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How to Write in Spanish: The Step-by-step Guide to Perfecting Your Writing Skills

Do you want to improve your Spanish writing skills and get even closer to fluency?

If you want to make Cervantes blush with your mastery of Spanish writing, you have come to the right place.

This step-by-step guide will show you how to write in Spanish, including information on spelling, grammar and more, as well as give you the tools to write practically anything!

Key Spanish Writing Rules

Spanish spelling, capitalization rules in spanish, spanish punctuation, spanish sentence structure, spanish abbreviations, other differences between english and spanish writing rules, how to write letters in spanish, how to write an email in spanish, how to write an essay in spanish, texting in spanish, spanish creative writing, journaling in spanish, other types of spanish writing, how to type in spanish, main differences between english and spanish keyboards, and one more thing….

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If you want to be the next Cervantes, you should get acquainted with the main Spanish writing rules and the major differences between writing in English and writing in Spanish. Here are a few of them.

Spelling in Spanish is much more intuitive than it is in English.

This may sound almost too good to be true, but written words in Spanish are actually designed to reflect what they sound like! There are far fewer cases of silent letters, double letters or different spellings for the same sounds. Also, vowels each have their own specific sounds that don’t change, no matter what other letters surround it.

However, there are a couple of spelling “situations” that can give you a bit of a headache if you do not pay attention:

  • The letter h has no sound. Regardless of its position in a word, it will always be soundless (zanahoria — carrot, hoguera  — bonfire , hueso  — bone). This letter changes the sound of the letter c when they go together (chaleco— vest , coche  — car , noche  — night), and even though it has no sound, it can change the meaning of a word (ola— wave, hola  — hello).
  • There are some letter pairs that can be confusing. It would be impossible for you to learn every word containing these pairs, so the best you can do is check a dictionary in case of doubt. The letters that normally cause problems to learners of Spanish are b/v, r/rr, g/j, ll/y and the “triplets” c/k/q and c/s/z .
  • Spanish uses accent marks . Accent marks may be small, but they are very important. If a word has an accent mark in Spanish, do not ignore it, because accent marks can easily change the pronunciation and meaning of words (tráfico — traffic , trafico — I smuggle , traficó — he smuggled).

If you want to improve your Spanish spelling skills, you can try some Spanish spelling games . They will make the learning process much more enjoyable, and the topic more accessible to you.

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Additionally, you may want to install a Spanish spell checker . This way you can be sure the majority of spelling errors you make while writing in Spanish will be detected and corrected.

Learning Spanish capitalization is actually pretty straightforward. You just have to remember the words that are not capitalized in Spanish.

For instance, Spanish does not capitalize, among others:

  • Days of the week
  • Nationalities
  • Religions and their adjectives
  • Social and political movements
  • The pronoun yo (I) unless it is the first word in a sentence
  • Book titles (except for the first word)
  • Movie titles (except for the first word)
  • Personal titles (except when they are the first word in a sentence)

Punctuation is another area where English and Spanish share a lot of features.

However, there are some Spanish punctuation rules that may be surprising for learners of Spanish.

These are the main ones (some of them have already been mentioned):

  • Spanish has an opening question mark and an opening exclamation mark (¿,¡).
  • Spanish does not capitalize the first word after a colon.
  • Spanish uses the colon in the opening of letters. While English uses a comma (Dear Mrs. Petunia,), Spanish uses a colon (Estimada señora Petunia:).
  • In Spanish, there is no Oxford comma at all. The last two items of a list will always be joined with a conjunction like y (and) or o (or) .
  • Spanish and English write out numbers differently. In Spanish, you use a period to separate groups of thousands (e.g. 1450 or 1,450 would be 1.450 in Spanish). Spanish uses the comma as the decimal separator (so 1.5 would be 1,5 in Spanish).
  • Spanish normally leaves commas, periods and other punctuation marks outside the quotation marks. (English: “I love you.” vs. Spanish “Te quiero”.).
  • Dialogue formatting is very different in Spanish. The biggest difference is possibly the fact that Spanish uses a dash to open a dialogue (instead of quotation marks) and to enclose the dialogue tag (instead of commas). For example: 

English: “I love him,” she said, “I always have. “

Spanish: –Lo amo –dijo ella–. Siempre lo he amado.

Sentence structure refers to the internal organization of a language, i.e. the order we have to put elements in a sentence so that it is grammatically correct.

Many learners of Spanish think that since both Spanish and English follow the general pattern S + V + O (Subject + Verb + Object), both languages build sentences in the exact same way.

This is true sometimes, as in the following two examples:

Marta está bebiendo café. (S + V + O) Marta is drinking coffee. (S + V + O)

Unfortunately, this is not always the case, and learners of Spanish should take into account a couple of Spanish sentence structure rules if they want to come up with correct sentences, even if they are trying to produce basic Spanish sentences :

  • In Spanish, you can omit the subject. If you know who you are talking or writing about, you do not need to mention that person (Tengo hambre — I am hungry). This is possible because verbs in Spanish have a different ending for each grammatical person.
  • Adjectives come after the noun in Spanish. There are a few exceptions with a change in meaning, but overall, adjectives always come after the noun (la camisa blanca — the white shirt).
  • Nouns and adjectives have to agree in Spanish. When you write a sentence in Spanish, you have to take a look at the nouns. Every determiner, quantifier, adjective and adverb that refers to a noun must have the same gender and number (el perro negro  — the black dog, all words masculine and singular in Spanish; las tazas rojas  — the red cups, all words feminine and plural in Spanish).
  • Negation is very simple in Spanish. The majority of sentences become negative in Spanish by adding no in front of the main verb. No other changes are normally needed. You can also make negations in Spanish by using negative adverbs like nunca (never) and nadie (no one).

Abbreviations can be used in both formal and informal contexts, and even though they tend to work similarly across languages, there are a couple of things you should know about Spanish abbreviations and how to use them when writing in Spanish:

  • Even though personal titles are not capitalized when written in full, their abbreviations are capitalized. For example:

señor — Sr. / Mister

señora  — Sra. / Mrs .

doctor  — Dr. / Doctor

  • There are some abbreviations that appear very frequently in Spanish correspondence. For instance:

usted  — Vd. / formal you

se ruega contestación — S.R.C. / RSVP

  • Ordinal numbers are gendered. They are adjectives, so they take on the gender of the noun they are referring to. Because of this, their abbreviations are also marked for gender (1º/1ª, 2º/2ª…).
  • Spanish abbreviations can have a plural form. Normally, abbreviations add -s to form their plural (página — pág. / page, páginas  — págs. / pages). If the abbreviation has only one letter, they normally double it (página  — p. / page , páginas  — pp. / pages).
  • Some acronyms do not accept the plural ending -s . They will still take the plural determiner if necessary (los CD  — the CDs). Oddly enough, you have to pronounce the final -s when reading/pronouncing them (los ce-dés  — the cee dees).
  • There are some international abbreviations and acronyms that have their own version in Spanish. Examples of this are:

la UE  — la Unión Europea / the EU (European Union)

la ONU — la Organización de Naciones Unidas / the UN (United Nations)

  • Spanish people use a lot of abbreviations when texting. (Have a look at the section on Texting in Spanish for more info.)

Although less important, there are some differences between English and Spanish you should take into account when writing in Spanish:

  • We write dates differently. In Spanish, the order of writing the date is always day/month/year. So, while an American might read the date 02/07/2018 as February the 7th 2018, for a Spanish-speaking person it would be July the 2nd 2018.
  • We use different measurement systems. This is something to bear in mind not only while writing, but when using Spanish in general. Not everybody knows what inches, feet, pounds or miles are (especially in Spain). Spanish-speaking countries use the metric system, so we have centimeters, meters, kilograms, kilometers, etc.

The first thing you need to do before starting to write a letter is to decide whether it has to be formal or informal.

This will have an impact not only on the body of the letter, but also (and especially) on the way you start and finish writing it.

There are a couple of well-established rules you should bear in mind when writing a letter in Spanish :

  • Querido/a (Dear) is only used in informal letters, while Estimado/a (Dear) is the preferred form in formal ones.
  • You normally use just the first name of the person you are writing to if the letter is informal (Querido Julián), but Señor (Mr.), Señora (Mrs.) or Señorita (Miss) and a surname if the letter is formal (Estimado Sr. González).
  • Use tú (informal you) in the body of informal letters, but usted/ustedes (formal you singular/plural) in formal ones.
  • When closing a letter, you can send Besos y abrazos (Hugs and kisses) in casual letters, but never in formal ones. Use Saludos (Regards) in semi-formal letters, and Cordialmente/Atentamente (Yours sincerely) in formal ones.

Knowing how to write an email in Spanish is a skill you are going to need sooner or later, because email communication, especially in a professional environment, is something most of us have to do on a daily basis.

The majority of the rules we had for writing letters also apply here.

You should make sure to use the right opening and closing in your email, and that the overall tone and the vocabulary used are appropriate to the situation.

When writing an email, especially a formal one, you will normally have to include four sections: greeting, reason for writing, body of the email and closing.

Here is a very brief example of an informal email John wrote to his friend Joanne:

¡Hola, Joanne! (Hi, Joanne!)

Reason for writing

Te escribo para preguntar si irás mañana al cumpleaños de Sonia. (I’m writing to ask if you’ll be going to Sonia’s birthday tomorrow.)

Me encantaría verte. ¡Hace tanto tiempo que no te veo! Madre mía, creo que la última vez que nos encontramos fue para Navidad. ¿Te acuerdas? (I would love to see you. I haven’t seen you in ages! Good Lord, I think the last time we ran into each other was on Christmas. Do you remember?)

Un abrazo, (Hugs,)

Starting to write essays in Spanish is possibly one of the most challenging tasks for beginner learners.

Going from simple sentences to several paragraphs requires a lot of practice, but there are tons of fixed expressions that can be used in order to make this process easier.

Depending on the type of essay you need to write, you will have to cover one or more of the following points:

Giving your opinion

This is very common in essays, especially the ones included in official Spanish exams. Make sure you use expressions that help you introduce your personal opinions, such as en mi opinión (in my opinion), me parece que (it seems to me that) or creo que (I believe that).

Agreeing and disagreeing

Another very common type of essay is the one where you are given a sentence or quotation and you have to agree or disagree with it. Useful expressions here can be estoy de acuerdo (I agree), no estoy de acuerdo (I disagree) and es falso que (it is false that).

Backing your claims

If you say that something is false or that you know for a fact something is true, you should back your claims with some evidence. Try to introduce words and expressions such as según (according to), demostrar (to demonstrate) and la fuente (the source).

A conclusion normally summarizes the main topics of the essay and answers any questions and hypotheses that were posed in the introduction. When writing your conclusion, use expressions like en conclusión (in conclusion), por esta razón (for this reason) and en resumen (in summary).

Texting in any language has its own separate set of rules.

For instance, depending on the recipient of the message, two texts can look completely different even if they include the exact same information:

Xq tki. (Because I have to go.) This is very informal, sent to a friend.

Porque tengo que irme. (Because I have to go.) This is sent in a much more formal situation, normally to someone with whom we do not have a very close relationship.

As you can see from the first example, there are a lot of abbreviations and slang words you can use while texting in Spanish , much like you would do in English.

It would be impossible to mention all of them here, but if you learn their most common traits, you will be able to text in Spanish like a pro:

  • Letters are omitted. The most common feature you will see is the omission of vowels and consonants.

For example: xa — para (for), gnl — genial (great)

  • The letters q and c normally become k.

For example: One of the most common examples is the expression tkm — te quiero mucho (I love you so much)

  • There are some established abbreviations you will need to learn by heart. Sometimes you will only be given one letter, so knowing what it means in the world of Spanish texting will come in handy .

