or friend who's highly regarded in their ...

  20. How to write a cover letter

    How to write your cover letter. Start with a brief introduction about yourself and why you're writing. Mention the job you're applying for and your interest in it. Give a snapshot of the relevant skills, experience and qualifications you have that relate to the job. Think about the key two or three points in your resume and explaining these ...

  21. here's a real-life example of a fantastic cover letter

    The cover letters I write are broadly similar to this one - leading the reader briefly through my career and experience and how it matches up to the job description being advertised - so I think although the language is definitely different, the overall idea is the same.

  22. Crafting Catchy Cover Letters: A How-To Guide

    Learn more: Read 10 of the Worst Cover Letter Mistakes to Avoid to round out your knowledge about having a stand-out cover letter. Stand out from the crowd, win the interview It may take a bit of time, but writing a catchy cover letter that lands you an interview is definitely worth the effort.

  23. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    So let's talk about how to do cover letters right., First, understand the point of a cover letter., The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just ...

  24. PDF Writing an Effective Cover Letter

    You can practice writing a cover letter but you will have to write a new one each time you apply for a job. If you do not change your cover letter with each job application, you will be less likely to convince a potential employer that you really want the job. When do you send a cover letter? If you are applying for a job by mailing, emailing ...

  25. What Is a Cover Letter? (And What To Include in One)

    A simple format on your cover letter can make your writing easier to read. Avoid distracting the reader by using neutral colors, such as black, and a sans-serif font. Read the job description. Before writing a cover letter, read the job description closely to understand what the employer is looking for in an ideal candidate.

  26. Cover Letters

    Keep the cover letter conclusion brief and explain that you look forward to the employer's response about possible next steps. Learn more: Sample cover letter for students; Cover letter checklist; CTHires has a cover letter builder and free workshops to help you write a great resume and cover letter. Harvard Business Review: How to Write a ...

  27. How to Write a Cover Letter [Tips with Examples]

    This is the best approach I can suggest for writing a great cover letter, but I highly recommend using WPS Office templates for this. The AI features in AIPal and WPS Office can help extract keywords and assist with writing, while the templates provide pre-written content tailored to the position you're applying for. This approach minimizes ...

  28. Introduction of new NHS vaccination programmes against respiratory

    Following guidance from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), we are writing to systems to set out next steps for delivery of 2 new respiratory syncytial virus (RSV ...

  29. The Supreme Court ruled that Trump has immunity for official acts. Here

    Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John Roberts divided presidential conduct into three categories: official acts that are part of presidents' "core constitutional powers"; other official ...