The University of Edinburgh home

  • Schools & departments

Reflection Toolkit

Gibbs' Reflective Cycle

One of the most famous cyclical models of reflection leading you through six stages exploring an experience: description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion and action plan.

Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences.  It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn’t go well. It covers 6 stages:

  • Description of the experience
  • Feelings and thoughts about the experience
  • Evaluation of the experience, both good and bad
  • Analysis to make sense of the situation
  • Conclusion about what you learned and what you could have done differently
  • Action plan for how you would deal with similar situations in the future, or general changes you might find appropriate.

Below is further information on:

  • The model – each stage is given a fuller description, guiding questions to ask yourself and an example of how this might look in a reflection
  • Different depths of reflection – an example of reflecting more briefly using this model

This is just one model of reflection. Test it out and see how it works for you. If you find that only a few of the questions are helpful for you, focus on those. However, by thinking about each stage you are more likely to engage critically with your learning experience.

A circular diagram showing the 6 stages of Gibbs' Reflective cycle

This model is a good way to work through an experience. This can be either a stand-alone experience or a situation you go through frequently, for example meetings with a team you have to collaborate with. Gibbs originally advocated its use in repeated situations, but the stages and principles apply equally well for single experiences too. If done with a stand-alone experience, the action plan may become more general and look at how you can apply your conclusions in the future.

For each of the stages of the model a number of helpful questions are outlined below. You don’t have to answer all of them but they can guide you about what sort of things make sense to include in that stage. You might have other prompts that work better for you.

Description

Here you have a chance to describe the situation in detail. The main points to include here concern what happened. Your feelings and conclusions will come later.

Helpful questions:

  • What happened?
  • When and where did it happen?
  • Who was present?
  • What did you and the other people do?
  • What was the outcome of the situation?
  • Why were you there?
  • What did you want to happen?

Example of 'Description'

Here you can explore any feelings or thoughts that you had during the experience and how they may have impacted the experience.

  • What were you feeling during the situation?
  • What were you feeling before and after the situation?
  • What do you think other people were feeling about the situation?
  • What do you think other people feel about the situation now?
  • What were you thinking during the situation?
  • What do you think about the situation now?

Example of 'Feelings'

Here you have a chance to evaluate what worked and what didn’t work in the situation. Try to be as objective and honest as possible. To get the most out of your reflection focus on both the positive and the negative aspects of the situation, even if it was primarily one or the other.

  • What was good and bad about the experience?
  • What went well?
  • What didn’t go so well?
  • What did you and other people contribute to the situation (positively or negatively)?

Example of 'Evaluation'

The analysis step is where you have a chance to make sense of what happened. Up until now you have focused on details around what happened in the situation. Now you have a chance to extract meaning from it. You want to target the different aspects that went well or poorly and ask yourself why. If you are looking to include academic literature, this is the natural place to include it.

  • Why did things go well?
  • Why didn’t it go well?
  • What sense can I make of the situation?
  • What knowledge – my own or others (for example academic literature) can help me understand the situation?

Example of 'Analysis'

Conclusions.

In this section you can make conclusions about what happened. This is where you summarise your learning and highlight what changes to your actions could improve the outcome in the future. It should be a natural response to the previous sections.

  • What did I learn from this situation?
  • How could this have been a more positive situation for everyone involved?
  • What skills do I need to develop for me to handle a situation like this better?
  • What else could I have done?

Example of a 'Conclusion'

Action plan.

At this step you plan for what you would do differently in a similar or related situation in the future. It can also be extremely helpful to think about how you will help yourself to act differently – such that you don’t only plan what you will do differently, but also how you will make sure it happens. Sometimes just the realisation is enough, but other times reminders might be helpful.

  • If I had to do the same thing again, what would I do differently?
  • How will I develop the required skills I need?
  • How can I make sure that I can act differently next time?

Example of 'Action Plan'

Different depths of reflection.

Depending on the context you are doing the reflection in, you might want use different levels of details. Here is the same scenario, which was used in the example above, however it is presented much more briefly.

Adapted from

Gibbs G (1988). Learning by Doing: A guide to teaching and learning methods. Further Education Unit. Oxford Polytechnic: Oxford.

CrowJack

Services We Provide

proof-reading

Resources We Provide

blog

Login / Register

login

  • Learn From Your Past Experience with Gibb’s Reflective Cycle
  • Exploring Different Types of Reflection Models with Examples

Jessica Robinson - Image

You must have heard about Gibbs' reflective cycle. It is a widely prominent reflective cycle that helps individuals to work through past experiences and improve future practices. Gibbs' The reflective cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 with the main aim of structuring individual learnings from past experiences (Markkanen et al., 2020). Effective utilization of this cycle offers a wide opportunity to examine past experiences and improve future actions.

