101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples

If you struggle to find “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay topics on prejudice, race, the characters’ courage, or any other issue, look no further. Our team has prepared a list of titles and essay writing tips for this book.

🏆 Best To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Topics & Examples

📌 most interesting to kill a mockingbird essay titles, 👍 good to kill a mockingbird research topics, ❓ to kill a mockingbird essay questions.

Before we will talk about the do’s and don’ts in essay writing, let’s clarify the types of essay.

When working on “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay thesis, you can focus on the facts of the book or concentrate on your attitude towards its key issues and characters. According to your approach, we can divide essays into two main areas:

  • Objective essay: you set out your personal thoughts on a chosen issue and provide supporting arguments and evidence;
  • Subjective essay: you express your point of view on a specific topic without claiming the truth and strengthening it with facts.

For example, when you choose a “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay topics on goodness, you will state that Atticus is a kind and fearless. No doubt that this character has a positive role.

On the other hand, when you describe Mayella, you will have to choose: will you condemn her or express pity.

As for the essay content, it can be divided into many subcategories:

  • Philosophical essay
  • Critical essay
  • Literary analysis
  • Historical essay, etc.

There are also a few key literary types:

  • Feature article, etc.

Do’s & Don’ts When Writing To Kill a Mockingbird Essays

Now, it’s time to talk about what you should write and what to avoid in your paper. First of all, you have to remember that all “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay titles should reveal the essence of the issue.

Recommendations for essay writing:

  • Do mark your essay subject at the beginning of the text. “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay hooks will help you to catch the reader’s attention. Don’t forget to emphasize the central issue in the conclusion.
  • Do support the style of presentation by your emotions, vision, and opinion. Use the “question-answer” in paragraphs. Make the transitions between paragraphs harmonious and smooth.
  • Do use quotes, historical facts, and observations to argue the thesis statement, solve the main issue, and describe the key subject of the paper.
  • Do stick to the central thesis of your essay. Avoid deepen into philosophical reflections — tell about concrete facts and examples. Here’s an example: don’t include the facts from the author’s biography if you focus on the events of the book and factors that affect discrimination.
  • Do proofread the paper. Read carefully your essay several times and think if your readers will understand your expressions.
  • Do not use specific terminology in “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay. For example, when you write about discrimination, you don’t necessarily have to provide its dictionary definition or use complex law, historical and psychological literature, and samples. Just your own language. However, it doesn’t mean that your opinion should seem ungrounded.
  • Do add your emotions to the paper. Let your readers feel that you believe in your ideas when defending the essay thesis.
  • Don’t choose the header before you write an essay. First, you should write an essay, and only then compile the title of your paper.

Well, now you know about the essay types, what to do, and what to avoid in your essay. Of course, you may ask: “What to write in my own essay?”

The key to success is to start. Check “To Kill a Mockingbird” essay examples on our website to get inspiration. Even the topic seems to you too complicated, start your research, and then you will be able to express new and original thoughts.

  • “To Kill a Mockingbird”: Book and Movie Differences It is important to note that the film, To Kill a Mockingbird entails most of the aspects depicted in the novel.
  • Slavery in To Kill a Mockingbird Novel The introduction of Tom by the author is a plot device to represent the plight of the slaves in the state.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Main Themes The main themes of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird cover both adult and children’s concerns, including the dignity of human life, the importance of truth, the rights of people to be different, the need […]
  • Analysis of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird Although the innocent black man is killed while attempting to break out of prison when he might have gone free had the case proceeded to a higher court, Atticus and the town’s sheriff conjure a […]
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962) by Robert Mulligan This movie presented a timely reflection of the extent of deep racial problems and social injustices existing in the southern part of the US in the early 60s.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird The author, in the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird presents a deeper understanding in relation to events occurring in her novel. To enhance understanding of the novel, the author has widely embraced symbolism in […]
  • Lift a Ban on “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Lee Understanding different activities have remained vital in society.”To Kill a Mockingbird” is a book that explains the problems of the United States and promotes people to be just and respect human rights.
  • The Problem of Racism and Injustice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In the novel, Harper Lee demonstrates her vision of the question of the social inequality with references to the problem of racism in the society based on prejudice and absence of actual principles of tolerance […]
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: Movie Analysis Speaking of the movements which convey the essence of the film without any speech “intrusion”, it would be a good idea to drive the example of Boo Radley standing in the darker corner of the […]
  • The Title of Lee’s “How to Kill a Mockingbird” Book The novel’s core topic is the disappearance of innocence and the influence of bias on the lives of the novel’s characters.
  • Empathy and Racism in Stockett’s The Help and Li’s To Kill a Mockingbird To start with, the first approach to racism and promoting empathy is to confront prevalent discrimination and racism, which was often shown in The Help. Another solution to racism and the possibility of promoting empathy […]
  • Systemic Racism in Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” & Whitehead’s “The Nickel Boys” Racism in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird is pronounced and presented as the natural habitat of the town of Maycomb.
  • Reflections of Harper Lee’s Life in “To Kill a Mockingbird” Nelle Harper Lee wrote a book, “To kill a Mockingbird,” this novel is one of greatest in the history of world literature, but the author would never have written the book without the best friend […]
  • Themes in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird, in its imperfection, is a testament to the march of progress in social justice and racial equality.
  • Nelle Harper Lee and Her Reflection in “To Kill a Mockingbird” The author perfectly reflects her life in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird as her father played an essential role in creating the story.
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” Drama Film The plot proves to be logical and consistent throughout the movie, motivating the audience to watch till the end of the film.
  • Understanding Other Perspective: To Kill a Mockingbird The literature portrays the actual happenings in the society in an educative and corrective manner that is acceptable to both sides of the victim and perpetrator of injustices.
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird”: The Novel by Harper Lee Scout does not realize the severity of many of the events of the book as they are taking place, and as such she is an innocent.
  • American History in “To Kill a Mockingbird” Book & Film Racial attitudes and the dominance of white men over the black ones in the USA are the central ideas of the movie and the novel.
  • Racist Trial in the Novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee For the purpose, evaluation would be made in the context of utilization of events, time and culture of the book and compare it to today’s society, culture and racial attitudes.
  • Racial Prejudice in Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” Paul Lawrence Dunbar in his poem, “Sympathy” has vividly portrayed the pangs of a caged bird and likens it to the collective pain that colored people have felt like victims of racial prejudices.”And a pain […]
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” Novel by Harper Lee It is one of the main characteristics of the mockingbird includes its innocence and imitation of the songs of other birds in a loud voice.
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee In consequence, the book became a model source of reading that inspired people to further take on the issues of race in the USA and throughout the world.
  • American Novel: “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee It is also worth to mention that the novel is indeed relevant to its readership because it mirrors the nature of society affected by racism and inequality. Through the act of inclusiveness, I am in […]
  • Novel Appreciation: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee The contemporary discussion of this novel is often tied to the question of racism; nevertheless, I am convinced that this book can be of great interest to modern readers, and I would like to discuss […]
  • What It Takes to Kill a Mockingbird: In Search for the Differences Between the Novel and a Movie The characters both in the novel and in the movie were often pushed to the breaking point; however, one of such moments described in the book was left out of the movie.
  • Social Issues in the “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee The phrase ‘to kill a mocking bird’ stands out as a metaphor in the book To kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
  • Moral Principles in Harper Lee’s Novel To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee explores a great number of themes in the first chapters of the novel, for example, integrity of a person and his/her ability contradict the norms, adopted in the community.
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” and the Techniques Used: Characterisation, Structure, Point of View, and Language
  • The Different Types of Families Represented in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Atticus Finch’s Views on Race and How They Change Throughout “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Racist Attitudes of the People in Maycomb County in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird”: How Symbolism Reinforces Important Ideas
  • The Supproting Character of Boo Radley as a Hero in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Unjust Persecution as a Major Theme in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Significance of the Title of “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Use of Symbols in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Trial of Tom Robinson and Its Role in Exploring the Issue of Racism in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Violence and Alienation in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • “To Kill a Mockingbird”: The Importance of Understanding Individual Differences
  • True Courage in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Two Types of Underprivileged People in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Influences Parents Have on Their Children in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The References That Suggest to Boo Radley and Tom Robinson in Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Tom Robinson and Boo Radley as Mockingbirds in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Southern Gothic Elements in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Resemblance Between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Themes of Childhoods in “Jane Eyre” and “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Role of Family in Shaping the Characters in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Affects of One’s Surrounding Environment on Their Personality and Morals in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The True Heroic Qualities of Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Theme of the Loss of Childhood Innocence in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Town of Maycomb’s Role in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Different Types of Prejudice Represented in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Atticus Finch as a Moral Compass for His Children in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Moral Development of the Characters in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Impact of Cowardice on the Characters in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Mrs Dubose as an Example of Courage in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Impact of Scout’s Family on Her Development in “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Victims of Stereotyping in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Atticus Finch as a Father Figure in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Tragic Hero in “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “The Crucible”
  • The Themes of Racism and Fear of the Unknown in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Hidden Symbols in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Value of Informal Education in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Tom Robinson’s Trial as a Central Part of “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Unarmed Bravery in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Use of Piaget’s Theories of Child Development in Analyzing “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • The Tolerance Level of the Characters in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • The Use of Symbolism and Irony in Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • Tom Robinson’s Conviction in Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”
  • How Old Is Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Does Mrs. Maudie’s Nut Grass Symbolize in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Does Scout Describe Dill in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Is the Theme of Femininity and the Power of Women From “To Kill a Mockingbird” Still Relevant Today?
  • Who Are the Radleys in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • Why Does Scout Have That Nickname in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Are Fathers Presented in the Novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Is the Main Meaning of “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Does Author Present Racial Issues During the 1930s in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Are the Two Main Plots in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Is the Irony in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Is the Most Important Lesson in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • Is “To Kill a Mockingbird” Still Relevant Today?
  • How Does Lee Make Atticus Finch a Heroic Figure in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What “To Kill a Mockingbird” Teaches Us?
  • What Are Some Life Lessons From “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Is the First Turning Point in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What’s the Climax of “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Are Some Symbols in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Are Prejudice and Hypocrisy Explored in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Does Harper Lee Build Up Tension Throughout the Novel “To Kill a Mockingbird?
  • How Has “To Kill a Mockingbird” Changed the World?
  • Why Should Students Read “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Does Harper Lee Use Minor Characters in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • How Does “To Kill a Mockingbird” Connect to the World?
  • What Does the Reader Learn About the Social Setting in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Are the Most Important Quotes in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • Who Is the Protagonist in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • Who Lost Their Innocence in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • What Does the Mad Dog Represent in “To Kill a Mockingbird”?
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2024, March 1). 101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-examples/

"101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples." IvyPanda , 1 Mar. 2024, ivypanda.com/essays/topic/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-examples/.