For example: b — bien (good), q — que/qué (that/what)

  • Numbers and symbols can also be used. Just as in English, if a number comes close to the pronunciation of a part of a word, some letters will be replaced by numbers .

salu2 — saludos (regards), 100pre — siempre (always)

  • Watch out for acronyms. Spanish normally uses their own versions of well-known acronyms. These acronyms are often similar to the international ones or can be understood from the context, but sometimes they will be completely different.

For example: NATO — OTAN , World Health Organization / WHO – Organización Mundial de la Salud / OMS

Creative writing is basically any kind of writing that is not professional, academic or journalistic.

Since this definition is so broad, there are also many types of writing that can fall into this category, the most common ones being poetry, novels, scripts, short stories, fairy tales and screenplays, among others.

Creative writing can be an amazing way to improve your Spanish language skills.

It forces you to think, be creative, ask questions and find answers for them. Your brain will be working hard while you write creatively, and the fact that you will be using vocabulary and grammar rules you have previously studied will make you remember them easier.

The ideal scenario for a learner of Spanish who wants to give creative writing a go would be having a native Spanish speaker that can read what the learner is writing and give detailed feedback (spelling and grammar errors and overall writing skills that could be improved).

Unfortunately, this is quite difficult to find, so the second-best option is to find resources that will help the learner get some Spanish writing practice (such as writing apps, creative writing websites, textbooks that teach writing, writing prompts, etc.).

Regardless of the way you choose to practice your creative writing skills, remember rule number one of every good writer: You have to read much more than you write!

Since there are no established rules, journaling can be a good way of practicing writing in Spanish without stress. No one except you will have access to your journal (unless you want to), so it does not matter if you make spelling mistakes or write grammatically incorrect sentences as long as you are doing it in Spanish.

If you feel that writing a journal in Spanish can be challenging, try to break your thoughts down into smaller thoughts.

There are many topics you can write about that will allow you to practice your Spanish writing skills in an undemanding way:

  • Your bucket list.
  • Your dreams.
  • Things you are thankful for.
  • Reasons for learning Spanish.
  • Things that motivate you.
  • Things that make you sad.
  • Your goals for this week/month/year.
  • Your fears.
  • Your favorite places/people and why.

The list goes on and on. Write about the topics you want, whenever you want and however you want. Just remember to do it on a daily basis to be able to enjoy all the benefits journaling in Spanish can bring to you, both mentally and linguistically speaking.

There are many more types of Spanish writing, and each of them has its own intrinsic characteristics and rules.

Mentioning all of them would be impossible here, so here you have a selection of a few of them:

Recipes have a very easy structure: a list of ingredients and steps to cook the dish. You can start practicing writing recipes in Spanish by using the infinitive when you give the instructions (Pelar las patatas — To peel the potatoes), and move on to the imperative mood when you study the Spanish imperativo (Pela las patatas — Peel the potatoes).

Greeting cards

Even though we normally buy ready-made cards, adding a few words of our own could be a very nice finishing touch. If you are giving a birthday card, remember to include some wishes like ¡Feliz cumpleaños! (Happy birthday!) or ¡Te deseo mucha felicidad! (I wish you lots of happiness!).

If you want to give a Valentine’s Day card, try to make it even more personal by creating a romantic card in Spanish yourself. Do not forget to express your feelings with phrases like:

  • Mi amor (My love)
  • Mi cariño (My sweetheart)
  • Te amo (I love you)

Notes can be written to say thank you, to ask for a favor or to remind someone to do something. They tend to be very short and to the point, including only information that is absolutely necessary. For this reason, many notes only include one or two words:

  • ¡Gracias! (Thanks!)
  • Para ti. (For you.)
  • ¿Me echas una mano? (Will you help me?)
  • Te quiero. (I love you.)
  • Que aproveche. (Enjoy your meal.)
  • Compra leche. (Buy some milk.)

Spanish and English keyboards are different.

Because of that, typing in Spanish can be a challenge for the first few times.

There are several ways in which you can type in Spanish on your device:

  • You can install a keyboard on your device. 
  • You can use Alt codes (Windows) and Opt codes (Macs). 
  • You can use online tools such as TypeIt.  

If you take a look at a Spanish keyboard, you will notice some letters, characters and symbols have changed, moved or disappeared.

Let’s have a look at these changes.

Once you have your device ready to type in Spanish, you will notice some things are… different.

There are enough differences between a Spanish and an English keyboard to write a whole book, so I will only mention the three most important ones:

Accent marks

Spanish vowels can have an accent mark ( á, é,  í, ó, ú ). In order to type it, you first have to type the accent key on your keyboard (‘) and then the vowel you want to add the accent mark to.

Another letter with a mark is the Spanish letter ñ . In this case, you only have to press the (:) key, because Spanish keyboards have their own ñ key. The last mark you will need in Spanish is the diéresis (¨). In order to type it, press Shift + the (‘) key. Then type u or i.

Question and exclamation marks

One of the first interesting facts we learn about the Spanish language is that it has opening question marks and exclamation marks.

In order to type the opening question mark, press Shift and (=). The closing question mark can be typed by pressing Shift and (-). As for the exclamation marks, the opening one is very easy: just press the (=) key. The closing one can be typed by pressing Shift + 1, like on your normal keyboard.

Another change you will notice when typing in Spanish is the series of symbols you get by pressing Shift + numbers 2 to 0. Your keyboard probably has the sequence @#$%^&*() , while the Spanish keyboard will give you “·$%&/()= .

There are other differences between both keyboards, like the position of hyphens, dashes, apostrophes, colons, semi-colons, stops and commas, among others.

In the beginning, all these differences can be a little bit overwhelming, and you will probably type the wrong symbol or letter because your brain will want to do it automatically in your normal keyboard layout.

As with everything, practicing Spanish typing will be the key (no pun intended) to get you used to the new layout. There are even Spanish typing games where you can practice all you want until you feel fully comfortable using the Spanish keyboard.

I know this is a lot of information to digest, but the good news is that you now have everything you need to know about how to write in Spanish!

Thanks to writing, you will improve not only your vocabulary and grammar, but also your reading, speaking and listening skills.

So take a pencil and a piece of paper (or run that word processor you normally use) and start writing in Spanish right away!

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how to write spanish essay

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Spanish Essay Phrases: 40 Useful Phrases for an Impressive Writeup

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May 30, 2019

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Do you need to write a lot of essays in Spanish? If you do, don’t worry. It's about to get a little bit easier for you because here in this article, we’ve listed many useful Spanish essay phrases that you can readily use in your essays.

Essay Phrases

Feel free to pepper your essays with the words and expressions from this list. It would certainly elevate your essays and impress your teachers. You're welcome!

Get the PDF ( + MP3!)

No time to read now? Then you might opt to get the list in PDF instead. If you sign up to the newsletter, you'll get the list of Spanish essay phrases in PDF format plus free audio files. 

Spanish Essay Phrases

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Additional Resources

You can also check out the following resources:

84 Spanish Expressions for Agreeing and Disagreeing

Common Spanish Verbs

Expresiones útiles para escribir en español

Looking for more Spanish phrases? Check out this e-book with audio!

Try to use the essay phrases in Spanish that you learned in this lesson and write a few example sentences in the comments section!

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About the author 

Janey is a fan of different languages and studied Spanish, German, Mandarin, and Japanese in college. She has now added French into the mix, though English will always be her first love. She loves reading anything (including product labels).

VERY VERY useful !! Gracias

Amazing! This will definitely help me in tomorrow’s spanish test 🙂

Sounds good

Thanks for the assistance, in learning Spanish.

Amazing article! Very helpful! Also, this website is great for Spanish Beginners.

It’s easy when you put it that way

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Basic Guidelines For Writing Essays in Spanish

how to write essays in spanish

Students tend to focus on speaking practice while learning Spanish, so they often neglect writing. However, most educators emphasize its importance for mastering the language. They say it’s impossible to become fluent in a particular language if one doesn’t train writing skills. 

Therefore, teachers give a lot of essay assignments to students. This type of homework is a great way to inspire them to think and communicate in Spanish effectively. It may be quite difficult to complete such a task. However, it’s one of the most effective ways to learn Spanish or any other language.

You may be tempted to go online and find the best essay writing service to have your essay written for you. This may be helpful when you’re pressed for time, but in the long run, you’re missing an opportunity to improve your own essay writing skills. That’s why we are going to provide you with some recommendations on how to ease the writing process.

Some tips on writing in Spanish 

  • Be careful with word spelling. Remember that teachers pay special attention to spelling so it can either make or break your student image. Having good spelling makes a positive impression of your writing skills and boosts your grades. 
  • Make your essay coherent with the help of connectors. Use them to explain the relationship between the ideas so your essay doesn’t look like just a list of thoughts and facts. 
  • Pay attention to syntax or the word order. As you need to stick to the academic style, try to keep the traditional order such as “subject + verb + objects”. This will also help you express your opinion in a simpler way, so it’s more clear to the reader.
  • Avoid word repetitions by using synonyms. Frequent repetitions make your text boring and heavy. If you use the same words again and again, your essay will look dull. Hence, try to find synonyms in Spanish thesaurus and replace the most commonly used expressions with them. 
  • Before you create a final version of your essay, let someone read it and give feedback. It’s hard to be objective about your writing, so ask another person to tell you which ideas are less clear if your text contains any confusing phrases, and what are the positive aspects that can be reinforced. 
  • Do not write the essay in your native language first to translate it into Spanish then. This approach is not viable for mastering a foreign language. The only thing that you are doing by translating the text literally is practicing the grammatical structures that you have learned. This doesn’t help you learn new idioms and collocations that don’t follow the general grammatical rules. 

Now that you know how to make your writing better, let’s consider a step-by-step guide to essay writing in Spanish. 

Pick an interesting topic 

If possible, choose a topic you are truly excited about. Unless the specific title was given to you by instructors, find a theme you want to research and write about. True interest is what will drive you towards creating an excellent piece. If you enjoy reading about the subject you are going to analyze in your essay, then you will definitely succeed in writing. Remember that decent work can be done only if you are passionate about it. 

Brainstorm the ideas 

When it comes to any project, brainstorming is an integral stage of the creation process. This is one of the most efficient ways to gain insights and generate new ideas. You can use this technique to think of the main supporting arguments, an approach for a catchy introduction, and paragraph organization. You can also try freewriting and/or make a brief outline to ease the writing process itself. 

Create an introduction 

Probably the main rule about creating an introduction that you have to stick to is adding a clear thesis statement there. It must be included in the first paragraph to give your essay a certain direction and help the readers focus their attention on the topic. Also, your introduction must be catchy and intriguing to evoke the desire to read the essay further and learn more. 

Organize an essay body 

It’s essential to make the body paragraphs organized logically. You need to make sure that each of them is closely related to the main topic and discusses one major point. Each body paragraph must consist of a topic sentence and supporting arguments with evidence. It’s very important to write sentences in a logical sequence so they follow each other orderly. Also, since paragraphs shouldn’t overlap in content, add smooth transitions from one to the other. 

Sum up the content 

The vital requirement to the conclusion is that it must logically relate to the original thesis statement. Generally, it’s not acceptable to introduce new ideas in the conclusion. Instead, you need to sum up the main points mentioned in the essay’s body. It’s also forbidden to add any off-topic ideas to the last paragraph of your paper.

Check content relevance and cohesion 

Once you complete the conclusion, read through the essay for relevance and cohesion. Make sure that the whole piece is on the topic and in the mode required. In particular, check if body paragraphs support the thesis statement and whether the conclusion relates to it. After that, read your paper once again to see whether the parts connect together well. Think if there are logical links between ideas and if you need more transitions. 

Read for clarity and style

Scan your essay to find out whether some sections may be unclear to the reader. Analyze the text to find out if it sounds academic and polished. Check if there are any vague pronouns, excessive wording, or awkward phrases. Don’t forget to make sure that all points are listed in similar grammatical forms.