Table of Contents

Six stages of gibbs' reflective cycle.

  • Example of Gibbs' reflective cycle

Hence, the efficacious use of Gibbs' reflective cycle helps individuals to learn from past experiences that went well as well as past experiences that did not. The 6 stages of Gibbs' cycle include description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion, and action plan (Smith & Roberts, 2015).

For each step of this framework, you can work on a set of helpful questions given below to properly reflect on your past experiences and situations.

Stage 1: Description

The first step in Gibbs' reflective cycle is a description where you get an opportunity to properly describe a situation based on your experience. The following questions can assist you in describing your experience are

  • What happened? In this, you will explain the factual information about the experience you want to reflect upon.
  • Why did it happen? In this, you will underline the main reason behind the occurrence of the event.
  • What did you do? While answering this question, you will highlight all the actions taken by you.
  • Who was present? In this, you will highlight all the people that were present during the event.
  • What were the major outcomes? In this, you will underline the results of the actions that were taken by you.

Using these questions, you will provide complete background information about an incident as well as a factual description of the event you want to reflect upon.

Stage 2: Feelings

The second step in Gibbs’ reflective cycle is an analysis of your feelings where you can describe your thoughts as well as feelings in detail to reflect on the corresponding experience of your feelings. You can reflect on this phase on the basis of a few assisting questions given below:

  • What did you feel? In this section, you will highlight your feelings during the experience.
  • Why did you feel this way? You will highlight the major reasons behind feeling the way you were feeling.
  • How did other external factors influence your feelings? In this section, you will underline the positive or negative influence of other external factors such as the environment, and other involved people on your feelings.
  • How did other internal factors influence your feelings? In this section, you will highlight the influence of various internal factors such as mindset, attitude, and physical or mental health.

These questions will help you to describe your feelings and the way in detail and will also assist in making the reader understand your emotional aspect from the incident you are reflecting upon.

Stage 3: Evaluation

In the evaluation phase, you get a chance to properly evaluate what worked well and what didn't work well. This phase includes the evaluation of experiences from both good as well as bad points, allowing you to mentally create a report of the experience. Below given are the questions that can be answered in this phase

  • What worked well? In this, you will highlight the positive outcomes of your actions throughout the experience.
  • What didn't work well? This will highlight all the negative outcomes of your actions taken by you throughout the experience.
  • What did you contribute? Through this question, you will highlight your contribution to the whole experience.
  • What did others contribute? While answering this question, you will highlight the actions of others that were involved in the situation.
  • What was missing? In this, you will highlight the actions that were missing in the experience as per your opinion.

Based on these questions, you can honestly and objectively evaluate the past situation which will also help you in setting a base for future actions.

Elaboration of Gibbs reflective cycle

Stage 4: Analysis

In an analysis phase, you can make sense of a whole situation and determine the exact meaning of a situation along with the reasons for its success or failure. Some helpful questions for the analysis phase of Gibbs’ reflective cycle include

  • Why did things not work well? In this, you will point out the reason as per your knowledge that contributed to the failures of your actions in your experience.
  • Why did things go well? Through this section, you will highlight the reasons behind the success of your actions.
  • What is the exact meaning that we can drive from a situation? While answering this question, you will highlight the overall analysis of the situation.

Based on the analysis, you can get a clear picture of the situation and ensure that every aspect of the situation is covered and understood meticulously.

Stage 5: Conclusion

After a proper situation analysis, you can also conclude the whole situation by reflecting on your learnings. In this phase, you can highlight changes that you need to make to your actions while dealing with future situations. In this phase, a list of questions includes

  • What did you learn? In this, you will highlight all of your main learnings of the situation.
  • What skills do you need to gain to handle situations more effectively? Through this, you will highlight the requirements of the skills for handling the situation better in the future.
  • What else could you have done to deal with situations differently? In this, you will highlight the alternative actions that you could have taken to respond to the same situation in a different manner.

After the analysis, in the conclusion phase, using the above questions, you will clearly outline your learnings and the skills gained through the experience.