IvyPanda . (2024) '101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples'. 1 March.

IvyPanda . 2024. "101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples." March 1, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-examples/.

1. IvyPanda . "101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples." March 1, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-examples/.

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IvyPanda . "101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples." March 1, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-examples/.

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109 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

Inside This Article

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a classic novel that has been studied in classrooms for decades. The story of Scout Finch and her father, Atticus, as he defends a black man accused of raping a white woman in the segregated South, has sparked countless discussions and debates about race, justice, and morality. If you're tasked with writing an essay on this timeless piece of literature, you may be wondering where to start. To help you get the creative juices flowing, here are 109 To Kill a Mockingbird essay topic ideas and examples to inspire your writing:

  • Analyze the theme of morality and ethics in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Discuss the role of empathy and compassion in the novel.
  • Explore the theme of racial inequality and injustice in the South.
  • Examine the character of Atticus Finch and his moral integrity.
  • Compare and contrast Atticus' parenting style with that of other characters in the novel.
  • Discuss the significance of the mockingbird as a symbol in the story.
  • Analyze the social hierarchy in Maycomb and its impact on the characters.
  • Explore the theme of education and ignorance in the novel.
  • Discuss the importance of community and belonging in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Examine the character of Boo Radley and his role in the story.
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of Scout and Jem as they mature throughout the novel.
  • Analyze the symbolism of the Radley house in the story.
  • Discuss the theme of courage and bravery in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Explore the role of women in the novel and how they challenge traditional gender roles.
  • Examine the relationship between Scout and Calpurnia and its significance in the story.
  • Discuss the impact of social norms and expectations on the characters in the novel.
  • Analyze the character of Tom Robinson and his representation of innocence and injustice.
  • Discuss the theme of prejudice and discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Compare and contrast the attitudes of different characters towards race and class.
  • Examine the symbolism of the trial of Tom Robinson in the novel.
  • Discuss the significance of the title To Kill a Mockingbird and its relation to the story.
  • Explore the theme of childhood innocence and loss of innocence in the novel.
  • Analyze the role of gossip and rumors in shaping the characters' perceptions of each other.
  • Discuss the importance of perspective and point of view in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Compare and contrast the different forms of courage exhibited by the characters in the novel.
  • Examine the theme of social justice and the legal system in the South.
  • Discuss the impact of poverty and class on the characters' lives in Maycomb.
  • Analyze the relationship between Scout and her brother Jem and how it evolves throughout the story.
  • Explore the symbolism of the mockingbird and its relation to innocence and purity.
  • Discuss the theme of redemption and forgiveness in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of different characters as they confront prejudice and discrimination.
  • Analyze the character of Bob Ewell and his representation of evil and ignorance.
  • Discuss the theme of heroism and sacrifice in the novel.
  • Examine the symbolism of the courthouse in the story.
  • Explore the theme of social change and progress in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Discuss the impact of historical events, such as the Great Depression, on the characters in the novel.
  • Analyze the role of religion and spirituality in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Compare and contrast the different forms of discrimination experienced by the characters in the story.
  • Discuss the significance of the trial of Tom Robinson in challenging the status quo.
  • Examine the symbolism of the mad dog incident in the novel.
  • Discuss the theme of justice and fairness in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Analyze the character of Mayella Ewell and her representation of victimhood and oppression.
  • Explore the theme of social isolation and alienation in the story.
  • Discuss the impact of fear and prejudice on the characters' actions and beliefs.
  • Compare and contrast the different forms of courage exhibited by Scout and Jem.
  • Analyze the symbolism of the Finch family name in the novel.
  • Discuss the theme of family and loyalty in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Examine the relationship between Atticus and his sister Alexandra and how it reflects the values of the Finch family.
  • Explore the role of tradition and heritage in shaping the characters' identities.
  • Discuss the significance of the fire at Miss Maudie's house in the story.
  • Analyze the character of Miss Maudie and her role as a moral compass for the children.
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of different characters as they confront change and progress.
  • Discuss the impact of community values and norms on the characters' actions and beliefs.
  • Examine the symbolism of the treehouse and its relation to innocence and childhood.
  • Explore the theme of empathy and understanding in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Discuss the significance of the mockingbird as a symbol of innocence and purity.
  • Analyze the character of Calpurnia and her role as a surrogate mother for Scout and Jem.
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of different characters as they navigate the complexities of race and class.
  • Discuss the impact of social expectations and norms on the characters' identities.
  • Examine the symbolism of the courthouse and its relation to justice and fairness.
  • Explore the theme of social responsibility and civic duty in the novel.
  • Analyze the character of Boo Radley and his representation of isolation and alienation.
  • Explore the theme of justice and fairness in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Discuss the role of empathy and compassion in the story.
  • Analyze the character of Atticus Finch and his moral integrity.
  • Explore the theme of education and ignorance in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Discuss the importance of community and belonging in the novel.
  • Discuss the impact of fear and prejudice on the characters' actions and

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35 To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics

Harper Lee’s classic American novel To Kill a Mockingbird is among the most taught books in American literature. The story of young Scout Finch, her brother Jem, and their father Atticus–as told through the eyes of Scout–is one that has captivated readers for generations.

With the reading of the novel also comes an assortment of assignments that require students to analyze and interpret the text. One such assignment is the To Kill a Mockingbird essay.

While understanding the book’s content can be a challenge in and of itself, crafting a well-written essay on the subject can be even more so. However, we’ve created a handy guide detailing everything you need to know about writing a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, including tips on structure and 35 essay topic ideas.

How to Write the Essay

To Kill A Mockingbird essays can be written in many different writing styles depending on the essay prompt and the teacher’s individual preferences. However, there are a few key things that every To Kill A Mockingbird essay should have. Let’s take a look at what those are.

A Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement is the most crucial element of a good To Kill A Mockingbird essay. This statement is what your entire essay will be based around and should be narrow in focus. Depending on whether your essay is an argumentative, persuasive, comparative statement, or literary analysis essay, your thesis will take on a different form.

An Argumentative Thesis Statement

If you’re writing an argumentative essay, your thesis statement should take a clear position on the issue at hand. For example, if you’re writing about whether or not Atticus Finch is a good father, your thesis statement might look something like this:

“Atticus Finch is a good father because he is patient, teaches his children to be moral people, and is always there for them when they need him.”

A Persuasive Thesis Statement

If you’re writing a persuasive essay, your thesis statement will take on a slightly different form. Instead of simply stating your position, you’ll also need to provide evidence from the text to support your claim. So, for example, if you’re writing about whether or not Atticus Finch is a good father, your thesis statement might look something like this:

“Atticus Finch is a good father because he is patient, teaches his children to be moral people, and is always there for them when they need him. This is evident in how he deals with Scout’s defiance, helps Jem come to terms with Boo Radley, and stands up for Tom Robinson in court.”

A Comparative Thesis Statement

If you’re writing a comparative essay, your thesis statement will need to compare and contrast two or more characters, themes, or elements from the text. For example, if you’re comparing and contrasting the characters of Atticus Finch and Bob Ewell, your thesis statement might look something like this:

“Though both Atticus Finch and Bob Ewell are fathers, they couldn’t be more different in the way they raise their children. Atticus Finch is a patient and level-headed father who instils morality in his children, while Bob Ewell is an abusive and alcoholic father who does nothing but harm his daughter.”

A Literary Analysis Thesis Statement

In this type of essay, you’ll be asked to analyze the themes, symbols, or other literary devices used in the text. So, for example, if you’re writing about the theme of racism in To Kill A Mockingbird, your thesis statement might look something like this:

“The theme of racism is evident in To Kill A Mockingbird through the characters of Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, and Atticus Finch.”

In each of these examples, you’ll notice that the thesis statement is clear, concise, and takes a position on the issue at hand. This is exactly what your thesis statement should do as well.

The Body Paragraphs

Once you have a thesis statement, you can begin to write the body paragraphs of your essay. In each body paragraph, you’ll need to include a topic sentence, supporting evidence from the text, and your own analysis.

The topic sentence is the first sentence of the paragraph and introduces the main idea that will be discussed in the paragraph. The supporting evidence can be quotes, events, or other information from the text that backs up your main idea. And finally, your analysis is your interpretation of the evidence and how it supports your main idea.

For example, if you’re writing about Atticus Finch as a good father, your first body paragraph might look something like this:

Paragraph 1:

  • Topic sentence: Atticus is a good father because he is patient.
  • Supporting evidence: “Atticus was making a feeble attempt to comfort her, but his hands were shaking as badly as hers.” (Lee 94)
  • Analysis: This quote shows that even when Scout is misbehaving, Atticus remains calm and patient with her.

With each new paragraph, you’ll need to include a new topic sentence and supporting evidence.

The Conclusion

The conclusion of your essay is where you’ll need to tie everything together and leave your reader with a clear understanding of your position. To do this, you’ll need to restate your thesis statement and main points from the body of your essay.

You’ll also want to leave the reader with something to think about. Maybe offer a new perspective on the text, or suggest how the themes of the text apply to real life.

For example, your conclusion might look something like this:

“Though Atticus Finch is a fictional character, he serves as an excellent role model for fathers everywhere. His patience, morality, and courage are qualities that all fathers should strive to possess.”

35 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Topics

Sometimes the most challenging part of essay writing is coming up with a topic. That is where this list of To Kill A Mockingbird essay topics will come in handy.

