Griffin Teaching

Insider GCSE creative writing tips + 106 prompts from past papers

by Hayley | Mar 9, 2023 | Exams , Writing | 0 comments

Are you feeling a little bit twitchy about your child’s English GCSE writing task?

Sciences and humanities – although sometimes daunting in their content – seem a fair bet as ‘revisable’ topics. But the creative writing element of the English Language GCSE is less knowable and ultimately more of a frightening prospect for a student keen to do well.

Preparing for the GCSE writing task? You don’t need to do it alone.

We run a weekly online writing club which prepares students to write high-scoring content. Our “Higher” level club is designed to transform your writing so that you can ace the GCSE language paper.

What is the GCSE writing element of the GCSE Language Paper?

There are 5 key GCSE exam boards: AQA , OCR , Pearson Edexcel , WJEC Eduqas and CCEA . Each board sets their own papers which may appear much the same at first glance (bizarrely they all have a similar front cover layout and fonts). Certainly there is plenty of overlap between their mark schemes and the comments and tips they share in their Examiner Reports.

However, as with all your child’s other subjects, it is essential to know which exam board they are preparing for. You may be surprised to discover that schools pick and choose boards by subject, perhaps choosing AQA for chemistry and OCR for mathematics. Individual school departments have their own preferences. My brother teaches at a school where their English Literature and English Language exams have been split between two different boards. This is unusual though, not the norm!

What forms (question formats) can the test take?

It varies by board.

The AQA board has a writing task in their Question Paper 1 called Explorations in creative reading and writing . Students are given two prompts to choose between. The AQA board also has a second persuasive writing task in Paper 2 called Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives.

Jump ahead to AQA creative writing and persuasive writing prompts from past GCSE papers

The Pearson/Edexcel international iGCSE favoured by many UK private schools has two prompts to choose between for each section. The student is asked to complete a piece of transactional writing (perhaps a persuasive speech or an advertisement leaflet) and additionally a piece of imaginative writing.

Jump ahead to Pearson/Edexcel transactional writing and imaginative writing prompts from past GCSE papers

Interestingly, the WJEC Eduqas board favours non-fiction writing. Unit 2 Reading and Writing: Description, Narration and Exposition gives two prompts to choose between, for an account and an essay perhaps, and Unit 3: Reading and Writing: Argumentation, Persuasion and Instructional sets up a letter, or similar.

Jump ahead to WJEC Eduqas non-fiction writing prompts from past GCSE papers

The OCR board offers two prompts to choose between. One might be a talk for other students and the other might be a letter on a difficult subject .

Jump ahead to OCR creative writing prompts from past GCSE papers

The CCEA board has a writing task in called “ Writing for Purpose and Audience and Reading to Access Non-fiction and Media Texts” and a second writing task which offers a choice between personal writing and creative writing.

Jump ahead to CCEA persuasive writing, personal writing, and creative prompts from past GCSE papers

How long do students have to craft their piece of writing?

Creative writing tests are timed at either 45 minutes or 1 hour. The last thing your child will need is to prepare to write for an hour, only to find they have just three-quarters of an hour on the day. If in doubt, insist that they check with their teacher.

AQA students are given 45 minutes to produce their writing response. The introduction advises: ‘ You are reminded of the need to plan your answer. You should leave enough time to check your work at the end.’ What this means is that 30–35 minutes max is what’s really allowed there for the writing itself.

Pearson/Edexcel allows 45 minutes for each of the two writing tasks.

OCR students are given an hour to complete this section of their exam. The introduction states: ‘You are advised to plan and check your work carefully,’ so they will expect the writing itself to take 45–50 minutes.

How long should the completed GCSE writing task be?

Interestingly, although the mark schemes all refer to paragraphingthey don’t state how many paragraphs they expect to see.

‘A skilfully controlled overall structure, with paragraphs and grammatical features used to support cohesion and achieve a range of effects’ (OCR)
‘Fluently linked paragraphs with seamlessly integrated discourse markers’ (AQA)

Why? Because management of paragraph and sentence length is a structural technique available to the student as part of their writers’ toolkit. If the number of optimal paragraphs were to be spelled out by the board, it would have a negative impact on the freedom of the writer to use their paragraphs for impact or to manage the pace of the reader.

For a general guide I would expect to see 3 to 5 paragraphs in a creative piece and 5 paragraphs in a persuasive piece. Leaflets have a different structure entirely and need to be set out in a particular form to achieve the top notes of the mark scheme.

What are the examiners looking for when they are marking a student’s creative writing paper?

There are two assessment objectives for the writing itself:

  • It has to be adapted to the form, tone and register of writing for specific purposes and audiences.
  • It has to use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures, with appropriate paragraphing, spelling, punctuation and grammar.

As a GCSE English nerd, I really enjoy delving deeper into the Examiner Reports that each board brings out once the previous cohort’s papers have been marked. They are a fascinating read and never disappoint…

Within their pages, examiners spell out the differences they have spotted between the stronger and the weaker responses.

