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The 8 Parts of Speech in English Grammar

Parts of Speech In English

Table of Contents

Introduction.

In English grammar, The fundamental components of language that are essential for constructing meaningful and grammatically correct sentences are known as parts of speech. This article will delve into the eight parts of speech, providing definitions, examples, and insights into their distinct roles within sentences.

What are Parts of Speech?

Parts of Speech Defined

In grammar, parts of speech , also referred to as lexical categories, grammatical categories, or word classes, categorize words based on their linguistic functions. These parts play a crucial role in sentence construction by conveying specific meanings and relationships between words.

In English, there are eight parts of speech:

  • Adjectives.
  • Interjection.
  • Conjunction.

Prepositions

Let’s explore these parts of speech in more detail!

A List of 8 Parts of Speech

Definition: Verbs express actions or states of being within a sentence.

  • She goes to school every day.
  • He writes a diary entry every night.
  • The unicorn exists only in myths.
  • They are happy together.

English has various types of verbs:

A. Action Verbs : Action verbs denote physical or mental actions and are the most common type of verbs. These verbs can be conjugated in simple and continuous tenses

  • She runs in the park every morning. (Simple Present
  • He thought deeply about life. (Simple past)
  • Look at the students are copying the lesson. (Present Continuous)

B. Stative Verbs:  Stative verbs express a state of being or conditions that are not changing or likely to change. In contrast to action verbs, these verbs can’t be conjugated into continuous tenses. It is incorrect to say “The book is belonging to Jane.”

  • The necklace belongs to her.
  • They love each other deeply.
  • He prefers tea to coffee.

C. Linking Verbs: Linking verbs connect the subject of a sentence to a subject complement, which describes or identifies the subject.

  • She is a teacher.
  • The plan seems perfect.
  • They become friends quickly.

D. Helping (Auxiliary) Verbs:   Helping verbs work in conjunction with the main verb to express nuances such as tense, mood, or voice.

  • She has finished her homework.
  • They will come to the party.
  • He is working on a project.

E. Modal Verbs:  Modal verbs express ability, possibility, necessity, or permission.

  • She can swim very well.
  • You must finish your assignment.
  • He may join us later.

F. Transitive Verbs: Transitive verbs require a direct object to complete their meaning.

  • She eats an apple.
  • They built a sandcastle.
  • He reads a book every night.

G. Intransitive Verbs : Intransitive verbs do not require a direct object to convey a complete meaning.

  • She runs every morning.
  • They laughed loudly.
  • He arrived early.

READ MOR ABOUT VERBS

Definition: Nouns represent people, animals, objects, substances, states, events, ideas, and feelings. They function as subjects or objects and can be modified by adjectives.

Here are the major noun characteristics: 

  • Nouns identify people, places, things, or ideas in a sentence.
  • Nouns can serve as subjects, objects, or indirect objects.
  • Nouns can be modified by adjectives or possessive pronouns.
  • Nouns can be singular or plural.

There are different types of nouns:

  • Common Nouns: Refer to general, non-specific entities (e.g., dog, city).
  • Proper Nouns: Refer to specific, unique entities and are capitalized (e.g., John, Paris).
  • Countable Nouns: Can be counted and have both singular and plural forms (e.g., book, books).
  • Uncountable Nouns: Cannot be counted individually and lack a plural form (e.g., water, knowledge).
  • Concrete Nouns: Refer to tangible, physical entities (e.g., table, tree).
  • Abstract Nouns: Refer to intangible concepts or qualities (e.g., love, courage).
  • Collective Nouns: Denote a group or collection of individuals (e.g., team, family).
  • Compound Nouns: Comprise two or more words to express a single concept (e.g., toothpaste, basketball).

Example sentences with nouns:

  • John is my neighbor.
  • lion: The lion roared loudly.
  • table: The table is made of oak.
  • freedom: Freedom is a precious gift.
  • love: Love conquers all.

READ MOR ABOUT NOUNS

Definition: Adjectives describe or specify nouns or pronouns. Examples of adjectives include good, beautiful, nice, my, etc.

  • It’s a good day.
  • She wears a beautiful dress.
  • He has a nice car.
  • This is my house.

READ MORE ABOUT ADJECTIVES

Definition: Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Adverbs often end in -ly as in nicely, beautifully, slowly, etc (formed by adding -ly to an adjective). But that’s not always the case. 

There are various types of adverbs in English:

  • Adverbs of Time: Indicate when an action occurs. ( Today, now, later, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Place: Specify the location of an action. ( Here, there, everywhere, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Manner: Describe how an action is performed. ( Quickly, softly, well, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Frequency: Express how often an action occurs. ( Always, rarely, sometimes, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Degree: Modify the intensity or degree of an adjective or adverb. ( Very, too, quite, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Certainty: Indicate the level of certainty about an action. ( Surely, certainly, maybe, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Purpose: Describe why an action is performed. ( In case, so that, in order to, etc.)

Example sentences with adverbs:

  • She is completely unaware.
  • I never expected this.
  • The book is there on the shelf.
  • She speaks slowly .

READ MORE ABOUT ADVERBS

Definition: Pronouns replace nouns or phrases.

Pronouns can be categorized based on their functions:

  • Example: She, they, it
  • Example: His, hers, theirs
  • Example: Himself, herself, themselves
  • Example: Who, which, that
  • Example: This, these, those

Example sentences with pronouns:

  • I love chocolate.
  • This is for you.
  • He is coming tomorrow.
  • She likes ice cream.
  • It is on the table.

READ MORE ABOUT PRONOUNS

Definition: Prepositions indicate the relationship between nouns and other words in a sentence. A preposition is positioned before a noun or pronoun, creating a phrase that modifies another word within the sentence.

Consequently, a preposition is an integral component of a prepositional phrase, typically functioning either as an adjective or an adverb. 

Below is a compilation of the most frequently used prepositions:

  • in, on, under
  • with, without, beside
  • for, during, after
  • between, among, beyond

Example sentences with prepositions:

  • The cat is in the basket.
  • The plane is above the clouds.
  • She went to the market.
  • This gift is for you.

READ MORE ABOUT PREPOSITIONS

Conjunctions

Definition: Conjunctions connect clauses, sentences, or words.

There are three types of conjunctions in English:

Coordinating Conjunctions:

  • Examples: and, but, or
  • Sentence: She likes tea and coffee.

Correlative Conjunctions:

  • Examples: not only…but also, either…or
  • Sentence: He is not only smart but also diligent.

Subordinating Conjunctions:

  • Examples: although, because, since
  • Sentence: Although it’s raining, we will go out.

More example sentences:

  • She is rich and successful.
  • He is intelligent, but he is shy.
  • Although it’s raining, we will go out.
  • They won because they worked hard.

READ MORE ABOUT CONJUNCTIONS

Interjections

Definition: Interjections express surprise or emotion. Examples of interjections include oh, wow, alas, yippee, etc.

  • oh!: Oh! That was unexpected.
  • Good Lord: Good Lord, what a mess!

READ MORE ABOUT INTERJECTIONS

Analyzing Sentence Structure (Parts of Speech) 

In the following examples, we will analyze the structure of sentences to identify the different parts of speech used.

Sample Sentences:

  • My (adjective) friend (noun) speaks (verb) English (noun) fluently (adverb).
  • Oh! (interjection) I (pronoun) went (verb) to (preposition) school (noun) and (conjunction) I (pronoun) met (verb) Fred (noun).

In conclusion, parts of speech serve as crucial categories that describe the distinct roles words play within a sentence. A comprehensive grasp of these categories empowers you to discern how words function, fostering a deeper understanding of language nuances. 

1. How many parts of speech are used in English? In English, there are traditionally eight parts of speech.

2. Are there 9 parts of speech? No, there are traditionally eight parts of speech in English.

3. Are articles and determiners parts of speech? Yes, articles and determiners are considered parts of speech. They fall under the category of adjectives.

4. How do you identify parts of speech in a sentence? To identify parts of speech in a sentence, analyze the function of each word. Determine whether it expresses an action (verb), describes a noun (adjective), modifies a verb, adjective, or adverb (adverb), replaces a noun (pronoun), connects words or groups of words (conjunction), shows a relationship (preposition), or expresses strong emotion (interjection).

lesson english 8 parts of speech

Literacy Ideas

Parts of Speech: The Ultimate Guide for Students and Teachers

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This article is part of the ultimate guide to language for teachers and students. Click the buttons below to view these.

What are Parts of Speech ?

Just as a skilled bricklayer must get to grips with the trowel, brick hammer, tape measure, and spirit level, the student-writer must develop a thorough understanding of the tools of their trade too.

In English, words can be categorized according to their common syntactic function in a sentence, i.e. the job they perform.

We call these different categories Parts of Speech . Understanding the various parts of speech and how they work has several compelling benefits for our students.

Without first acquiring a firm grasp of the various parts of speech, students will struggle to fully comprehend how language works. This is essential not only for the development of their reading comprehension but their writing skills too.

Visual Writing

Parts of speech are the core building blocks of grammar . To understand how a language works at a sentence and a whole-text level, we must first master parts of speech.

In English, we can identify eight of these individual parts of speech, and these will provide the focus for our Complete Guide to Parts of Speech .

THE EIGHT PARTS OF SPEECH (Click to jump to each section)

A complete unit on teaching figurative language.

Parts of Speech | figurative language Unit 1 | Parts of Speech: The Ultimate Guide for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

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parts of speech, what is a noun?

Often the first word a child speaks will be a noun, for example, Mum , Dad , cow , dog , etc.

Nouns are naming words, and, as most school kids can recite, they are the names of people, places, and things . But, what isn’t as widely understood by many of our students is that nouns can be further classified into more specific categories. 

These categories are:

Common Nouns

Proper nouns, concrete nouns, abstract nouns, collective nouns, countable nouns, uncountable nouns.

All nouns can be classified as either common or proper .

Common nouns are the general names of people, places, and things. They are groups or classes on their own, rather than specific types of people, places, or things such as we find in proper nouns.

Common nouns can be further classified as abstract or concrete – more on this shortly!

Some examples of common nouns include:

People: teacher, author, engineer, artist, singer.

Places: country, city, town, house, garden.

Things: language, trophy, magazine, movie, book.

Proper nouns are the specific names for people, places, and things. Unlike common nouns, which are always lowercase, proper nouns are capitalized. This makes them easy to identify in a text.

Where possible, using proper nouns in place of common nouns helps bring precision to a student’s writing.

Some examples of proper nouns include:

People: Mrs Casey, J.K. Rowling, Nikola Tesla, Pablo Picasso, Billie Eilish.

Places: Australia, San Francisco, Llandovery, The White House, Gardens of Versailles.

Things: Bulgarian, The World Cup, Rolling Stone, The Lion King, The Hunger Games.

Nouns Teaching Activity: Common vs Proper Nouns

  • Provide students with books suitable for their current reading level.
  • Instruct students to go through a page or two and identify all the nouns.
  • Ask students to sort these nouns into two lists according to whether they are common nouns or proper nouns.

As mentioned, all common and proper nouns can be further classified as either concrete or abstract .

A concrete noun is any noun that can be experienced through one of the five senses. In other words, if you can see, smell, hear, taste, or touch it, then it’s a concrete noun.

Some examples of concrete nouns include:

Abstract nouns refer to those things that can’t be experienced or identified through the five senses.

They are not physical things we can perceive but intangible concepts and ideas, qualities and states.

Some examples of abstract nouns include:

Nouns Teaching Activity: Concrete Vs. Abstract Nouns

  • Provide students with a book suitable for their current reading level.
  • Instruct students to go through a page or two and identify all the nouns (the lists from Practice Activity #1 may be suitable).
  • This time, ask students to sort these nouns into two lists according to whether they are concrete or abstract nouns.

A collective noun is the name of a group of people or things. That is, a collective noun always refers to more than one of something.

Some examples of collective nouns include:

People: a board of directors, a team of football players, a cast of actors, a band of musicians, a class of students.

Places: a range of mountains, a suite of rooms, a union of states, a chain of islands.

Things: a bale of hay, a constellation of stars, a bag of sweets, a school of fish, a flock of seagulls.

Countable nouns are nouns that refer to things that can be counted. They come in two flavors: singular and plural .

In their singular form, countable nouns are often preceded by the article, e.g. a , an , or the .

In their plural form, countable nouns are often preceded by a number. They can also be used in conjunction with quantifiers such as a few and many .

Some examples of countable nouns include:

COUNTABLE NOUNS EXAMPLES

Also known as mass nouns, uncountable nouns are, as their name suggests, impossible to count. Abstract ideas such as bravery and compassion are uncountable, as are things like liquid and bread .

These types of nouns are always treated in the singular and usually do not have a plural form. 

They can stand alone or be used in conjunction with words and phrases such as any , some , a little , a lot of , and much .

Some examples of uncountable nouns include:

UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS EXAMPLES

Nouns teaching activity: how many can you list .

  • Organize students into small groups to work collaboratively.
  • Challenge students to list as many countable and uncountable nouns as they can in ten minutes.
  • To make things more challenging, stipulate that there must be an uncountable noun and a countable noun to gain a point.
  • The winning group is the one that scores the most points.