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Racism

  • The racist attitudes of the people in Maycomb County
  • The impact of racism on the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The trial of Tom Robinson and its role in exploring the issue of racism
  • Atticus Finch’s views on race and how they change throughout the novel
  • How racism affects the relationships between the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Family

  • The different types of families represented in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The role of family in shaping the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch as a father figure
  • The impact of Scout’s family on her development
  • How the absence of a mother figure affects the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Courage

  • The definition of courage and how it applies to the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch as a model of courage
  • Mrs Dubose as an example of courage
  • How the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird define and demonstrate courage
  • The impact of cowardice on the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Morality

  • The moral development of the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch as a moral compass for his children
  • The importance of morality in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • How the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird deal with moral dilemmas
  • The impact of immorality on the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Prejudice

  • The different types of prejudice represented in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The role of prejudice in shaping the events of the novel
  • How the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird deal with prejudice
  • The impact of prejudice on the relationships between the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch’s views on prejudice and how they change throughout the novel

To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Injustice

  • The injustice of the trial of Tom Robinson
  • The role of injustice in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • How do the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird deal with injustice
  • The impact of injustice on the relationships between the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch’s views on justice and how they change throughout the novel

To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Topics About Gender

  • The role of gender in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • How characters in To Kill A Mockingbird are impaired or helped by gender roles
  • The impact of gender roles on the relationships between the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch’s views on gender and how they change throughout the novel
  • The significance of Scout’s development as a tomboy

With any of these 35 To Kill A Mockingbird essay topics, you will have a pretty easy time coming up with an excellent essay. Remember to create a strong thesis and use the guide above when writing your To Kill A Mockingbird essay body and conclusion.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Writing Prompts: Creative, Persuasive, and Informative

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

Incorporating To Kill a Mockingbird writing assignments into your TKM unit increases engagement and builds essential skills. Here are 23 To Kill a Mockingbird writing prompts ranging from poetry to formal research. Read on for 15 TKM project ideas.

Post overview:

  • Creative Writing (8 prompts)
  • Persuasive / Argument (4 prompts)
  • Informative / Expository (11 prompts)
  • Project Ideas

To Kill a Mockingbird Creative Writing Prompts

  • To Kill a Monologue

In this To Kill a Mockingbird creative writing prompt students write a theatrical monologue for one of the characters.  The goals focus on characterization, character motivation, and point of view.

Write a Symbol Poem

We will look at symbolism in poetry t o prepare for analyzing  To Kill a Mockingbird .   You will analyze a famous example and then write your own original poem that contains a symbol.

Share a reading of  “The Secret Heart” by Robert Peter Tristram Coffin  (or another poem with a clear symbol).

Write a poem that contains a meaningful symbol and be prepared to offer analysis of your key poetic elements.

  • Theme or feeling:
  • Tone (speaker’s attitude):
  • Mood (feeling created):
  • Bonus element (imagery, figurative language, sound device, etc.):
  • Creative Writing with Imagery

Imagery draws readers in and kick-starts their imaginations through word choice. Imagery means giving descriptive details and figures of speech that allow the reader to imagine with their senses.

“She was horrible. Her face was the color of a dirty pillowcase, and the corners of her mouth glistened with wet, which inched like a glacier down the deep grooves enclosing her chin. Old-age liver spot dotted her cheeks, and her pale eyes had black pinpoint pupils. Her hands were knobby, and the cuticles were grown up over her fingernails. Her bottom plate was not in, and her upper lip protruded; from time to time she would draw her nether lip to her upper plate and carry her chin with it. This made the wet move faster.” 

Demonstrate imagery by creating an original example and providing analysis. Your example of imagery can take one of several forms: a short story, an excerpt from an imagined narrative, a poem, or an in-depth description of a person, place, or event (descriptive essay).

Word choice terms:

  • Figurative language : metaphor, personification, simile, hyperbole, understatement, idiom, etc.
  • Connotations : the feelings and thoughts associated with particular words.
  • Imagery : helping readers imagine with their five senses
  • Allusions : references to or use of source materials
  • Sound devices : rhythm, rhyme, onomatopoeia, etc.
  • Sense of time and place : dialogue, dialect, allusions, and references
  • Tone: the narrator’s attitude toward the subject
  • Mood : how the words create feelings in the reader

The Lost Chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird

The class will be perpetrating an elaborate hoax. Everyone will write a “missing chapter” for To Kill a Mockingbird . The best fraud (selected by a class vote) will be published online along with lies about how Harper Lee wrote it.

Your “missing chapter” must fit thematically and show the elements of plot structure (conflict, inciting incident , etc.) The point of view must match the narration of TKM , and the word choice should imitate Lee’s style .

TKM assignment options

  • Writing Dialogue

Harper Lee is a master of writing dialogue. The way her characters express themselves makes their personalities and motivations come to life . The dialect they use creates a sense of time and place.

Write an original narrative that includes dialogue. Your story could be from your own life or pure imagination. R emember that dialogue is the focus. 

Writing dialogue instructions

  • Symbolism Narrative

Write an original narrative with a literary symbol that develops the theme. You might choose to use the symbol in the story’s title (e.g., “The Last Fudgsicle”). The story could be a true event, totally fictional, or somewhere in between.

Your story should have all the narrative elements (theme, characters, plot, etc.), but give extra attention to establishing point of view (the narrator and the narrator’s tone) and using a literary symbol .  

Example: “The Last Fudgsicle”

A thirteen-year-old boy named Zeek is saving the last fudgsicle in the freezer. He is trying to act more like an adult (drinking coffee, being responsible, etc.), so he is saving this childish treat for a special occasion. Zeek’s father dies unexpectedly and Zeek is crushed. After the funeral, Zeek decides he will eat the treat, but he discovers that it is no longer there. He also realizes that he will have some serious responsibilities as the family moves forward. The fudgsicle represents the end of his childhood. He should have enjoyed being childish while he had the chance.

  • Point of View Shift

Lee chooses the point of view in To Kill a Mockingbird carefully.  An adult Jean Louise Finch looks back on her childhood. Through her memories we experience the events with the eyes a child. Sometimes the point of view is childish and sometimes the adult point of view comes through.

Rewrite one chapter or event from the novel from a different point of view. You may choose a first-person narrator or a third-person narrator. Make sure to establish and maintain the point of view.  Follow your re-write with an explanation of how the point of view shift changes the telling.

Prewriting table

Foreshadowing in Creative Writing

Lee creates feelings of tension and suspense in To Kill a Mockingbird . Think about how the writing puts the reader on edge leading up to the attack on the children. One way that Lee creates tension and suspense is through foreshadowing, clues about what may happen.  

Write an original narrative that includes at least two types of foreshadowing.  The foreshadowing should help build a sense of anticipation, suspense, or mystery.

Types of foreshadowing:

  • Concrete foreshadowing : A material item is shown so that the reader or viewer will remember it for later (e.g., the kitchen knives shown early in the horror film). 
  • Word choice : The author might clue you in to what type of story this is through word choice. (Why did the author describe the ocean as blood red instead of wine red?)
  • Direct foreshadowing : A knowledgeable source tells you exactly what is going to happen. 
  • Flashback / flash forward : The author interrupts the timeline to inform the reader.
  • Symbolism : Imagine a gangster movie that starts with a bunch of rats killing each other in an alley; they all die. The filmmaker started this way to give you a clue. 
  • Red Herring : A red herring is misleading foreshadowing.  The author wants you to guess wrongly. Many readers think that these fishy clues stink.    

To Kill a Mockingbird Projects and Assignments COVER - Edited

To Kill a Mockingbird Writing Prompts: Persuasive / Argument

  • Should Mockingbird Fly Away?

Many schools are dropping To Kill a Mockingbird from the curriculum . Choose a position on whether To Kill a Mockingbird should be read in schools. Does it deserve its place as one of the most read texts in American classrooms ? Write a formal argument to support your position and be sure to address counterarguments.

Outline for a possible response:

  • To Kill a Mockingbird should not be required reading.
  • Students are harmed by seeing and/or hearing the n-word and racist ideas.
  • The inclusion of a false accusation of rape may negatively shape student views.
  • The portrayal is racist; Atticus shows agency but African Americans do not.
  • The symbolism is too obvious and heavy-handed.
  • Some feel that racial slurs are a reality to be faced, but this is a topic best left to parents.
  • In conclusion, To Kill a Mockingbird should not be required reading.
  • Free Robinson Speech

Imagine that Tom Robinson is alive and in prison. You have been selected to give a speech in the Alabama House of Representatives to rally support for a retrial. 

Your speech in support of Tom Robinson should take the form of a formal argument with a clear claim, supporting reasons with evidence, and a response to counterarguments. Pair your sound argument with effective speech devices.

Speech devices table

  • Hypocrisy Editorial
Hypocrisy : when one claims to have moral standards that they do not actually follow (e.g., a gossip who claims to despise gossip). Editorial : a newspaper article written by or on behalf of an editor that gives an opinion on a topical issue.

Harper Lee shows the hypocrisies of Maycomb to make her points. For example, The Missionary Society claims to support charity, but the members are very uncharitable in thought and practice.

What hypocrisies do you see in life? Write an editorial to argue against a reality that you view as hypocritical. Topics can range from the serious to the trivial (e.g., a teacher who does not allow students to have drinks in class but is known to spill coffee during lessons).

Addressing counterclaims:

  • State the opposing claim: Some conclude that…
  • Recognize their reasons: They form this conclusion based on…
  • Give your response: This does not change the fact that…
  • Does the Jury System Work?

The 6th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution requires that those accused of a crime receive a speedy, public trial by an impartial (fair) jury.

Is the jury system used in the United States fundamentally flawed or fundamentally just ? Would you be proud to perform your duty as a juror? Conduct a short research project on how the jury system works. Should the jury system remain, or should justice be served in a different way?  

Questions to research:

  • How does serving on a jury work?
  • In what ways is the jury system just?
  • What are some famous examples of the system failing?
  • What issues caused the failures?
  • What alternatives to trial by jury have been suggested?