The last stage of your writing process is final proofreading. Read your paper the last time looking at grammar, spelling, punctuation, verb tense, word forms, and pronoun agreement. Correct all the mistakes to make your work excellent. 

Remember that the most important thing about learning a foreign language is a regular practice. Therefore, you should use any opportunity provided by instructors to polish your skills. Hopefully, the recommendations given above will help you write an excellent essay and master the Spanish language!

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how to write spanish essay

Spanish Words to Use in an Essay

Are you writing an essay in Spanish and aren't sure of the best way to start the next paragraph? Or maybe you're trying to think of some connectors to make your essay flow better. Look no further! In this article, we've prepared a list of words that will help you write that Spanish essay without even breaking a sweat.

Looking to learn more phrases in Spanish? Check these articles out!

  • Fundamental Spanish Phrases to Learn Right Away
  • Spanish Exclamatory Words and Expressions
  • Spanish Idioms
  • How to Say "I Don't Understand" in Spanish
  • How to Say “Good Morning” in Spanish
  • "Good Night" in Spanish
  • How to Say "I Speak a Little Spanish"
  • Words of Encouragement in Spanish
  • Common Mistakes in Spanish

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how to write spanish essay

Writing an Essay in Spanish: Tips for a Great Essay

how to write spanish essay

When learning Spanish, many students put all their energy into practicing speaking. They chat with classmates, engage in conversations with native speakers, and tune into Spanish TV shows or podcasts. But amidst this flurry of spoken practice, writing often gets pushed aside like yesterday's homework.

Yet, without honing those writing chops, achieving true fluency in Spanish—or any language for that matter—can be tough. That's why, in this article, we're jumping into writing an essay in Spanish, showing why it's not just a dreaded task but a great chance to boost your language skills. ¡Vamos!

how to write spanish essay

Quick Tips on Writing in Spanish

Now that you're ready to tackle Spanish essay writing, let's make sure you're armed with some handy tips from our Spanish essay writer :

  • Mind Your Spelling : Pay close attention to how words are spelled. Good spelling can make your writing look professional and help you avoid embarrassing mistakes.
  • Use Transition Words : Incorporate transition words like 'sin embargo' (however), 'por lo tanto' (therefore), and 'además' (moreover) to connect your ideas and make your essay flow smoothly.
  • Stick to Simple Sentences : Keep your sentences straightforward and easy to understand. Avoid using overly complicated phrases that might confuse your reader.
  • Practice Grammar Regularly : Brush up on grammar rules to avoid common mistakes. Pay attention to verb conjugations, noun-adjective agreement, and sentence structure.
  • Expand Your Vocabulary : Learn new Spanish words and phrases regularly to enrich your writing. Try using a Spanish-English dictionary or language-learning app to discover new vocabulary.
  • Read Spanish Texts : Read books, articles, and essays written in this language to familiarize yourself with the language's structure and style. Pay attention to how sentences are constructed and how ideas are expressed.

With these quick tips in mind, let’s now check out a step-by-step guide to crafting an essay in Spanish.

Choose a Compelling Subject

When you start your essay, picking a compelling subject is your first step. Choose a topic that you care about. It will show in your writing, making it more engaging and lively.

Think about what excites you or what you want to know more about. Maybe there's a part of Spanish culture that fascinates you, like flamenco dancing or the traditional food of a specific region. Or perhaps you're intrigued by a historical figure or a current issue in Spanish-speaking countries.

Once you settle on a topic, dig into it. Look up articles, watch videos, and gather as much information as you can. This background work will not only beef up your knowledge but also give you plenty of material to draw from when you sit down to write your essay.

Generate Ideas

Brainstorming can really kick things into gear by helping you develop a deep and varied pool of thoughts related to your topic. Start by jotting down everything that comes to mind about your subject. Don't worry about organizing these ideas yet; the goal is to get all your thoughts out on paper. You might be surprised by what you come up with!

Use mind maps to help visualize the connections between different ideas. Draw a circle in the center of a page, write your main topic in it, and then branch out with related ideas, connecting them with lines to show how they relate to each other and to the central theme.

Asking questions can also spark more ideas. What? Who? Where? When? Why? How? These questions can lead you to consider different angles of your topic that you might not have thought about before.

Once you have a good list of ideas, look for patterns or themes that could form the backbone of your essay. Choose the ones that are most interesting to you, or that have plenty of information available, and you'll find your essay starts to take shape naturally from there.

how to write spanish essay

Craft an Opening

The opening, or introduction, should not only introduce your topic but also pique the reader's curiosity. Here's how you can create an engaging introduction:

  • Start with a hook : Begin with an intriguing statement, a surprising fact, or a provocative question related to your topic. For example, if you're writing about the influence of Spanish cinema, you might start with statistics about the international awards Spanish films have won.
  • Provide some background : After grabbing the reader's attention, give a bit of background to place your topic in context. This doesn't have to be detailed but should provide enough information to understand the importance of the topic and why it's relevant.
  • State your thesis : End your introduction with a clear thesis statement that will guide the rest of your essay, making sure it's specific and directly related to your topic.

Structure the Essay

A well-organized essay makes it easier for your readers to follow your arguments and understand the points you're making. As previously mentioned, your introduction should start with a hook to capture interest, provide some background information to set the scene and conclude with a strong thesis statement that outlines your main argument or perspective.

As for the body section, start each paragraph with a topic sentence that introduces the main idea of the paragraph. This sentence should link back to your thesis statement and indicate how this paragraph will support your overall argument. Then, follow the topic sentence with evidence, examples, and explanations to flesh out your argument.

Lastly, begin your conclusion by briefly summarizing the key points you have discussed. Then, reinforce your thesis statement with a fresh rephrasing, showing how the body of your essay has supported it throughout.

Recap the Content

Now that you've laid out your arguments in the body of your essay, it's time to recap. Briefly go over the main points from each section of your essay. This reminds the reader of what you've discussed and how it all connects. Then, tie each point back to your thesis statement. Also, mention any particularly strong evidence or insightful observations again, reinforcing their importance.

Ensure Coherence and Relevance

Once you've recapped the content of your writing, it's essential to ensure coherence and relevance throughout. You can do this by reviewing the transitions between paragraphs and sections, ensuring they flow smoothly and logically from one idea to the next.

Also, look for any redundant or repetitive information. Remove anything that doesn't add value to your argument or that repeats points you've already made. It's also important to avoid going off on tangents or introducing unrelated information.

Lastly, before finalizing your essay, ask yourself if every part of it is relevant to your main argument. If not, consider revising or removing those sections to maintain focus.

Review for Clarity and Style

Once you've ensured coherence and relevance in your writing, it's time to review for clarity and style. Break down long or convoluted sentences into shorter, more straightforward ones. This helps prevent confusion and keeps your writing clear. You can also read your essay aloud to yourself or have someone else read it to you. This can help you identify awkward phrasing or unclear passages that may need revision.

Edit for Errors

Finally, it's time to edit your essay for errors. This step is crucial for ensuring that your writing is polished and professional. Using a spellchecker or asking a native speaker to proofread your essay for you is usually a good idea. Then, double-check your formatting, including margins, font size, and spacing. Make sure your essay follows any specific formatting guidelines provided by your instructor.

By thoroughly editing your essay for Spanish language errors, you ensure that your final product is polished and ready to impress your readers. Take your time with this step to catch any mistakes and make the necessary revisions for a flawless finish.

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Spanish Writing Practice

Spanish writing exercises by level.

Practise your Spanish writing skills with our ever-growing collection of interactive Spanish writing exercises for every  CEFR level from A0 to C1! If you're unsure about your current proficiency, try our  test to get your Spanish level before diving into the exercises.

Spanish writing exercise with Answer

All writing exercises are made by our qualified native Spanish teachers to help you improve your writing skills and confidence.

Kwizbot  will give you a series of prompts to translate to Spanish. He’ll show you where you make mistakes as you go along and will suggest related lessons for you.

Boost your Spanish writing skills by adding the lessons you find most interesting to your  Notebook and practising them later.

Click on any exercise to get started.

A1: Beginner Spanish writing exercises

  • A business meeting Employment Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Noelia tells us about her business meeting.
  • A day out with my daughter Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Artículo definido Isabel plans to spend a delightful day out with her daughter.
  • A declaration of love Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Read this declaration of love from Enrique.
  • A hotel booking Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Borja is going to spend a week in Barcelona and tells us about the hotel that he is going to book.
  • A love story Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Apócope Marta and Andrew meet in a bar...
  • A march for rare diseases Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Diego is participating today in a charity march.
  • A mysterious invitation Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Guillermo tells us about a mysterious note he found inside his locker.
  • A new space suit Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Sergio is going to travel to the moon in a new space suit!
  • A perfect day in Granada Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Travel with Enrique to Granada.
  • A piece of cake, please Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Carolina loves celebrating her birthday in style with her favourite cake.
  • A purple tide Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Learn about the purple tide in Spain.
  • A royal dinner in Santo Domingo Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Indulge yourself with a royal dinner experience in Santo Domingo.
  • A sunny Christmas in the Southern Cone Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Artículo definido Humberto tells us about Christmas in Uruguay.
  • A ticket for Malaga, please! Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio Artículo indefinido César wants to get a train ticket to travel to Malaga.
  • A trip to the Sierra de Atapuerca Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Pedro and Miguel are visiting Atapuerca tomorrow.
  • A very interactive lesson with Kwiziq Language & Education Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adverbio Clara is using kwiziq for the first time and tells us about a lesson she is taking.
  • Alexis Sánchez: a famous soccer player Famous People Adjetivo Adverbio Artículo indefinido Learn about Alexis Sánchez, a famous soccer player.
  • Almendra market Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Experience the charm of Vitoria's medieval market.
  • Amelia Valcárcel: a famous Spanish philosopher Famous People Language & Education Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Learn about Amelia Valcárcel, a famous Spanish philosopher.
  • An ergonomic steering wheel Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Discover Sofia's revolutionary ergonomic steering wheel for the ultimate driving experience!
  • An exhibition by Frida Kahlo Art & Design Famous People Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Marcos is going to a Frida Kahlo exhibition.
  • An exotic flower Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Learn about this Argentinian flower.
  • An original costume Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Adverbio Lucía's mum tells us about her daughter's costume.
  • Ana's baby shower Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Artículo definido Some friends are planning Ana's baby shower.
  • Animal welfare Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Step into the realm of animal welfare, where compassion guides us to protect and care for our animal companions.
  • Arón Bitrán: a Chilean violinist Music Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Learn about Arón Bitrán, a famous Chilean violinist.
  • At El Corte Inglés Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Have you ever been to El Corte Ingles?
  • At the cocktail bar Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Raúl is having a refreshing cocktail in Majorca.
  • At the laundromat Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Álvaro shows us how a laundromat works.
  • At the nutritionist Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Sheila is at the nutritionist looking for a healthier lifestyle.
  • At the opera Music Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Ana plans to go to the opera tonight.
  • At the science lab Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Marta and Javier love spending time in the lab.
  • Bank of Spain Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Artículo definido Artículo indefinido Learn about Bank of Spain.
  • Be quiet! Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Immerse yourself in the enchanting silence of a northern Spanish procession.
  • Benefits of sport Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Mara tells us about exercising at the gym and its benefits.
  • Blanca Paloma: Spanish candidate 2023 Music Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adverbio Meet Blanca Paloma, Spain's candidate for Eurovision 2023.
  • Booking a table in a restaurant Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Artículo indefinido Learn how to book a table in a Spanish restaurant.
  • Breakfast at home Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Raúl loves having a healthy breakfast at home every morning.
  • Buenos Aires International Book Fair Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo demostrativo Artículo definido Artículo indefinido Learn about this cultural event in Buenos Aires.
  • Calva: a traditional Spanish game Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Learn about calva, a traditional Spanish game.
  • Carnival in Rio de Janeiro Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Julio is in Rio de Janeiro to visit its famous carnival.
  • Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela Art & Design Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Artículo definido Contracción de artículo El Futuro Próximo John would like to visit the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.
  • Celebrating a new year Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Artículo definido Juan tells us his plans for New Year's Eve.
  • Chocolate and roses Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Patricia describes us the most common presents for Saint Valentine's Day.
  • Cibeles: a monument in Madrid Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Learn about Cibeles, a famous monument in Madrid.
  • Climate change Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio Aspecto progresivo Patricia doesn't feel happy at all about climate change.
  • Coco: a lovely poodle Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Meet Coco, a lovely poodle.
  • Colombian coffee Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Adverbio There is always a nice cup of Colombian coffee at Carlos Alberto's house!
  • Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Pedro tells us about a famous theatre building in Buenos Aires.
  • Cuban rum Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Patricia tells us about her favourite Cuban drink.
  • Load more …