Parts of Speech | parts of speech square 1 | Parts of Speech: The Ultimate Guide for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Without a verb, there is no sentence! Verbs are the words we use to represent both internal and external actions or states of being. Without a verb, nothing happens.

Parts of Speech - What is a verb?

There are many different types of verbs. Here, we will look at five important verb forms organised according to the jobs they perform:

Dynamic Verbs

Stative verbs, transitive verbs, intransitive verbs, auxiliary verbs.

Each verb can be classified as being either an action or a stative verb.

Dynamic or action verbs describe the physical activity performed by the subject of a sentence. This type of verb is usually the first we learn as children. 

For example, run , hit , throw , hide , eat , sleep , watch , write , etc. are all dynamic verbs, as is any action performed by the body.

Let’s see a few examples in sentences:

  • I jogged around the track three times.
  • She will dance as if her life depends on it.
  • She took a candy from the bag, unwrapped it, and popped it into her mouth.

If a verb doesn’t describe a physical activity, then it is a stative verb.

Stative verbs refer to states of being, conditions, or mental processes. Generally, we can classify stative verbs into four types:

  • Emotions/Thoughts

Some examples of stative verbs include: 

Senses: hurt, see, smell, taste, hear, etc.

Emotions: love, doubt, desire, remember, believe, etc.

Being: be, have, require, involve, contain, etc.

Possession: want, include, own, have, belong, etc.

Here are some stative verbs at work in sentences:

  • That is one thing we can agree on.
  • I remember my first day at school like it was yesterday.
  • The university requires students to score at least 80%.
  • She has only three remaining.

Sometimes verbs can fit into more than one category, e.g., be , have , look , see , e.g.,

  • She looks beautiful. (Stative)
  • I look through the telescope. (Dynamic)

Each action or stative verb can also be further classified as transitive or intransitive .

A transitive verb takes a direct object after it. The object is the noun, noun phrase, or pronoun that has something done to it by the subject of the sentence.

We see this in the most straightforward English sentences, i.e., the Subject-Verb-Object or SVO sentence. 

Here are two examples to illustrate. Note: the subject of each sentence is underlined, and the transitive verbs are in bold.

  • The teacher answered the student’s questions.
  • She studies languages at university.
  • My friend loves cabbage.

Most sentences in English employ transitive verbs.

An intransitive verb does not take a direct object after it. It is important to note that only nouns, noun phrases, and pronouns can be classed as direct objects. 

Here are some examples of intransitive verbs – notice how none of these sentences has direct objects after their verbs.

  • Jane’s health improved .
  • The car ran smoothly.
  • The school opens at 9 o’clock.

Auxiliary verbs, also known as ‘helping’ verbs, work with other verbs to affect the meaning of a sentence. They do this by combining with a main verb to alter the sentence’s tense, mood, or voice.

Auxiliary verbs will frequently use not in the negative.

There are relatively few auxiliary verbs in English. Here is a list of the main ones:

  • be (am, are, is, was, were, being)
  • do (did, does, doing)
  • have (had, has, having)

Here are some examples of auxiliary verbs (in bold) in action alongside a main verb (underlined).

She is working as hard as she can.

  • You must not eat dinner until after five o’clock.
  • The parents may come to the graduation ceremony.

The Subject-Auxiliary Inversion Test

To test whether or not a verb is an auxiliary verb, you can use the Subject-Auxiliary Inversion Test .

  • Take the sentence, e.g:
  • Now, invert the subject and the suspected auxiliary verb to see if it creates a question.

Is she working as hard as she can?

  • Can it take ‘not’ in the negative form?

She is not working as hard as she can.

  • If the answer to both of these questions is yes, you have an auxiliary verb. If not, you have a full verb.

Verbs Teaching Activity: Identify the Verbs

  • Instruct students to go through an appropriate text length (e.g., paragraph, page, etc.) and compile a list of verbs.
  • In groups, students should then discuss and categorize each verb according to whether they think they are dynamic or stative, transitive or intransitive, and/or auxiliary verbs.

The job of an adjective is to modify a noun or a pronoun. It does this by describing, quantifying, or identifying the noun or pronoun. Adjectives help to make writing more interesting and specific. Usually, the adjective is placed before the word it modifies.

lesson english 8 parts of speech

As with other parts of speech, not all adjectives are the same. There are many different types of adjectives and, in this article, we will look at:

Descriptive Adjectives

  • Degrees of Adjectives

Quantitative Adjectives

Demonstrative adjectives, possessive adjectives, interrogative adjectives, proper adjectives.

Descriptive adjectives are what most students think of first when asked what an adjective is. Descriptive adjectives tell us something about the quality of the noun or pronoun in question. For this reason, they are sometimes referred to as qualitative adjectives .

Some examples of this type of adjective include:

  • hard-working

In sentences, they look like this:

  • The pumpkin was enormous .
  • It was an impressive feat of athleticism I ever saw.
  • Undoubtedly, this was an exquisite vase.
  • She faced some tough competition.

Degrees of Adjectives 

Descriptive adjectives have three degrees to express varying degrees of intensity and to compare one thing to another. These degrees are referred to as positive , comparative , and superlative .

The positive degree is the regular form of the descriptive adjective when no comparison is being made, e.g., strong .

The comparative degree is used to compare two people, places, or things, e.g., stronger .

There are several ways to form the comparative, methods include:

  • Adding more or less before the adjective
  • Adding -er to the end of one syllable adjectives
  • For two-syllable adjectives ending in y , change the y to an i and add -er to the end.

The superlative degree is typically used when comparing three or more things to denote the upper or lowermost limit of a quality, e.g., strongest .

There are several ways to form the superlative, including:

  • Adding most or least before the adjective
  • Adding -est to the end of one syllable adjectives
  • For two-syllable adjectives ending in y , change the y to an i and add -est to the end.

There are also some irregular adjectives of degree that follow no discernible pattern that must be learned off by students, e.g., good – better – best .

Let’s take a look at these degrees of adjectives in their different forms.

Let’s take a quick look at some sample sentences:

  • It was a beautiful example of kindness. 

Comparative

  • The red is nice, but the green is prettier .

Superlative

  • This mango is the most delicious fruit I have ever tastiest. 

Quantitive adjectives provide information about how many or how much of the noun or pronoun.

Some quantitive adjectives include:

  • She only ate half of her sandwich.
  • This is my first time here.
  • I would like three slices, please.
  • There isn’t a single good reason to go.
  • There aren’t many places like it.
  • It’s too much of a good thing.
  • I gave her a whole box of them.

A demonstrative adjective identifies or emphasizes a noun’s place in time or space. The most common demonstrative adjectives are this , that , these , and those .

Here are some examples of demonstrative adjectives in use:

  • This boat is mine.
  • That car belongs to her.
  • These shoes clash with my dress.
  • Those people are from Canada.

Possessive adjectives show ownership, and they are sometimes confused with possessive pronouns.

The most common possessive adjectives are my , your , his , her , our , and their .

Students need to be careful not to confuse these with possessive pronouns such as mine , yours , his (same in both contexts), hers , ours , and theirs .

Here are some examples of possessive adjectives in sentences:

  • My favorite food is sushi.
  • I would like to read your book when you have finished it.
  • I believe her car is the red one.
  • This is their way of doing things.
  • Our work here is done.

Interrogative adjectives ask questions, and, in common with many types of adjectives, they are always followed by a noun. Basically, these are the question words we use to start questions. Be careful however, interrogative adjectives modify nouns. If the word after the question word is a verb, then you have an interrogative adverb on hand.

Some examples of interrogative adjectives include what , which , and whose .

Let’s take a look at these in action:

  • What drink would you like?
  • Which car should we take?
  • Whose shoes are these?

Please note: Whose can also fit into the possessive adjective category too.

We can think of proper adjectives as the adjective form of proper nouns – remember those? They were the specific names of people, places, and things and need to be capitalized.

Let’s take the proper noun for the place America . If we wanted to make an adjective out of this proper noun to describe something, say, a car we would get ‘ American car’.

Let’s take a look at another few examples:

  • Joe enjoyed his cup of Ethiopian coffee.
  • My favorite plays are Shakespearean tragedies.
  • No doubt about it, Fender guitars are some of the best in the world.
  • The Mona Lisa is a fine example of Renaissance art.

Though it may come as a surprise to some, articles are also adjectives as, like all adjectives, they modify nouns. Articles help us determine a noun’s specification. 

For example, ‘a’ and ‘an’ are used in front of an unspecific noun, while ‘the’ is used when referring to a specific noun.

Let’s see some articles as adjectives in action!

  • You will find an apple inside the cupboard.
  • This is a car.
  • The recipe is a family secret.

Adjectives Teaching Activity: Types of Adjective Tally

  • Choose a suitable book and assign an appropriate number of pages or length of a chapter for students to work with.
  • Students work their way through each page, tallying up the number of each type of adjective they can identify using a table like the one below:
  • Note how degrees of adjective has been split into comparative and superlative. The positive forms will take care of in the descriptive category.
  • You may wish to adapt this table to exclude the easier categories to identify, such as articles and demonstrative, for example.

Parts of Speech - What is an adverb?

Traditionally, adverbs are defined as those words that modify verbs, but they do so much more than that. They can be used not only to describe how verbs are performed but also to modify adjectives, other adverbs, clauses, prepositions, or entire sentences.

With such a broad range of tasks at the feet of the humble adverb, it would be impossible to cover every possibility in this article alone. However, there are five main types of adverbs our students should familiarize themselves with. These are:

Adverbs of Manner

Adverbs of time, adverbs of frequency, adverbs of place, adverbs of degree.

Adverbs of manner describe how or the way in which something happens or is done. This type of adverb is often the first type taught to students. Many of these end with -ly . Some common examples include happily , quickly , sadly , slowly , and fast .

Here are a few taster sentences employing adverbs of manner:

  • She cooks Chinese food well .
  • The children played happily together.
  • The students worked diligently on their projects.
  • Her mother taught her to cross the road carefully .
  • The date went badly .

Adverbs of time indicate when something happens. Common adverbs of time include before , now , then , after , already , immediately , and soon .

Here are some sentences employing adverbs of time:

  • I go to school early on Wednesdays.
  • She would like to finish her studies eventually .
  • Recently , Sarah moved to Bulgaria.
  • I have already finished my homework.
  • They have been missing training lately .

While adverbs of time deal with when something happens, adverbs of frequency are concerned with how often something happens. Common adverbs of frequency include always , frequently , sometimes , seldom , and never .

Here’s what they look like in sentences:

  • Harry usually goes to bed around ten.
  • Rachel rarely eats breakfast in the morning.
  • Often , I’ll go home straight after school.
  • I occasionally have ketchup on my pizza.
  • She seldom goes out with her friends.

Adverbs of place, as the name suggests, describe where something happens or where it is. They can refer to position, distance, or direction. Some common adverbs of place include above , below , beside , inside , and anywhere .

Check out some examples in the sentences below:

  • Underneath the bridge, there lived a troll.
  • There were pizzerias everywhere in the city.
  • We walked around the park in the pouring rain.
  • If the door is open, then go inside .
  • When I am older, I would like to live nearby .

Adverbs of degree express the degree to which or how much of something is done. They can also be used to describe levels of intensity. Some common adverbs of degree include barely , little , lots , completely , and entirely .

Here are some adverbs of degree at work in sentences:

  • I hardly noticed her when she walked into the room.
  • The little girl had almost finished her homework.
  • The job was completely finished.
  • I was so delighted to hear the good news.
  • Jack was totally delighted to see Diane after all these years.

Adverb Teaching Activity: The Adverb Generator

  • Give students a worksheet containing a table divided into five columns. Each column bears a heading of one of the different types of adverbs ( manner , time , frequency , place , degree ).
  • Challenge each group to generate as many different examples of each adverb type and record these in the table.
  • The winning group is the one with the most adverbs. As a bonus, or tiebreaker, task the students to make sentences with some of the adverbs.

Parts of speech - what is a pronoun?

Pronouns are used in place of a specific noun used earlier in a sentence. They are helpful when the writer wants to avoid repetitive use of a particular noun such as a name. For example, in the following sentences, the pronoun she is used to stand for the girl’s name Mary after it is used in the first sentence. 

Mary loved traveling. She had been to France, Thailand, and Taiwan already, but her favorite place in the world was Australia. She had never seen an animal quite as curious-looking as the duck-billed platypus.

We also see her used in place of Mary’s in the above passage. There are many different pronouns and, in this article, we’ll take a look at:

Subject Pronouns

Object pronouns, possessive pronouns, reflexive pronouns, intensive pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, interrogative pronouns.

Subject pronouns are the type of pronoun most of us think of when we hear the term pronoun . They operate as the subject of a verb in a sentence. They are also known as personal pronouns.

The subject pronouns are:

Here are a few examples of subject pronouns doing what they do best:

  • Sarah and I went to the movies last Thursday night.
  • That is my pet dog. It is an Irish Wolfhound.
  • My friends are coming over tonight, they will be here at seven.
  • We won’t all fit into the same car.
  • You have done a fantastic job with your grammar homework!