To Kill a Mockingbird Writing Assignments: Informative / Explanatory

  • A New Point of View (personal essay)

What does it mean to be grown up? How do you know when you are an adult? What are different points of view on the meaning of adulthood? (Think about legal, cultural, and personal definitions.)

One theme of the novel focuses on growing up.  The kids in the story experience events that change their points of view in important ways.  You will write a short personal essay on an event from your own life that changed your point of view.

Example: My First Time Babysitting

  • Main idea: I learned that being a caretaker is no easy task.
  • Body 1 : Why I thought that taking care of younger kids would be easy money
  • Body 2 : The horrific details of my babysitting experience (AKA “The Twins of Evil”)
  • Body 3: What it takes to be responsible for others.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird in Context (research report)

Harper Lee wrote and published To Kill a Mockingbird during the Civil Rights Movement, but her story takes place decades earlier, during the Great Depression. 

To fully understand the historical context of  To Kill a Mockingbird , one must think about America in the 1930s and in the 1950s-1960s.  Choose a topic related to the historical context of the novel, conduct   formal research , and compose a research report.

  • Truth and Fiction

Harper Lee wrote To Kill a Mockingbird during the Civil Rights Movement, but her story takes place decades earlier. Aspects of the fiction resemble real-life events of the Jim Crow Era.

Research events and realities from the segregation era and compare what you learn with the events described in To Kill a Mockingbird .  Consider important court cases, laws, crimes, and social norms.  Include evidence from your research and examples from the novel in your comparison.

Scout’s Point of View

Write a response to literature essay analyzing how Lee uses point of view in To Kill a Mockingbird .  We stand in Scout Finch’s shoes as the events of the novel unfold.  The telling would be very different from the point of view of Atticus, Tom Robinson, or an objective (not involved) narrator.

Make sure to discuss Scout’s point of view at the beginning of the novel, her point of view at the end of the novel, and her point of view as an adult looking back on the events.

Lee’s Style (word choice)

How does an author make language powerful and engaging? Lee chooses her words carefully to create emotions and sensations. The imagery she creates makes a memorable impression on many readers.

Write an essay analyzing Lee’s style, especially her word choice. You will be graded on how well you explain elements of word choice, support your ideas with specific details, and include an effective conclusion.

Identify key elements of Lee’s word choice and how she uses them.

  • Dialogue and dialect  (how the characters talk)
  • Figurative language (idioms, simile, metaphor, hyperbole, analogy, etc.)
  • Word connotations (the thoughts or feelings of specific words and phrases)
  • Imagery / sensory details (the five senses help the reader imagine)
  • Tone (the narrator’s attitude toward the subject – including the level of formality)
  • Mood (how the words create feelings in the reader)
  • Sentence styles (e.g., short and direct or long and flowing)
  • Sound devices (rhythm, rhyme, onomatopoeia, etc.) 
  • Allusions and references (mentioning well-known ideas, texts, or examples)
  • Comparing Mockingbirds

People love to discuss the merits of different adaptations of their favorite stories, but they do not often provide in-depth analysis comparing the versions.

Write an informative essay comparing the differences between the original novel and the 1962 film version of To Kill a Mockingbird .  You do not need to decide which is better; it is more important that you make thoughtful comparisons.

TKM Writing Assignment handout

  • Studies of Courage

What does it mean to be courageous? In To Kill a Mockingbird , Atticus wants Jem to rethink his definition.  He uses Mrs. Dubose’s example to help Jem broaden his view. 

“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.”

Write an informative, personal essay explaining what courage means to you. Support your ideas with case studies from history and real life. Keep in mind that a personal interview can be a research source.

  • Hypocrisy in Maycomb: Point of View and Irony

Harper Lee uses Scout’s point of view to show the ironies of Maycomb. Through her eyes we see how hypocritical people can be.

Irony : When the reality is the opposite of what is expected or appropriate. Hypocrisy :  When the behavior of a person or group is contrary to their supposed or stated principles.

Use examples of irony in To Kill a Mockingbird to explain how Lee uses the different points of view to express a message (theme). (Whenever someone is hypocritical it is ironic.)  Choose three or more examples to examine the irony, the points of view, and the message. 

Choose examples that you might write about in your essay body:

  • The celebration of Africa (Egypt) in a segregated, all-white school.
  • The justice system (that does not care about justice)
  • The teacher who disapproves of reading at home
  • The Missionary Society (that supports oppression in their own community)
  • White people feeling threatened after the trial
  • Dill the clown (who laughs at the audience)
  • Atticus’ reelection (despite popular disapproval)
  • The whispering lynch mob (It’s rude to annoy the man you are about to kill.)
  • The thoughtful juror (The man who defends Tom was in the lynch mob.)
  • Treatment of the Ewells (respected in court but not in life)
  • Criticism of racism in Europe (Scout learns about Nazi Germany)
  • Atticus the sexist
  • Dolphus Raymond (the drunk who doesn’t drink)
  • The supposed psychopath (Boo) is one of the kindest people.
  • Parts, Plots, and Episodes

A short story usually has a simple structure with a beginning, middle, and end.  Long-form literature (like To Kill a Mockingbird ) often contains parallel main plots, sub-plots, and even separate parts.

Write an essay explaining the complex structure of Lee’s novel. How do the parts fit together and what is the overall effect? Make sure to use structure terms effective transitions.

  • Growing Up (personal essay)

Much of To Kill a Mockingbird explores themes on growing up.  For Jem and Scout, growing up includes discovering some awful truths about Maycomb and human nature.

Write a personal essay explaining what being “grown up” means to you. How do you know when you are an adult? What are different points of view on the meaning of adulthood? (Think about legal, cultural, and personal definitions.)

  • Foreshadowing in To Kill a Mockingbird

Lee creates feelings of tension and suspense in To Kill a Mockingbird . For example, think about how the writing puts the reader on edge leading up to the attack on the children.  

One way that Lee creates tension and suspense is through foreshadowing, clues about what may happen.  Write an essay analyzing Lee’s use of foreshadowing and include textual evidence in your explanation.

Choose an example to analyze:

  • The kids’ mission to the Radley House
  • Waiting for the verdict of the trial
  • Atticus shooting Tim Johnson
  • Bob Ewell’s attack on Scout and Jem
  • Other: ______________________________

Looking for TKM project ideas?

Post preview:.

  • Beyond the Mockingbird: Symbol Presentations
  • Primary Source Gallery
  • Is To Kill a Mockingbird Overrated?  (debate)
  • It’s Complicated (class display)
  • Themes of Mockingbird Presentation
  • Truth and Fiction (research project)
  • Free Robinson Campaign
  • TKM Artwork (visual exhibit)
  • Maycomb on Trial (mock trial)

Read more:  15 To Kill a Mockingbird Project Ideas

To kill a mockingbird writing prompts summary:, to kill a mockingbird creative writing.

  • Writing a Symbol Poem
  • The Lost Chapter
  • Using Foreshadowing in Creative Writing

To Kill a Mockingbird Writing Assignments: Informative / Expository

  • Scout’s Point of View
  • Lee’s Style (word choice)

Getting students to write creatively, persuasively, and informatively takes critical thinking to the next level. I hope that you can use one or more of these To Kill a Mockingbird writing assignments in your unit.

If you would like the complete assignment pages for the To Kill a Mockingbird creative writing prompts and the rest, check out the  To Kill a Mockingbird Unit and Teacher Guide .

Related post: To Kill a Mockingbird Discussion Questions

Related post:  To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Test (PDF)

Become a Writer Today

Essays About To Kill a Mockingbird: Top 5 Examples

Understand Harper Lee’s intention for the novel and successfully write essays about To Kill a Mockingbird. Here are some examples and prompts.

To Kill a Mockingbird is an iconic novel created by Harper Lee and published on July 11, 1961. It tells the story of a girl, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, and how she absorbed her father’s lessons through events over three years. She initially struggled to understand his lessons until she had to experience them firsthand through other characters. These include their recluse neighbor Boo Radley, African-American cook Calpurnia, and her father’s client accused of rape, Tom Robinson.

To further understand why this book is a timeless classic and why it deserves to be in teachers’ lesson plans, here are five sample essays you can read:

1. Metaphor, Foreshadowing, And Allusion In The Book To Kill A Mockingbird By Anonymous On Edubirdie.Com

2. growth in to kill a mockingbird by anonymous on samplius.com, 3. parenting in “to kill a mockingbird” by writer terra, 4. critical essays racial relations in the southern united states by anonymous on cliffsnotes.com, 5. my ‘to kill a mockingbird’ problem… and ours by zack graham, 1. to kill a mockingbird as an iconic novel, 2. literary elements in to kill a mockingbird, 3. lessons to learn from “to kill a mockingbird”, 4. why is it titled “to kill a mockingbird”, 5. what impacted the creation of to kill a mockingbird, 6. is to kill a mockingbird worth reading , 7. the characters in to kill a mockingbird, my reflection on a to kill a mockingbird movie.

Essays About to Kill a Mockingbird

“…Harper Lee excellently uses metaphors, foreshadowing, and allusion to show the theme of coming of age. Coming of age is something that occurs in everyone’s life whether it be at a young or old age.”

The essay retells To Kill a Mockingbird’s plot to refresh its readers on the novel’s contents. The author focuses on the literary elements in the book and how they helped to develop the story’s theme. 

The writer gives examples of these elements. Metaphors for Atticus asking Scout to put herself in someone else’s shoes to understand their point of view. Allusions for referring to Mockingbirds, alluding to innocent people. Foreshadowing for Atticus telling his daughter to resist the urge to fight, followed by Scout being unable to control her anger.

“Scout and Jem are both excellent examples of growth and maturity during a childhood. Jem learns what it really means to be brave, and Scout gets a true representation of the prejudice in her town.”

The piece delves into Jem’s bravery and how it changes throughout the novel. From simply touching the side of Boo Radley’s house, understanding what racism is through Tom Robinson’s trial, and coping with the attack of Bob Ewell. In the end, Jem grew up to be his sister’s savior. 

It also expounds on Scout’s growth and how she learned lessons worth a lifetime in just three years. In addition, the author recounted times when Scout was narrow-minded as a kid and how the people who love her corrected her ways. 