A2: Lower Intermediate Spanish writing exercises

  • A Christmas cocktail Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Celebrate the season in style with our special cocktail.
  • A Spanish course in Bogota Language & Education Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Patrick tells us about his Spanish course in Colombia.
  • A creepy recipe for this Halloween Food & Drink Adjetivo Adverbio El Futuro Próximo Enjoy a terrifying Halloween recipe!
  • A cruise to Puerto Rico Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Manuel feels excited about his next cruise trip to Puerto Rico.
  • A day in Las Burgas Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo posesivo Borja tells us about a relaxing day in Las Burgas.
  • A day out at the park Family & Relationships Adverbio interrogativo Artículo definido Conjunción subordinante Pedro and Rosa are gearing up for a park day tomorrow.
  • A day outside Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Julián tells us about his amazing weekend.
  • A different look Art & Design Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Adverbio de cantidad Carmela went to the beauty salon and tells us about her experience.
  • A documentary about the Sun Film & TV Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Artículo definido Javier watched a documentary about the Sun last night.
  • A ghost tour Celebrations & Important Dates Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido David has booked a ghost tour for Halloween night in Madrid.
  • A handmade gift Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Discover Juan's artistic touch in every detail of this special handmade gift.
  • A horrible campsite Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio María describes us her unpleasant experience at a campsite.
  • A horror film Film & TV Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Aspecto imperfectivo Marta watched a terrifying film yesterday.
  • A job interview Employment Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo posesivo Ainhoa is ready to do her first job interview.
  • A letter to Melchior Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo El Presente Alberto wrote a letter to Melchior, his favourite wise man.
  • A luxurious day in Marbella Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Aspecto imperfectivo El Pretérito Imperfecto El Pretérito Indefinido Aurelia tells us about her luxurious visit to a friend in Marbella.
  • A memory-based challenge Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Embark on an enchanting journey with Julia through the enigmatic labyrinth of memories.
  • A mountaineering adventure in Jalisco Sports & Leisure Adjetivo indefinido Aspecto imperfectivo Conjunción coordinante While mountaineering El Diente in Jalisco, Julio faced tough trails and reveled in the breathtaking summit views.
  • A movie marathon Film & TV Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Carlos plans to have a movie marathon this weekend at home.
  • A postcard from Madrid Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Conjunción Raquel received a postcard from her best friend.
  • A story of personal triumph Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Pedro tells us his story of personal improvement after being in an accident.
  • A stunning car in the newspaper Sports & Leisure Aspecto imperfectivo El Pretérito Imperfecto El Pretérito Indefinido Discover Antonio's latest passion.
  • A superbike event Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio El Futuro Próximo Two friends have been to a superbike event.
  • A surprise party Family & Relationships Adverbio Adverbio de cantidad Adverbio interrogativo Raquel doesn't know where her family is today.
  • A tour of Buenos Aires Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio El Futuro Próximo Manuel tells us about his visit to Buenos Aires.
  • A very healthy barbecue Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo posesivo Discover Pedro and Maribel's recipes for their barbecue.
  • A very noisy neighbour Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Sara has to deal with a really noisy neighbour living downstairs.
  • A wedding in Las Vegas Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Discover what a wedding in Las Vegas means!
  • A weekend in Sierra Nevada Monuments, Tourism & Vacations El Pretérito Indefinido Expresión idiomática con "estar" Gender of nouns in Spanish: masculine Mercedes tells us about her weekend in Sierra Nevada in the south of Spain.
  • Acid rain Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Learn about some interesting facts about the acid rain.
  • Aid to emancipate myself Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Miguel tells us about his struggle to pay rent.
  • Ainhoa Arteta: a Spanish soprano Famous People Music Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Aspecto imperfectivo Learn about Ainhoa Arteta, a famous Spanish soprano.
  • Aire fresco: an Argentinian film Film & TV Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Adverbio Learn about the Argentinian movie that Rodrigo saw yesterday.
  • An afternoon in Caracas Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido María Elena spent an exciting afternoon with her friend Gabriela in Caracas.
  • An aromatherapy session Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Conjunción subordinante El Futuro Próximo Discover what an aromatherapy session is like!
  • An interview with Juanes Famous People Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Learn about Juanes' music with this interview.
  • An unusual taxi ride Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Pretérito Imperfecto Juan tells us about his strange experience in a taxi. In this exercise you'll practise El Pretérito Imperfecto and El Pretérito Indefinido.
  • Aragonese jota Music Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Pilar tells us about her local dance, the Aragonese jota.
  • Argentina's journey towards a zero-waste lifestyle Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo invariable Argentina is striving for zero waste, prioritizing reduction, reuse, and recycling for a sustainable future.
  • Arguiñano and his set menu Famous People Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Adverbio Minerva loves Zarauz and Arguiñano's restaurant.
  • Armed Forces Immigration & Citizenship Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Learn about The Spanish Armed Forces
  • Art therapy in Spain Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Learn about some art therapy exercises.
  • At Cartagena beach Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adverbio Adverbio de cantidad Aspecto imperfectivo Juan went to the beach with some of his friends yesterday.
  • At a barbecue Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Grill and chill at Sandra and her friends' barbecues.
  • At a karate competition Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Gabriel just participated in a karate competition.
  • At our deli shop Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Are you looking for something different to eat? If so, visit Leila's deli.
  • At the circus Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adjetivo posesivo Irene tells us about a circus afternoon with her son.
  • At the dry cleaner's Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adjetivo indefinido Raquel just left the dry cleaners with a lovely just-ironed shirt.
  • At the florist Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adjetivo posesivo Marta is at the florist to buy her sister some flowers.
  • At the office gym Employment Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo posesivo Artículo indefinido Do you have a gym in your office?

B1: Intermediate Spanish writing exercises

  • 5G network Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio El Futuro Simple Learn about the 5G network.
  • 6th of January Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Futuro Simple Eduardo is thinking about the 6th of January in order to get his Christmas presents.
  • A Christmas jumper Art & Design Adjetivo El Futuro Simple El Presente de Subjuntivo Marcos must wear a Christmas jumper (US: sweater) for a party, but he is not very excited about it.
  • A Halloween wish Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Daniela tells us about her special Halloween wish.
  • A Mediterranean breakfast Food & Drink Adjetivo Adverbio de cantidad Adverbio interrogativo This food company has prepared a magnificent Mediterranean breakfast for you to start your day!
  • A Tinder date Family & Relationships Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio de duda Artículo neutro Learn about Tomás's Tinder date.
  • A bumpy flight Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Rosa tells us about her bumpy flight to Costa Rica.
  • A day among dolphins Family & Relationships El Futuro Simple El Presente El Presente de Subjuntivo Marisa tells us about her mother's passion: dolphins.
  • A family lunch on Easter Sunday Celebrations & Important Dates Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Conjunción Javier tells us about what lunch on Easter Sunday is like for his family.
  • A gala evening Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Sara has received an invitation for a special event.
  • A human anatomy class Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Dive into the marvels of the human body in our anatomy class!
  • A jungle trip Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Conjunción subordinante Andrea tells us about her ideal holiday.
  • A luxurious stay in Madrid Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Conjunción Stay in a top luxurious hotel in Madrid!
  • A magic show in hospital Employment Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Apócope Alberto is starting a new job next week in a hospital.
  • A night hike Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio de cantidad Experience the thrill of a night hike with María and Alberto.
  • A photo of our grandparents Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adjetivo invariable Two brothers show us a heartwarming snapshot of their cherished grandparents.
  • A roadside breakdown Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Juan's roadside breakdown transformed his routine drive into an unexpected adventure.
  • A romantic dinner Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo demostrativo Adverbio Sergio and Tania have a romantic dinner.
  • A second chance Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Comparativo Manuela is asking Mateo to give their relationship a second chance.
  • A trip to Majorca Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio interrogativo Discover the beautiful city of Majorca.
  • A video game night Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Imperativo Learn about the benefits of playing with video games.
  • A weekend in the Pyrenees Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Apócope El Presente Last weekend, Samuel and his friends ventured out of the city to seek adventure in the magnificent Pyrenees.
  • A wonderful gardener Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Learn about Pedro, a high-skilled gardener.
  • Acupuncture Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Learn about acupuncture in Spanish.
  • Adventures with friends Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Raquel loves spending time with her friends and going on trips with them.
  • All Saints' Day Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Artículo neutro Learn about how All Saints' Day is celebrated in Spain.
  • As bestas by Rodrigo Sorogoyen Film & TV Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio interrogativo Discover As bestas, a Spanish thriller by the film director Rodrigo Sorogoyen.
  • At Carlos Baute's concert Music Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio interrogativo María Fernanda went to a Carlos Baute's concert, a famous Venezuelan singer.
  • At summer camp Employment Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Conjunción Maribel feels very excited about working as a group leader at a summer camp.
  • At the Magic Fountain of Montjuïc Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Apócope Ester plans to start the New Year at the Magic Fountain of Montjuïc.
  • At the butcher's Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Learn how to order some meat at the butcher's.
  • At the gym Sports & Leisure Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Conjunción Samuel wants to lose some weight and keep healthy.
  • At the local gym Sports & Leisure Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Pedro tells us about his workout at the local gym.
  • At the market Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Join us at the market for a delightful shopping experience.
  • At the pediatrician Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Lucia's baby is not feeling well and she is at the pediatrician to get some advice.
  • At the street market Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Learn about the most famous street market in Madrid.
  • At the tourist office Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Mónica and Ángel are at the tourist office to get some information for their day trip to San Jose.
  • At the vet Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Rodrigo takes Max to the vet as he is not feeling well.
  • B-Travel Barcelona: a tourism fair Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adverbio de duda Learn about this interesting tourism fair in Barcelona.
  • Baroque in Latin America Art & Design Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Learn about the baroque in Latin America.
  • Bartering Politics, History & Economics Technology & Science Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Condicional Simple Interested in exchanging your stuff without using money?
  • Buena Vista Social Club: a Cuban band Music Adjetivo Apócope Aspecto progresivo Learn about the Buena Vista Social Club, a famous Cuban band.
  • Buying a second home in Spain Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo This couple feels very excited about buying a house in Spain for their retirement.
  • Captain Thunder Literature, Poetry, Theatre Adjetivo El Pretérito Imperfecto El Pretérito Indefinido Ramiro tells us about Captain Thunder.
  • Changing schools Language & Education Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Conjunción María is starting at a new school.
  • Cheap smart homes Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Learn about how to set up a cheap smart home.
  • Circuit of Jarama Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio Apócope Learn about Rodrigo, a high-speed motorcyclist.
  • Classical music in Mexico Music Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Apócope Learn about classical music in Mexico.
  • Cleaning bots: revolutionizing household cleaning Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Transform your cleaning routine with revolutionary cleaning bots!
  • Climbing up and down stairs Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo invariable Explore the benefits for your health and well-being by climbing the stairs.