Stage 6: Action plan

In the action plan stage in Gibbs’ reflective cycle, you can plan to deal with future situations. It is an important phase of this reflective cycle as this phase helps to determine ways to deal with similar situations in the future and actions that you need to take to improve your ability to deal with various situations. Some questions that can be considered in this stage include

  • How will you deal with this situation more effectively in the future? In this, you will highlight the actions that you have thought of that will help you in dealing with a similar situation differently in the future.
  • How will you develop your skills and abilities to deal with similar situations? In this situation, you will highlight the methods in which you will develop the skills for dealing with situations more effectively.

After understanding the cycle, let us now take an example of reflective practice in health education to reflect on the learning situation using Gibbs’ reflective cycle.

Gibbs’ reflective cycle example in health education

Case assessment - This reflective example will highlight the experience of students in a group task of completing a health project. In this, a student will reflect upon a group task assigned to students during their MSc in health practice.

While doing my MSc in health practice, I was required to engage in various group work assignments and during a certain group work task, my team members decided to divide tasks among group members. All team members encouraged me to divide the tasks among the team. I divided tasks among team members according to their knowledge regarding various healthcare practices to ensure that all tasks are completed within a set deadline. All team members encouraged me to divide the tasks among the team. I divided tasks among team members according to their knowledge regarding various healthcare practices to ensure that all tasks are completed within a set deadline. However, I failed to consider the risk of various contingencies in completing projects and the same occurred when one of our team members was hospitalized due to some health emergency which resulted in a lack of task completion assigned to that team member. My whole team was present when I got a call from the injured team member about the accident that occurred to him. This then resulted in an increased burden to complete tasks among team members and failure to complete a task on time.

Before beginning the health project, I was very confident regarding my team management capabilities. I felt that our team will be able to complete assigned tasks on time due to my strong knowledge and abilities. I was already feeling very guilty that our project got delayed because of my lack of planning but the external factors made me feel even worse. Other than that, I felt like it was my overconfidence that made me feel more guilty because things did not work as planned.

During the group health project, a thing that worked well was the effort of team members to complete work within the extended deadline was cooperation as well as motivation among all team members. However, I believe that the hospitalization of one team member resulted in a lack of task completion on time. I felt that contingency planning is one most important requirement in a team project which was missing in this project. Thus, I believe that I am also responsible for the bad repercussions of this situation as I failed to properly plan and did not consider the risks of contingencies in a group. But still, till the end, everyone contributed effectively and did not lose hope till the end and gave their best.

I think the major reasons behind the successful completion were group efforts, cooperation abilities, self-identification of strengths, effective division of tasks, and ability to help others. However, the only thing that created a problem in completing a project is a lack of time management and planning capabilities. Through this whole experience, I believe that I need to focus on improving my time management skills as well as leading the ability to effectively manage group tasks.

After getting into this group health project, I got to know that time management and contingency planning are important skills that every project manager needs to possess to effectively manage group tasks. I also found that team management is possible only through the cooperation of team members as well as their effort to give the best results to a team project. I learned that as a project manager, it is always better to have a contingency plan ready for implementation than to develop one as risk is taking its toll (Heimann, J. F. 2000). However, I found that various problems can arise in a group task which could be managed effectively by making contingency plans for such situations in advance. I would have prepared contingency plans in the beginning and I believe that it would have helped me in dealing with situations differently.

In order to deal with this situation in the future, I have decided that I will use various time management tools such as PERT and CPM while planning various group tasks to keep separate times for various contingencies. For enhancing my time management and planning skills, I have decided to use time management skills such as making time tables and assigning time blocks for each task. If a similar situation occurs again in the future, I will ensure that in the planning phase only, I take time for contingency planning and plan things accordingly.

How to reference Gibbs reflective cycle?

To reference Gibbs' reflective cycle, include the author's name "Gibbs" and the publication year (if available) in parentheses. For instance, in APA style, it would be: (Gibbs, 1988). If you use a direct quote, add the page number as well.

Can Gibbs' Reflective Model be used in any profession?

Yes, the model is versatile and applicable in various professions and fields, including education, healthcare, social work, and more.

What are the disadvantages of Gibb's reflective cycle?

Gibbs' reflective cycle lacks a strong theoretical foundation and may not suit complex or long-term learning experiences. Some of you may even find its structured approach restrictive that could potentially overlook unique aspects of individual experiences. Additionally, it may not be universally applicable to various learning contexts.

Previous Model

Markkanen, P., Välimäki, M., Anttila, M., & Kuuskorpi, M. (2020). A reflective cycle: Understanding challenging situations in a school setting. Educational Research, 62(1), 46-62. https://doi.org/10.1080/00131881.2020.1711790

Smith, J., & Roberts, R. (2015). Reflective Practice. Vital Signs For Nurses, 222-230. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119139119.ch14

Heimann, J. F. (2000). Contingency planning as a necessity. Paper presented at Project Management Institute Annual Seminars & Symposium, Houston, TX. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute.