Object pronouns operate as the object of a verb, or a preposition, in a sentence. They act in the same way as object nouns but are used when it is clear what the object is.

The object pronouns are:

Here are a few examples of object pronouns in sentences:

  • I told you , this is a great opportunity for you .
  • Give her some more time, please.
  • I told her I did not want to do it .
  • That is for us .
  • Catherine is the girl whom I mentioned in my letter.

Possessive pronouns indicate ownership of a noun. For example, in the sentence:

These books are mine .

The word mine stands for my books . It’s important to note that while possessive pronouns look similar to possessive adjectives, their function in a sentence is different.

The possessive pronouns are:

Let’s take a look at how these are used in sentences:

  • Yours is the yellow jacket.
  • I hope this ticket is mine .
  • The train that leaves at midnight is theirs .
  • Ours is the first house on the right.
  • She is the person whose opinion I value most.
  • I believe that is his .

Reflexive pronouns are used in instances where the object and the subject are the same. For example, in the sentence, she did it herself , the words she and herself refer to the same person.

The reflexive pronoun forms are:

Here are a few more examples of reflexive pronouns at work:

  • I told myself that numerous times.
  • He got himself a new computer with his wages.
  • We will go there ourselves .
  • You must do it yourself .
  • The only thing to fear is fear itself .

This type of pronoun can be used to indicate emphasis. For example, when we write, I spoke to the manager herself , the point is made that we talked to the person in charge and not someone lower down the hierarchy. 

Similar to the reflexive pronouns above, we can easily differentiate between reflexive and intensive pronouns by asking if the pronoun is essential to the sentence’s meaning. If it isn’t, then it is used solely for emphasis, and therefore, it’s an intensive rather than a reflexive pronoun.

Often confused with demonstrative adjectives, demonstrative pronouns can stand alone in a sentence.

When this , that , these , and those are used as demonstrative adjectives they come before the noun they modify. When these same words are used as demonstrative pronouns, they replace a noun rather than modify it.

Here are some examples of demonstrative pronouns in sentences:

  • This is delicious.
  • That is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.
  • These are not mine.
  • Those belong to the driver.

Interrogative pronouns are used to form questions. They are the typical question words that come at the start of questions, with a question mark coming at the end. The interrogative pronouns are:

Putting them into sentences looks like this:

  • What is the name of your best friend?
  • Which of these is your favourite?
  • Who goes to the market with you?
  • Whom do you think will win?
  • Whose is that?

Pronoun Teaching Activity: Pronoun Review Table

  • Provide students with a review table like the one below to revise the various pronoun forms.
  • They can use this table to help them produce independent sentences.
  • Once students have had a chance to familiarize themselves thoroughly with each of the different types of pronouns, provide the students with the headings and ask them to complete a table from memory.  

Prepositions

Parts of speech - What is a preposition?

Prepositions provide extra information showing the relationship between a noun or pronoun and another part of a sentence. These are usually short words that come directly before nouns or pronouns, e.g., in , at , on , etc.

There are, of course, many different types of prepositions, each relating to particular types of information. In this article, we will look at:

Prepositions of Time

Prepositions of place, prepositions of movement, prepositions of manner, prepositions of measure.

  • Preposition of Agency
  • Preposition of Possession
  • Preposition of Source

Phrasal Prepositions

It’s worth noting that several prepositional words make an appearance in several different categories of prepositions.

Prepositions of time indicate when something happens. Common prepositions of time include after , at , before , during , in , on .

Let’s see some of these at work:

  • I have been here since Thursday.
  • My daughter was born on the first of September.
  • He went overseas during the war.
  • Before you go, can you pay the bill, please?
  • We will go out after work.

Sometimes students have difficulty knowing when to use in , on , or at . These little words are often confused. The table below provides helpful guidance to help students use the right preposition in the right context.

The prepositions of place, in , at , on , will be instantly recognisable as they also double as prepositions of time. Again, students can sometimes struggle a little to select the correct one for the situation they are describing. Some guidelines can be helpful.

  • If something is contained or confined inside, we use in .
  • If something is placed upon a surface, we use on .
  • If something is located at a specific point, we use at .

A few example sentences will assist in illustrating these:

  • He is in the house.
  • I saw it in a magazine.
  • In France, we saw many great works of art.
  • Put it on the table.
  • We sailed on the river.
  • Hang that picture on the wall, please.
  • We arrived at the airport just after 1 pm.
  • I saw her at university.
  • The boy stood at the window.

Usually used with verbs of motion, prepositions of movement indicate movement from one place to another. The most commonly used preposition of movement is to .

Some other prepositions of movement include:

Here’s how they look in some sample sentences:

  • The ball rolled across the table towards me.
  • We looked up into the sky.
  • The children ran past the shop on their way home.
  • Jackie ran down the road to greet her friend.
  • She walked confidently through the curtains and out onto the stage.

Preposition of manner shows us how something is done or how it happens. The most common of these are by , in , like , on , with .

Let’s take a look at how they work in sentences:

  • We went to school by bus.
  • During the holidays, they traveled across the Rockies on foot.
  • Janet went to the airport in a taxi.
  • She played soccer like a professional.
  • I greeted her with a smile.

Prepositions of measure are used to indicate quantities and specific units of measurement. The two most common of these are by and of .

Check out these sample sentences:

  • I’m afraid we only sell that fabric by the meter.
  • I will pay you by the hour.
  • She only ate half of the ice cream. I ate the other half.
  • A kilogram of apples is the same weight as a kilogram of feathers.

Prepositions of Agency

These prepositions indicate the causal relationship between a noun or pronoun and an action. They show the cause of something happening. The most commonly used prepositions of agency are by and with .

Here are some examples of their use in sentences:

  • The Harry Potter series was written by J.K. Rowling.
  • This bowl was made by a skilled craftsman.
  • His heart was filled with love.
  • The glass was filled with water.

Prepositions of Possession

Prepositions of possessions indicate who or what something belongs to. The most common of these are of , to , and with .

Let’s take a look:

  • He is the husband of my cousin.
  • He is a friend of the mayor.
  • This once belonged to my grandmother.
  • All these lands belong to the Ministry.
  • The man with the hat is waiting outside.
  • The boy with the big feet tripped and fell.

Prepositions of Source

Prepositions of source indicate where something comes from or its origins. The two most common prepositions of source are from and by . There is some crossover here with prepositions of agency.

Here are some examples:

  • He comes from New Zealand.
  • These oranges are from our own orchard.
  • I was warmed by the heat of the fire.
  • She was hugged by her husband.
  • The yoghurt is of Bulgarian origin.

Phrasal prepositions are also known as compound prepositions. These are phrases of two or more words that function in the same way as prepositions. That is, they join nouns or pronouns to the rest of the sentence.

Some common phrasal prepositions are:

  • According to
  • For a change
  • In addition to
  • In spite of
  • Rather than
  • With the exception of

Students should be careful of overusing phrasal prepositions as some of them can seem clichéd. Frequently, it’s best to say things in as few words as is necessary.

Preposition Teaching Activity: Pr eposition Sort

  • Print out a selection of the different types of prepositions on pieces of paper.
  • Organize students into smaller working groups and provide each group with a set of prepositions.
  • Using the headings above as categories, challenge students to sort the prepositions into the correct groups. Note that some prepositions will comfortably fit into more than one group.
  • The winning group is the one to sort all prepositions correctly first.
  • As an extension exercise, students can select a preposition from each category and write a sample sentence for it.

ConjunctionS

Parts of Speech - What is a conjunction?

Conjunctions are used to connect words, phrases, and clauses. There are three main types of conjunction that are used to join different parts of sentences. These are:

  • Coordinating
  • Subordinating
  • Correlative

Coordinating Conjunctions

These conjunctions are used to join sentence components that are equal such as two words, two phrases, or two clauses. In English, there are seven of these that can be memorized using the mnemonic FANBOYS:

Here are a few example sentences employing coordinating conjunctions:

  • As a writer, he needed only a pen and paper.
  • I would describe him as strong but lazy.
  • Either we go now or not at all.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are used to introduce dependent clauses in sentences. Basically, dependent clauses are parts of sentences that cannot stand as complete sentences on their own. 

Some of the most common subordinate conjunctions are: 

Let’s take a look at some example sentences:

  • I will complete it by Tuesday if I have time.
  • Although she likes it, she won’t buy it.
  • Jack will give it to you after he finds it.

Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions are like shoes; they come in pairs. They work together to make sentences work. Some come correlative conjunctions are:

  • either / or
  • neither / nor
  • Not only / but also

Let’s see how some of these work together:

  • If I were you, I would get either the green one or the yellow one.
  • John wants neither pity nor help.
  • I don’t know whether you prefer horror or romantic movies.

Conjunction Teaching Activity: Conjunction Challenge

  • Organize students into Talking Pairs .
  • Partner A gives Partner B an example of a conjunction.
  • Partner B must state which type of conjunction it is, e.g. coordinating, subordinating, or correlative.
  • Partner B must then compose a sentence that uses the conjunction correctly and tell it to Partner A.
  • Partners then swap roles.

InterjectionS

parts of speech - What is an interjection?

Interjections focus on feelings and are generally grammatically unrelated to the rest of the sentence or sentences around them. They convey thoughts and feelings and are common in our speech. They are often followed by exclamation marks in writing. Interjections include expressions such as:

  • Eww! That is so gross!
  • Oh , I don’t know. I’ve never used one before.
  • That’s very… err …generous of you, I suppose.
  • Wow! That is fantastic news!
  • Uh-Oh! I don’t have any more left.

Interjection Teaching Activity: Create a scenario

  • Once students clearly understand what interjections are, brainstorm as a class as many as possible.
  • Write a master list of interjections on the whiteboard.
  • Partner A suggests an interjection word or phrase to Partner B.
  • Partner B must create a fictional scenario where this interjection would be used appropriately.

With a good grasp of the fundamentals of parts of speech, your students will now be equipped to do a deeper dive into the wild waters of English grammar. 

To learn more about the twists and turns of English grammar, check out our comprehensive article on English grammar here.

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Basic English: The 8 Parts of Speech

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8 Parts of Speech

The 8 parts of speech in English are: Nouns, Adjectives, Adverbs, Verbs, Prepositions, Pronouns, Conjunctions, and Interjections.

A part of speech is a category of words that have similar grammatical functions or properties. In other words, they play similar roles in a sentence. For instance, a verb shows the action of a subject or the subject's state of being. 

The 8 parts of speech table

We'll now look in more detail at the function of each of these parts of speech. 

Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns are words used to talk about people, places, things, or ideas/concepts. Here are some examples:

  • Person: The President
  • Place: London
  • Thing: Table
  • Idea/concept: Neo-liberalism

So it may be naming something we can touch ( e.g. table; book; car ) or something we cannot touch ( e.g. Neo-liberalism; happiness; wish ).

There are both common nouns, used for classes of   people, places, things, or ideas/concepts,  and proper nouns, which is their given name, always with a capital letter.

Common Nouns

  • political party

Proper Nouns

  • Chester Avenue

Learn more about the various types of noun >>

Another of the 8 parts of speech are adjectives. They describe nouns or pronouns. They can come before or after the noun/pronoun they describe:

Absolute Adjectives

  • The  large  shopping complex
  • The  excited  child
  • She is  happy
  • It was a  shocking  film
  • Her dress was  lovely
  • He's a  good-looking  man

These are  absolute adjectives , but they can also be  comparative  (comparing two or more things) or  superlative  (showing degree or quality):

Comparative Adjectives

  • She's  fitter than the others
  • Their house is bigger
  • I ran faster  than you
  • Cats are more agile than dogs
  • Sue's  more tired than Tim

Superlative Adjectives

  • She's the fittest
  • Their house is the biggest
  • I ran the fastest
  • Cats are the most agile
  • Sue's the most tired

There are various other types of adjective. Learn more about the different types of adjectives >>

Adverbs modify verbs, other adverbs, and adjectives. There are adverbs of manner, time, place and degree . Here are examples of each being modified in relation to verbs, adverbs, and adjectives (the word being modified is underlined):

Adverbs Modifying Verbs

  • He runs fast
  • Ian quickly left the room
  • She spoke slowly

Adverbs Modifying Other Adverbs

  • He runs exceptionally  fast
  • Ian very  quickly left the room
  • She spoke extremely  slowly

Adverbs Modifying Adjectives

  • She's really excited
  • He's happily married
  • The elegantly designed dress is mine

Verbs form part of the predicate of a sentence.

In relation to the subject, they are used to express a physical action (e.g. walk; speak; show) or a mental action (e.g. think; feel; want). They can also express a state of being , mainly with the verb 'to be' but also some others.

Here are some examples:

Physical Action

  • He ran home
  • They chose the blue one

Mental Activity

  • I am thinking about it
  • Ian guessed the answer
  • She believes in ghosts

State of Being

  • She is a police woman
  • They seem worried

These though are main verbs. They have many other uses in a sentence so you should read about all the types of verbs further. 

Prepositions

Another of the 8 parts of speech are prepositions. These show the relationship between two words or phrases in a sentence. They precede a noun or pronoun.