“There is a wide diversity of parenting styles in Maycomb which leads to many children behaving poorly… Atticus, Calpurnia, and Miss Maudie combine to make parental figures during the childhood of Jem and Scout.” 

Terra scrutinizes the many parenting styles in To Kill a Mockingbird and examines their effects on the characters’ children. For example, she labels Bob Ewell a lousy parent, resulting in mean, stubborn, and uneducated kids. On the other hand, Scout and Jem have many parental figures they learned from, such as their father, Atticus, nanny Calpurnia, and family friend Miss Maudie.

The author relates instances in the book to prove why Atticus is a great parent and how he tried to protect them despite the hate around their town. Terra further narrates other times when Calpurnia and Miss Maudie taught Scout and Jem valuable life lessons. 

“The racial concerns that Harper Lee addresses in To Kill a Mockingbird began long before her story starts and continued long after. In order to sift through the many layers of prejudice that Lee exposes in her novel, the reader needs to understand the complex history of race relations in the South.”

The writer lists relevant headlines during the time of Harper Lee’s creation of her book. The list includes Jim Crow laws that legalized racial segregation, banned interracial marriage, the Scottsboro Trials, where nine black teenage boys were falsely accused of rape, and Rosa Parks’ part in the Civil Right Movement.

“…after re-reading To Kill a Mockingbird, I can’t help but think about how the more things change, the more they stay the same. The book’s themes and dramatic tensions are anything but dated: they live on around us, appearing on the news and on social media. When you teach this book, I implore you to use it as a way of exploring what’s happening in this country to your students. “

Graham labels his essay an open letter to teachers. He shares his honesty on how he didn’t appreciate reading To Kill a Mockingbird in middle school and how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated him to re-read the book. Finally, he debates why teaching To Kill a Mockingbird to children doesn’t send them the right message. 

He highlights how the heroes in the novel are white people in the characters of Atticus and Boo Radley. Next, he compels teachers to teach their students about racism, such as how white people demonize blacks. He also mentions allegories in the book that can be used to explain cybersecurity, mental disabilities, and other information teachers should give more attention to when discussing the novel. Finally, he also points out the parts of the book he finds “ugly” and infuriating.

For help with your essay, check out our round-up of best essay writing apps .

8 Prompts on Essays About To Kill a Mockingbird

Below are persuasive prompts you can use for your essay:

For this prompt, explain why To Kill a Mockingbird is considered an iconic book. What makes it different from other books? Highlight the key points that make this bestseller a famous English literature example. Then, discuss its themes and provide a summary of the plot for those who haven’t read the book.

In this essay, study the key literary elements that make this book so groundbreaking. First, talk through the literary elements Harper Lee used in this novel, such as the settings, plot, and motif. How did they make the story more digestible? Then, discuss your favorite elements within the book and expand on the points made.

Atticus shares four lessons with his children in the book. Briefly summarize these lessons and share how you understand them. Then, give your opinion on whether they are good or bad advice and include your relevant experience connected to these lessons.

Explain to your readers why the novel is titled as such. Include what you thought of Harper Lee’s title, are there any other title you think better fits the book? For example, you may think the title should be: Atticus’ Four Lessons because the book revolves around his four core messages.

Many events inspired Harper Lee during her time. For example, explain how Rosa Parks’ bus incident and the murder of Emmett Till affected the book’s plot. Then, to give you an idea, you can create a timeline of these events and add their possible impact on Harper Lee.

To Kill a Mockingbird was praised back when it was first published in 1960, but some comment that it has a one-dimensional view of racism. For this essay, share your thoughts and your stance on this debate. Also, include what you felt during and after you read the book and why you would or would not recommend it to others.

Discuss the characters in the story — Scout, Jem, Atticus, Boo Radley, Bob Ewell, Tom Robinson, etc. Include why their parts are relevant in the novel. For example, if you pick Scout, share how her father’s lessons guided her through the book. 

To Kill a Mockingbird Movie was directed by Robert Mulligan and released in 1962. Highlight the elements that you think the movie managed to convey well. You can also point out what the movie missed.

If you are interested in learning more, see our essay writing tips .

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

Maria Caballero is a freelance writer who has been writing since high school. She believes that to be a writer doesn't only refer to excellent syntax and semantics but also knowing how to weave words together to communicate to any reader effectively.

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creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

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“To Kill a Mockingbird” Essay Writing Guide

Academic writing

Essay paper writing

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

To Kill a Mockingbird is perhaps one of the most outstanding novels in American literature. The novel by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and remains popular to this day. The publishing of such a book was marked as a milestone in the fight for black rights.

Harper Lee masterly depicted the memories of a distant childhood full of joys, discoveries, and extraordinary incidents and brought up the topic of discrimination, which was not typical for that time.

If you have been assigned to write an essay on To Kill a Mockingbird, you are the lucky one because you have an opportunity to get acquainted with and analyze such an amazing book. In this article, we will share the best writing tips as well as useful information on the novel.

Ideas for To Kill a Mockingbird essay topics

Here are some of the best To Kill a Mockingbird essay ideas:

  • Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Factors that affect moral growth in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Good and evil in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on enemies
  • To Kill a Mockingbird literary essay: plot analysis
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on goodness
  • Why is it a sin to kill a mockingbird? essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on courage
  • Facing history in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay: Tom Robinson (character analysis)
  • Loss of innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Symbol of mockingbird in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Was justice served in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Setting in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird literary analysis essay
  • Misperception in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Racism in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay: stereotypes and public perceptions
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on discrimination
  • Social class in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay: Scout growing up
  • To Kill a Mockingbird racism essay: historical analysis
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: book vs movie essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on point of view of any character of choice
  • Symbolism in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Life lessons in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Tolerance in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Gender bias in To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Who is the mockingbird in To Kill a Mockingbird? essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on appearance vs reality
  • Social inequality in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on the Maycomb caste system
  • Empathy in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on social inequality and strive for justice
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay on maturity
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: Atticus essay
  • Character analysis of Scout in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Who is the most courageous character in To Kill a Mockingbird? essay
  • Types of prejudice in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird: character analysis essay
  • Gender prejudice in a To Kill a Mockingbird: Societal standards and non-conformity
  • Family relationships in a To Kill a Mockingbird essay
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: Coming of age essay

to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-writing-guide1

To Kill a Mockingbird essay outline

Creation of an outline will help you stick to the topic and never lose any important points. An outline of a good essay consists of the following:

  • How to start a To Kill a Mockingbird essay?  A brief yet powerful quotes from the novel or a discrimination fact or statistic may serve as a good opening sentence for To Kill a Mockingbird essay.
  • Next, you will need to think about To Kill a Mockingbird essay thesis. This is the sentence that will be the essence of your whole paper, and all the points stated here will have to be supported with arguments and facts. That is why your thesis has to be brief, clear, and precise. Include 3 points that you want to focus on and make sure you have enough evidence to support them before you make a choice.
  • Body paragraphs. This part is the most informative and extended one. Here, you will need to present in detail all your arguments and reinforce the points of your thesis statement with strong evidence and examples. You shouldn’t also forget about a good clincher for a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, which should be present in the final sentence of each paragraph and strengthen the statements you make. An effective clincher leaves the audience with a strong final impression of the essay. You may also use some To Kill a Mockingbird essay quotes to prove that your interpretations of what was written is correct.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird essay conclusion. In this final part, you have two main tasks: restate your thesis statement and summarize all the key points from the main section. Apart from it, you may also leave your readers with some food for thought in the very last sentence of the paragraph.

Rules for writing a creative title for To Kill a Mockingbird essay

In order to make a clever title for a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, come up with one when the paper is ready. This way, you will already have a clear understanding of the issue you considered and will be able to create a catchy title that is both interesting and relevant to what you have written.

What type of essay can you choose?

You definitely know that there are various types of essays. But what is the best kind for the To Kill a Mockingbird essay? Here are some suggestions depending on what you want to focus on in the paper:

  • To Kill a Mockingbird character analysis essay. Everything is as simple as it sounds: you have to choose a character and analyze his or her role in the novel as well as their worldview, motivation, actions, background etc.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird analytical essay. Analytical essay is a type of writing in which you put forward a claim and try to reinforce it with some arguments. The good news is that there can be a lot of topics to choose from in this case. You may even select one from the next paragraph.
  • Literary analysis essay on To Kill a Mockingbird. This is a paper that you will likely be assigned in one of the English or Literature classes. In this case, you may analyze the genre or stylistic features of the novel.
  • Argumentative essay To Kill a Mockingbird. As it might be obvious from the name, you need to choose a controversial topic, and argue for or against an idea you put forward. For example, you may state that while Atticus’s decision to defend Tom took a huge toll on his family, it was a smart choice to make. After that, you will have to present 2-3 supporting points for this idea, and, if necessary, 1 opposing viewpoint.
  • Compare-contrast To Kill a Mockingbird essay. For this paper, you will need to choose two aspects or characters that you would like to compare, i.e. find similarities and differences for. For example, you may compare the actions of the main characters, either protagonists or antagonists, or, instead, choose to compare secondary characters and their roles in the story.

to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay-writing-guide2

The brief history of a book

In the last century, Harper Lee published just one book - To Kill a Mockingbird, but it was enough for her to enter the history of world literature. For 50 years after this event, Lee remained silent. But in 2015, her fans learned about the release of the second book Go Set a Watchman, which is simultaneously a prehistory and a continuation of the novel about Atticus Finch and his kids.

In 2016, the writer died, and the first work remained the main legacy of her life.

Harper was born in Monroeville, a small town in Alabama - one of the most racially intolerant US states. Traditionally, the leaders of the Ku Klux Klan organization had a great political influence in Alabama. The girl’s family was large. Father worked as a lawyer and, for some time, as an editor of the newspaper. All these facts formed the basis for the plot of the book, which later became a vital part of the American school curriculum.