B2: Upper Intermediate Spanish writing exercises

  • 12 self-portraits by Pablo Picasso Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Learn about Pablo Picasso's self-portraits.
  • A Christmas surprise Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio de cantidad Daniela is wondering who wrote her an anonymous message.
  • A Christmas tale Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adverbio A forgotten Christmas gift sparks a heartwarming holiday story.
  • A big surprise! Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo El Presente de Subjuntivo El Pretérito Imperfecto Adela tells us about an axciting surprise she got from her boyfriend.
  • A change of career Employment Language & Education Adjetivo Apócope Conjunción Discover Vanessa's career plans.
  • A delayed train Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo El Condicional Simple El Futuro Perfecto Ana is furious about the fact that her train is delayed.
  • A family of potters Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo invariable Adverbio Get into the fascinating world of a family of master potters.
  • A gift woven with care Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Clara's skilled hands knit more than just a sweater.
  • A homemade costume Art & Design Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adverbio de negación Conjunción coordinante Amalia plans to make her own costume for carnival.
  • A letter to Santa Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Conjunción El Condicional Simple Read this letter from my nephew.
  • A letter to my love Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Sandra wrote a romantic letter to her love.
  • A lost Nazarene Celebrations & Important Dates Adverbio Adverbio de duda Adverbio interrogativo Rodrigo got lost during a celebration!
  • A magic piano Music Adjetivo Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adverbio interrogativo Learn about Pablo Alborán and his excellent piano skills.
  • A message from the Three Wise Men Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Lucas is enchanted by a celestial message from the Three Wise Men.
  • A saeta Celebrations & Important Dates Music Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Futuro Simple Jaime tells us about his experience in Seville during Easter celebrations.
  • A snow storm Technology & Science Adjetivo Apócope El Pretérito Imperfecto Have you ever experienced a big snow storm?
  • A special lunch Food & Drink Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Arancha enjoyed a special lunch today.
  • A tourist in my own city Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio de duda Artículo neutro Marta tells us about the pleasure of being in an empty city during the summer.
  • A true friendship Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Apócope What does a true friendship look like?
  • A very nosy parrot Family & Relationships Aspecto progresivo Conjunción El Condicional Simple Meet Beru the parrot. It's hard to have a secret conversation with him around!
  • A walk along the Guayas river Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio Conjunción Have a fun learning jorney with this tourist leaflet about the Guayas river in Ecuador.
  • A weekend without new technology Family & Relationships Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio de cantidad Conjunción coordinante Carlos' mum was concerned about his health and recommended him to spend a weekend away.
  • An afternoon around the fire Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Aspecto progresivo Conjunción subordinante What do you think of a warm afternoon around the fire?
  • An appointment with the ENT specialist Family & Relationships Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adverbio interrogativo Conjunción Carlos got an appointment with the Ear, Nose and Throat doctor to get a treatment for his anosmia.
  • An inspiring extreme sports story Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Unleash your adrenaline with an inspiring story of extreme sports triumph.
  • An oasis in the middle of the desert Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo In the barren desert, a hidden oasis offers solace to weary travelers.
  • An online Carnival party Celebrations & Important Dates Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Victoria is very excited about her upcoming online Carnival party.
  • An online shopping gift voucher Technology & Science Adjetivo El Condicional Simple El Futuro Simple Lorena feels very lucky today with her online shopping gift voucher.
  • An undercover investigation Employment Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo In the shadows of the drug underworld, an undercover investigation reveals the truth.
  • Apology letter to a client Free Language & Education Adjetivo Conjunción Conjunción subordinante Learn how to write a formal letter of apology in Spanish.
  • Are you ready to adopt an animal? Family & Relationships Conjunción subordinante El Condicional Simple El Futuro Simple Find out if you are ready to adopt an animal.
  • Art therapy exercises Art & Design Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Learn about some art therapy exercises.
  • At the hairdresser's Art & Design Adjetivo indefinido Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adverbio de duda Clara goes to the hairdresser to change her look.
  • Athleisure on social media Sports & Leisure Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Laura loves following social media athleisure accounts.
  • Basque Pottery Museum Art & Design Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Have you ever been to the Basque Pottery Museum?
  • Be my Valentine! Celebrations & Important Dates Family & Relationships Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Miguel is declaring his love for Jimena in front of everyone!
  • Blanca Suárez: a Spanish actress Famous People Film & TV Adjetivo Conjunción coordinante El Pretérito Perfecto Subjuntivo Learn about the famous Spanish actress Blanca Suárez
  • Breakfast, the most important meal of the day Food & Drink Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo Discover why breakfast is such an important meal for performing well at work.
  • Campervan trip Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio Jesús and Mateo love their campervan and travelling around Spain
  • Campsite activities Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Apócope Artículo neutro Get some fresh ideas for things to do when you go camping.
  • Casa Decor Madrid Art & Design Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Apócope Adriana plans to attend an exclusive exhibition next year.
  • Casillero del Diablo Food & Drink Adjetivo El Presente de Subjuntivo El Pretérito Imperfecto Rosa and Enrique tell us about their experience with this Chilean wine.
  • Changing my wardrobe Art & Design Adjetivo Adverbio Adverbio interrogativo María plans to change the clothes in her closet for the new season.
  • Chupachups: the Spanish lollipop Food & Drink Adjetivo Apócope El Pretérito Imperfecto Did you know that these lollipops were a Spanish invention?
  • Colombia in the world Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Apócope Conjunción Why is Colombia a great place to visit?
  • Couchsurfing in Spain Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Adverbio interrogativo Learn about Couchsurfing, a service that connects a global community of travelers.
  • DIY Art & Design El Condicional Perfecto El Futuro Perfecto El Futuro Simple Do some DIY with Marta!
  • Dancing an aurresku Music Adjetivo Adverbio El Imperativo Learn about the aurresku, a famous dance from the Basque Country.
  • Dominican style salted cod Food & Drink Adjetivo Adverbio Artículo neutro Savor the Dominican touch with our Dominican style salted cod.
  • Dream trips Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Have you ever experienced a dream trip?

C1: Advanced Spanish writing exercises

  • 2021: the Year of the Ox Celebrations & Important Dates El Infinitivo Compuesto Jerga/ Expresión idiomática Modo subjuntivo Learn about the new Chinese year for 2021.
  • A TikTok dance challenge Sports & Leisure Technology & Science Adverbio Adverbio de duda Artículo definido Celia's dance got popular in TikTok.
  • A coffee shop for cats Family & Relationships Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Artículo neutro Gerundio/Spanish present participle Discover this unusual coffee shop where cats are the stars!
  • A film review Film & TV Adjetivo Artículo neutro Aspecto progresivo Antonio makes us a review of a movie.
  • A handyman at home Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo indefinido Apócope Transform your living space with the expert touch of our skilled handyman services!
  • A rock 'n' roll grandmother Family & Relationships Music Adjetivo Artículo definido Artículo neutro Sandra tells us about her unconventional grandmother, Carmen.
  • A tornado Family & Relationships Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción A fierce tornado struck Mar Azul, turning its tranquil shores into a tempestuous battleground.
  • Alcoy and its textile industry Art & Design Adjetivo Artículo definido Artículo neutro Inés is telling her son Alberto about Alcoy's industry.
  • Antonio Gaudi's architecture Art & Design Famous People Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción coordinante Learn about Gaudí's architecture in Barcelona and practise relative pronouns and the passive voice.
  • Benefits of art therapy Art & Design Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción coordinante Have you ever heard about art therapy?
  • Bilbao Book Fair Literature, Poetry, Theatre El Infinitivo Compuesto El Presente de Subjuntivo El Pretérito Imperfecto Subjuntivo Ready to visit the Bilbao Book Fair?
  • Bungee Jumping Sports & Leisure El Condicional Perfecto El Condicional Simple El Futuro Perfecto Candela tells us about her first bungee jump.
  • Castile comes from 'castle' Language & Education Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción coordinante Learn about the etymological origin of the word 'Castile'.
  • Cataract surgery Family & Relationships Artículo definido Artículo neutro Aspecto perfectivo Cecilia tells us about her upcoming cataract surgery.
  • Centennial oak trees Sports & Leisure Artículo neutro Conjunción subordinante El Presente de Subjuntivo Shelter beneath the magnificent centennial oak trees.
  • Charity Kings Parade Celebrations & Important Dates Artículo definido Artículo neutro Conjunción Are you a fan of The Three Wise Men?
  • Chinese horoscope Technology & Science Artículo neutro Aspecto progresivo Conjunción Learn about the Chinese horoscope.
  • Climbing the Gorbea Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Aspecto progresivo Conjunción Learn about this hill in the north of Spain.
  • Cognitive inclusion at school Language & Education Artículo definido Artículo indefinido Artículo neutro Learn about this cognitive inclusion project.
  • Combat sports: sport or violence? Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Conjunción coordinante Expressing need and obligation (deber, tener que, haber que, necesitar [que]) Do you think that combat sports are violent? Look at what Pedro thinks about them.
  • Corruption Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Aspecto progresivo El Presente Corruption in Spain is a serious problem that dates back centuries.
  • Council housing challenges Art & Design Aspecto progresivo Conjunción subordinante El Condicional Simple Learn about the council housing situation in a Spanish city.
  • Eating in the heights of Barcelona Food & Drink Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Interested in getting a high-flying meal?
  • Elcano: sailing into history's horizon Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Cambio de tiempos verbales inesperados Conjunción subordinante Join Elcano on a historic voyage, where the seas become a canvas for extraordinary tales.
  • Frozen Film & TV Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción Experience the magic of ice and adventure in 'Frozen'.
  • Handicrafts Art & Design Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción Discover what the traditional Honduran handicrafts are.
  • Hatless women Politics, History & Economics Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Condicional Simple Learn about the hatless women from the twenties.
  • History of Valencia FC Sports & Leisure Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Pretérito Imperfecto Learn about Valencia FC's history.
  • History of ceramics in America Art & Design Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Pretérito Imperfecto Trace the evolution of American ceramics through the centuries.
  • How to become an au pair Employment Language & Education Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Presente Are you looking for a host family to do some au pair work while improving a foreign language?
  • I'm going everywhere with my GPS! Sports & Leisure Artículo definido Artículo neutro El Infinitivo Compuesto Pedro tells us about the GPS he just bought.
  • Ice on the moon? Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Aspecto progresivo Is there or was there water on the Moon?
  • Improving the circulation of my veins Technology & Science Adjetivo Adjetivo interrogativo y exclamativo Adverbio Elisa has decided she needs to improve her circulation and embrace a healthier lifestyle.
  • Intarsia Art & Design Adjetivo Expresión idiomática con "ser" Infinitivo Learn about intarsia, a very old traditional woodwork technique.
  • Is it cake? Film & TV Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Learn about an amazing TV show on Netflix.
  • Jose Ortega y Gasset: a Spanish philosopher Famous People Language & Education Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Pretérito Imperfecto Learn about Ortega y Gasset and his philosophy.
  • Kitchen Nightmares Film & TV Adjetivo Artículo neutro Expressing need and obligation (deber, tener que, haber que, necesitar [que]) Step into the world of 'Kitchen Nightmares', where culinary rescues and transformations unfold in each episode.
  • Last-minute travelling Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Artículo definido Marisa is tempted to travel last minute this summer.
  • Lost among cacti Family & Relationships Adjetivo Conjunción subordinante El Pretérito Imperfecto Lucía found herself adrift in a prickly sea of cacti.
  • Madeira Centro hotel Art & Design Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Adjetivo Conjunción coordinante Gerundio/Spanish present participle Discover this beautiful hotel in Benidorm.
  • Marmitako to keep warm Food & Drink Adjetivo Artículo neutro El Condicional Simple Blanca feels like cooking a hot tuna dish to warm herself up after a rainy day.
  • Mexicans in the USA Immigration & Citizenship Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción coordinante Amelia is impressed by Mexican culture and cuisine in the USA.
  • Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba Art & Design Monuments, Tourism & Vacations Conjunción Expresión idiomática con "ser" Expressing need and obligation (deber, tener que, haber que, necesitar [que]) Have you ever visited the Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba?
  • My father's self-portrait Art & Design Adverbio de cantidad Expresión idiomática con "estar" Gerundio/Spanish present participle Daniel had a lot of fun with his father's self-portrait.
  • My relationship with my parents Family & Relationships Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción Learn about Pablo's relationship with his parents.
  • Myths associated with Valentine's Day Celebrations & Important Dates Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción Discover some myths behind Valentine's Day.
  • On the moon Technology & Science Adjetivo Adverbio interrogativo Adverbio relativo Learn about Clara's adventure in an unknown place.
  • One day on the radio Film & TV Adjetivo Adverbio de duda Artículo neutro María is looking forward to participating in a radio session.
  • Our energy bill Technology & Science Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción Samuel and his wife are not happy at all with their last electricity bill.
  • PISA report: Spain Language & Education Adjetivo Artículo neutro Conjunción coordinante Carlos, headmaster of a Spanish school, shares his thoughts about the latest PISA report.