For example, a creative task set by the AQA board was to describe a photograph of a town at sunset. The examiners explained that some of the strongest responses imagined changes in the scene as darkness descended. They enjoyed reading responses that included personification of the city, and those that imagined the setting in the past, or the weariness of the city. Weaker candidates simply listed what was in the picture or referred directly to the fact it was an image. This chronological-list approach weakened the structure of their work.

No surprises that some weaker students relied heavily on conversation. (As an exam marker myself, I dreaded reading acres of uninspiring direct speech.)

Pearson/Edexcel explain that weaker persuasive pieces (in this case on the value of television) simply listed pros and cons rather than developed ideas fully to clarify their own opinions. The higher-level responses here were quirky and engaging, entertaining the reader with a range of appropriate techniques and making the argument their own.

What accommodations are possible for students who have specific learning difficulties?

The UK Government’s Guide for Schools and Colleges 2022: GCSE, AS and A Levels includes information about changes to assessments to support ‘disabled students.’ Their definition of disabled includes specific learning difficulties (dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD, ADD, ASD etc).

Exam boards can make a wide range of adjustments to their assessments. Some of the most common adjustments are:

  • modified papers (for example, large print or braille exam papers)
  • access to assistive software (for example, voice recognition systems or computer readers)
  • help with specific tasks (for example, another person might read questions to the student or write their dictated answers)
  • changes to how the assessment is done (for example, an oral rather than a written assessment, word-processing rather than hand-writing answers)
  • extra time to complete assessments
  • exemptions from an assessment

The exam board will expect paperwork to be in place where your child’s specific needs are formally reported by an appropriate professional (Educational Psychologist, Clinical Psychologist, Consultant). The report needs to be recent, but how recent is difficult to confirm.

If your child is likely to need adjustments to their access arrangements you will need to discuss this with their school in plenty of time before the exam itself.

A close friend of mine realised in the final few weeks before her son’s GCSE exams that his tinnitus would have a negative impact on his performance. She approached the school to ask if he might take his exams in a separate room to minimise noise disturbance. Unfortunately, it was far too late by then to apply, and her son was denied the request.

Your child’s school will explain the process for applying for special arrangements and will be able to advise you on what your expectations should be. Never presume your child will be given what they need – but plenty of requests are successful, so stay positive and make sure your paperwork is in order beforehand.

Tips and strategies for writing a high scoring GCSE creative writing paper:

1.         learn the formats.

Know the different formats and conventions of the different GCSE writing tasks. There is a standard layout for a leaflet, for example, where including contact details and a series of bullet points is part of the mark scheme. Not knowing these conventions will knock back a student’s score.

2.         Plan ahead

Prepare a planning structure for each of the written forms you might encounter during the exam. It may need to be flexed on the day, but it will banish fear of the blank page and allow you to get started.

3.         Prepare sentence-openings

Familiarise yourself with appropriate sentence-openings for each type of GCSE writing task. Fronted adverbials of time and place will improve the quality of a creative piece, whereas access to varied and specific conjunctions might push up the mark of a transactional piece.

4.         Check your speaking

Ask your family to check your speech at home. Every now and then try to flip a sentence into formal language, using more interesting synonyms for your usual spoken vocabulary. This will help you to write formally on paper, avoiding colloquialisms.

5.         Forget finishing

Finishing is less important than you might imagine. Sloppy, hurried work is your enemy. GCSE examiners will follow your clear planning and mark you accordingly, even if you’ve not managed to complete that final paragraph.

6.         Note the details

The question often gives additional information the examiner would like to see included. Note it in your plan to make sure it doesn’t get forgotten.

7.         Start strong

Use your best sentence-opener at the start of each paragraph. It will set you up as someone to be taken seriously.

8.         Cut back dialogue

Keep dialogue contained in a single paragraph. Focus on description of the speaker and their actions before noting the second character’s reply.

9.         Revise

Do this by prepping work as above. Nothing beats it.

Would you like me to transform your child’s writing in my higher writing club?

Each week in my higher writing club , we spend 20 minutes on Zoom together. After the task has been introduced, the students write for 15 minutes. Next, they upload their work for 1:1 video marking.

There is no point prepping essays/creative pieces for the GCSE English Language exam if your child’s writing is poor. First, their scruffy presentation, attention to detail, punctuation, grammar and vocabulary need to be addressed.

After 2 months in the higher writing club your child’s written technique and fluency will be transformed by our 1–2-1 video marking system (consistent messaging is achieved by matching your child with their own teacher).

Each weekly activity is drawn directly from the GCSE English Language Subject Content and Assessment Objectives , published by the English Department of Education.

Here’s an example of a student’s writing, BEFORE they joined our club:

Handwriting and creative writing sample from a GCSE level student - before online writing lessons

It is chaotic, poorly-presented and nonsensical. Letter-sizing is confused and the student is clearly anxious and repeatedly scribbling through small errors.