Important background information about racism for a To Kill a Mockingbird essay

Evaluating credible sources for a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, it is better to use not only the book itself but also trustworthy references with historical facts about racism in the XX century in The United States. However, to make your academic life easier, we have collected some shocking facts about racism, which you can use in your paper to provide some historical context of the novel:

  • Before the First World War, the black population of the United States consisted of about 10 million people. 89% of them lived in the South, but at that time, more and more Afro-Americans moved to the North in search of a better life.
  • The life of these ten million people was regulated by a system of racist customs called the Jim Crow laws. Even in 1940, only 5% of the Black population of the American South had the right to vote. In the South, racial segregation was universally observed. For example, interracial marriages were strictly forbidden in 31 states. This ban existed until 1967!
  • In Alabama, it was forbidden for black and white people to play dominos or chess.
  • Any attempt to live under the same roof with a representative of another race prompted an immediate reaction of the police in order to stop a “violation of public order.”
  • An outstanding scientist, Charles Richard Drew, who discovered blood plasma, died on the doorstep of a hospital after a car accident in Georgia since doctors refused to help a black colleague.
  • In 1940, only 5% of Black population graduated from high school.
  • In the North, the situation was not much better. Racism was the norm of life, an unwritten custom. Blacks could count only on the dirtiest work and life in crowded ghettos; several families could live in one communal apartment (until the late 60’s).
  • In 1912, Woodrow Wilson, a candidate for the presidency of the United States, promised black Americans to do his best to promote their interests in the United States. But he lied. On the contrary, with Wilson’s rise to power, the position of Black people became critical in terms of civil and human rights.
  • Many senators, representatives of the Supreme Court, as well as, probably, President Harding came from the ranks of the Ku Klux Klan. The number of victims of the Ku Klux Klan is very hard to determine precisely. Formally, their number is estimated as dozens of people each year. But murders were committed all the time. People were abducted at night and never returned. Black veterans became the main hunting target for the Ku Klux Klan. In 1919, 14 of them were publicly burned, 11 of which were burned alive.

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Ava ai is launched to transform student counseling, themes in to kill a mockingbird.

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Lesley J. Vos

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the themes in “To Kill a Mockingbird” .

What is it about “To Kill a Mockingbird” that makes it a literary classic? “To Kill a Mockingbird,” written by Harper Lee and published in 1960, is a timeless literary masterpiece that continues to resonate with readers across generations. This iconic novel delves into a tapestry of profound themes that shed light on the complexities of society, morality, and human nature. Harper Lee, who was just 34 years old when she penned this remarkable work, gifted the world with a narrative that remains as relevant and influential today as it was upon its initial release.

Harper Lee

The enduring power of “To Kill a Mockingbird” extends far beyond its pages, as it addresses issues of racial injustice, moral integrity, and the human capacity for empathy. Lee’s portrayal of the American South through the eyes of an independent female protagonist provides a unique perspective not often found in the works of other southern women writers. As we explore the major themes of this novel, we gain valuable insights into the author’s intentions and the profound messages she sought to convey, ensuring that the impact of “To Kill a Mockingbird” will endure for decades to come.

In this article, we will focus attention on the most prominent To Kill a Mockingbird’s themes. 

Racial Prejudice

Racial prejudice takes center stage in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” where the story revolves around the trial of Tom Robinson, a Black man falsely accused of a crime in a deeply racist Southern community. The question that looms large is how can a Black man ever expect a fair trial when racial hatred is so ingrained in the community that it’s even taught in schools? And what does a jury of one’s peers look like in such a prejudiced environment? These questions about prejudice, especially racism, lie at the heart of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” giving rise to some of its most compelling and unforgettable moments.

Racial conflict within the story leads to two tragic deaths, highlighting the high stakes of racial tension. On a basic level, the novel portrays a straightforward and moralistic view of racial prejudice: White individuals who hold racist beliefs are depicted as morally wrong, while those who reject racism are seen as virtuous. Atticus Finch, the novel’s moral compass, risks his reputation, his standing in the community, and even his children’s safety because he refuses to embrace racism; he represents the embodiment of goodness. On the other hand, characters like Bob Ewell, who falsely accuses a Black man of rape, publicly humiliates Atticus, and attempts to harm a child, stand as symbols of racism’s malevolence and evil.

However, “To Kill a Mockingbird” also attempts to delve into the complexities of life in a racially prejudiced society. Scout and Jem, Atticus’s children, confront not only the discomfort but also the outright hostility that arises from their family’s opposition to racial prejudice. Their commitment to equality positions them in opposition to the wider community, resulting in conflicts and challenges.

Racial Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird

Prejudice is pervasive throughout the novel, with numerous characters displaying varying degrees of bigotry. Many residents of Maycomb harbor racist sentiments and prejudices against Black people. For instance, Tom Robinson is automatically assumed guilty of sexually assaulting Mayella Ewell solely because of his race, despite clear evidence suggesting his innocence. During Tom’s trial, Mr. Gilmer, the prosecuting lawyer, expresses shock when Tom admits to feeling sorry for Mayella. The idea of a Black man sympathizing with a white person is so unthinkable in the community that it seems to seal Tom’s fate.

Atticus, in contrast, champions tolerance and equality, values he hopes to instill in his children, Jem and Scout. However, his sister, Aunt Alexandra, embodies a different mindset. This is evident in her treatment of Calpurnia, a Black woman who helps care for the Finch children. When Aunt Alexandra comes to the Finch house to assist while Atticus is busy with the trial, she instructs Calpurnia to carry her suitcase upstairs, a task Atticus would never ask of her. This disparity in treatment reflects Alexandra’s prejudiced beliefs.

The novel further exposes hypocrisy when Aunt Alexandra hosts a missionary tea attended by Maycomb’s ladies. At this gathering, the ladies express pity for the fictional Mruna tribe in Africa, sympathizing with their perceived hardships. Yet, these same women later condemn the Black people in their own community, revealing the extent of their prejudice. Mrs. Merriweather, one of the ladies, exemplifies this hypocrisy. She can show sympathy for a distant tribe but fails to empathize with the Black citizens of Maycomb, dismissing them as lazy and sulky. Her focus on the Mruna tribe stems from their non-Christian status, as she believes that white missionaries can save their souls by converting them to Christianity and introducing them to the Bible.

Dolphus Raymond provides another perspective on prejudice in Maycomb. He pretends to be continuously drunk to divert attention from his unconventional life choices. Raymond is in a relationship with a Black woman and has mixed-race children, a taboo in the community. Consequently, he and his family are treated as outcasts. As Jem observes about Raymond’s mixed-race children, they are rejected by both Black and white communities. Raymond’s deception about his drinking habits serves as a shield, allowing him to lead his life as he sees fit, even if others find it objectionable.

Racial intolerance, though prominent, is not the sole prejudice explored in the novel. Many residents of Maycomb are depicted as narrow-minded and intolerant of anyone who deviates from their expectations. Boo Radley, a reclusive neighbor who hasn’t been seen outside his house for years, becomes the target of gossip and persecution. Neighbors speculate about his mysterious activities, painting him as a shadowy figure who only ventures out at night. Local rumors even depict Boo as a terrifying monster, perpetuating the cycle of prejudice and intolerance.

In “To Kill a Mockingbird,” courage shines through the actions of various characters. First and foremost, Atticus Finch stands out as a symbol of courage. He demonstrates this quality by agreeing to defend Tom Robinson, fully aware that it will bring trouble to him and his family. Despite the slim chances of winning the case in a deeply prejudiced society, Atticus takes on the challenge. His courage is further evident when he guards Tom Robinson’s prison cell alone, knowing there’s a high risk of a lynch mob attempting to harm Tom. Throughout the novel, Atticus consistently opposes racism and encourages his children to do the same. He emphasizes the importance of not using derogatory language like the N-word, teaching Scout and Jem about the courage it takes to stand up against injustice.

Atticus’s courage extends to his marksmanship when he shoots a rabid dog that poses a threat to the neighborhood. Despite his reputation as “One-Shot Finch” from his youth, he hasn’t handled a gun in 30 years. Taking on the responsibility of eliminating the dangerous dog requires immense bravery. Remarkably, Atticus doesn’t reveal this skill to his children because he wants them to understand that true courage isn’t defined by marksmanship.

Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird

Other characters also exhibit acts of courage throughout the novel. Miss Maudie, for instance, displays courage when her house burns down. Instead of wallowing in despair, she remains optimistic and focuses on the opportunity to have a larger garden. Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor, shows courage when he intervenes to protect Jem and Scout from Bob Ewell’s threats, even though it means leaving the security of his home.

Mrs. Dubose is yet another example of courage. She battles a morphine addiction, determined to break free from it before her death. Unbeknownst to Jem, reading to her aids in her struggle to overcome the addiction. Her decision becomes even more courageous when it’s clear that there’s no immediate need for her to quit the drug, given her terminal illness. Mrs. Dubose’s bravery stems from her personal satisfaction in wanting to be drug-free at the time of her passing. Her battle is a deeply personal one, and most of Maycomb remains unaware of the inner strength it takes for her to face it. Atticus believes that her quiet courage, unseen by many, makes her even braver. He wants Scout and Jem to witness her struggle to understand that courage often involves doing difficult things that others may never comprehend or may even criticize. This prepares them for the bravery they’ll need during Tom Robinson’s trial.

“To Kill a Mockingbird” underscores the idea that standing up for what is right demands both courage and bravery. These traits are exemplified by various characters in the story, while others exhibit cowardice. Atticus, the Finch children, and even Boo Radley exemplify courage and bravery as they stand up for justice and morality, even in the face of danger and adversity.

Justice vs Law

The book conveys the idea that adhering to the law doesn’t always equate to achieving justice. Laws, being human-made, are not without their flaws. Sometimes, strict adherence to the letter of the law doesn’t lead to true justice. Atticus comes to understand that doing what is right and just may require going beyond the confines of the legal system. Laws, he realizes, are shaped by society’s values, even when those values are rooted in hatred and prejudice. This is starkly evident in the case of Tom Robinson, where his innocence is glaringly apparent to those willing to see the facts. Yet, the deep-seated prejudice within the justice system prevents the delivery of true justice.