In this section

  • Hanukkah 2023 Menorah
  • Christmas 2023 Advent Calendar
  • Tips and ideas to improve your Spanish writing skills
  • Spanish Glossary and Jargon Buster

Spanish Writer Freelance

65 spanish phrases to use in an essay.

If Spanish is not your first language, memorizing specific phrases can help you improve your essay-writing skills and make you sound more like a native speaker. Thus below, you will find a list of useful phrases categorized by groups to help you appear more proficient and take your essays to the next level!

Introductory Phrases

Based on my vast experience as a freelance writer , I can say that starting an essay is undoubtedly the most challenging part of essay writing. Nonetheless, many phrases have proven to help organize my thoughts and form cohesive and intriguing introductions, such as:

• “Para empezar” – To begin with

• “Al principio” – At the beginning… 

• “En primer lugar” – To start… 

• “Empecemos por considerar” – Let’s begin by considering/acknowledging 

• “A manera de introducción” – We can start by saying…

• “Como punto de partida “ – As a starting point

• “Hoy en día” – Nowadays… Notice that these introductory phrases are not exactly the same than those you would use in a conversation. For that, I suggest reading my article about Sentence Starters in Spanish .

You can also use phrase to introduce a new topic in the text such as:

  • En lo que se refiere a – Regarding to
  • Respecto a – Regarding to
  • En cuanto a – Regarding to
  • Cuando se trata de – When it comes to
  • Si pasamos a hablar de – If we go ahead to talk about

Concluding Phrases

It is also crucial that you know how to finish your essay. A good conclusion will allow you to tie all your ideas together and emphasize the key takeaways. Below, a few ways in which you can begin a concluding argument:

• “En conclusion” – In conclusion

• “En resumen/resumiendo…” – In summary

• “Como se puede ver…” – As you can see

• “Para concluir” – To conclude

• “Para finalizar” – To finish

• “Finalmente, podemos decir que…” – We can then say that…

• “ En consecuencia, podemos decir que…” – As a result, one can say that…

• “Por fin” – Finally

Transitional Phrases

Transitions phrases are crucial if you wish your essay to flow smoothly. Thus, I recommend you pay special attention to the following sentences:

• “Además” – Besides

• “Adicionalmente” – In addition…

• “Dado que…” – Given that…

• “Por lo tanto” – Therefore

• “Entonces” – Thus/So

• “Debido a…” – Hence

• “Mientras tanto” – Meanwhile

• “Por lo que” – This is why

• “Desde entonces” – Since then

Argumentative Phrases

When writing essays, it is very common for us to need to include argumentative phrases to get our message across. Hence, if you are looking for new ways to introduce an argument, below a few ideas:

• “Por otro lado…” – On the other hand…

• “En primera instancia…” – First of all 

• “A diferencia de…” – As oppossed to

• “De igual forma” – More so

• “Igualmente” – The same goes for… 

• “En otras palabras” – In other words

• “A pesar de que…” – Although 

• “Aunque” – Even though 

• “En contraste” – By contrast 

• “De hecho…” – In fact… 

• “Sin embargo” – Nevertheless

• “No obstante” – However

Opinion Phrases

There are many formal (and less formal ways) to express your opinions and beliefs in Spanish. Here, a few examples: 

• “Considero que…” – I considerthat…

• “Mi opinión es” – It is my opinion

• “Pienso que…” – I think that…

• “Opino que” – In my opinion…

• “Afortunadamente” – Fortunately

• “ Lamentablemente” – Unfortunately

• “Me parece que…” – It seems to me that…

• “En mi opinión” – I believe that…

• “En mi experiencia” – Based on my experience

• “Como yo lo veo…” – As I see it…

• “Es mi parecer” – My pointview 

General Phrases

Finally, I wanted to include a group of useful common phrases that can enrich your essay’s vocabulary:

•   “En realidad” – In reality

• “Actualmente” – Today/Nowadays 

• “De acuerdo a…” – According to… 

• “Por ejemplo” – For example

• “Cabe recalcar que…” – It is important to note that… 

• “Vale la pena resaltar que…” – It is important to highlight that… 

• “No podemos ignorar que…” – We can’t ignore that… 

• “Normalmente” – Usually/Normally 

• “Por lo general” – In general

• “Es normal que…” – It is normal to…

• “Otro hecho importante es…” – Another relevant factor is… 

• “Podría decirse que…” – One could say that… 

• “Para ilustrar” – To illustrate 

There you have it! A list of 60 useful phrases you can memorize to make your essays sound more professional and become more appealing to readers. However, if you are struggling and need further assistance with your essay, here you can see an Spanish essay example that can help you to structure and edit your work.

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Ideas and Resources for Spanish Teachers

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay

Tips For the AP Spanish Argumentative Essay

Need some help with the AP Spanish Argumentative Essay? In my humble opinion, it is the most complicated task our AP Spanish students will have to complete. El ensayo argumentativo requires excellent reading skills, listening skills and writing skills. So how can we help our students do well on this part of the AP Spanish exam? Here are some tips!

Tip #1 Direct Instruction

Students need to understand what exactly they need to do for the AP Spanish Argumentative Essay. Consider taking the class time to have a mini lesson that provides the specifics and details of the expectations. Here is a short list of what students should know.

-2 readings; one in narrative form and usually on graph or chart

-1 listening source

-each source must be referenced at least once in their essay

-writing needs to be organized and concise

-only 1 hour to read, listen and write!

I created this Google Slides presentation for the direct instruction I provide to my students. Feel free to create one too, or use mine to save time!

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay Tip #2

Don’t assume that your students have good writing skills. *Yes, they need to understand what they read and hear. Let’s assume that they are practicing those skills daily in one way or another in class. But in my experience, students really struggle with organizing their writing.

Teach them how to write a concise introductory paragraph that ends with a thesis statement (the answer to the question that was asked for the task).

Then teach them how to write a topic sentence. When they have a clear topic sentence, their paragraph is much more likely to stay on track. This is really important, because the time constraint on this section of the AP Exam is a big challenge!

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay Tip #3

Design teacher-friendly ways for students to practice.

Let’s face it. Students need lots of practice and lots of feedback to get good at this essay. But essays are very time consuming to write and very time consuming to grade.

The strategy I use with my students is to break the essay into parts and allow them to practice one part at a time.

Day 1: Direct instruction followed by a set of sources

-Teach students how to focus on what the question is

-Encourage them to underline, star and highlight important parts of the text

-Ask them to take notes while listening

*Now, develop a thesis/answer to the question. Teach them to choose the one that’s easier to prove rather than the one they believe is the right answer!

Pair students. Have them write the introductory paragraph only. I am always shocked with how many students need help getting the formula right for their intro. I tell them to put their thesis statement last! Why don’t they?? Lol!

Giving feedback on just one paragraph is far less overwhelming and time consuming than grading a whole essay, especially if they’re working in pairs! Half the correcting!

Once they have a good intro paragraph, have them move on to their topic sentences for each body paragraph. Ask them to identify a quote/idea from each source to include within their paragraph.

When you are happy with their topic sentences and quotes, now they can write their conclusion. This part is easier- it’s the inverse of their introduction!

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay Tip #4

Share resources!

At least for me, it took me a long time to feel confident in my instruction for the AP Spanish Argumentative Essay. I did not have a colleague- I was (and still am) the only one teaching the course at my school. The College Board did not have AP Classroom, or at least nothing like what exists now. I had never heard of Teachers Pay Teachers.

Therefore, I learned by trial and error and created everything from scratch. It was time consuming. Like…. years!!!!

Profes, don’t do that to yourself!

If you have a teaching partner in your school, or maybe someone you know from another district, divide and conquer! Share what you create!

Here are the resources I know about that may help you and your students gain confidence regarding the Argumentative Essay!

AP Spanish Language and Culture: the College Board site (has lots of lessons, videos and free practices!)

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay: Sample Intro Paragraphs (FREEBIE!)

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay Feedback Checklist (My lifesaver!)

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay: Graphic Organizer for Student Practice

AP Spanish Argumentative Essay: How To

Test Prep Growing Mega Bundle (This includes all my materials for the open ended sections of the AP Spanish test)

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Get the password to my FREE Resource Library!!

Click here!

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  • Dec 9, 2023

Spanish A Level (AQA): Tips for writing a successful literature or film essay

Updated: Dec 10, 2023

In Paper 2 of the AQA A Level Spanish exam, students write one essay for each of the two works they have studied (which can be a text and a film, or two texts).

Students are asked to write approximately 300 words for each question within a 2-hour duration for the whole paper. Although there is no word limit in the AQA A Level exam, and everything you write will be assessed, writing more words does not necessarily mean achieving more marks. Being concise and giving a clear response demonstrate that your reflections and your evaluation of the text or film are strong and accurate.

Essays are assessed according to two criteria: AO3 and AO4. In this post we break down the requirements of each of the Assessment Objectives and look at how you can fulfil them and write an outstanding essay.

Assessment Objective 3 (AO3)

This measures the student’s ability to manipulate the language accurately, in spoken and written forms, using a range of lexis and structure .

The specification gives the following description for the highest marking band:

The language produced is mainly accurate with only occasional minor errors. The student shows a consistently secure grasp of grammar and is able to manipulate complex language accurately.

💡 Tip: Use complex language and vocabulary effectively and appropriately .

The words " effectively " and " appropriately " are important here. It's certainly not necessary to copy out entire pre-learned sentences or rely on formulaic language.

The 2022 Examiner's Report from AQA notes that

There is a fine line between using complex language with a range of structures and forcing inappropriate subjunctives or pre-learned phrases into an essay.

Source: REPORT ON THE EXAMINATION – A-LEVEL SPANISH – 7692/2 – JUNE 2022, from aqa.org

The key is to strike the balance between showcasing advanced writing skills and avoiding redundant phrases, or phrases that are stylistically out of place.

Take a moment to read these further comments from the same Examiner's Report:

On the whole it is more important to have the vocabulary needed to express points clearly and to be able to deal with tenses and verbs accurately. It is not appropriate to use phrases such as ‘que yo sepa’ in a literature/film essay, nor the ‘if/would’ structure that we see all the time [...]. Similarly, expressions of emotion that are followed by a subjunctive are out of place in this style of essay; for example ‘me enfada que Paco trate a Paula de esta manera’.

The highest-achieving students are those who are able to use the full range of verb tenses to convey their ideas without relying on pre-learned structures.

Avoid overusing the subjunctive and set phrases; instead, focus on your ability to express yourself clearly and accurately in your writing.

Try some other more complex sentence structures:

Comparative formulations: Este personaje evolucionó mucho más rápido de lo que el lector esperaba.

Using the reflexive as a passive where appropriate:  Las luces en esta escena se usaron para crear una atmósfera de suspense.

Here is the second part of the description for the top marking band under AO3:

The student uses a wide range of vocabulary appropriate to the context and the task.

💡 Tip: Employ a broad range of appropriate vocabulary.

This could include:

Words and expressions related to film: El primer plano / El enfoque / La perspectiva …

Literary words and expressions: En este pasaje / La obra / La escena / El diálogo …

Vocabulary related to the specific text or film. For example, show an understanding of the Colombian Spanish words in “El coronel no tiene quien le escriba” by García Márquez and the terminology related to the historical context.