Below is the same student 2 months later:

Handwriting and creative writing sample from a GCSE level student -after 2 months of weekly online writing lessons with Griffin Teaching

Observe the rich vocabulary, authorial techniques (the jagged rocks are ‘like shards of broken glass’) and general fluency and sophistication.

Real and recent GCSE example questions/prompts from each of the 5 key exam boards

Aqa english language gcse questions, paper 2 writers’ viewpoints and perspectives:.

  • ‘Our addiction to cheap clothes and fast fashion means young people in poorer countries have to work in terrible conditions to make them. We must change our attitude to buying clothes now.’ Write an article for a magazine or website in which you argue your point of view on this statement. ( Source )
  • ‘People have become obsessed with travelling ever further and faster. However, travel is expensive, dangerous, damaging and a foolish waste of time!’ Write an article for a news website in which you argue your point of view on this statement. ( Source )
  • ‘Cars are noisy, dirty, smelly and downright dangerous. They should be banned from all town and city centres, allowing people to walk and cycle in peace.’ Write a letter to the Minister for Transport arguing your point of view on this statement. ( Source )
  • ‘All sport should be fun, fair and open to everyone. These days, sport seems to be more about money, corruption and winning at any cost.’ Write an article for a newspaper in which you explain your point of view on this statement. ( Source )

Paper 1 Explorations in creative reading and writing:

  • A magazine has asked for contributions for their creative writing section. Either write a description of an old person as suggested by the picture below or write a story about a time when things turned out unexpectedly. ( Source )

Image of a man with a beard, example image to use as a GCSE creative writing prompt

  • Your school or college is asking students to contribute some creative writing for its website. Either, describe a market place as suggested by the picture below or write a story with the title, ‘Abandoned’. ( Source )

image of a market scene to use as a creative writing prompt

  • Your local library is running a creative writing competition. The best entries will be published in a booklet of creative writing. Either, write a description of a mysterious place, as suggested by the picture below or write a story about an event that cannot be explained. ( Source )

image of a round entrance to a spooky scene to use as a gcse creative writing prompt

  • A magazine has asked for contributions for their creative writing section. Either, describe a place at sunset as suggested by the picture below or write a story about a new beginning. ( Source )

OCR English Language GCSE questions

Paper: communicating information and ideas.

  • Either, Write a post for an online forum for young people about ‘A moment that changed my life’.
  • Or, You are giving a talk at a parents’ information evening about why all children should study science at school. Explain your views. ( Source )
  • Either, Write a letter to a friend to describe a challenging and unpleasant task you once had to do.
  • Or, Write a short guide for new workers about how to deal successfully with difficult customers. ( Source )
  • Either, “Was it worth it?” Write an article for a magazine to describe a time when you had to do something difficult.
  • Or, Write a speech for an event to congratulate young people who have achieved something remarkable. ( Source )
  • Either, Write the words of a talk to advise pet owners how to make life more enjoyable for their pet and themselves.
  • Or, Write an article for a travel magazine to describe your dramatic encounter with an animal. ( Source )
  • Either, ‘How I prefer to spend my time.’ Write the words of a talk to young people about your favourite activity
  • Or, Write a magazine article to persuade parents to allow their teenage children more freedom. You are not required to include any visual or presentational features. ( Source )
  • Either, Write a talk for other students about a person you either admire strongly or dislike intensely
  • Or, Write a letter to a friend to explain a difficult decision you had to make. ( Source )

Paper: Exploring effects and impact

  • Either, Hunger satisfied. Use this as the title for a story.
  • Or, Write about a time when you were waiting for something. ( Source )
  • Either, The Taste of Fear Use this as the title for a story.
  • Or, Write about a time when you were exploring a particular place. ( Source )
  • Either, Alone. Use this as the title for a story.
  • Or, Describe a time when you found yourself in a crowd or surrounded by people. ( Source )
  • Either, Land at Last. Use this as the title for a story.
  • Or, Imagine you have visited somewhere for the first time and are now reporting back on your experience. ( Source )
  • Either, The Playground Use this as the title for a story
  • Or, Write about a memory you have of playing a childhood game. ( Source )
  • Either, It seemed to me like I had been magically transported. Use this as the title for a story.
  • Or, Describe a place where you have felt comfortable. ( Source )

Pearson Edexcel English Language iGCSE questions

Paper 1: transactional writing.