While the trial of Tom Robinson occupies only a small portion of the book, it serves as the focal point around which the rest of the narrative revolves. This trial serves as a critique of the legal system, particularly as it functions within the town of Maycomb. Procedurally, the trial follows the rules. The judge oversees the proceedings, the lawyers present their cases, and the jury is selected in the usual manner. However, the all-white jury’s decision doesn’t align with the evidence or the law; instead, it reflects their own biases. Tom Robinson’s unjust verdict underscores the limitations of the legal system, prompting readers to question the fairness of a “fair trial.”

Justice vs Law in To Kill a Mockingbird

Atticus, while acknowledging the flaws in the legal system, maintains his faith in due process. Simultaneously, he believes that the law should be applied differently based on an individual’s circumstances. He explains to Scout that while she enjoys a privileged life with ample opportunities, others face far greater challenges and fewer prospects. In certain situations, he suggests it’s just to allow these individuals some leeway in breaking the law to prevent them from being unduly harmed by its rigid enforcement.

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creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

To Kill a Mockingbird Essay: Scout Finch

To kill a mockingbird essay: character analysis and growth of scout finch.

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

A Great Path to Maturity: Scout Finch

“A mature person is one who does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably,” promoted Eleanor Roosevelt during her dedicated years as an advocate for the U.S.’s citizens.  As the First Lady, she, like many other good people in the world, had achieved the success of maturity and gave her life to the people.  Likewise, in the fiction book To Kill a Mockingbird , Harper Lee concocted a brilliant masterpiece filled with themes about a young girl named Scout and connected her adventures to her own memories of growing up in the prejudiced South, specifically in Alabama, in the 1930s.  The story reflects a major meaning of life and maturity through the prejudiced death of an innocent black man, and the events before and after the case prove to be enlightening experiences for Scout.   Known as tomboy Scout, Jean Louise Finch transforms in the course of three years from an innocent child to a courageous young lady by learning to control her originally stormy temper, apprehending the prejudice and racism around her, and caring for others after absorbing different perspectives.

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

Character Traits of Scout Finch in the Beginning of To Kill A Mockingbird

As a tomboy, Scout has early troubles with fighting on impulse or speaking before thinking whenever a person or event irritates her, but she outgrows her hot temper and learns to rationalize thoroughly after encountering several events.   Originally, on her first day of school, Scout is slightly naïve when she tries to explain to her teacher Ms. Caroline about a boy named Walter Cunningham and his “no lunch” situation.  However, Scout did not consider Walter’s embarrassing side of the story and unintentionally insults him, “…but it was beyond my ability to explain things as well as Atticus, so I said, ‘You’re shamin’ him, Miss Caroline. Walter hasn’t got a quarter at home to bring to you, and you can’t use any stovewood’” (Lee 21).   Scout is innocent and does not really understand that Walter and his family are proud people, so her thinking does not yet reach a mature insight.  The teacher immediately punishes her, and Scout’s flashy temper overtakes her because she does not word her explanation carefully.  As a result, she decides to punish Walter for her mistake.  Therefore, as children, people often do not think thoroughly about their actions, and their tempers often control them in silly ways, but maturity stabilizes the mind and body to act as one being, and thoughts of reasoning cause people to act justly.   For example, in a situation in which Scout matures, her Aunt Alexandra holds a missionary group meeting with the ladies in the town, and they are discussing troubling news about changing the Mrunas, whom the hypocritical women, such as Mrs. Merriweather, believe that they live like animals.  Near the end of the meeting, Scout and Aunt Alexandra are both angry with the hypocritical comments and also receive the shocking news of the meaningless death of an innocent black man named Tom Robinson, but Scout manages to stay calm just like her aunt.   Scout demonstrates her newfound ladylike patience , “I carefully picked up the tray and watched myself walk to Mrs. Merriweather.  With my best company manners, I asked if she would have some.  After all, if Aunty could be a lady at a time like this, so can I” (237).  Through this thought, Scout reveals a maturity growth in which she deals with stressful and unfair situations with dignity.  She is no longer her childlike, eruptive personality and instead, reacts calmly with both the unjust comments of Mrs. Merriweather and the surprising news of Tom Robinson’s death.  Deep inside of her, she considers both situations and knows their injustice, but she keeps her outer self as a patient lady.  Because her reaction seems content, Scout is able to analyze her situation and object to extreme events within her mind. Near the end of the book, she steers her life into a more thoughtful and patient way that changes her previously boiling personality.

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

How Scout Finch Grows

Furthermore, Scout matures as she experiences the harsh realities of prejudice and racism around her when she learns about Walter Cunningham’s lifestyle and encounters the unfair trial of Tom Robinson.  At the beginning of the school year, she previously hurts Walter Cunningham after she is punished by the teacher for trying to defend him.  At the same time, she is learning from her aunt, who comes to stay with Scout and her family to serve as her feminine role model.  When Scout suggests to her father that she wants to visit their cook’s home and play with Walter Cunningham, Aunt Alexandra erupts with disdain, “…she said, ‘Because-he-is-trash, that’s why you can’t play with him…’” (225).  In addition, Scout’s older brother calms her as she furiously reacts, “…and he led me away sobbing in fury to his bedroom” (225).  Scout considered everyone, including impoverished Walter, equally. When Aunt Alexandra disapproves of him, Scout sobs because the unfairness in the world angers her. She matures in her thinking and sees people as a big dysfunctional family, but everyone is still considered equal to each other.  Therefore, she views the world with equality in mind and knowing that it was unfair, which is further revealed in her reaction to the verdict of Tom Robinson’s trial.  He is wrongly accused of raping an impoverished and neglected white girl, and the society wrongly uses prejudice of black people to influence their conclusions, “A jury never looks at a defendant it has convicted, … not one of them looked at Tom Robinson” (211).  Scout is now aware of the prejudice around her.  In this, she displays insight of the world beyond her and how it affects equality.  Her instinctive guess of the outcome also shows her experience with the racism that exists between white and black people.  Unraveling the injustice in the world and experiencing it strengthens Scout’s mental and emotional growth .

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

Character Development of Scout Finch

In addition, Scout masters a technique that makes her more caring and worldly like her saintly father and great older brother, and she learns to consider others’ points of view to understand people.  In an early situation, Scout’s Aunt Alexandra arrives to stay at her home for a long time to serve as Scout’s feminine influence because her mother had passed away.  Thus, Aunt Alexandra wants to help Scout, but Scout sees this as an intrusion of her own freedom, so she tactlessly tries to dissuade her aunt from staying a long time by referring to missing her own husband, “The moment I said, ‘Won’t you miss him?’ I realized that this was not a tactful question” (128).  In this action, Scout is less experienced with seeing the different point of view of her aunt’s good intentions. Instead, it reveals that Scout is still young and does not yet consider how her aunt feels. Not seeing other points of view is often what children are portrayed as, and thus, it reflects their innocence.  As a result, their actions can be excused as long as they learn form their mistakes and consider others.  After three long years of yearning to see her mysteriously reclusive neighbor Boo Radley, Scout finally understands his reasons for staying in his home after seeing his point of view.  Previously, her father Atticus always wants her to consider other points of view, and Scout masters it with Boo.  After Boo saves her and her brother’s lives, Scout walks him home and is amazed by his perspective of events, “ Atticus was right….you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough…I felt very old ” (279).  Scout is overwhelmed by emotions because she finally understands her neighbor, and as a more mature person, she now considers her previous actions to see Boo as childish. With this, Scout demonstrates a great capacity as an almost fully-fledged adult .  At the same time, comprehending others shows a technique that comes with experience and knowledge. Scout’s encounters with learning different points of view change her own opinions and views of the outside world.

creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

Conclusion: The Growth of Scout and Her Maturity

Overall, Scout gains the power of knowledge and experience by learning to suppress her originally short temper, realizing the unfairness in society, and viewing the world thought others’ points of view.  Moreover, she learns to be more careful with her actions after she hurts her classmate Walter and realizes her mistakes while later, Scout is respectful with her aunt’s hypocritical missionary circle.  Scout also senses the inequality in the world with her aunt’s comments about Walter’s impoverished lifestyle and the prejudiced verdict of Tom Robinson.  Finally, Scout completes an essential step to her maturity when she learns from her misunderstanding of her aunt’s caring intentions, and she masters the art of understanding others, especially Boo Radley, after placing herself in his perspective of events.  Scout not only masters maturity physically but also emotionally, socially, and mentally.  Often, she makes mistakes that cause her to stop and consider them, and as a result, she matures by learning from them and improving herself for later events in the story.  Conquering her temper was a small step to advance into the adult world while protesting inequality and understanding others brings her to another level of maturity that is evident in many of her later actions.  Equipped with the knowledge and experience of controlling temper, disapproval of inequality, and the art of comprehending those around her, Scout, like other benevolent people, earns the honor of reaching true maturity after conquering obstacles.  Finally, achieving those aspects of maturity allows people like Scout to face society with confidence, respect, and kindness , allowing them to be ready for the real world.

Learn More about Jem Finch, Scout Finch, and Atticus Finch’s Character Analysis in Our Second To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

Works Cited

Lee, Harper.  To Kill a Mockingbird. Print.

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All rights reserved. This essay or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher. 

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11 replies »

  • Pingback: To Kill A Mockingbird: All Characters Analysis Essay – Moosmosis

This is wonderful! Very detailed analysis, I really enjoyed To Kill A Mockingbird back in the day, and Scout Finch’s my favorite! ❤

Like Liked by 1 person

Thank you very much, very sweet of you!

Like Liked by 2 people

I live Scout too! 💕great analysis too!

Thank you Helen! ❤ very kind of you

Your article is excellent. My class just started reading the book and I showed this all my students. Insightful read.

Thank you Mr. Samson! I’m glad that it’s helpful to your class

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To Kill a Mockingbird Persuasive

This essay about “To Kill a Mockingbird” examines Harper Lee’s timeless masterpiece, highlighting its exploration of themes such as racial injustice, moral integrity, and societal resilience. Through Atticus Finch’s principled defense and Scout’s perspective, the text into the complexities of prejudice and the enduring quest for justice. It underscores the novel’s relevance in today’s world, urging readers to confront systemic oppression and work towards a more equitable future.