You will naturally pick up this vocabulary throughout your A Level Spanish course, but you can also refer to our in-course resources and the Quizlet lists for inspiration.

Assessment Objective 4 (AO4)

This measures the student’s ability to show knowledge and understanding of, and respond critically and analytically to, different aspects of the culture and society of countries/communities where the language is spoken. The description for the highest marking band is as follows:

Knowledge of the text or film is consistently accurate and detailed. Opinions, views and conclusions are consistently supported by relevant and appropriate evidence from the text or film.

💡 Tip: Support each of your points with relevant and appropriate evidence .

Although you are not strictly required to learn quotations by heart (according to the AQA examiners, it’s enough to paraphrase  something that a character said), it’s important to have a clear idea of specific events and plot points to reinforce the arguments that you make.

When you re-read your book or re-watch your film, create a knowledge organiser such as a table or mindmap with your own notes on important characters, themes and plot points so that you can revise them easily and have plenty of examples for your essay.

A clear structure is essential to help you organise your ideas. When you plan your essay, make sure there is a reference to the text or film to demonstrate every point that you make and help you to develop your argument.

You can follow this framework:

Introduction - The beginning must include a brief outline of the topic and, very importantly, your thesis statement (the sentence that sums up the central point or idea of your essay).

Each of the following main paragraphs should develop one strong point that relates and justifies the main idea of your essay, and must be supported with specific examples from the book or film.

Evidence from the book / film

Link to title

Conclusion - The last paragraph should include a short but strong conclusion that summarises your evaluation in relation to the original essay question.

Finally, the descriptor for the top marking band under AO4 specifies that:

The essay demonstrates excellent evaluation of the issues, themes and the cultural and social contexts of the text or film studied.

💡 Tip: Focus on evaluation and not description.

As we’ve seen, AO4 focuses on the ability to respond critically and analytically. One common mistake when writing about a film or a text, though, is writing in a descriptive way, simply narrating or recalling events that take place instead of analysing their impact on the subject at hand.

In the same way that a template of the structure can help you write your essay, some sentence starters can guide you to make your paragraphs more analytical. For example:

Make your point:

Es evidente que … / Se puede afirmar que…

Give some evidence:

Una prueba de ello es que …

Develop your point in relation to the original question:

Por consecuencia. ..

De esto se deduce que…

To summarise:

✅ Use complex language and vocabulary effectively  and appropriately .

✅ employ a broad range of appropriate  vocabulary., ✅ support each of your points with relevant and appropriate evidence ., ✅ focus on evaluation  and not description..

Most importantly, practice essay writing as often as you can and use tutor feedback to your advantage!

Kate Maria Languages A Level Academy runs complete A Level courses in Modern Foreign Languages. Find out more about our Spanish A Level course or get in contact to discuss how we can support you.

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The Best Spanish Essay Writing Tools in 2023

Level up your Spanish texts and become a Spanish essay writer!

When we learn a new language, we love to continue exploring new possibilities to practice it. We like to watch movies in the original language, meet and speak with native Spanish speakers, read books, etc.

One important skill to keep practicing is writing. 

Through written words, we can communicate more easily on social media, with our foreign coworkers, and even with friends at school.

However, the exercises we receive in class often are not enough. We must also look for new ways and tools to refine our writing in Spanish.

In this article, we will share some tools, online platforms, and software applications that can be useful in strengthening your writing.

Let’s start!

Join 559 million people on the planet who speak Spanish! Sign up for your free trial Spanish class today. ➡️

Explore and Discover Essay Writing Tools in 2023

The following digital programs will help you work on your writing skills in Spanish and successfully complete your essays and texts.

Some are dedicated to specific writing areas like verb conjugation, grammar review, and practice exercises.

Keep reading!

1.     Reverso Conjugation

As you may know, the conjugation of verbs in Spanish can be complicated. Reverso is a tool that can help you overcome this difficulty.

This platform is very intuitive in terms of verb conjugation. 

All you need to do is write the verb you want to consult, and it’ll show you all the verb tenses and their conjugation.

You can consult the verbs by writing them in infinite form or already conjugated since it easily recognizes any of the two options.

Use this platform by entering the link directly from your preferred browser, either on your computer or cell phone.

It’s also available to download the app for iPhone and Android phones.

In addition to conjugations, you will also find other options such as synonyms, correctors, translators, and many more that you can use the more advanced your level of Spanish is.

Don’t forget that this option can also be found in the Real Academia Española RAE dictionary. 

Every time you look up the verb’s meaning, it also allows you to conjugate it.

2.     Simplified

Artificial Intelligence is growing rapidly, and you can find more robust platforms and applications like Simplified.

You can write in Spanish with its AI Writer module in its essay checker or translate it from your language.

This AI writer has over 50 writing templates with which you can generate content, from product descriptions, titles, and advertisements to articles and books.

It’s an essay generator tool with an easy-to-use and intuitive format with user support, a blog, and video training to get the most out of it.

You can download the app for iPhone and Android, use the Chrome extension, or the WordPress plugin.

You can opt for the free plan with limited use or choose other monthly plans ranging from $20 to $81.

We recommend: The Top 5 Spanish Grammar Rules You Can’t Afford to Ignore

3.   iScribo

If your writing level is more advanced, iScribo is for you!

This AI language assistant will help you to give the final touch to your documents and improve them to communicate the message you want to share.

iScribo checks and corrects grammar, vocabulary, tone, fluency, and many more features of the Spanish language to improve your writing skills. 

This tool is simple and very easy to use. 

The editor is friendly, it’ll mark those words or sentences that need improvement, and it’ll also help you with the syntax.

It can even detect your document’s formal or informal tone and correct it accordingly to create sentences that connect with your target audience.

This software is available for use on computers and cell phones. You can get the 7-day trial period and then pay $1 weekly to use it.

 4. Language Tool

Language Tool is another AI language assistant that can help you check your Spanish grammar.

This program includes a personal dictionary, quality scoring for evaluating style and grammar, and more.

The software will mark errors as simple as typos or misspellings so that no mistake is overlooked.

It also checks and corrects grammatical errors and will tell you why it’s wrong and what would be the correct use of the grammar rule.

Some corrections Language Tool checks are wrong plural forms, incorrect subject-verb agreement, and misuse of grammatical structures, among others.

It can also check capital letters and punctuation. Since capitalization in Spanish is different from English, we tend to misuse them. 

This program is available in all internet browsers, mobile phones, computer apps, and add-ons in Word and E-mail programs.

You can use the free version with limited benefits or pay an annual subscription of approximately $35 to access more benefits.

 5. Google Docs

The famous Google Docs is one of the most used essay-writing tools.

Not only because it’s preceded by years of experience and creation but because it has built-in tools to create documents successfully.

It’s no longer just a word processor. It allows you to work anywhere without installing the program on your computer.

After creating a user, you can start writing without having to save all the time, since it includes an automatic saving option that saves your file every time you make a change.

It includes ready-to-use templates for any type of document you want to write. You also have different formatting, style, and headlines at your disposal.

One of the features we like the most is the spelling and grammar checkers, citation tools, and a translator.

Smart Compose, the essay bot, and virtual assistant, will help you write faster and with fewer errors so you can focus on the ideas you’re developing.

This software is free; you just have to create an account with Google and are ready to go!

Read also: 10 Ways to Learn How to Think in Spanish

Practice your Spanish writing with Kwiziq!

With this program, you will be able to do Spanish writing exercises according to your level of the language.

All exercises are done by native Spanish teachers who will boost your writing skills and help you gain confidence.

The software will grade each exercise you do, and for each mistake you make, it’ll teach you how to correct it and give you more lessons to practice the grammar rule until you have mastered them.

The platform will help you improve your Spanish learning process through proven techniques.

The Kwizbot virtual teacher, which works through artificial intelligence, will encourage you to correct mistakes and avoid frustration while you improve your writing.

You can choose to use the free plan, an annual plan for $144 per year, or choose other more affordable options.

How to Take Advantage of AI to Write Essays

Although using artificial intelligence may sound like cheating when doing a task as complex as writing, it can benefit you and help you learn.

Your productivity will benefit since it’ll give you specific suggestions that will facilitate the writing of documents, such as grammar checks and proofreading.

In addition, when you’re writing in a second language that is not your mother tongue, AI can give you a very realistic approach to the quality of your writing with a natural touch of Spanish.

When you’re writing, and you’re not sure if you’re doing well, artificial intelligence will help you reduce stress or anxiety.

It’ll save you time since passing your text through a Spanish grammar-checking software will help you be sure that your document will be high-quality work.

See also: Does Being Bilingual Speed-Develop Your Brain?

Improve Your Writing and Your Spanish Essays Starting Today!

You already took the first step, taking classes to learn Spanish.

Now all that remains is to work on your linguistic skills, and soon you will be fluent in writing Spanish.

And although it’s challenging to write documents and essays in Spanish, it’s not impossible to handle it like an expert with the proper guidance and necessary practice.

In addition, it’s increasingly necessary to have bilingual people since interpreters, transcriptionists, and translators are needed in different organizations and companies worldwide.

Are you ready to become a Spanish writer?

At Homeschool Spanish Academy, our team of Guatemalan teachers is trained to teach you Spanish and practice your writing skills.

Sign up for your free trial class and discover why students love our 5-star Spanish instruction classes.

Click here to check our prices and our programs available for all ages.

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how to write spanish essay

6 Best Spanish Paraphrasing Tools

6 Best Spanish Paraphrasing Tools

  • Smodin Editorial Team
  • Published: May 21, 2024

If you are a non-Spanish speaker, you probably struggle to find the perfect way to convey your message in Español. Or, you’re taking a Spanish class in school and battling clumsy sentence structure.

Because if you are, a paraphrasing tool can be really handy! Fear no more amigos !

Paraphrasing tools can be your secret weapon for crafting clear, understandable, original Spanish text that even the locals would find legit!

This guide will shed light on the best Spanish paraphrasing tools you can use, exploring six of the best options to elevate your writing in Spanish and improve your grades. We’ll discuss what they do and how much they cost so you can perfect your Spanish skills!

1. Smodin AI Rewriter & Spinner

smodin ai rewriter

It can also improve your writing to make it more concise and readable without losing the original meaning. Smodin is ideal for rewriting high-quality research papers, essays, articles, blogs, and SEO-focused content.

  • Over 100+ languages, including Spanish, Yiddish, Italian, German, Arabic, and Chinese
  • AI detector
  • AI author/writer
  • Check plagiarism
  • Optimized reading
  • Streamlined workflow
  • Flawless wording
  • Rephrase existing text
  • Humanize your content
  • Extremely versatile

Bypass AI detection mechanisms and double-check your Spanish translations with Smodin’s AI Rewriter tool!

2. Academic Help

academic help

The user-friendly interface and paraphrasing tool help writers phrase their sentence structure into understandable Spanish – readers wouldn’t know the difference!

Let’s take a closer look at what Academic Help has to offer.

  • Choose from seven writing modes that are tailored to fit your needs
  • Built-in plagiarism checker ensures your content is unique
  • Smart rewording algorithms
  • Grammar checker
  • Summarizing tool
  • Proofreading service (a.k.a editing)
  • Source citation generator
  • Loads of useful guides

Transform rough drafts into your own (Spanish) words in no time while keeping the original meaning of your content.

Academic Help’s free paraphrasing tool has a 200-word limit where you can convert and paraphrase any language into Español. Incorporating such a tool into the writing process can help you craft essays, assignments, and research papers perfectly, especially when learning a new language.

3. Quillbot

quillbot

When you upgrade Quillbot to the premium version for $4.17 per month, you unlock a plethora of additional add-ons. While the standard version of Quillbot is good, Quillbot Premium is great! Use the ‘statistics’ feature on the right-hand side toolbar to get a breakdown of your sentences; including the number of syllables and readability score.