  • Either, ‘In our busy twenty-first century lives, hobbies and interests are more important than ever.’ Write an article for a newspaper expressing your views on this statement.
  • Or, ‘We are harming the planet we live on and need to do more to improve the situation.’ You have been asked to deliver a speech to your peers in which you explain your views on this statement. ( Source )
  • ‘ Zoos protect endangered species from around the world.’ ‘No wild animal should lose its freedom and be kept in captivity. Write an article for a magazine in which you express your views on zoos.
  • Write a review of an exciting or interesting event that you have seen. ( Source )
  • Your local newspaper has published an article with the headline ‘Young people today lack any desire for adventure’. Write a letter to the editor of the newspaper expressing your views on this topic.
  • ‘The key to success in anything is being prepared.’ Write a section for a guide giving advice on the importance of preparation. ( Source )
  • You and your family have just returned from a holiday that did not turn out as you expected. Write a letter to the travel agent with whom you booked your holiday, explaining what happened.
  • A magazine is publishing articles with the title ‘Friendship is one of the greatest gifts in life’. Write your article on this topic. ( Source )
  • ‘Important lessons I have learned in my life.’ You have been asked to deliver a speech to your peers on this topic.
  • Your local/school library wants to encourage young people to read more. Write the text of a leaflet explaining the benefits of reading. ( Source )
  • ‘Most memorable journeys.’ A website is running a competition to reward the best articles on this subject. Write an article for the competition about a memorable journey.
  • ‘Cycling is one form of exercise that can lead to a healthier lifestyle.’ Write a guide for young people on the benefits of exercise. ( Source )
  • ‘Television educates, entertains and helps global understanding.’ ‘Television is to blame for society’s violence and greed and delivers one-sided news.’ You have been asked to deliver a speech in which you express your views and opinions on television.
  • ‘Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions we ever make.’ Write the text of a leaflet that gives advice to young people on how to choose a career. ( Source )
  • Write the text for a leaflet aimed at school students which offers advice on how to deal with bullying.
  • A museum is planning to open a new exhibition called ‘Life in the Twenty-First Century’. ( Source )

Paper 2: Imaginative writing

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, enjoyed success
  • Write a story with the title ‘A Surprise Visitor’.
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that begins ‘I did not have time for this’ ( Source )

two images to choose to use as a story starter for a gcse creative writing prompt that begins with "I did not have time for this"

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, challenged an unfair situation.
  • Write a story with the title ‘Bitter, Twisted Lies’.
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that begins ‘It was a new day …’ You may wish to base your response on one of these images. ( Source )

two images to use for GCSE creative writing practice. Image 1 is of a woman on top of a mountain at sunset, the second image is of a harbour at sunset with a bridge in the field of view

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, visited a new place.
  • Write a story with the title ‘The Storm’
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that ends ‘I decided to get on with it.’ ( Source )

Two images to use as GCSE writing prompts. Students are asked to choose one and start their story with the words "I decided to get on with it"

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, saw something surprising.
  • Write a story with the title ‘The Meeting’.
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that starts ‘Suddenly, without warning, there was a power cut.’ ( Source )

Two images to use as GCSE writing prompts. The first shows two children sitting at a table lit by candles, the second is of a city scene with half of the buildings lit up and the other half shrouded in darkness

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, went on a long journey.
  • Write a story with the title ‘A New Start’
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that begins ‘I tried to see what he was reading. ( Source )

two example images students can use while revising for the GCSE wri5ting task. Both are on the theme of reading.

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, felt proud.
  • Write a story with the title ‘The Hidden Book’.
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that begins ‘It was like a dream’ ( Source )

Two images from past GCSE papers to use as a prompt for creative writing.

  • Write about a time when you, or someone you know, had to be brave
  • Write a story with the title ‘Everything Had Changed’
  • Look at the two images below. Choose one and write a story that begins ‘It was an unusual gift’. ( Source )

Two images of presents that students can use to start a story with "it was an unusual gift."

WJEC Eduqas English Language GCSE questions

Unit 2 reading and writing: description, narration and exposition.

  • Write an account of a time when you enjoyed or hated taking part in an outdoor activity.
  • “It’s essential that more people are more active, more often.” (Professor Laura McAllister, Chair of Sport Wales) Write an essay to explain how far you agree with this view, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • Describe an occasion when you did something you found rewarding.
  • Famous chefs such as Jamie Oliver and Mary Berry have spoken of the need for better food and better education about food in schools. Write an essay to explain your views on this subject, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • Write an account of a visit to a dentist or a doctor’s surgery.
  • NHS staff, such as doctors and nurses, provide excellent service in difficult circumstances. Write an essay to explain your views on this subject, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • Write an article for a travel magazine describing somewhere interesting that you have visited.
  • You see the following in your local newspaper: ‘Young people are selfish. They should all be made to volunteer to help others.’ Write an essay to explain your views on this subject, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • Describe an occasion when technology made a difference to your life.
  • Write an account of a time you were unwilling to do something. ( Source )
  • Describe a time when you faced a challenge
  • Write an essay explaining why charity is important, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • Write an account of a time when you did something for the first time.
  • “It’s time for us to start making some changes. Let’s change the way we eat, let’s change the way we live, and let’s change the way we treat each other.” Tupac Shakur Write an essay on the subject of change, giving clear reasons and examples. ( Source )
  • “School uniform is vitally important in all schools.” Write an essay explaining your views on this, giving clear reasons and examples.
  • Describe a time when you had to create a good impression. ( Source )