Commons examples of prepositions are  above,  up, upon,  at, before, behind,  since, to, through, under, until, with, within,  about, against, along, around,  beside, between,  down, during,  below, by,  except, for, from, in, into, like, near, of, off, on,  toward.

In these example sentences with prepositions, the two words whose relationship is being expressed are underlined and the prepositions are in bold:

  • The book is on the table
  • He is the leader of the conservative party
  • The boy picked up the toy under the sofa
  • This is a present for your mother

Pronouns replace nouns and they prevent us from repeating the noun in a sentence. These are the types of pronouns with some examples:

  • Personal e.g. I; you; they; she
  • Possessive e.g. mine; yours; his; theirs
  • Relative e.g. who; which; that; whom
  • Demonstrative e.g. this; these; those
  • Reciprocal e.g. one another; each other
  • Emphatic / Reflexive e.g. myself; herself; itself; ourselves
  • Interrogative e.g. what; which; whom; whose

Here are some examples of these words used in sentences:

  • Martha decided she would leave
  • Why don't you use his  car instead of mine
  • Mick is a person who learns quickly
  • Shall we buy some of these ?
  • They began to argue with each other
  • Jenny is pleased with  herself
  • What time is he coming?

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are the of the 8 parts of speech responsible for joining together words, phrases, or clauses. There are three types:

  • Coordinating: and; or; but; so; yet; for; nor
  • Correlative: neither/nor; either/or; not only/but also
  • Subordinating: e.g. although; because; while; which; where; until

Coordinating Conjunctions

Used to connect like for like words (e.g. noun+noun):

  • I like apples and oranges ( 2 nouns )
  • His speech was slow but effective ( 2 adjectives )
  • Shall I say it loudly or quietly? ( 2 adverbs )

Or simple sentences (independent clauses):

  • I find the music annoying but she finds It pleasant
  • She came to the lecture late so she missed everything important
  • She took her umbrella for it was raining hard

Correlative Conjunctions

Used to join alternative or equal elements:

  • He felt neither happy nor sad about it
  • Sue had to decide to either quit or carry on
  • I went not only to Australia but also to New Zealand

Subordinating Conjunctions

Used to join subordinate clauses to main clauses:

  • The government won't vote on the bill until both parties agree
  • I'm still not tired although it is late
  • I'll eat the dish which you don't like

Interjections

Interjections are words used to express an emotion or a sentiment such as surprise, joy, disgust, fear, excitement, pain, or enthusiasm.

They usually appear at the start of a sentence and are not connected to it grammatically. Here are some examples of interjections in sentences:

  • Wow , that's an amazing score!
  • Oh , I didn't know you failed the exam
  • Well , we better not leave too late
  • Ow , that really hurt!
  • Ah , I understand now
  • Oops , I've forgotten to bring the sandwiches

Are there only 8 Parts of Speech?

Sometimes rather than 8 parts of speech, you may see 9 or 10 listed. This is because some people treat articles and determiners  as separate categories. 

However, when there are only 8 parts of speech considered (as above), this is because as these two types of word modify nouns, they are classified under adjectives. 

Now practice what you have learned in our identifying parts of speech quiz

More on Sentence Structure:

Direct and indirect objects are key parts of most sentences. A direct object is the receiver of action while indirect object identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed.

Direct and Indirect Objects: The Differences

Direct and indirect objects are key parts of most sentences. A direct object is the receiver of action while indirect object identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed.

Advice on how to use either and neither in English grammar. They can be adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and conjunctions.

How to Use Either and Neither with Examples

Advice on how to use either and neither in English grammar. They can be adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and conjunctions.

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction.

Types of Clauses in English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clause

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction.

Here we demystify subject complements, predicate adjectives, and predicate nominatives with simple explanations and examples.

Subject Complements: Predicate Adjectives and Predicate Nominatives

Here we demystify subject complements, predicate adjectives, and predicate nominatives with simple explanations and examples.

Parallelism is about balancing the grammatical structure of words, phrases and clauses in your sentences. Parallel structure will improve your writing's coherence.

Parallelism Grammar Rules (Parallel Structure)

Parallelism is about balancing the grammatical structure of words, phrases and clauses in your sentences. Parallel structure will improve your writing's coherence.

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

Nominalisation in English Grammar: High Level Writing Tips

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

Using object complements in a sentence enhances your ability to convey specific information about actions and their outcomes.

Using Object Complements in a Sentence

Using object complements in a sentence enhances your ability to convey specific information about actions and their outcomes.

Phrases and clauses are the key building blocks of sentences. A clause contains a subject and a verb and can express a complete thought. A phrase does not contain a subject or verb.

Phrases and Clauses - Building good sentences

Phrases and clauses are the key building blocks of sentences. A clause contains a subject and a verb and can express a complete thought. A phrase does not contain a subject or verb.

The main parts of a sentence are subjects, verbs, objects, predicates, and subject complements. All of these have a specific purpose within the structure of a sentence.

Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Verbs, Objects, Predicates, Complements

The main parts of a sentence are subjects, verbs, objects, predicates, and subject complements. All of these have a specific purpose within the structure of a sentence.

View examples of parallelism in English grammar that show you correct and incorrect parallel sentences.

Examples of Parallelism in English Grammar

View examples of parallelism in English grammar that show you correct and incorrect parallel sentences.

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Parts of speech in english – video.

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In this lesson, you can learn about parts of speech in English.

How many parts of speech are there in english can you name them, and explain what they do, understanding parts of speech —nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on—can help you to understand english sentence structure and how english grammar works., in this class, you’ll learn the basic information about parts of speech, you’ll see some ways that parts of speech can be more complicated than you might expect, and you’ll have several chances to practice, quiz: parts of speech in english.

Now test your understanding of the different parts of speech by trying this quiz. There are 20 questions, which get harder as you go through it!

When you have finished, click ‘View Questions’ to see all the correct answers and read the explanations. There are links to further study resources in the explanations.

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1 . Question

For the first five questions, answer true or false.

True or false: a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function and meaning in the sentence.

Review part three of the lesson if you need help with this one.

2 . Question

True or false: a noun can be a word or a phrase.

3 . Question

True or false: if a word can be a noun, it can only be a noun.

4 . Question

True or false: when analysing parts of speech, you don’t need to think about what the sentence means.

5 . Question

True or false: articles (‘the’, ‘a’), demonstratives (‘this’, ‘that’), quantifiers (‘some’, ‘few’) and possessive adjectives (‘your’, ‘their’) are all determiners.

Remember that determiners specify the noun you’re referring to. Do all these words do this?

6 . Question

For the next five questions, choose the part of speech described.

What part of speech can be an action or a state?

  • Interjections
  • Conjunctions

‘Run’ is an action and ‘understand’ is a state.

7 . Question

What part of speech can describe verbs, adjectives, adverbs or whole sentences?

  • Prepositions

8 . Question

What part of speech represents or replaces nouns?

9 . Question

What part of speech expresses an emotion or can be used to react to something?

10 . Question

Which part of speech doesn’t indicate something about a noun?

  • Determiners

11 . Question

For the next five questions, match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“He slept badly.”

Sort elements

12 . question.

Match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“She has bought a second-hand car.”

  • noun phrase

This time, you’re not analysing each word but the function of word groups and phrases in the sentence.

13 . Question

“Um, can you stop making so much noise, please?”

  • ‘um’ and ‘please’
  • 'can' and 'stop'
  • 'you'
  • 'making so much noise'

14 . Question

“Is this your bag or mine?”

  • conjunction
  • (possessive) pronoun

15 . Question

“Hey! Give his new watch back to him.”

  • interjection
  • preposition

16 . Question

For the last five questions, tick all the words that are correct.

Which words can be nouns?

You need to choose three answers.

17 . Question

Which words can be adverbs?

Only one word here is not an adverb.

18 . Question

Which words can be determiners?

This time there are two correct answers.

19 . Question

Which words can be more than one part of speech?

Two answers are correct; one of the others doesn’t even exist!

20 . Question

Which words are conjunctions?

  • nevertheless

This is a deliberately difficult question to end with! A conjunction must be followed by a noun (or noun phrase) and then a verb, with no commas.

So, first question: how many parts of speech are there?

Well, we did a Google search, and many of the top results said ‘eight’. So there must be eight parts of speech in English.

Wrong! There are nine.

So, what are they?

1. Guide to Parts of Speech in English

Number one: nouns. Nouns can be things, animals, or people, like doctor, pencil, tree or cat.

Nouns can also be ideas or abstract things, like idea, happiness, time or money.

Parts of Speech in English - cat image

Number two: verbs. Verbs can be actions, like do, run, fly or win.

Verbs can also describe states, like be, love, believe or understand.

Number three: adjectives. Adjectives describe nouns. For example: red, big, metal, or beautiful.

Number four: adverbs . Adverbs can describe verbs, meaning they describe how someone does something. For example, quickly, loudly, angrily or well.

Adverbs can also describe adjectives, other adverbs, or even whole sentences. For example, very is an adverb which can describe an adjective— very slow —or another adverb— very slowly.

Unfortunately or sometimes are adverbs which can be used to add information to a whole sentence.

For example:

  • Unfortunately, they missed the train and were late to their own wedding!
  • Sometimes, I wish I’d made different choices in life.

So, adverbs are a little more complicated. Here’s a good way to remember it: adjectives and adverbs both describe other words. They are both used to add information to something else.

Adjectives describe nouns, and adverbs describe everything else: verbs, adjectives, adverbs and whole sentences.

Number five: pronouns.

Pronouns replace or represent nouns. For example, I, you, she or they are pronouns which represent different people.

You use pronouns to avoid repeating the same word, or to refer to something when it’s obvious what you mean.

  • How was the weather there?

There is a pronoun which refers to a place. If you’ve already mentioned the place you’re talking about, you don’t need to say it again.

Another example:

  • Give me two, please.

Two is a pronoun which refers to a quantity of something which has already been mentioned. The person you’re talking to already knows what you’re talking about.

Number six: prepositions.

Prepositions usually go before a noun or noun phrase. What’s their job?

Prepositions can do two basic things: first, they can add an idea of time, place, or movement to a noun. For example:

  • on Wednesday
  • in the corner
  • towards the door

Secondly, prepositions can connect other words to a noun, or a pronoun.

For example, think about the verb depend on. The preposition on connects the verb depend to the object of the verb. For example:

  • It depends on the cost.

Usually, the noun or noun phrase goes after the preposition.

However, sometimes the preposition can link to a noun (or pronoun) earlier in the sentence. For example:

  • What does it depend on?

Here, on links to the pronoun what.

Number seven: conjunctions.

Conjunctions connect two things. A conjunction can connect two words:

  • I like cake and ice-cream.

A conjunction can connect two phrases:

  • Do you want to go now or wait till this afternoon?

You can also use a conjunction to connect two clauses:

  • Although I’ve been trying to learn for years, I’m still really bad at drawing.

Number eight: determiners

Determiners go before a noun. They include words like a, the, this or that, which help to specify which noun you’re talking about.

Words like my, your, his, her, etc. are also determiners. They specify which noun you’re talking about by saying who something belongs to.

Determiners can also tell you how many of something there are. Look at three examples:

  • ten bananas
  • some people
  • both of my brothers

The words ten, some and both are determiners.

Number nine: interjections

Interjections are different, because they aren’t normally part of a sentence.

Interjections are words or phrases which show how you feel. For example:

Parts of Speech in English - interjections

So, now you know about the nine parts of speech in English.

2. Practice with Parts of Speech in English

Let’s practice! Look at three sentences. Each sentence has five words.

  • They told me about it.
  • Look in the big cupboard.
  • Put it there, but carefully.

Can you identify which part of speech each word is? Pause the video and think about your answers.

How did you do? Could you identify the parts of speech correctly?

Let’s look at one more.

  • I’m staying in this evening.

What part of speech are these words? Think about it.

So, I is a pronoun, am is a verb, and staying is also a verb.

What about in? Did you say it’s a preposition?

It’s not a preposition; it’s an adverb.

How does this work? We had the word in in one of the sentences you saw before, and it was a preposition.

So, what’s going on?

3. The Same Word Can be More than One Part of Speech

Some words can only be one thing.

For example, the words independence or hair can only be nouns.

Believe and destroy can only be verbs.

However, many words can be more than one part of speech.

There are two things happening here.

First, a word can be two different things, which have the same written form and the same pronunciation.

Think about the word win. Is it a noun or a verb?

It can be both.

  • I’m sure they’ll win the game this weekend.
  • We’ll be hoping for a win in the big game this weekend.

Many words are like this. Another example: red can be an adjective or a noun.

  • What do you think about this red for the kitchen?
  • I like that red top she was wearing.

This is very common: very often, a word with one written form can be two (or more) different parts of speech.

We told you there are two things happening here; what’s the other?

Sometimes, a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function in the sentence.

Look at two sentences:

  • I have a few photos of my grandparents.
  • Sure, you can have a few.

Here’s a question: what part of speech is few in these sentences?

In the first sentence, few is a determiner; in the second, it’s a pronoun.

Can you explain why this is?

Think about what few does in these two sentences.