Facebook

Copyright © 2023 CrowJack. All Rights Reserved

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

You are here

Moscow downtown historic district.

  • Location: Moscow Idaho Regional Essays: Idaho Latah County Architect: Robert H. Barton Leonidas McCartor Michael Shields William J. McConnell James McGuire Milburn Kenworthy Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

What's Nearby

Wendy R. McClure, " Moscow Downtown Historic District ", [ Moscow , Idaho ], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ID-01-057-0003 . Last accessed: March 9, 2024.

Permissions and Terms of Use

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

According to historians who traveled throughout North Idaho at the turn of the twentieth century to interpret the early histories and future viability of the region’s towns, Moscow was a community where the early “pioneers got it right.” In 1903, visiting historians observed a thriving town in the center of a rich agricultural valley, where commercial development significantly outpaced resident population growth. They noted that, here, in contrast to other pioneer settlements, railroad companies accepted early settlers’ geographic choice for the town center rather than forcing the town to move the commercial districts to accommodate railroad interests. Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city.

Multiple conditions favored early Moscow’s capacity to achieve stability and prosperity as a business center during its formative years. The region’s geography was naturally accommodating of human habitation. For hundreds of years “Tatkinmah,” the “valley of the spotted deer” in which Moscow is located, served as a seasonal meeting grounds for tribal peoples including the Nez Perce, Coeur d’Alene, and Palouse, who frequented the area to harvest camas roots, trade, and race horses. Early settlers benefitted from ease of access to the region afforded by the Nez Perce Trail, which climbed two thousand feet from the tribe’s winter home in the Snake River Valley. In 1871, the first wave of homesteaders ascended the trail and claimed land in what they called “Paradise Valley,” a landscape of rich soil, bucolic grassy hills, and gently flowing streams. As farm families in pursuit of a permanent home, they brought early stability to the area and a need for a commercial marketplace. Moscow’s formative years also benefitted from the foresight and generosity of four homesteaders and businessmen (Almon Lieuallen, James Deakin, Henry McGregor, and John Russell), who each donated 30 acres of their intersecting claims to establish the initial townsite and commercial center. From the start, they established a climate for community stability by cultivating commercial enterprises along Main Street. Their motivations differed from those of fortunes seekers throughout the west, who temporarily populated, and exploited, early western settlements and then moved on.

Given its central location within a highly productive agricultural landscape, downtown Moscow quickly expanded from its humble beginnings into a booming regional marketplace for outlying communities and farmsteads. In 1885, the railroad arrived downtown, assuring Moscow’s role as a regional shipping point. Equally vital to the commercial district’s economic well-being, was the territorial legislature’s 1888 decision to locate the University of Idaho in Moscow. The combined economic stimuli afforded by agriculture, railroad linkage, and education produced downtown Moscow’s most significant period of commercial development. All downtown buildings constructed between 1888 and 1893 were either retail establishments or banks; over one-third of buildings designated as “contributing” to Moscow’s National Historic Downtown District were built in this period. Their developers, which included William McConnell, Robert H. Barton, and Michael Shields, were among Moscow’s most influential local businessmen. In architectural stature and purpose, these buildings remain unsurpassed by later periods of downtown development.

In 1891, William McConnell and his partner, James McGuire, erected the McConnell-McGuire Building, a three-story department store on the southeast corner of First and Main Streets. The physical heart of downtown during this period, however, developed at the intersection of Fourth and Main Streets, where a prominent commercial building was constructed at each corner between 1889 and 1891. All of the structures were built of brick, as required by an 1891 city ordinance regulating fire safety. The 1891 Skattaboe Block, originally constructed on the southwest corner of the intersection in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, was modified at the street level in the 1980s. The Hotel Moscow, a replacement building following a catastrophic fire in 1890, was also designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Across the street on the northeast corner, Leonidas McCartor erected two mixed-use buildings in the Romanesque Revival style in 1891 and 1896, respectively. The 1891 building initially served as Farmer’s Bank before becoming Moscow’s City Hall in 1900, and it served in that capacity until the mid-twentieth century. Use of the Italianate style for downtown buildings was also relatively common as in the Shields Building on the intersection’s southeast corner. Michael Shields developed the Shields Building North as Moscow’s first three-story brick building with an elevator in 1889. The building has since lost some of its original ornamentation and has been modified at the street level.