Unit 3: Reading and writing: Argumentation, persuasion and instructional

  • Your school/college is considering using more Fairtrade items in its canteen. Although this will help to support Fairtrade farmers, it will mean an increase in the price of meals. You feel strongly about this proposal and decide to write a letter to your Headteacher/Principal giving your views. ( Source )
  • Increasing litter levels suggest we have lost all pride in our beautiful country. Prepare a talk for your classmates in which you give your opinions on this view. ( Source )
  • Write a guide for other students persuading them to stay safe when using social media and the internet. ( Source )
  • According to your PE teacher, ‘Swimming is the very best form of exercise.’ You have been asked to prepare a talk for your classmates in which you give your views about swimming. ( Source )
  • You read the following in a newspaper: ‘Plastic is one of the biggest problems faced by our planet. Why would we use something for a few minutes that has been made from a material that’s going to last forever?’ Write a letter to the newspaper giving your views on the use of plastic. ( Source )
  • “People today never show enough kindness to one another. We must make more effort to be kind.” Write a talk to give on BBC Wales’ new programme Youth Views persuading young people to be kind to others. ( Source )
  • ‘We have enough problems in the world without worrying about animals.’ Write an article for the school or college magazine giving your views on this statement.
  • You would like to raise some money for an animal charity. Write a talk for your classmates persuading them to donate to your chosen charity. ( Source )

CCEA English Language GCSE questions

Unit 1: writing for purpose and audience and reading to access non-fiction and media texts.

  • Write a speech for your classmates persuading them to agree with your views on the following issue: “Young people today are too worried about their body image.” ( Source )
  • Write an article for your school magazine persuading the readers to agree with your views on the following question: “Should school uniform have a place in 21st century schools?” ( Source )
  • Write a speech for your classmates persuading them to agree with your views on the following question: “Are celebrities the best role models for teenagers?” ( Source )
  • Write an article for your school magazine persuading the readers to agree with your views on the following statement: “Advertising is just another source of pressure that teenagers don’t need!” ( Source )

Unit 4: Personal or creative writing and reading literacy and non-fiction texts

  • Either, Personal writing: Write a personal essay for the examiner about what you consider to be one of the proudest moments in your life.
  • Or, Creative writing: Write your entry for a creative essay writing competition. The audience is teenagers. You may provide your own title. ( Source )
  • Write a personal essay for the examiner about an experience that resulted in a positive change in your life.
  • Write a creative essay for the examiner. The picture below is to be the basis for your writing. You may provide your own title. ( Source )

Picture of a family waiting at an airport.

  • Personal writing: Write a speech for your classmates about the most interesting person you have ever met.
  • Creative writing: Write a creative essay for your school magazine. The picture below is to be the basis for your writing. You may provide your own title. ( Source )

picture of two elderly men playing soccer

  • Personal writing: Write a personal essay for the examiner describing your dream destination.
  • Creative writing: Write a creative essay for publication in your school magazine. The picture below is to be the basis for your creative writing. You may provide your own title. (Source)

picture of a two people mountain climbing

Get 1:1 support and personalized feedback on your GCSE creative writing practice

For 1–2-1 writing support for your pre-GCSE child, join the Griffin Teaching Higher Writing Club—online weekly writing classes specifically tailored to English GCSE creative writing preparation.

In just 20 minutes per week and their writing will be transformed.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

english mastery pro blog

Your Inner Author – 350+ Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

Have you ever stared at a blank page, itching to write a story but unsure where to begin? Fret no more! Sentence starters are like magic keys, unlocking the door to creative writing for all ages and skill levels.

This guide will equip you with a toolbox of starters for different situations, helping you craft captivating stories and essays.

Different Types of Sentence Starters for Writing – For Adults and Kids

Here we gonna list different types of sentence starters for creative writing. Lets see –

1/ Sentence starters for creative writing for different age groups (KS1, KS2, KS3, adults, high school)

Creative writing is a fantastic way to express your thoughts, feelings, and imagination through words.

It’s an art that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, from young children to adults. Let’s explore some sentence starters specifically crafted for different age groups:

Key Stage 1 (KS1) : Ages 5-7

Key Stage 1 (KS1)

Key Stage 2 (KS2): Ages 7-11

Serial No Text

Key Stage 3 (KS3): Ages 11-14

Sentence starters for third grade.

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 I like to…
2 My favorite book is…
3 When I grow up, I want to be…
4 I feel happy when…
5 My best friend is…
6 I love to play…
7 On the weekend, I like to…
8 In school, my favorite subject is…
9 I enjoy reading about…
10 My family likes to…
11 I am excited to learn about…
12 When it is sunny, I like to…
13 If I could have any pet, I would choose…
14 My favorite food is…
15 I like to help my friends by…
16 At recess, I like to…
17 My favorite holiday is…
18 I am proud of myself when…
19 I like to watch…
20 On rainy days, I like to…
21 If I had a superpower, it would be…
22 My favorite game to play is…
23 I like to draw…
24 I have fun when…
25 I like to collect…
26 In the summer, I like to…
27 I like to listen to…
28 My favorite season is…
29 I like to learn about…
30 When I am outside, I like to…

For Adults and High School Students

Serial NoSentence Starter

These sentence starters are just a glimpse into the vast world of creative writing. Feel free to mix and match them, adapt them to your own style, and let your imagination run wild!