In the first sentence, few adds a quantity to the noun photos. It tells us how many photos you have. This makes it a determiner.

In the second sentence, few replaces a noun. You don’t know which noun it replaces, but in context, you would understand what the person meant.

Maybe it was ‘a few biscuits’, or ‘a few pieces of paper.’

We don’t know! But, you do know that few replaces a noun, which makes it a pronoun.

Another example is the sentence we saw before:

Prepositions go with nouns, and connect nouns to other words in the sentence. In here doesn’t go with a noun, so it can’t be a preposition.

Learn more with this Oxford Online English lesson on adverbs – to, in, at .

In here means ‘at home’, and it adds information to the verb stay. What kind of words add information to verbs?

Adverbs! So, in is an adverb.

Wait a minute, did we ever finish explaining what parts of speech are in this sentence?

You’re right! We didn’t. Let’s do it now. You need to say what parts of speech the words this evening are.

Can you do it?

Maybe you said that this is a determiner, and evening is a noun. That’s technically correct, but it’s not the best answer.

The best answer is that this evening is an adverb.

How do you explain that?

4. Compound Parts of Speech in English

Until now, you’ve seen single words, and how single words can be nouns, verbs, etc.

However, when you’re thinking about parts of speech, you can’t just think about single words. Phrases can also be nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on.

Let’s do an example:

  • Add a small spoonful of brown sugar, then turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

Think about the first part of this sentence: add a small spoonful of brown sugar.

What parts of speech do we have here?

Of course, you can go through it word by word. You can say, add is a verb, a is a determiner, small is an adjective and so on.

But, is that the most useful way of looking at it?

It makes more sense to see this as a verb— add —and a noun— a small spoonful of brown sugar.

The noun is made up of several parts of speech: determiners, adjectives, prepositions and nouns, but together they have one meaning. These words refer to one thing.

You can analyse a sentence in several different layers. So, you can see a small spoonful of brown sugar as six individual words, or one noun phrase.

You could also see it as three parts: a determiner— a small spoonful —a preposition— of —and a noun— brown sugar.

Confused? We understand! You want to know the answer. You want to know which way is ‘correct’.

There isn’t one ‘correct’ way to see this. There are different perspectives.

A better question is: which perspective makes more sense?

In this sentence, a small spoonful of brown sugar refers to one thing in the world. So it makes sense to think of it as one part of speech in the sentence.

What about the second part of the sentence? How would you analyse the parts of speech?

As you saw before, there isn’t one right answer, but here’s a suggestion.

The sentence contains a conjunction— then —and then two verb phrases linked with the conjunction and.

This makes sense because the sentence is telling you to do two things: turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

So, it makes sense to see turn the heat down as one part of speech, because it’s telling you do to one thing.

Let’s put these ideas together.

First, when you think about parts of speech, you can’t just memorise information. You have to look at each sentence individually, and think about what each word is doing.

Secondly, always think about what the sentence means in the real world. Sentences aren’t abstract things; they refer to real people, real things and real actions.

There is always more than one way to analyse the parts of speech in a sentence: choose the way that makes sense based on what the sentence is telling you about real life!

Let’s do a more challenging practice exercise so you can see these ideas in action.

5. More Challenging Practice with English Parts of Speech

Look at three sentences:

  • Amazing! It’s way better than I ever thought it would be.
  • She was an amazing clinician , who came up with many innovative ways to treat patients.
  • I don’t believe it!

How would you analyse the parts of speech in these sentences? Think about the ideas we talked about in the last section. Does it make sense to break the sentences into individual words, or is it better to group words into phrases?

Pause the video and think about your ideas.

You can pause the video again to look at these in more detail.

Notice how the same word can be different parts of speech in different sentences. For example, amazing is an interjection in one sentence, and an adjective in another.

Notice also the different layers of analysis. For example, look at the phrase many innovative ways. You can see this as one noun phrase, or as a determiner plus a noun phrase, or as three individual parts: a determiner, an adjective and a noun.

Which is correct? They all are! Choose the perspective which makes more sense to you.

Thanks for watching!

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parts of speech

Parts of Speech

What is a Part of Speech?

We can categorize English words into 9 basic types called "parts of speech" or "word classes". It's quite important to recognize parts of speech. This helps you to analyze sentences and understand them. It also helps you to construct good sentences.

Parts of Speech Table

Parts of speech examples.

  • Parts of Speech Quiz

This is a summary of the 9 parts of speech*. You can find more detail if you click on each part of speech.

  • lexical Verbs ( work, like, run )
  • auxiliary Verbs ( be, have, must )
  • Determiners may be treated as adjectives, instead of being a separate part of speech.

Here are some examples of sentences made with different English parts of speech:

Here is a sentence that contains every part of speech:

Words with More Than One Job

Many words in English can have more than one job, or be more than one part of speech. For example, "work" can be a verb and a noun; "but" can be a conjunction and a preposition; "well" can be an adjective, an adverb and an interjection. In addition, many nouns can act as adjectives.

To analyze the part of speech, ask yourself: "What job is this word doing in this sentence?"

In the table below you can see a few examples. Of course, there are more, even for some of the words in the table. In fact, if you look in a good dictionary you will see that the word " but " has six jobs to do:

  • verb, noun, adverb, pronoun, preposition and conjunction!

People often ask

FAQ: frequently asked parts of speech questions

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Parts of Speech

What are the parts of speech, a formal definition.

Table of Contents

The Part of Speech Is Determined by the Word's Function

Are there 8 or 9 parts of speech, the nine parts of speech, (1) adjective, (3) conjunction, (4) determiner, (5) interjection, (7) preposition, (8) pronoun, why the parts of speech are important, video lesson.

parts of speech

  • You need to dig a well . (noun)
  • You look well . (adjective)
  • You dance well . (adverb)
  • Well , I agree. (interjection)
  • My eyes will well up. (verb)
  • red, happy, enormous
  • Ask the boy in the red jumper.
  • I live in a happy place.
  • I caught a fish this morning! I mean an enormous one.
  • happily, loosely, often
  • They skipped happily to the counter.
  • Tie the knot loosely so they can escape.
  • I often walk to work.
  • It is an intriguingly magic setting.
  • He plays the piano extremely well.
  • and, or, but
  • it is a large and important city.
  • Shall we run to the hills or hide in the bushes?
  • I know you are lying, but I cannot prove it.
  • my, those, two, many
  • My dog is fine with those cats.
  • There are two dogs but many cats.
  • ouch, oops, eek
  • Ouch , that hurt.
  • Oops , it's broken.
  • Eek! A mouse just ran past my foot!
  • leader, town, apple
  • Take me to your leader .
  • I will see you in town later.
  • An apple fell on his head .
  • in, near, on, with
  • Sarah is hiding in the box.
  • I live near the train station.
  • Put your hands on your head.
  • She yelled with enthusiasm.
  • she, we, they, that
  • Joanne is smart. She is also funny.
  • Our team has studied the evidence. We know the truth.
  • Jack and Jill went up the hill, but they never returned.
  • That is clever!
  • work, be, write, exist
  • Tony works down the pit now. He was unemployed.
  • I will write a song for you.
  • I think aliens exist .

Are you a visual learner? Do you prefer video to text? Here is a list of all our grammar videos .

Video for Each Part of Speech

lesson english 8 parts of speech

The Most Important Writing Issues

The top issue related to adjectives, the top issue related to adverbs.

  • Extremely annoyed, she stared menacingly at her rival.
  • Infuriated, she glared at her rival.

The Top Issue Related to Conjunctions

correct tick

  • Burger, Fries, and a shake
  • Fish, chips and peas

The Top Issue Related to Determiners

wrong cross

The Top Issue Related to Interjections

The top issue related to nouns, the top issue related to prepositions, the top issue related to pronouns, the top issue related to verbs.

  • Crack the parts of speech to help with learning a foreign language or to take your writing to the next level.

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This page was written by Craig Shrives .

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Storyboard That

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8 Parts of Speech

Parts of speech are an important aspect of the language taught in English Language Arts and English as a New Language classrooms. Not only do the parts of speech help in formulating correct sentences, they also help the reader to understand what is taking place. As a staple of clear communication and analysis, mastery of the parts of speech is essential for students. The eight parts of speech chart on the right is a great visual for displaying the 8 categories of words that are included.

Teachers use a variety of different approaches to engage students in their parts of speech lesson plans. One popular idea for a "bodily kinesthetic" activity for parts of speech is to conduct a scavenger hunt to have students identify the 8 different parts of speech existing around the classroom. There is also the classic lesson on parts of speech that instructs students to diagram and label sentences provided by the teacher.

A parts of speech writing activity could begin with students first writing about a simple topic like what they are going to do after school. After they have their sentences down, they could work individually or with a partner to label each of the 8 parts of speech. Another fun part of speech activity is to have students play "Grammar Bingo". They can fill in a bingo card that includes all 8 parts of speech!

These are all effective activities for part of speech where students can see the language in action or on paper and identify these important grammatical elements. However, the reality is that this particular part of language learning and development can be boring and dry for students. Teachers can liven up their parts of speech lesson plans for elementary, middle and high school students with Storyboard That!

Storyboard That can help teachers use more creative ways to teach parts of speech!

The 8 Parts of Speech Lessons Help You

  • Understand clearly what is being said in a sentence.
  • Know how and when to use words correctly.
  • Reflect more accurately on the English language.

8 Parts of Speech

What are the Parts of Speech?

Do you know each part of speech, 8 parts of speech activity.

The parts of speech activity below shows how you can use the Storyboard That Creator to make storyboards depicting the different parts of speech, in this case three different verbs. Teachers can quickly create a parts of speech lesson plan using the "create an assignment" wizard where they can input directions and even a template to help students get started. The template could include the titles of the parts of speech for students to depict such as:

Verb Examples

8 Parts of Speech Lesson Plans

In reading and writing, it is important to make clear for your audience who or what is most important in a sentence, what is happening, and other important details that enhance the information being conveyed. Using the Storyboard Creator in your parts of speech lesson allows students to make visual depictions of the parts of speech and help them remember these important pieces of writing!

Some General Elementary School Parts of Speech Activity Ideas

  • Use Storyboard That’s parts of speech template to create your own storyboard using the 8 parts of speech.
  • Provide students with a sentence that has certain underlined or highlighted words by replacing "EXAMPLE SENTENCE".

Note: If you're not a Storyboard That user yet, sign up for a free trial .

  • Have students make a visualization of the sentences on the storyboard.
  • While creating the storyboards, students will make sure to point out which part of speech they are illustrating by drawing attention to the word using an arrow or other indicator.
  • Lesson Extension: Have students come up with their own sentences and use storyboards to depict them!

Parts of Speech Storyboard Template

Example Project for the 8 Parts of Speech

Parts of Speech Examples

More Parts of Speech Project Ideas

  • Make a storyboard that describes and illustrates the most common prepositions.
  • Make a T-chart that illustrates examples of action verbs and nonaction verbs.
  • Choose at least one prepositional phrase and make a storyboard to illustrate it.
  • Make a storyboard that illustrates adjectives that express emotion. Teachers can either give students a list so that students all have the same words, or have students choose their own.
  • Research and define the many different speech definitions such as: independent clauses, complex sentences, main verbs, and so much more!
  • A fun adverbs project idea is to have students answer a prompt in the storyboard such as the one below. The teacher can include the prompt in the template and have the students write and illustrate their answer using as many other adverbs as they can! To modify this assignment, the template could include the description box on the bottom where students can write more full sentences showing their understanding of how to use adverbs. This project could also be modified to be an activity for any of the 8 parts of speech.

Adverb Project Idea

Related Activities

--- N/A --- - Ser vs Estar Special Cases

How to Teach Parts of Speech with Games and Activities

Choose games and activities.

Select games and activities that are engaging and appropriate for the age and skill level of your students. Examples of games and activities that teach parts of speech include Mad Libs, Charades, Parts of Speech Bingo, Parts of Speech Jeopardy, and Word Sorts.

Define Parts of Speech

Before starting the games and activities, make sure your students understand the basics of parts of speech. Define and provide examples of the main parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.

Model Parts of Speech Use

Model the use of different parts of speech to ensure that students understand how they function in language. Use sentences or examples from the games or activities you have chosen to illustrate the different parts of speech.

Play Games and Activities

Play the games and activities with your students, making sure to explain the rules and provide any necessary guidance. Encourage active participation and engagement from all students, and provide support or additional practice for students who may need it.

Reinforce Learning

After playing the games and activities, reinforce learning by reviewing the parts of speech used and how they function in language. Ask students to explain how they used different parts of speech in the games and activities and provide feedback or corrections as needed.

Create Your Own Games and Activities

Encourage students to create their own games and activities that incorporate parts of speech. This can help them solidify their understanding of the concepts and provide opportunities for peer teaching and learning.

Assess Understanding

Finally, assess students' understanding of parts of speech through quizzes, writing assignments, or other assessments. Make sure that your assessments reflect the skills and knowledge you want students to acquire, such as identifying parts of speech and using them correctly in context. Use the results of your assessments to guide further instruction and support for students who may need it.