Mirroring national economic trends, downtown development and construction activity paused during the economic panic of 1893. The national recession led to a slowdown in new construction and the upper floors of several department stores were converted from retail space to offices and apartments between 1893 and 1900. Main Street’s growth resumed in tandem with the country’s economic recovery. Twenty percent of the downtown district’s current inventory of buildings was built between 1900 and World War I. The majority are one- and two-part, block-style commercial buildings. They are smaller in scale and simpler in their detailing than buildings associated with downtown’s peak period. The Kenworthy Theater, a vaudeville and motion picture venue, is a notable exception. Between World War I and World War II, downtown continued to infill with brick and concrete block buildings designed in period-appropriate Art Deco and Spanish Mission styles. Both downtown movie theaters exhibit Art Deco influences and remain popular destinations for cultural entertainment and community events.

Typical of downtowns throughout the country during the post–World War II period, retail businesses and buildings along Moscow’s Main Street suffered from the erosive effects of highway traffic and shopping mall construction. A downtown revitalization initiative in 1980, featuring highway rerouting, streetscape improvements, and construction of a public plaza at the downtown’s core intersection at 4th and Main, helped to re-establish Main Street as a center for public life. The historic integrity of even the most prominent downtown buildings has been compromised, and many bear the marks of storefront modifications intended to forestall retail decline. Collectively, however, they provide a palimpsest of inherited culture and visitors to Moscow’s Main Street need only look up from street level at the brick buildings to connect with late-nineteenth-century community builders who had envisioned downtown Moscow as a bustling regional marketplace.

Attebury, J. Building Idaho: An Architectural History. Moscow: University of Idaho Press, 1991.

David, H. “Moscow at the Turn of the Century.” Moscow, ID: Local History Paper #6, Latah County Historical Society, 1979.

Hibbard, Don, “McConnell-McGuire Building,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1977. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, “Moscow Downtown Historic District,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2005. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, and D. Krae, “Kenworthy Theater,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2001. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Monroe, J. Moscow: Living and Learning on the Palouse , Charleston, SC: Making of America Series, Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Otness, L. A Great Good Country: A Guide to Historic Moscow and Latah County, Idaho . Moscow, ID: Local History Paper # 8, Latah County Historical Society, 1983.

Western Historical Publishing Company. An Illustrated History of North Idaho: embracing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai and Shoshone Counties, State of Idaho . Spokane, WA: Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903.

Wright, Patricia, “Hotel Moscow,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1978. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Writing Credits

  • Location: Moscow, Idaho Regional Overviews: Latah County Architect: Robert H. Barton Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

Consuunt

  • Your Project
  • MoSCoW Method

What is the MoSCoW Method?

The MoSCoW Method is a prioritization tool that helps professionals in managing their time and effort .

To do so, it proposes to classify the importance of the different characteristics of a product (or a Project) according to their importance .

Its name is an acronym of the 4 Prioritization Categories proposed (adding two “o”):

  • M ust Have .
  • S hould Have .
  • C ould Have .
  • W on’t Have .

Four Prioritization Categories

Must Have : Essential Requirements that the product or project must have.

  • Critical Features without replacement.

Should Have : Important desired Requirements for the product or project.

  • They can be substituted if necessary.

Could Have : Improvements to the product or project.

  • There are different alternatives.

Won’t have : Characteristics agreed not to be adopted .

  • No one will waste time implementing them.

Let’s see the first example:

MoSCoW Method example

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

Imagine that you have been hired to create a Website for a Law firm.

They want a professional Site where people can Register and, once inside, track their court cases .

Since you want to deliver the best possible Site on time, you decide to follow the MoSCoW method .

How does it look like?

Must Have :

  • Solid programming without any bugs.
  • A Solid Register System.
  • A Safe and Reliable personal directory.

Should Have :

  • A Fast Site.
  • An outstanding Design.
  • Notifications sent by e-mail.

Could Have :

  • Custom menus.
  • Suggestions.
  • A Blog section with latest news.

Won’t Have :

  • Paid content.
  • A Public Members section.

As we usually say, this Method may seem obvious.

Then… Why is it important?

Why is the MoSCoW Method important?

Many of professionals end up wasting time , effort and resources on useless task s that are ultimately not essential at all.

Surely you have experienced this situation working in a Team:

  • Everyone spends hours modifying a minor feature and, ultimately, the important thing is missing .

That is why this Method is so important:

  • Because it concentrates your efforts and forces you to think about what is really important .