Adverb Sentence Starters

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 Quickly, she ran to the store.
2 Quietly, he tiptoed through the house.
3 Carefully, they crossed the busy street.
4 Suddenly, the storm hit the town.
5 Gently, she placed the baby in the crib.
6 Surprisingly, he finished the race first.
7 Happily, they celebrated their anniversary.
8 Reluctantly, she agreed to the terms.
9 Eagerly, he awaited his turn.
10 Sadly, the event was canceled.
11 Bravely, the soldier faced the enemy.
12 Nervously, she entered the room.
13 Frequently, they visited their grandparents.
14 Unexpectedly, the guests arrived early.
15 Lazily, he lounged on the couch.
16 Excitedly, she opened the gift.
17 Calmly, he explained the situation.
18 Briskly, they walked to the park.
19 Slowly, the sun set over the horizon.
20 Lovingly, she prepared dinner for her family.
21 Playfully, the children ran around the yard.
22 Promptly, he responded to the email.
23 Cheerfully, she greeted her neighbors.
24 Furiously, the wind howled through the trees.
25 Gracefully, the dancer moved across the stage.
26 Warmly, they welcomed the new family.
27 Impatiently, he tapped his foot.
28 Cautiously, she approached the strange dog.
29 Hungrily, he devoured the sandwich.
30 Eagerly, they packed for their vacation.

2/ Sentence starters for different perspectives (first person, third person)

Writing in the first person allows the writer to narrate the story from their own point of view, using “I” and “we.”

This perspective can create a deep connection between the narrator and the reader. Here are some examples of sentence starters for first-person creative writing:

Third Person Perspective

Writing in the third person provides a broader perspective, using “he,” “she,” “it,” and “they.” This can offer a more objective view of the story and its characters. Here are some examples of sentence starters for third-person creative writing:

Serial NoText

These sentence starters can serve as a springboard for your creative writing, whether you’re aiming to write from an intimate, personal perspective or a more detached, omniscient one.

Feel free to use them as inspiration and adapt them to fit your unique storytelling voice.

3/ Sentence starters for essays and introductions

Writing an essay can be challenging, but starting with a strong opening sentence can set the tone for the entire piece.

A good introduction not only engages the reader but also provides a clear overview of the topic. Here are some examples of sentence starters for essays and introductions:

Sentence starters for General Essay Introductions

Introduction paragraphs.

Serial No Text
As we delve into the topic of…, it becomes evident that…
Understanding the complexities of… requires…
From ancient times to the present day, the issue of… has been…
By examining the effects of…, we can better understand…
The question of… is one that has perplexed scholars for decades…
Through a careful analysis of…, it is possible to…
The following essay will address the reasons why…
Given the current state of…, it is crucial to explore…
To fully grasp the impact of…, we must first…
The central theme of this essay revolves around…
As society progresses, the issue of… becomes increasingly relevant…
Exploring the intricacies of…, one can discern…
The complexities of… are multifaceted and require…
In today’s fast-paced world, understanding… is crucial for…
The issue of… has been a topic of debate for centuries…
As we confront the challenges of…, it is important to consider…
The significance of… cannot be overstated…
By exploring the historical context of…, one gains insight into…
Understanding the implications of… is essential for…
As we embark on this exploration of…, it is important to…

Body Paragraph Starters

Sentence starters for evidence and reasoning, concluding paragraph starters.

Serial NoText

4/ Sentence Starters for Writing Prompts and Story Starters

Writing prompts and story starters are great tools to ignite creativity and inspire writers to embark on new storytelling journeys.

They provide a jumping-off point for exploration and imagination. Here are some examples of sentence starters for writing prompts and story starters:

Writing Prompts

Serial NoWriting Prompt
</

Sentences for Story Starters

Serial NoStory Starter

5/ Character Introductions Sentence Starters

Serial NoCharacter Introduction

6/ Dialogue Starters Sentence’s

Serial NoDialogue Starter

7/ Sentence starters for writing a summary or article

Summarizing information or writing an article requires clarity, coherence, and conciseness.

Effective sentence starters can help you transition smoothly between ideas and maintain the reader’s interest. Here are some examples:

Writing a Summary

Serial NoSummary Starter

Writing an Article

Serial NoArticle Starter

Introducing Ideas

Serial NoIntroducing Idea

Providing Evidence

Serial NoProviding Evidence

Concluding Ideas

Serial NoConcluding Idea

These sentence starters can help you structure your summary or article effectively, ensuring that your ideas flow logically and cohesively. Feel free to adapt them to fit the specific content and tone of your writing.