Frequently Asked Questions about 8 Parts of Speech

What is included in a parts of speech chart.

The 8 parts of speech to include in a parts of speech chart are:

  • Noun : Nouns are a person, place, thing, or idea
  • Verb : Verbs are actions or states of being
  • Adjective : Adjectives describe nouns
  • Adverb : Adverbs describe a verb, adjective or another adverb
  • Pronoun : Pronouns stand in for a noun
  • Preposition : Prepositions link a noun to another word
  • Conjunction : Conjunctions join words, clauses, and sentences
  • Interjection : Interjections are short exclamations

What are some parts of speech activities to do with students?

There are many 8 parts of speech lesson plans that incorporate the storyboard Creator that will help students visualize and be able to demonstrate their understanding. Some parts of speech activities using the Storyboard That Creator are:

  • Create a visual part of speech diagram of a sentence using a storyboard! Many teachers instruct students to diagram parts of speech in their sentences by underlining or circling different parts of speech. However, by illustrating what is occurring in the sentence and how those parts of speech are related, students are more apt to retain the information.
  • Create a list of all of the different parts of speech with illustrations and definitions.
  • Make a quiz for a fellow classmate!

How can teachers create parts of speech lesson plans in Storyboard That?

Creating assignments in Storyboard That is as easy as 1-2-3! The easiest way to create a lesson is to copy one of our awesome premade lesson plans and customize it how you see fit. To create a lesson from scratch, simply follow the “create an assignment” steps.

What is the difference between proper nouns and common nouns?

The difference between a proper noun and a common noun is that a common noun refers to general things, such as a mountain, river, or lake. A proper noun, however, refers to a specific noun, such as Mt. Everest, Nile River, or Lake Michigan.

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ESL Activities

ESL Games, Activities, Lesson Plans, Jobs & More

in Listening · Reading · Speaking · Writing

ESL Parts of Speech Activities, Worksheets & Lesson Plans

In English, there are 8 parts of speech: adjectives, adverbs, nouns, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections. In this article, you’ll find parts of speech activities and games, along with worksheets and lesson plans.

Why is it important for ESL students to understand part of speech? It’s so that students can work towards more complex language and sentence structure. As teachers, it’s very important to provide opportunities to practice these things through memorable activities, games, and worksheets. The goal is that students will understand the meaning of words, word function and also how to use these grammatically within a sentence.

parts-of-speech-esl

ESL parts of speech

ESL Parts of Speech 

We’ve broken down some of the parts of speech into small subsections. For example, nouns or verbs are a big category and things like modal verbs or phrasal verbs are quite different things. You’ll find these interesting and engaging ESL activity ideas useful for beginner to advanced students. You may also find this one useful: List of Categories .

Adjectives describe nouns and are key for rich, varied English usage. They are also one of the most common parts of speech that even beginners will need to know. Check out some of the top game, activity, worksheet and lesson plan ideas:

ESL Adjective Activities

Also be sure to check out this simple comparative adjective quiz for students:

Adjectives of Feeling and Emotion

Adjectives are an important part of speech for ESL and can be used to describe a lot of things, but these ones focus on feelings. Check out these parts of speech games and activities:

Feeling and Emotion Adjective Activities

In English, adverbs serve an important function int hat they describe or modify a verb, as well as certain other parts of speech. Check out some of the best activities for this:

Adverb Activities and Games .

Adverbs of Frequency

Adverbs are an important part of speech in English and one of the most common uses of them is with frequency. Basically, expressions with, “How often” fall into this category.

Adverbs of Frequency ESL Activities

39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Grammar Activities and Games: For English Teachers of Teenagers and Adults...

  • Amazon Kindle Edition
  • Bolen, Jackie (Author)
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  • 87 Pages - 10/24/2019 (Publication Date)

Although not specifically a part of speech, articles are key because they combine with nouns and are a key part of correct sentence structure.

Articles ESL Activities and Games

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparatives and superlatives adjectives—an example is big, bigger, biggest. They are a very common English part of speech and our English learners need to master them early on. Here are some ideas for your lesson plans:

ESL Comparative and Superlative Adjective Games

Compound Nouns

Nouns are the most common English part of speech and within that category, you’ll see a ton of compound nouns. They’re basically two words that are joined together to have a possibly separate meaning from those two original words. For example snowstorm or water skiing.

ESL Compound Noun Activities

Conjunctions and Transitions

We use conjunctions and transitions all the time in English to make writing especially easier to read. They show the relationship between sentences and parts within a sentence.

Conjunction Transition Activities

You may also want to check out this sequence words list.

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Check out these countable and uncountable noun activities that will help students figure out the difference between these two noun categories. They’ll also learn how to use them correctly in a sentence with a quantifier.

Countable and Uncountable Noun ESL Activities

Future Verb Forms

Talking about the future is a key part of mastering the English language. However, there are a few different ways to do that and it can be a little bit tricky for students to know when to use which one. Check out some of the best ideas here:

Future Verbs Forms ESL Activities

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Imperatives

We use imperatives when we want to give a command, order or direction. Listen to a conversation between a teacher and student or child and parents and you’ll notice that the utterances are filled with them! Find out more:

ESL Imperative Activities and Games .

Indefinite Pronouns

We use an indefinite pronoun as a way to refer to something, but not to any specific person, amount or thing. Some common examples are nobody, somebody, everything, etc. We use them all the time in the English language which is why it’s vital to work on them with our students. Here are some ideas:

Indefinite Pronouns Activities .

Irregular Verbs

Unfortunately, English is filled with irregular verbs that don’t have the typical “ed” ending in the past tense (more ideas here: past continuous games and past tense ESL ). Students have to memorize them—there’s just no way around it. However, you can help your students become more proficient at this ESL part of speech by trying out some of the following:

ESL Irregular Verb Games.

Linking Verbs

A linking verb in English is also known as an auxiliary or helping verb. There are several functions, but they mainly serve to extend the meaning of the main verb. Check out some of the best ideas here:

Linking Verb Games .

Modal Verbs

Modals are words like can, might, should, etc. and they are important ESL part of speech. They can be used to express things like permission, ability, obligation, possibility, and more. Here are some of the top recommendations:

Modal Verb Activities and Games.

Passive Voice Activities

The passive voice is used in some very specific situations in English. For example, when the person doing the action isn’t important (She counted out the change for me) or when it’s obvious who the agent is (I was instructed to be friendlier to customers).

Passive Voice ESL Games and Activities

Past Tense Verb Activities

Verbs are a vital ESL part of speech. However, in the past tense, irregular verbs make this a little bit tricky for our students sometimes. Check out these ideas here:

Past Tense ESL Activities and Worksheets

Phrasal Verbs

One common verb type in English is a phrasal verb. This is where a verb is combined with an adverb or preposition and the resulting combination has a different meaning. For example: back off, call back, etc. They are a very common part of speech in English and something that our students need to master.

Phrasal Verb ESL Activities

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Possessive Adjectives and Pronouns

Both pronoun and adjective parts of speech can be used to express ownership of something. Here are some of the best ideas for helping students with possessives:

ESL Possessives Activities and Games

A prefix is some letters at the beginning of a word that changes its meaning in some way. It could negate it, make it opposite or express a manner or time. Here are some recommendations:

Prefix Games

Prepositions

If you’re looking for activities, games, worksheets and lesson plans specifically for prepositions of place (in, on, at, etc.), then you’ll want to check out the following resource:

ESL Prepositions of Place

Present Perfect Verbs

The present perfect is a key verb tense for students to master. Verbs are a major part of speech in English and this is a commonly used tense.

Present Perfect ESL Games

Present Continuous

We use the present continuous to talk about things that are currently happening and will probably continue into the future. Have a look here:

Activities for present continuous .

Quantifiers

Any, some, much, many are all examples of quantifiers in English that deal with how much of something. Students need to master quantifier expressions in order to become proficient in English. Here are some recommendations for student-centred, fun activities to work on them:

ESL Quantifier Activities

Reflexive Pronouns

There are nine reflexive pronouns in English which are words that end in “self” or “selves.” For example, myself or themselves. They’re used when the subject and object of a sentence are the same.

Check out these recommendations:

Reflexive Pronouns Games .

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Singular and Plural Nouns

English nouns are found in both singular and plural forms. It’s often one of the first concepts that beginners learn when they’re just getting started out with English.

Here are some of the best activities for teaching this important concept:

ESL Singular and Plural Nouns

Subject and Object Pronoun Activities

Subject and Object pronouns are an important part of speech that students need to master in order to become proficient in English. These student-centred ESL activities and worksheets will help students do that!

Subject-Object Pronoun ESL Games

Subject-Verb Agreement

Unfortunately for English learners, the verb form changes with the subject. It’s often a mistake that even more advanced learners can make when they’re not actively thinking about it. That’s why it’s key to provide opportunities for our students for lots of practice.

English Subject Verb Agreement Activities and Worksheets

Suffixes are letters that are added onto the end of base words to change the meaning or part of speech. For example, ed added onto the end of a verb makes it into the past tense. Or, ing plus a verb makes it into a continuous form. The good news is that there are specific rules for how suffixes function.

Suffix Games and Activities

Verb Activities

There are plenty of subcategories of verbs to consider when thinking about ESL parts of speech. However, if you want some general games and activities that focus on them, here is your best resource.

ESL Verb Activities

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Verbs: Present Perfect For and Since

Verbs are a key part of ESL parts of speech and the present perfect is a vital thing for our students to master if they want to become proficient in English. It can be a little bit tricky because of the verb changes in this tense. Check out our recommendations here for mastering the present perfect with for and since:

ESL Present Perfect Activities

WH Question Games and Activities

Okay, so “WH” questions aren’t exactly a part of speech in English! However, they are certainly important in English and something that students need to master. You’ll certainly want to spend some time working on them with your students. All the details here:

ESL WH Questions Games and Activities

parts-of-speech-games

English part of speech activities

Yes/No Questions 

Yes/no questions are one of the first grammar concepts that beginners learn. For example:

  • Do you like ice cream?
  • Are you 10 years old?

Find out some of the best ideas for teaching them here:

Yes/No Question Games .

What are some Common Language Teaching Methods?

There are various approaches and methods for teaching language, ranging from grammar-translation to the communicative language approach to task-based learning. Have a look here for all the details:

Methods and Approaches in Language Teaching . 

Parts of Speech ESL Activities

If you’re looking for some ESL parts of speech activities and games, here are a few of the best options:

  • Odd one out 
  • Fill in the blank activities
  • Word categories 
  • Videos in the ESL classroom
  • Use a reading lesson plan
  • 3 things writing activity
  • Word association

More Ideas for Teaching English

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If you want to brush up on English teaching methodology and practice, then you’ll definitely want to check out this book. I put my 20 years of classroom experience into a single book—the result is a very practical, helpful guide to teaching ESL/EFL.

Pick up a copy of the book today, and get ready for better English classes tomorrow:

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ESL Parts of Speech FAQs

There are a number of common questions that people have about English parts of speech, along with activities and games to practice them. Here are some of the most popular ones.

What are the 10 parts of speech?

In English, there are 10 main parts of speech. They include the following:

  • prepositions
  • conjunctions
  • interjections
  • articles/determiners

What are the four main parts of speech?

In English, the four main parts of speech are nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives.

How do you teach parts of speech?

Teaching parts of speech can be quite a difficult task if done together. That’s why most ESL textbooks and English teachers teach small parts of them in sequence. For example, a lesson on the simple past, then one on pronouns, usage of articles, then adjectives, etc. Once students are more advanced, lessons focused on identifying the various parts of speech in a sentence can be a useful exercise.

How do you identify a noun?

In English, a noun is considered to be a person, place, thing or idea. It can be found in various parts of the sentence and can be the subject, object, indirect object, complement, object complement, appositive, or adjective.

What is basic English grammar?

Basic English grammar involves the following word order in a sentence: subject, verb, object. There are other parts of speech used at various points including adjectives, adverbs, articles, etc to form more complex sentences.

How to teach parts of speech in a fun way?

It’s possible to teach parts of speech in a fun way by using various ESL games and activities. Some of the best ones include Bingo, running dictation, charades, mixed up sentences, dictation activities, videos, songs, chants, and more.

ESL Parts of Speech Worksheets

If you’re looking for some parts of speech ESL worksheets, check out some of the top options:

ISL Collective

English for Everyone

English Worksheets

esl parts of speech worksheets

Parts of speech ESL worksheets

Have your say about these ESL Parts of Speech

Do you have any recommendations for resources to help our students with parts of speech ESL? Leave a comment below and let us know. We’d love to hear from you.

Also be sure to give this article a share on Facebook, Pinterest, or Twitter. It’ll help other busy teachers, like yourself find this useful teaching resource.

Last update on 2022-07-17 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

lesson english 8 parts of speech

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Jackie Bolen has been teaching English for more than 15 years to students in South Korea and Canada. She's taught all ages, levels and kinds of TEFL classes. She holds an MA degree, along with the Celta and Delta English teaching certifications.

Jackie is the author of more than 60 books for English teachers and English learners, including Business English Vocabulary Builder and 39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Speaking Activities for Teenagers and Adults . She loves to share her ESL games, activities, teaching tips, and more with other teachers throughout the world.