As you can imagine, this Tool can be employed in practically all kinds of situations.

But when do we especially recommend it?

When should you use the MoSCoW Method?

We highly recommend to use the MoSCoW Method:

  • To put order and prioritization.
  • To avoid wasting time with non-essential touch-ups.
  • In order to meet the Essential Requirements.
  • When the product can have very different characteristics.

Now, let’s see more examples:

MoSCoW Method examples

We have chosen different real examples where the MoSCoW Method can be of great help for the development of certain products.

Let’s begin:

A Wallet - MoSCoW Method example

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

Let’s imagine that you are developing a wallet .

As you know, wallets are very modular products.

They can have:

  • Several or few departments for cards.
  • Coin purse… or not.
  • 1 or 2 bill slots.

There is not a canonical wallet (one that is the benchmark for all the others).

  • That is why you decided to use the MoSCoW Method to develop it.

After some thoughts, you decide that your wallet:

  • 2 bill slots.
  • 8 compartments for credit cards.
  • High resistance materials and sewing.
  • Leather as its main material.
  • A translucid Credit card compartment.
  • A transverse horizontal compartment.
  • A striking color on the inside of the bill slots.
  • Completely black exterior color.
  • One translucid compartment for small photos.
  • A Coin purse.
  • A Passport compartment.

Making a Cake - MoSCoW Method example

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

In this example, we’ll imagine that you are preparing a wedding Cake .

  • You have a very rigid deadline (the wedding day, of course).

In addition, as you also know, Cakes can have lots of variations.

  • We could say they are very modular .

That is why you decide to use the MoSCoW Method.

How does it look?

Well, your Cake:

  • White coating.
  • Two sugar figurines on top.
  • 6 layers of sponge cake inside.
  • Belgian chocolate between the layers.
  • Decorations on the edges
  • Sugar flowers.
  • Chocolate balls.
  • Scattered sugar pearls.
  • Multicolor layers.
  • An excessive amount of decoration.
  • Fruit flavor.

Designing a Poster - MoSCoW Method example

gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

You are now an artist hired to Design a poster for a Rock concert.

Obviously, this is a Design job with infinite variations possible.

  • Also, you have a close deadline to finish it.

No need to mention that you will use the MoSCoW Method.

Finally, the Poster:

  • The name of the Main rock band, very prominent.
  • Images and colors that best suit their style.
  • A typeface that best suits the musical style.
  • An illustration related to Rock in the middle.
  • The name of the rest of the bands that will play.
  • Where and when it will take place.
  • Where you can buy the tickets.
  • Nearby metro and bus stations.
  • The name of the city.
  • The maximum capacity of the stadium
  • At what time each band will play.

Summarizing

The MoSCoW Method is a prioritization tool that helps professionals in managing their time and effort.

It proposes to classify the importance of the different characteristics of a product in 4 Categories :

  • M ust Have.
  • S hould Have.
  • C ould Have.
  • W on’t Have.

Although this Method can be used in all kinds of situations, we highly recommend to use it:

  • When working in a team .
  • In Design tasks .
  • When there is a close deadline .
  • With modular products or projects .
  • Economies of Scale
  • Business Plan for Beginners
  • Business Plan Basics
  • How to write a Business Plan
  • Cash Flow Calculation
  • Raising Funds for a Business
  • 4 C’s of Credit
  • Business Plan Templates
  • Customer Insight
  • Customer Experience
  • Customer Pain Points
  • 4C Marketing Model
  • RATER Model
  • Augmented Product
  • Product Mix
  • Unique Selling Proposition
  • DAGMAR Model
  • Marketing Storytelling
  • Content Marketing
  • Psychographics
  • Barnum Effect
  • Market Segmentation
  • Market Research & Big Data
  • Marketing to Generation Z
  • 4P Marketing Mix
  • 7P Marketing Mix
  • Sales Funnel
  • Loyalty Ladder
  • RACE Planning
  • Push and Pull Marketing
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Marketing Templates
  • Starting your own business
  • From Startup to a Business
  • Entrepreneur FAQs
  • Start your Business Idea
  • Entrepreneur Golden Rules
  • Innovate or Imitate?
  • Design Thinking
  • SCAMPER Model
  • AAR Process
  • Work From Home
  • Growth strategies for Startups
  • VMOST Analysis
  • 3P Framework
  • SOAR Analysis
  • TELOS Analysis
  • 5 C’s of Entrepreneurship
  • Crowdfunding
  • BATNA & ZOPA Negotiation
  • Entrepreneur with no Money
  • Entrepreneurship Templates
  • Strategy vs Tactics
  • Mission and Vision
  • Business Values
  • Value Chain
  • Scenario Planning
  • Porter 6 Forces
  • Bowman’s Strategy Clock
  • GE-McKinsey Matrix
  • Delta Model
  • PEST Analysis
  • PESTEL Analysis
  • SWOT Analysis
  • VRIO Framework
  • Strategy Canvas
  • Competitive Advantages
  • Porter’s Four Corners
  • 5 Ps of Strategy
  • Porter’s Generic Strategies
  • Porter’s Diamond Model
  • Wardley Map
  • Core Competencies
  • Resource Based View
  • Bridges Transition Model
  • CAGE Distance Framework
  • McKinsey’s 3 Horizons
  • Vertical Integration
  • Horizontal Integration
  • Blue Ocean Strategy
  • Red Ocean Strategy
  • Porter 5 Forces
  • Ansoff Matrix
  • McKinsey 7S Framework
  • CATWOE Analysis
  • Strategy Pyramid
  • Bain’s RAPID Framework
  • Balanced Scorecard
  • Resources and Capabilities
  • Strategy of Apple
  • Strategy of Amazon
  • Strategy of Starbucks
  • Strategy Templates
  • Communicate Effectively
  • COIN Conversation Model
  • SCARF Model
  • SBI Feedback Model
  • CEDAR Feedback Model
  • How to behave at a meeting
  • Gibbs’ Reflective Cycle
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • 5E Learning Model
  • 9-Box Performance Grid
  • SEEDS Bias Model
  • Halo Effect
  • Pygmalion Rosenthal Effect
  • Dunning-Kruger Effect
  • How to be an Entrepreneur
  • How to be a Leader
  • Mintzberg Managerial Roles
  • Cog’s Ladder
  • The Peter Principle
  • How to Negotiate
  • Teamwork Skills and Profiles
  • Gantt Chart
  • RACI Matrix
  • Eisenhower Matrix
  • FMEA Process
  • Problem Solving
  • Ishikawa Fishbone diagram
  • 5 Whys Method
  • 8 Disciplines Method
  • ADDIE Model
  • ORAPAPA Method
  • Cynefin Framework
  • Just In Time
  • SMART Goals
  • KISS Principle
  • Birkinshaw’s 4 Dimensions
  • Parkinson’s Law
  • OGSM Framework
  • OKR Methodology
  • APQP Framework
  • Theory of Constraints
  • Success through Organization
  • ADKAR Model
  • Lewin’s Change Model
  • Kotter’s 8-Step Model
  • The Greiner Curve
  • GAP Analysis
  • Planning Templates
  • Mean, Median and Mode
  • Define your Data
  • Pareto Principle 80/20 Rule
  • Decision Matrix
  • Decision Tree
  • TARA Framework
  • Root Cause Analysis
  • Simplex Process
  • Forecasting Methods
  • Product Life Cycle
  • How to use Google Trends
  • Correlation vs Causation

© 2024 - Consuunt .

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details.

IMAGES

  1. The 6 Stages Of Gibbs Reflective Cycle- A Complete Guide

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

  2. Reflective writing

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

  3. Your Essential Guide to Gibbs Reflective Cycle

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

  4. Gibbs' Reflective Cycle explained with lots of Examples

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

  5. Gibbs' reflective cycle

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

  6. SOLUTION: Gibbs' Reflective Cycle the 6 stages

    gibbs reflective cycle ukessays

VIDEO

  1. The Retro Reflective Cycle (5.733)

  2. Reflective Cycle Wheels #cycling #electriccycle #minivlog

  3. Personal Development Plan and Gibbs reflective cycle

  4. Gibbs Reflective Cycle

  5. DIGITAL BUSINESS MODEL

  6. FOUN1501 Group 2 Sub group5 Assignment 2 "Gibbs Reflective Cycle"

COMMENTS

  1. Gibbs' reflective cycle

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  2. Essays tagged as: Gibbs' Reflective Cycle

    Gibbs Reflective Cycle. Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go ...

  3. Reflecting on Individual Professional Practice with Gibbs

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  4. Reflection on Personal Development and Self-Awareness

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  5. Reflective Essay On Patient Encounters Using Gibbs Cycle Nursing Essay

    In this essay, I will reflect upon a experience which I had with a patient using the Gibbs cycle of reflection (Gibbs, 1998) to help to signpost my answer and help the reader to read this essay with ease. Description of the event: During my clinical placement I have encountered a number of patients, each one possessing a unique personality ...