8/ Sentence Starters For Writing A Letter

Below are some sentence starters for writing a letter –

Beginning a Letter

Serial No Addressing a Recipient

Expressing Gratitude

Serial No Expressing Gratitude

Sharing News

Serial NoSharing News

Expressing Sympathy

Serial No.Sympathy Message
1I was deeply saddened to hear about…
2Please accept my heartfelt condolences on the passing of…
3My thoughts are with you and your family during this difficult time of…
4I wanted to extend my sympathy to you and your family on the loss of…
5I’m so sorry to hear about your loss of…
6Please know that you are in my thoughts and prayers as you navigate through…
7I can’t imagine how difficult this must be for you. Please know that I am here for you during this challenging time.
8My heart goes out to you as you mourn the loss of…
9I’m sending you love and strength as you cope with…
10Please accept my deepest sympathy and know that I am here to support you in any way I can.
11Wishing you peace and comfort during this difficult time.
12May the memories of your loved one bring you comfort.
13Words cannot express how sorry I am for your loss.
14Sending you a hug during this heartbreaking time.
15You are in my thoughts and prayers.
16May your loved one rest in peace.
17I am here for you if you need anything at all.
18Thinking of you with deepest sympathy.
19There are no words, but please know that I care.
20May you find strength in the days ahead.
21You are strong and capable, and you will get through this.
22I know this is a difficult time, but please don’t hesitate to reach out if you need anything.
23Your loved one was a special person, and they will be dearly missed.
24Grieving is a process, and

Closing a Letter

Closing letter sentence starters.

Serial NoText
1Sincerely,
2With warm regards,
3Best wishes,
4Warmest regards,
5Yours truly,
6Take care,
7With gratitude,
8Kind regards,
9With love,
10Until we meet again,
11Respectfully,
12Yours faithfully,
13All the best,
14Best regards,
15Many thanks,
16Best,
17Regards,
18Yours sincerely,
19Thank you,
20Take it easy,
21Cheers,
22Faithfully yours,
23Yours respectfully,
24With heartfelt thanks,
25Warm wishes,
26Yours cordially,
27With appreciation,
28Gratefully,
29Yours affectionately,
30Fond regards,

Sentence Starters For Love Letters

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 My dearest love,
2 To the love of my life,
3 Every day with you is a blessing,
4 You mean the world to me,
5 I cherish every moment we spend together,
6 Your love has changed my life,
7 I am forever grateful for your love,
8 Thinking of you makes my heart skip a beat,
9 With all my love,
10 I am so lucky to have you in my life,
11 My heart belongs to you,
12 Loving you is the best thing I’ve ever done,
13 You are my soulmate,
14 Every moment with you is a treasure,
15 I can’t imagine my life without you,
16 Your smile brightens my day,
17 I love you more than words can say,
18 Being with you feels like home,
19 You complete me,
20 I am eternally yours,
21 Every thought of you makes me smile,
22 I am thankful for every moment we share,
23 Your love is my greatest treasure,
24 I love you with all my heart,
25 With you, every day is an adventure,
26 You are my one and only,
27 I am happiest when I’m with you,
28 Your love makes everything better,
29 I am blessed to have you by my side,
30 Every second spent with you is a joy,

9/ Sentence Starters For Conversation

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 What do you think about…?
2 How was your day?
3 Have you ever…?
4 Can you tell me about…?
5 What are your thoughts on…?
6 Do you have any plans for…?
7 I heard that… what do you think?
8 What’s your opinion on…?
9 How do you feel about…?
10 Can you explain…?
11 What was the highlight of your day?
12 Do you like…?
13 Have you seen…?
14 What do you usually do on…?
15 How did you get interested in…?
16 Could you tell me more about…?
17 What’s your favorite…?
18 How do you usually…?
19 Have you heard about…?
20 Do you enjoy…?
21 What do you like to do in your free time?
22 Can you recommend a good…?
23 What is your favorite memory of…?
24 How would you describe…?
25 Do you have any hobbies?
26 Have you traveled to…?
27 What’s the most interesting thing about…?
28 How do you manage…?
29 What would you do if…?
30 Could you share your experience with…?

10/ Sentence Starters For Texting

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 Hey, how are you?
2 What‘s up?
3 Did you hear about…?
4 Can you believe…?
5 Guess what happened today?
6 Have you seen…?
7 What are your plans for…?
8 Do you want to hang out?
9 I was thinking about you!
10 Have you been to…?
11 What’s your favorite…?
12 How did your day go?
13 Do you remember when…?
14 What are you doing right now?
15 Can you send me…?
16 I found something you’d like.
17 Have you tried…?
18 Let’s catch up soon!
19 What do you think about…?
20 Can you believe what happened?
21 I just wanted to say hi!
22 What’s new with you?
23 Have you been keeping up with…?
24 Do you have any recommendations for…?
25 What‘s the best thing that happened to you today?
26 How do you feel about…?
27 I can’t wait to tell you about…!
28 What are you watching lately?
29 Do you have time to talk?
30 How was your weekend?