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lesson english 8 parts of speech

Language Arts Classroom

Creative Ways To Teach the Eight Parts of Speech

Are you looking to teach the eight parts of speech in hands on and fun ways? Add these eight parts of speech activities to your eight parts of speech lessons.

Are you looking for creative ways to teach the eight parts of speech? Below, I’ve outlined my parts of speech lessons for older students. . . often my first set of grammar activities. 

So, you’re going to teach the eight parts of speech. . . often during those first weeks of school. Hmmmmmm. I have a method, a method that I created after years of experience. I’ve detailed it below.

First, consider methods with how to teach parts of speech. You can use a worksheet every day for every lesson, but students rarely retain information if they only see the information presented one way. Instead, consider how you teach other concepts in your classes. You probably utilize an assortment of activities like station work, task cards, coloring sheets , and graphic organizers.

Second, I included tons of parts of speech activities —I would never use all of these with one class. Over the years, I have taught many ages with a variety levels of grammatical understanding.

Only use what works for you and your students in your lesson plan!

What are the eight parts of speech?

The eight parts of speech are noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. These are the basic building blocks of the English language and understanding them is essential for effective communication and writing.

Are you looking to teach the eight parts of speech in hands on and fun ways? Add these eight parts of speech activities to your eight parts of speech lessons.

A few notes about these notes for teaching the eight parts of speech:

  • First! I don’t pretend that my older students have never heard these terms before. I know they have, but they probably don’t know them well enough for the manipulation and analysis for which older students should strive.
  • As a general guide to my parts of speech grammar lessons below, I’ve provided headers in bold. Read the specifics underneath because I work to overlap the material while differentiating for all the levels in my classes.
  • Also? I don’t think there is one “right” way for grammar lessons. This format works for me. Take what works for your students. . . I tried to be accurate and thorough.
  • You can purchase the grammar lessons for teaching the parts of speech I mention below. You don’t have to purchase those exact parts of speech lessons, though!

Now, we are ready! Here are my parts of speech lessons.

Creative ways to teach parts of speech include multiple activities

Week One: Pretest/ Nouns

Considering middle school grammar, I know that my students’ experiences and knowledge greatly varies. Therefore, I start with a pretest . Then I take information from the language pretest and divide it into areas for improvement. When possible, divide practice among students (task cards help with individual practice).

Finally, I provide that information to students and tell them that we’ll work to improve those areas. Grammar lessons can be interesting, and I establish early with students that language is diverse and requires multiple practice opportunities.

After the pretest, I begin with direct instruction with nouns. (Note: as I continue these parts of speech lessons, I’m writing about what normally happens. If students understand nouns, for example, we don’t complete lessons over them.)

Students may take notes however they wish—many choose note cards, but some choose flipping books or infographics . Since my older students feel that different parts of speech are “babyish,” I try to give them freedom in certain areas, like with note taking. Then I might organize how I teach the eight parts of speech like this:

  • I have presentations that outline all of the material concerning parts of speech lessons. All of our assignments branch from that information, and students know to consult that information. We will work through identifying nouns that first week in an assortment of ways: worksheets, task cards, coloring sheets, centers, and grammar manipulations.
  • When students arrive on a Monday, I give the direct instruction over the concept. Students practice, often together or with me.
  • The following days of the week, we reinforce that skill. It might be direct grammar materials, but it might also be through vocabulary or mentor sentences. When students complete an assignment (for instance in week one, nouns), they move onto the area I’ve told them to study from their pretest.
  • Finally, I focus on differentiation. For example students work on personal pronouns, conjunctions, verbs, or modifiers as extension work. Sometimes they have a specific exercise, like reviewing an online website or a Powerpoint I gave them.
  • Another option for differentiation (that I base on that pretest) is for me to sit with different groups. Students who need to practice prepositions, for example, benefit from a quick review with me. Since they struggled in that area on the pretest, I don’t worry about their being bored during the direct instruction in subsequent weeks.

At this point in their schooling, these students have experienced numerous parts of speech lessons. They still need review, and by giving them extra practice, I’m hoping they see success with this.

NOTE! I repeat this format for direct instruction and practice in the following weeks. If students begin to excel with their extra practice (from the pretest), I will switch how I teach the eight parts of speech for subsequent lessons.

Parts of speech activities should include multiple approaches.

Week Two: Pronouns , not relative pronouns

Pronouns: so many of them! Part of any English grammar less must include a discussion over pronouns and their changing role in language. When I teach the eight parts of speech, I include a discussion that language evolves.

My students make anchor charts of pronouns. I practice all pronouns except relative pronouns with students. I cover indefinite, personal, compound personal, interrogative, and demonstrative. (Whew.)

I acknowledge this is tons of material, and that is why we cover it so early. I remind students that for subject-verb agreement (especially with indefinite pronouns), they will need to know them.

When learning large chunks like pronouns, I’ve found it helpful to both continuously find those pronouns in other areas of class, and to also explain to students why they will use that information later.

Creative ways to teach the eight parts of speech can include task cards, station work, and worksheets.

Week Three: Verbs

Students must be able to locate a verb in different circumstances of writing. I once taught verbs after adjectives, but to reinforce both nouns and pronouns, I switched. (As you continue building your methods to teach the eight parts of speech, you’ll discover what works best for you.)

With verbs, I tell students they must memorize linking verbs. I help them: you can read how I “act out” verbs . This really sticks, and students run through that process when deciding if a verb is a linking or action one. Plus, connect grammar to writing here. Powerful verbs can improve writing.

How to teach parts of speech with word walls and fun activities

Week Four: Adjectives and Adverbs

For modifiers, we have two direct instruction days. We cover adjectives and practice with nouns and pronouns. Normally on Wednesday, we have direct instruction over adverbs. This creates a loop of practice of everything we have studies so far. As I continue to teach the eight parts of speech, I gather when students need a pause and when they need review.

I continue to consult with students about their pretest practice. I start switching students, assigning new Powerpoints and practice sheets based on what they feel they need. As we continue, students are often all reviewing different concepts at different times. Grammar has many moving pieces, and parts of speech lessons probably won’t be linear.

Creative ways to teach parts of speech include hands on pieces.

Week Five: Prepositions , with more adjectives and adverbs review

Most students find prepositions easy once they familiarize themselves with the list. They even find prepositions fun; they are amazed at how many we use in our writing and speaking. (My free grammar lessons contain a specific activity for prepositions.) Finally, teaching prepositions allows me to build on prior knowledge and connect grammar to writing. Overall, students do well with prepositions.

The biggest part of studying prepositions is to find the objects, which then loops back to nouns and pronouns. Older students must identify prepositional phrases for proper punctuation. Whenever I think ahead (connections to writing or punctuation) during parts of speech lessons, I’m sure to explain that to students.

Parts os speech activities

Week Six: Conjunctions , not subordinating conjunctions

Much like pronouns, I don’t teach all conjunctions the first week; I cover all except for subordinating conjunctions. Most students understand FANBOYS and will recognize the pieces of correlative conjunctions. (I give them the visual that they are puzzle pieces, and they must find the missing piece of the puzzle.)

After student see the sentence format for conjunctive adverbs, they are comfortable with them. When students have trouble with conjunctions, I have them keep the lists on their desks as we practice.

Of course, conjunctions join the previously studied parts of speech, and I will add on quick practice. Ask students to identify what is joined or to label all the nouns (for example) in their sentences.

Week Seven: Subordinating conjunctions, subjects

This week, I already start review, but I add in subordinating conjunctions. Students write those and keep that list on their desks. In our final assessments, I do not quiz over those just yet. Students struggle with those, so I give them extra time for mastery. If I am teaching sixth grade, I might not review subordinating conjunctions. Seventh graders, however, need to understand subordinating conjunctions for sentence structure.

I will often walk students through finding the subordinating conjunctions, and then we will find the conjunction’s subject (a noun or a pronoun) and verb. We will discuss if the noun, pronoun, and verb have any modifiers.

If at any time, students become overwhelmed, we make parts of speech posters together.

Fun ways to teach parts of speech can include word walls and coloring sheets.

Week Eight: “Big Picture”

I mention interjections, which normally takes five minutes. An interjection is an individual word that interjects, that exclaims.

If you want to have a bit of fun as you teach the eight parts of speech, ask students to punctuate and write some interjections. Students feel successful, and that’s a nice ending to the direct instruction for different words.

We start to put all of the parts of speech lessons together, more so than we have in previous weeks. I run through sentences with students and demonstrate how they can now label each word in a sentence.

I will also have students write sentences for me, and I will deconstruct them. That is actually a practice I continue all year; students try to “stump” me with difficult sentences to label. (You can use my free grammar lessons to start discussions.) Often, this week includes honest discussions about the purpose of eight parts of speech activities: We are building a foundation, we are gaining perspective, and we are connecting language to other parts of our lives.

Week Nine: Reviews and Assessments

We have final assessments, some of which might float into the tenth week dependent upon holidays. My favorite is to bring in food and analyze the ways language is used in real life . (Plus the kids get to eat.) Analyzing food goes beyond an eight parts of speech lesson, but if students are ready for application and analysis, diving into marketing is an authentic assessment.

Next, we move onto parts of a sentence, but as I like to tell students, they already have the foundation for that. Middle or high school students are looking at the language in a new way with different purposes. They have the foundation: the eight parts of speech.

And, that is a very quick overview of how I teach the eight parts of speech! Don’t forget to download my free grammar lessons to use the entire school year.

Word walls can help teach parts of speech creatively.

Tips to teach the eight parts of speech:

  • Build the grammar lessons. Week one, we study nouns, but we never stop studying them. We identify nouns in relation to adjectives, in the stories we read, and in the vocabulary we study. Continually use domain-specific language.
  • A message I always send students is that grammar is like building blocks. We’re laying the foundation. I trust that they know nouns, and we continue to study them. You can watch this free video that details how I talk to students about the “big picture” of grammar.
  • I don’t ignore subjects and verbs. Older students know those terms. When we identify verbs, I ask students to find the subject – which is probably reviewing nouns and pronouns.
  • I do expect all students to have a grasp of the eight parts of speech, and I encourage students to teach each other. Older students can show each other tricks and develop anchor charts for the class. Since they are older, I give them as much ownership as possible.
  • Again, I never stop talking about the parts of speech. I make it a point to mention if an author uses an abundance of prepositional phrases, or repeats a noun, or is vague with pronoun use. Students should realize that grammar filters into all parts of an ELA class!

This grammar bundle contains every activity I use to teach the eight parts of speech.

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How to teach parts of speech: an eight parts of speech mini unit could help

Do you still have questions about grammar for high school, general grammar lessons, and parts of speech lessons? Join us at Grammar Gurus . It’s a private Facebook page full of helpful teachers who are devoted to teaching grammar in meaningful ways.

middle school grammar parts of speech

🆓 Parts of Speech Lesson Plan for Middle Schoolers - Aligned to Common Core

🆓 Parts of Speech Lesson Plan for Middle Schoolers - Aligned to Common Core

Common core lesson plan - parts of speech .

Objectives:

- Students will be able to identify and define the eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

- Students will be able to correctly use the different parts of speech in sentences.

- Whiteboard or blackboard

- Markers or chalk

- Handouts with sentences for practice

- Pencils or pens

Bell-Ringer Activity:

- Display a sentence on the board and ask students to identify the parts of speech in the sentence. For example: "The cat jumped over the fence." Students can work individually or in pairs to identify the parts of speech.

Direct Instruction: 

Introduction: 

1. Begin by asking students if they know what a part of speech is. Allow for a brief discussion.

2. Explain that a part of speech is a category of words that have similar grammatical properties and functions in a sentence.

3. Inform students that there are eight main parts of speech: noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

4. Emphasize that understanding the different parts of speech is important for constructing sentences correctly and effectively.

Part 1: Noun

1. Write the word "noun" on the board.

2. Explain that a noun is a word that names a person, place, thing, or idea.

3. Provide examples of nouns such as "dog," "city," "book," and "love."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of nouns and write them on the board.

Part 2: Pronoun

1. Write the word "pronoun" on the board.

2. Explain that a pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun.

3. Provide examples of pronouns such as "he," "she," "it," and "they."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of pronouns and write them on the board.

Part 3: Verb

1. Write the word "verb" on the board.

2. Explain that a verb is a word that expresses an action or a state of being.

3. Provide examples of verbs such as "run," "eat," "is," and "play."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of verbs and write them on the board.

Part 4: Adjective

1. Write the word "adjective" on the board.

2. Explain that an adjective is a word that describes or modifies a noun.

3. Provide examples of adjectives such as "happy," "big," "beautiful," and "tasty."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of adjectives and write them on the board.

Part 5: Adverb

1. Write the word "adverb" on the board.

2. Explain that an adverb is a word that describes or modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb.

3. Provide examples of adverbs such as "quickly," "very," "loudly," and "carefully."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of adverbs and write them on the board.

Part 6: Preposition

1. Write the word "preposition" on the board.

2. Explain that a preposition is a word that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence.

3. Provide examples of prepositions such as "in," "on," "under," and "between."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of prepositions and write them on the board.