How it works

Winy opus magnum defence harp, to “kill mockingbird,” is a masterpiece, that outstrips time and literary place, weaves a tapestry themes and characters, that ring deeply with readers through insuperable generations profonds. Place despite basis American midday dans-chargé, story defence ouvre he with mixture sharpness and urgency rare, invites readers to contrast he trues bulky from prejudice, ethics, and dynamic complex society.

In a heart, to “kill mockingbird” link one accuses an act racial injustice and corrosions things systematic discrimination hot.

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Unit, between a black, to “kill mockingbird” too offers weak lights hope and resiliency. Through nonfrémit obligation Atticus to the justice and moral integrity, defence presents presentation insuperable ethic bravery in a person adversity. Atticus defence Tom Robinson acharnée stands so as precept one yields processing authority compassion and compassion, promising readers, to pass a border their clean possibilities étroite and to stand in solidarity with weighs minor and burdened.

In an era marked fights, rajeunies for justice and main shareholder public racial, appropriateness, to “kill mockingbird” remains undiminished. Ill-timed narrative talk defence so as appeal loud for self-examination and collective action, convinces readers to contrast he inheritances systematization oppresses and to train on setting despite anymore so as blow and just future. Because we he grab with problems inequality, cruelty, and structural injustice constabulary racial persistent, employments, to “kill mockingbird” offer priceless penetrating in authority compassion, solidarity, and relentless hunts a patient justice.

? conclusion, to “kill stands mockingbird” so as headlight clarity and moral public consciousness, promising readers, to contrast he trues our humanity divide bulky and to attach he more inclusive and compassionate society. Through his themes and indelible ill-timed characters, news continuous defence to inspire and to provoke, calls us from deep inclination despite a change, that fallouts in borders each of us. Because we navigate complications our actual moment, at a case, we attentively flow employments, to “kill mockingbird” and to undertake a walk on setting despite rapid, one more in arrives for unit.

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  1. To Kill a Mockingbird Reflection Essay Example

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

  2. To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Prompts by Brittany Bank

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

  3. American History in "To Kill a Mockingbird" Story

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

  4. To Kill A Mocking Bird Essay On Courage

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

  5. The Help And To Kill A Mockingbird Essay

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

  6. Print & Digital To Kill a Mockingbird Novel Activities Tom Robinson

    creative titles for to kill a mockingbird essays

VIDEO

  1. To Kill A Mockingbird (by Harper Lee)- Animated Short Film

  2. To kill A Mockingbird (Short version)

  3. Literary Legends: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Author Revealed!

  4. "To Kill a Mockingbird" Turns 50

  5. To Kill a Mockingbird Official Trailer 1962 Oscar Best Actor

  6. To Kill a Mockingbird Summary & Key Takeaways

COMMENTS

  1. 101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples

    101 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Titles & Examples. Updated: Mar 1st, 2024. 10 min. If you struggle to find "To Kill a Mockingbird" essay topics on prejudice, race, the characters' courage, or any other issue, look no further. Our team has prepared a list of titles and essay writing tips for this book. We will write.

  2. 109 To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

    Discuss the importance of community and belonging in To Kill a Mockingbird. Examine the character of Boo Radley and his role in the story. Compare and contrast the experiences of Scout and Jem as they mature throughout the novel. Analyze the symbolism of the Radley house in the story.

  3. 35 To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics

    To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Topics About Racism. The racist attitudes of the people in Maycomb County. The impact of racism on the characters in To Kill A Mockingbird. The trial of Tom Robinson and its role in exploring the issue of racism. Atticus Finch's views on race and how they change throughout the novel.

  4. To Kill a Mockingbird Writing Prompts: Creative, Persuasive, and

    To Kill a Monologue. In this To Kill a Mockingbird creative writing prompt students write a theatrical monologue for one of the characters. The goals focus on characterization, character motivation, and point of view. Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page.

  5. To Kill a Mockingbird: Suggested Essay Topics

    Previous. 1. Analyze the childhood world of Jem, Scout, and Dill and their relationship with Boo Radley in Part One. 2. How do Jem and Scout change during the course of the novel? How do they remain the same? 3. What is Atticus's relationship to the rest of Maycomb? What is his role in the community?

  6. To Kill a Mockingbird Suggested Essay Topics

    Suggested Essay Topics. 1. Describe Boo Radley, through the eyes of Jem and Scout Finch. Discuss his habits, his appearance, and his actions. 2. After defining the words "Caste" and "Class ...

  7. Essays About To Kill A Mockingbird: Top 5 Examples

    Foreshadowing for Atticus telling his daughter to resist the urge to fight, followed by Scout being unable to control her anger. 2. Growth In To Kill A Mockingbird By Anonymous On Samplius.Com. "Scout and Jem are both excellent examples of growth and maturity during a childhood.

  8. To Kill a Mockingbird Sample Essay Outlines

    Following each question is a sample outline to help get you started. Topic #1. The theme of the mockingbird is an important one in To Kill a Mockingbird. Write a paper on the mockingbird theme in ...

  9. To Kill a Mockingbird: Mini Essays

    Analyze the trial scene and its relationship to the rest of the novel. To Kill a Mockingbird explores the questions of innocence and harsh experience, good and evil, from several different angles. Tom Robinson's trial explores these ideas by examining the evil of racial prejudice, its ability to poison an otherwise admirable Southern town and ...

  10. Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird: A+ Student Essay Examples

    Harper Lee's Depiction of Racial Inequality in America in Her Book, to Kill a Mockingbird. 5 pages / 2345 words. In this American classic, a sleepy Southern town is rocked by the trial of a young black man accused of rape. This seemingly simple story, written in 1960, is now regarded as a hallmark of critical writing.

  11. To Kill a Mockingbird Style, Form, and Literary Elements

    PDF Cite Share. To Kill a Mockingbird examines southern religious practices and beliefs, revealing the tension that exists within a society that discriminates against select neighbors rather than ...

  12. Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird: Writing Guide for Every Student

    Essay paper writing. 32633. 23rd Oct 2018. To Kill a Mockingbird is perhaps one of the most outstanding novels in American literature. The novel by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and remains popular to this day. The publishing of such a book was marked as a milestone in the fight for black rights.

  13. Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird: Essay Example, Sample

    "To Kill a Mockingbird," written by Harper Lee and published in 1960, is a timeless literary masterpiece that continues to resonate with readers across generations. This iconic novel delves into a tapestry of profound themes that shed light on the complexities of society, morality, and human nature.

  14. To Kill a Mockingbird Essay: Scout Finch

    Likewise, in the fiction book To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee concocted a brilliant masterpiece filled with themes about a young girl named Scout and connected her adventures to her own memories of growing up in the prejudiced South, specifically in Alabama, in the 1930s. The story reflects a major meaning of life and maturity through the ...

  15. To Kill a Mockingbird: A+ Student Essay: Boo Radley's Role in Scout and

    In To Kill a Mockingbird, children live in an inventive world where mysteries abound but little exists to actually cause them harm. Scout and Jem spend much of their time inventing stories about their reclusive neighbor Boo Radley, gleefully scaring themselves before rushing to the secure, calming presence of their father, Atticus.

  16. To Kill a Mockingbird Essays: Titles, Topics, Outlines, Examples

    Abstract / Introduction When writing a "To Kill a Mockingbird" essay, keep in mind Harper Lee's 1960 novel is a Pulitzer Prize winning classic. It was well-received at the time and is still loved and admired by new readers today. One of the reasons the story is so successful is that Lee uses archetypes to present a world of good and evil that is easy for audiences to understand.

  17. The Historical Context of "To Kill a Mockingbird"

    Essay Example: Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" unfolds against the backdrop of the 1930s, an epoch marked by the profound societal upheavals of the Great Depression and entrenched racial segregation in the American South. The narrative's locale in Maycomb, Alabama, serves as a pivotal stage

  18. To Kill a Mockingbird Title Analysis

    A. Scout Finch. In Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," the character of Scout Finch serves as the narrator and provides insight into the meaning of the title. Scout learns from her father, Atticus Finch, that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird because they do no harm and only bring joy through their songs.

  19. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

    SOURCE: Shackelford, Dean. "The Female Voice in To Kill a Mockingbird: Narrative Strategies in Film and Novel."Mississippi Quarterly 50, no. 1 (winter 1996-97): 101-13. [In the following essay ...

  20. To Kill a Mockingbird Persuasive

    This essay about "To Kill a Mockingbird" examines Harper Lee's timeless masterpiece, highlighting its exploration of themes such as racial injustice, moral integrity, and societal resilience. Through Atticus Finch's principled defense and Scout's perspective, the text into the complexities of prejudice and the enduring quest for justice.

  21. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee began writing To Kill a Mockingbird in the mid-1950s. It was published in 1960, just before the peak of the American civil rights movement. Initial critical responses to the novel were mixed. Many critics praised Lee for her sensitive treatment of a child's awakening to racism and prejudice. Others, however, criticized the novel ...

  22. Argument Essay Based on To Kill a Mockingbird

    Marcy Siolka. WISELearn Grant Lesson Plan. Title: Argument Essay/To Kill a Mockingbird. Author: Harper Lee. Subject (s) : English Language Arts. Grade Level (s): 9. Total Time: 6 days. Overview / Description: After reading To Kill a Mockingbird, students will continue to study the theme of taking a stand as they finish the novel.

  23. What could be an alternative title for To Kill a Mockingbird and why

    A theme-based alternate title for the book To Kill a Mockingbird might be Other People's Skin. An alternative title for the book could be plot-based. For instance, the book could be called ...

  24. 310696821-To-Kill-a-Mockingbird-Literary-Analysis-Essay-Prompt-and

    To Kill a Mockingbird Literary Analysis Essay Directions: Write a well organized 5 paragraph essay on one of the following essay prompts. In your essay, be sure to briefly summarize the novel, have a clearly written thesis statement, support your thesis with at least 3 significant examples from the text, clearly interpret and analyze each example, and conclude with your opinion of the novel.

  25. To Kill A Mockingbird Chapter Titles

    What are the chapter titles in To Kill a Mockingbird? Quick answer: The chapters in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" are not titled, they are simply numbered. However, readers can devise their ...