  6. Gibbs Reflective Cycle 1988 Nursing Essay

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  7. Clinical Skills Reflection: Gibb's Model

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  8. Essays tagged as: Gibbs' Reflective Cycle

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well. It covers 6 stages.

  9. Reflection Diagram Of Gibbs Cycle

    The Gibbs Learning Cycle is very popular among the learning model and it is good for reflection of study where it consists of six steps for the whole process. Model of reflection diagram of Gibbs Cycle (Queen Margaret University, 2011) This six steps or stages contain Description, Feelings, Evaluation, Analysis, Conclusion, and Action Plan.

  10. Gibbs' Reflective Cycle

    Overview. Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  11. Incorporating Gibbs Reflective Cycle in a Group Setting

    Incorporating Gibbs Reflective Cycle in a Group Setting. This incident that I would like to analyze using the Gibbs' (1988) reflective cycle happened a few weeks ago. Our group was composed of seven members and meetings were held online using the social media platform. This group was considered as a closed group as we have decided not to take ...

  12. Individual Reflective Report On Gibbs Cycle Of Reflection ...

    The Gibbs cycle of reflection is used in 2 incidences in the report. The first incident is the group project for CLS course on starch and second is the feedback given for the SIM course for the business report. In both of the incidences, problems are evaluated and necessary solutions are taken for the improvements.

  13. Reflective Essay On Pressure Sore Nursing Essay

    Benbow (2006) defines it as areas of localized tissue damage as a result of excess pressure, shearing or friction forces. To reflect on my learning process, I am going to apply Gibbs' reflective model, which is a renowned model in reflective practice. This model requires passing through six stages to complete one reflective cycle.

  14. Gibbs' reflective cycle

    Gibbs' reflective cycle has 6 stages. They are usually given the following headings: 1. Description 2. Feelings 3. Evaluation 4. Analysis 5. Conclusion 6. Action Plan As part of my Overseas Nurse program, I am required to make a reflective essay. This essay is based on my experience in clinical placement in the Operating Theatre.

  15. The ultimate guide for understanding Gibb's Reflective Cycle

    It is a widely prominent reflective cycle that helps individuals to work through past experiences and improve future practices. Gibbs' The reflective cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 with the main aim of structuring individual learnings from past experiences (Markkanen et al., 2020). Effective utilization of this cycle offers a wide ...

  16. Mental Health

    Reflection is an active persistent and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds that support it and the further conclusion to which it tends Dewey (1933).Using Gibbs reflective Cycle, (1988) appendix 1 and Neil Fleming's Vark system, (1987) I will reflect on my experiences on my practise ...

  17. Moscow Downtown Historic District

    Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city. Multiple conditions favored early Moscow's capacity to achieve stability ...

  18. Life cycle assessment of the existing and proposed municipal solid

    The life cycle of waste starts from its generation at a consumer of a good and service, i.e., waste collection at special container sites. This boundary implies the so-called "zero burden" approach (Ekvall et al., 2007), which was used because waste generation remains the same in all the scenarios. In this study, however, waste generation ...

  19. MoSCoW Method

    The MoSCoW Method is a prioritization tool that helps professionals in managing their time and effort.. To do so, it proposes to classify the importance of the different characteristics of a product (or a Project) according to their importance. Its name is an acronym of the 4 Prioritization Categories proposed (adding two "o"):. M ust Have.; S hould Have.; C ould Have.

  20. Incorporating Gibbs Reflective Cycle in a Group Setting

    Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UKEssays.ae. Print Cite This This incident that I would like to analyze using the Gibbs' (1988) reflective cycle happened a few weeks ago.

  21. Gibbs Reflective Cycle 1988 Nursing Essay

    Gibbs Reflective Cycle 1988 Nursing Essay. I am a Paramedic registered with the health professions council and this essay will look reflectively at an incident I attended during the course of my duties. The assignment will look at the moral, ethical and legal aspects of pre-hospital care with which I was challenged during this particular emergency.

  22. Reflective Essay On Patient Encounters Using Gibbs Cycle ...

    Gibbs' Reflective Cycle was developed by Graham Gibbs in 1988 to give structure to learning from experiences. It offers a framework for examining experiences, and given its cyclic nature lends itself particularly well to repeated experiences, allowing you to learn and plan from things that either went well or didn't go well.

  23. Blankenship for Moscow City Council

    [email protected] | 208-494-1755 | P.O. Box 9032 Moscow, Idaho 83843