Part 7: Conjunction

1. Write the word "conjunction" on the board.

2. Explain that a conjunction is a word that connects words, phrases, or clauses.

3. Provide examples of conjunctions such as "and," "but," "or," and "because."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of conjunctions and write them on the board.

Part 8: Interjection

1. Write the word "interjection" on the board.

2. Explain that an interjection is a word or phrase that expresses strong emotion or surprise.

3. Provide examples of interjections such as "wow," "ouch," "oh," and "yay."

4. Ask students to come up with their own examples of interjections and write them on the board.

Guided Practice:

- Distribute handouts with sentences for practice (included below). Instruct students to identify the parts of speech in each sentence and write them down. Walk around the classroom to provide assistance and answer any questions.

Independent Practice:

- Ask students to write one sentence containing all the different parts of speech, and have them label each one. Encourage them to be creative and use a variety of words. Collect the sentences for assessment purposes.

Exit Ticket:

- Give students a short quiz (included below) on the parts of speech. This will allow you to assess their understanding of the lesson.

- Review the different parts of speech with the class, emphasizing their definitions and examples. Ask students if they have any questions or if there is anything they would like to review.

- Remind students that understanding the parts of speech is important for improving their writing and communication skills.

- End the lesson by summarizing the main points and thanking the students for their participation.

Resources - Parts of Speech 

Guided Practice Examples:

1. The tall girl ran quickly to catch the bus.

2. My brother and I went to the park to play soccer.

3. The delicious pizza smelled amazing.

4. The cat lazily stretched out on the warm windowsill.

5. After school, we will meet at the library to study.

6. Wow! What a beautiful sunset!

7. The teacher patiently explained the math problem.

8. The dog barked loudly at the mailman.

9. I love to read books about adventure and mystery.

10. Please pass me the red pen. 

Exit Ticket Quiz

Question 1:

Which of the following is a noun?

b) Beautiful

Question 2:

Identify the pronoun in the following sentence: "She went to the store to buy groceries."

Question 3:

Choose the correct verb form to complete the sentence: "The dog _______ in the park."

Question 4:

Which of the following is an adjective?

Question 5:

Identify the adverb in the following sentence: "He spoke softly to avoid waking the baby."

Question 6:

Select the correct preposition to complete the sentence: "The book is _______ the shelf."

Question 7:

Which of the following is a conjunction?

Question 8:

Identify the interjection in the following sentence: "Wow, that was an amazing performance!"

Question 9:

Choose the correct part of speech for the word "quickly" in the sentence: "She ran quickly to catch the bus."

Question 10:

Which of the following is not a part of speech?

d) Sentence

Note: If you need to add new questions to this quiz, please provide the new questions and specify where they should be inserted.

Answer Key:

Question 1: c) Table

Question 2: d) She

Question 3: c) runs

Question 4: b) Quickly

Question 5: c) softly

Question 6: a) on

Question 7: b) And

Question 8: d) Wow

Question 9: d) Adverb

Question 10: d) Sentence

Learn English Team

The Eight Parts of Speech in English (PDF)

In this article we will give you a brief introduction to the eight parts of speech . These are noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction and interjection.

A part of speech is simply the name given to a word based on the function it performs in a sentence. Learning parts of speech is necessary to understand the correct definition of a word and to speed up your study of English grammar .

You can think of parts of speech like job titles. Just as a person can be a soldier, a teacher or a baker, a word can be a noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction or interjection, depending on what it does in a sentence. You can download a PDF of the parts of speech with examples at the end of this article.

Parts of Speech Grammar Table

lesson english 8 parts of speech

noun is a word (other than a pronoun) used to identify any of a class of people, animals, places, things, ideas.

Nouns are separated into common nouns and proper nouns .

What is a common noun?

Common nouns are used for people, animals, places, or things.

Example: granny, mother, river, mountain, hotel, taxi, fox, camel.

He is an artist . Tom hates bananas . I love my mother . Her father is a doctor .

What is a proper noun?

Proper nouns are names for particular people, places or things. They always begin with a capital letter.

Example: Ali Baba, Harry Potter, Beethoven, Turkish, British, Malay, Hong Kong, India, The United Kingdom,the Pacific Ocean, the Eiffel Tower, Father’s Day, Ramadan, Halloween.

☛ The days of the week and months of the year are also proper nouns.

December is the last month of the year. Sunday is the last day of the week.

What is singular and plural noun?

When you are talking about one person, animal, place, or thing, use a singular noun .

Example: a ship, a teacher, a river, an apple, an umbrella.

When you are talking about two or more people, animals, places, or things, use plural nouns . Most nouns are made plural by adding -s at the end.

Example: ships, teachers, rivers, apples, umbrellas

Some exceptions: bus-buses. glass-glasses. watch-watches. brush-brushes. butterfly-butterflies. baby-babies. lady-ladies. story-stories.

☛ Nouns show possession by adding ‘s.

☛ Tom’s car. ☛ Car’s key.

What is concrete and abstract noun?

Concrete nouns are things you can experience (see, hear, smell, touch, or taste) with your senses. Here are some examples: tree, music, flowers, and chocolate.

Abstract nouns represent ideas, qualities, or states that cannot be perceived through the senses. Examples include love, honesty, joy, and freedom.

Here’s a table with examples of different types of nouns in English:

Check Also: Common and Proper Nouns Explained (Exercise and Examples) Masculine and Feminine Nouns in English 100 Most Common English Nouns A-Z List (PDF)

A pronoun is a word that can replace a noun in a sentence.

Personal Pronouns: The words I , you , he , she , it , we and they are called personal pronouns. He is a nice guy. You are welcome.

Possessive Pronouns: There words mine , yours , hers , his , its , theirs , ours , yours , theirs are called possessive pronouns. This car is mine . Time is yours .

Reflexive Pronouns: The words myself , yourself , himself , herself , itself , ourselves , yourselves and themselves are called reflexive pronouns. Maryam has hurt herself . Don’t cut yourself .

Demonstrative Pronouns: The words this , these , that and those are called demonstrative pronouns. This is my car. These are my flowers.

Interrogative Pronouns: The words who , whom , whose , what and which are called interrogative pronouns. We ask questions by using these pronouns. Who is she talking to? Which do you prefer?

Here’s a table with examples of different types of pronouns in English:

Check Also: Personal & Possessive Pronouns for English Learners Nobody, No one, None Difference & Examples Difference Between Who and Whom

A word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence, and forming the main part of the predicate of a sentence, such as hear, become, happen, run, eat.

Most verbs are action words. Verbs shows you what people, animals or things are doing.

Verbs can show actions or they can show states or situations.Those are the two types of verbs in English.

☛ I am eating. – verb (eat) shows an action. ☛ I am a student. verb (to be) shows a state.

☛ Verbs also change and take different forms to show tenses.

I drink a lot of water ☛ I drank a lot of water yesterday.

Here’s a table with examples of different types of verbs in English:

Check Also: 500+ English Verbs List (V1 V2 V3 Verb Forms) + PDF Most Common English Verbs & Synonyms List (PDF) All forms of the verb TO BE and Its Usage

4. ADJECTIVE

An adjective is a describing word. Adjective describes a noun or a pronoun.

The red carpet. Deep thoughts. A busy street. She is beautiful today.

Here’s a table with examples of different types of adjectives in English:

Check Also: List of Opposite Adjectives in English (PDF) Positive Adjectives to Describe a Person (PDF) Comparative and Superlative Adjectives List + PDF 

A word that describes a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or a sentence. It tells you about an action, or the way something is done.

☛ A lot of adverbs end in -ly.

We are happily married. Tom calls me regularly . Suddenly , she knows. It’s love!

Here’s a table with examples of different types of adverbs in English:

lesson english 8 parts of speech

Check Also: Types of Adverbs in English & Meaning and Examples (PDF) Common Suffixes in English (With Examples) & PDF

6. PREPOSITION

A preposition is a word that connects one thing with another, showing how they are related.

Prepositions tell us about time, position or place.

Some examples of prepositions are words like ‘ in ,’ ‘ at ,’ ‘ on ,’ ‘ of ,’ ‘ to ,’ ‘ from .’

She is in love. Book was on the table. I am from France. He is calling to you. Where are you at ?

Here’s a table categorizing types of prepositions with examples:

Check Also: Complete List of English Prepositions A-Z (Free PDF) Commonly Used Prepositions Lists in English  Common Collocations in English With Prepositions (PDF) Prepositions of Location At, In & On (PDF)

7. CONJUNCTION

A conjunction is a linking word that used to connect clauses or sentences. For example and, or, but, as, if.

Conjunctions are used to connect words, phrases, and clauses together.

a teacher and students. a male or female?

☛ Words such as before , after , as , when , while , until , since , are conjunctions of time. Maryam could play guitar before she was four. She always brush her teeth after eating her meal.

There are four categories of conjunctions:

8.INTERJECTION

An interjection is a word that expresses an emotion, sudden, strong feeling such as surprise, pain, or pleasure.

☛ It is often followed by an exclamation point.

Check Also: Interjections in English Grammar & List Examples 1000+ Common Daily English Phrases for Beginners (PDF)

lesson english 8 parts of speech

Parts of Speech PDF

Here you can download parts of speech PDF with examples.

  Parts of Speech in English PDF

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8 Parts of Speech for ESL Learners

You might have heard that learning grammar rules is a hard part of learning English as a second language . We beg to differ! While the rules of English grammar might be confusing at times, they are absolutely critical for understanding and learning the language. We are English language experts here at Excel, so if you run into any difficulties you’ll always have someone on your side to patiently help you along! Remember, practice makes perfect. Keep working at it, and soon you won’t even have to think about it any longer!

The most basic part of grammar in the English language is learning the parts of speech. Do you know all the eight parts of speech? Let’s take a walk down memory lane and see how much you remember from elementary school. You may remember some parts of speech from a song in school as a child or even Sesame Street. If this is the first time you’re hearing about the eight parts of speech, here’s our introduction for you!

First is the noun. I remember the phrase “person, place, or thing” repeated over and over by my grade school teacher. The noun is the easiest to identify and does most of the work in a sentence. It either comes before the verb as a subject or after the verb as an object.

Nouns can be regular in the plural form like apple/apples, nurse/nurses, and mother/mothers or irregular like goose/geese, tooth/teeth, and fish/fish.

Nouns can be common like books or abstract like love, laughter, fear.

The 8 Parts of Speech | Pronouns

2. PRONOUNS

Second, is the pronoun. Pronouns are used in the place of a noun and can be “I, you, he, she, it, they, we” as subjects or “me, you, him, her, it, them, us” as objects. Pronouns can be reflexive such as “myself, yourself, herself, etc.” or possessive like “my, your, her, etc.”

Relative pronouns are used with dependent clauses such as “which, that, what, whom, who” and demonstrative pronouns such as “this, that, these, those,” taking the place of a previously named noun.

For example, “The books which I read in college were better than those I read in elementary school.”

The third part of speech is the verb. Without it, the noun can’t do anything. Verbs must agree with the nouns they follow.

A singular noun like apple needs a singular verb. “An apple tastes good.”

However, a plural noun needs a plural verb. “Apples taste good.”

To make things even more complicated, English has a myriad of irregular verbs that change in spelling from the present to the past tense. Examples include: go/went, eat/ate/, lose/lost.

The 8 Parts of Speech | Adjective

4. ADJECTIVE

Four is the adjective. You can’t paint an accurate picture with words without adjectives. For example, “The beautiful , calm lake looked serene against the orange and yellow clear sky.”

Adjectives describe nouns with details about the size, color, quality, age, the material of nouns. Try telling a story without this part of speech, and the story will be dull and boring (which are also adjectives!)

If adjectives describe nouns, the fifth part of speech, adverbs, describe how things happen. Adverbs describe the manner with which verbs behave. They usually end in “ly” and answer the question of how something happened. “She sang the song slowly and clearly .”

The 8 Parts of Speech | Prepositions

6. PREPOSITIONS

Number six is prepositions. This word looks like the word position… Prepositions put nouns and pronouns in a place. For example, “The book is on the shelf in the corner of the room.”

7. CONJUNCTIONS

The seventh part of speech is conjunctions. I remember the Sesame Street song “conjunction junction, what’s your function?” Coordinating conjunctions link phrases and clauses. These include for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.

Subordinating conjunctions join independent and dependent clauses. For example, “I went to the store to buy milk and eggs because I wanted to bake a cake.”

8. INTERJECTIONS

The final part of speech is interjections. Interjections show mood or feelings. “Wow!” “Great!” “Oh, man!” are ways we add feeling or expression to something that was said.

The 8 Parts of Speech | Interjections

“Phew!” That was not easy.

These are the eight parts of speech. If they are new or unfamiliar to you, work on memorizing these! The eight parts of speech form the foundation of the English language. When you are reading, try to identify a few of the words in the article or book. You’ll get the hang of it in no time!

If you haven’t enrolled in our English Intensive Program yet, what are you waiting for? You’ll learn more than just the parts of speech…we’ll work on reading , speaking , writing , and more. Apply online today or give us a call !

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