  • Unlimited paraphrasing words
  • Eight language modes
  • Translate your writing into 45+ languages
  • Check your grammar, punctuation, and spelling
  • Built-in plagiarism checker
  • Unlimited prompts
  • AI detection
  • 6,000-word summarization
  • Citation generator
  • Multiple integration extensions

Whether you’re a student or content creator (or both!), communicate in Spanish with Quillbot Premium confidently!

4. Neural Writer

neural writer

Use Neural Writer to simplify the translation process and get peace of mind knowing that the very same text you have written retains its meaning. No need to flip through multilingual dictionaries when needing to rewrite English (or any other languages) into Español – just insert your content and es fácil !

Let’s look at what this AI paraphrasing tool has to offer.

  • Rephrase up to 10,000 characters
  • 3 specific AI paraphrasing modes
  • Access 27+ languages
  • Built-in humanizer (to make your text sound human-written)
  • Chat GPT prompt generator
  • Summarization tools
  • Word counter
  • Headline generator
  • Advanced paraphrasing and rewriting technology

5. Paraphrase Tool

paraphrase tool

Whether you need to rephrase a few words or an entire document, you can do it all with the Paraphrase Tool program!

Access 10,000 character credits when creating an account with the free version.

While the free version of the Paraphrase Tool is great as a quick word changer, its limitations may not be suitable when you need to convert and paraphrase multiple documents or lengthy text into Spanish.

This is where the premium version comes in – taking your Spanish paraphrasing to a whole new level! The premium edition costs $12.99 per month and packs a serious punch!

  • Unlimited paraphrasing in 20 styles
  • Access to 100+ languages
  • Up to 500 paragraphs per month
  • Up to 100 plagiarism checks per month
  • More powerful paraphrasing for all modes and languages

6. Reescribir textos

reescribir textos

But don’t fret, it also offers paraphrasing for eight European languages, including English, Dutch, French, Italian, and Romanian. The concept of Rewrite Texts is simple: input your copy into the lefthand side text box, hit “paraphrase text” and wait for the program to regenerate your original text into different words!

The premium package ($7.50 per month) boasts a comprehensive suite of tools and supports multiple languages.

  • “ Remove plagiarism ” scans your text for copied content and rewrites it to be original, all while keeping the core meaning intact. It’s used to avoid plagiarism, hence the name.
  • “ Essential ” and “ half ” modes allow slight variations to your original text by keeping the same meaning but suggest readability improvements.
  • “ Rewrite mode ” is a premium feature and will completely rephrase/reword your content in a new and unique way while keeping the gist of the original meaning.
  • “ Creative mode ” helps writers restructure their content to be more imaginative and engaging.
  • “ Academic mode ” focuses on enhancing academic writing, particularly helpful for school and university-goers.

What Is A Paraphrasing Tool?

A paraphrasing or rewording tool is essentially a fancy rephraser. It uses AI technology to help you rewrite text into your own words while retaining its original meaning.

Various paraphrasing tools have multiple language translators, so you can easily convert English text to Spanish. The different paraphrasing modes, such as tone of voice options, can be adapted to suit your writing context.

For instance, if you’re writing an academic research paper, you’ll need to use a more informative tone of voice to match the style of your topic and its intended audience.

Why would you want to use a paraphrasing tool?

There are many reasons as to why you would want to use a paraphrasing tool:

  • Avoid plagiarism – you cannot copy someone else’s work and claim it as your own. This is where a paraphrasing tool becomes invaluable in rewriting and restructuring the main points of a specific topic into words that are unique to you.
  • Improve readability and clarity— sometimes, AI-written text can be overly complex or wordy, and a paraphrasing tool can make it easier to understand.
  • Translating into other languages – each language has its own set of grammatical rules and phrases and when we directly translate from one language to another, we often miss the mark. Paraphrasing tools help keep the original text meaning even when translating.

How does a paraphrasing tool work?

  • You feed the tool a piece of text, such as sentences, paragraphs, or even whole articles.
  • The tool analyzes the text – using natural language processing (NLP) and AI technology – to understand its meaning, structure, and context. This may involve breaking the text into individual sentences or phrases and identifying key points and concepts.
  • The paraphrasing tool uses its knowledge of synonyms and different sentence structures to rewrite/rephrase the text.

So there we have it; a complete rundown of Spanish paraphrasing tools, ranging from basic to premium versions. Armed with this knowledge, you can craft clear, understandable, and grammatically correct articles in Español with ease.

Opt for Smodin’s Paraphrasing Tool to create polished, plagiarism-free Spanish content, whether you’re writing an essay, biology thesis, or recreational learning.

¡Buena suerte escribiendo!

IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Write in Spanish: The Step-by-step Guide to Perfecting Your

    In order to type it, you first have to type the accent key on your keyboard (') and then the vowel you want to add the accent mark to. Another letter with a mark is the Spanish letter ñ. In this case, you only have to press the (:) key, because Spanish keyboards have their own ñ key.

  2. 40 Useful Spanish Essay Phrases

    25. en realidad. in reality; really. 26. hay que tomar en cuenta. you have to take into account. 27. lo importante es. the important thing is.

  3. Basic Guidelines For Writing Essays in Spanish

    1) Some tips on writing in Spanish. 2) Pick an interesting topic. 3) Brainstorm the ideas. 4) Create an introduction. 5) Organize an essay body. 6) Sum up the content. 7) Check content relevance and cohesion. 8) Read for clarity and style. 9) Proofread.

  4. Spanish Essay Example and How to Write it

    Draft an outline. Create a list of words and terms. Start writing the body of your essay. Write the introduction. Formulate the conclusion. Proofread and edit. As you can see, learning how to write a good Spanish essay requires a lot of planning and organization.

  5. How to Write an Amazing Essay in Spanish

    6. Write the Body of Your Essay. Focus on fully developing your argument with relevant examples and evidence to support your position. Each paragraph should focus on only one argument along with supporting evidence, and the flow from one paragraph to the next should sound natural and rational.

  6. How to write an essay in Spanish: Escribir una redacción en español

    Advanced Spanish phrases to help you write an essay in Spanish. Escribe tu redacción con estas frases útiles. Making sure you cover all the different section...

  7. Spanish Words to Use In an Essay

    In this article, we've prepared a list of words that will help you write that Spanish essay without even breaking a sweat. Spanish. English. por lo tanto. therefore. sin embargo. however. rendimiento. performance.

  8. Composing an Essay in Spanish: Strategies & Organization

    Define the Topic. The topic of an essay is the first thing to decide. Make sure not to choose too broad a topic. For instance, at first, Stephanie thinks it would be a good idea to talk about the ...

  9. 15 Simple Tips to Improve Your Writing in Spanish

    1. Brainstorm. Before starting to write, brainstorm everything you want to cover in your text. This simple exercise of thinking beforehand helps not only with your writing in Spanish but also with any kind of writing. 2. Think in Spanish. As soon as you start preparing your text, all the time.

  10. Writing an Essay in Spanish and How to Do It with Excellence

    Use Transition Words: Incorporate transition words like 'sin embargo' (however), 'por lo tanto' (therefore), and 'además' (moreover) to connect your ideas and make your essay flow smoothly. Stick to Simple Sentences: Keep your sentences straightforward and easy to understand. Avoid using overly complicated phrases that might confuse your reader.

  11. Free Spanish writing practice

    Practise your Spanish writing skills with our ever-growing collection of interactive Spanish writing exercises for every CEFR level from A0 to C1! If you're unsure about your current proficiency, try our test to get your Spanish level before diving into the exercises.. All writing exercises are made by our qualified native Spanish teachers to help you improve your writing skills and confidence.

  12. Basics Of Spanish Writing: Sentence Structure, Verb Conjugation, Noun

    Learn the fundamentals of Spanish writing including sentence structure, verb conjugation, and noun and adjective agreement. Improve your Spanish writing skills with these tips and techniques. ... Composing an essay in Spanish allows you to articulate your ideas, analyze complex topics, and contribute to the ongoing conversation on various subjects.

  13. Writing in Spanish

    3.2.3 Writing an essay in Spanish Beginning to write an essay in Spanish is possibly one of the most difficult tasks for beginner learners. Going from single sentences to several paragraphs requires a lot of practice, but there are fixed expressions that can be used to make this process easier. Depending on the type of writing you do, you will ...

  14. Essay in Spanish? How to Write a Spanish Essay

    Latin American authors such as Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes are well-known for their essays in Spanish. Read their essays to strengthen your own essay writing abilities. The components and writing process of a basic essay in Spanish is the same as English: an introduction, three body paragraphs and a conclusion.

  15. 65 Spanish Phrases to Use in an Essay

    General Phrases. Finally, I wanted to include a group of useful common phrases that can enrich your essay's vocabulary: • "En realidad" - In reality. • "Actualmente" - Today/Nowadays. • "De acuerdo a…". - According to…. • "Por ejemplo" - For example. • "Cabe recalcar que…". - It is important to ...

  16. Composing a Persuasive Essay in Spanish

    The very first paragraph of a persuasive essay is in Spanish la introducción (the introduction) or el primer párrafo (the first paragraph). It has to be strong enough to entice the reader to ...

  17. 10 Creative Ways to Practice Your Spanish Writing Skills

    1. Daily Journaling. Journals are perfect for Spanish sentence writing practice! Pick up a new notebook or grab your laptop to start. Label each entry at the top to practice writing . 2. Download WordReference. is a must-have for any language learner! It's the ultimate online language dictionary.

  18. Tips For the AP Spanish Argumentative Essay

    AP Spanish Argumentative Essay Tip #3. Design teacher-friendly ways for students to practice. Let's face it. Students need lots of practice and lots of feedback to get good at this essay. But essays are very time consuming to write and very time consuming to grade. The strategy I use with my students is to break the essay into parts and allow ...

  19. PDF ) Persuasive Essay

    This is an organized essay where the thesis is presented from the beginning: "más facilidad" and "oportunidad a conectar.". The thesis structures the body paragraphs of the essay and is followed by a logical conclusion. The student uses explicit cohesive devices well: "Para empezar"; "También"; "Además"; "Para concluir ...

  20. How should I structure an A level Spanish essay to achieve a ...

    You should be aiming for 3 main themes which will in effect transfrom into 3 paragraphs. Within each paragraph you should then be looking to make 3 valid and detailed points all related to your main theme. Each point should be backed up by specific examples relating to the book/film/play/author or whatever it may be that you have studied.

  21. Spanish A Level (AQA): Tips for writing a successful literature or film

    Updated: Dec 10, 2023. In Paper 2 of the AQA A Level Spanish exam, students write one essay for each of the two works they have studied (which can be a text and a film, or two texts). Students are asked to write approximately 300 words for each question within a 2-hour duration for the whole paper. Although there is no word limit in the AQA A ...

  22. The Best Spanish Essay Writing Tools in 2023

    Explore and Discover Essay Writing Tools in 2023. The following digital programs will help you work on your writing skills in Spanish and successfully complete your essays and texts. Some are dedicated to specific writing areas like verb conjugation, grammar review, and practice exercises. Keep reading! 1. Reverso Conjugation

  23. PDF 2024 AP Spanish Language and Culture

    Now you have forty minutes to prepare and write your argumentative essay. Ahora tienes cuarenta minutos para preparar y escribir un ensayo argumentativo. (2400 seconds) Track #3. Directions. (N) End of recording. 2024 College Board. Visit College Board on the web: collegeboard.org.

  24. 6 Best Spanish Paraphrasing Tools

    More powerful paraphrasing for all modes and languages. 6. Reescribir textos. Rewrite Texts (or Reescribir textos in Spanish) is the best Spanish paraphrasing tool you'll get, as it exclusively rewrites for Spanish content writers! (This also means you'll need to change it to "English" in the URL translator tab!)