11/ Sentence Starters For Books

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 In a faraway land…
2 Once upon a time…
3 Deep in the forest…
4 On a dark and stormy night…
5 In a small village…
6 Long ago in a distant kingdom…
7 Beneath the starry sky…
8 On the edge of a cliff…
9 In the bustling city…
10 Far beyond the mountains…
11 In the quiet countryside…
12 Along the winding river…
13 Within the ancient castle…
14 Under the bright moonlight…
15 In the heart of the jungle…
16 Across the open plains…
17 In a hidden valley…
18 High in the mountains…
19 In the deep ocean…
20 Beyond the horizon…
21 In the magical forest…
22 In a quiet corner of the library…
23 Under the ancient oak tree…
24 In the mysterious cave…
25 On the sandy beach…
26 In the busy marketplace…
27 On top of the hill…
28 In the enchanted garden…
29 At the edge of the world…
30 In the old abandoned house…

12/ Argument Writing Sentence Starters

Serial No Sentence Starter
1 In my opinion…
2 The reason for this is…
3 It is evident that…
4 First and foremost…
5 One of the main arguments…
6 According to research…
7 For example…
8 Furthermore, it is clear that…
9 In addition…
10 Another reason is…
11 On the other hand…
12 It is important to consider…
13 This shows that…
14 To illustrate…
15 Therefore, we can conclude…
16 Thus, it is evident that…
17 Although some people believe…
18 It is widely accepted that…
19 For these reasons…
20 Many people agree that…
21 There is no doubt that…
22 It is often said that…
23 Most importantly…
24 In conclusion…
25 Some may argue…
26 In support of this…
27 To further support the point…
28 Despite this…
29 Considering these facts…
30 Given this evidence…

Final Lines

So, we covered a comprehensive list of sentence starters for creative writing in this article.

If you need more, please leave your request in the comment box. We will create more sentence starters for you!

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I wass wondering if you ever thought off changing the page layout of youur blog?

Its very well written; I love what youve got tto say.

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sentence starters gcse creative writing

GCSE English Language, Technical Accuracy- Sentence Starters

Many students find both creative and transactional writing to be overwhelming. To write effectively in either form, students must demonstrate various skills in academic writing. It’s common for students to experience writer’s block, particularly when they’re required to produce a substantial piece in exam conditions. Varying sentence starters can be challenging for students. This post will focus on methods to improve sentence variety.

In GCSE English Language Section B, which often requires creative or persuasive writing, using varied sentence starters is essential for multiple reasons:

  • Demonstrating Writing Skills: using varied sentence starters showcases a candidate’s ability to manipulate language effectively, demonstrating a range of writing techniques and structures.
  • Showing Creativity: different sentence starters allow candidates to showcase their creativity and originality in their writing, which is often a key aspect assessed in Section B.
  • Maintaining Reader Interest: GCSE examiners are looking for writing that engages and sustains the reader’s interest. Varied sentence starters help achieve this by preventing the writing from becoming repetitive or monotonous.
  • Expressing Ideas Clearly: by using a variety of sentence starters, candidates can express ideas and arguments clearly and effectively, ensuring that their writing is coherent and easy to follow.
  • Highlighting Language Skills: section B often assesses a candidate’s ability to use language for specific purposes, such as persuasion or narrative writing. Different sentence starters allow candidates to showcase their ability to adapt their language to suit different genres and purposes.
  • Creating Impact: using different sentence starters can help candidates create impact and emphasis in their writing, drawing attention to key points or arguments and making their writing more persuasive or compelling.

This post explores techniques to avoid repetition and improve academic writing by creating impactful sentence beginnings.

1. Noun phrase starter:

The scrawny homeless man was sleeping on the naked floor, in the freezing wintery nights.

2. Verb starter:

  • Running : Running late, she dashed out the door without breakfast.
  • Smiling : Smiling brightly, he greeted each guest at the entrance.
  • Thinking : Thinking carefully, she weighed the pros and cons before making a decision.
  • Swimming : Swimming effortlessly, the dolphins danced in the sparkling waves.
  • Laughing : Laughing uncontrollably, the children rolled on the grass in fits of giggles.
  • Writing : Writing furiously, he scribbled down his thoughts before they vanished from his mind.
  • Singing : Singing passionately, she poured her heart into every note of the song.
  • Dreaming : Dreaming of faraway lands, she lost herself in the pages of her favorite book.
  • Crying : Crying softly, he wiped away tears with the back of his hand.
  • Dancing : Dancing gracefully, she twirled across the stage, captivating the audience with every movement.
  • Putting his pale hand out, he asked for spare change.

3.Adverb, verb starter:

  • Carefully writing her name on the test paper, she panicked.
  • Quickly finishing his homework before dinner, he dashed downstairs and was the first at the dinner table.
  • Quietly sat in the corner, the girl cried as she felt isolated.
  • Excitedly unwrapping the present, the children screamed with excitement.
  • Confidently stepping on stage, to her shock, she had lost her voice as she was ready to deliver her speech.
  • Angrily slamming the door behind him, he jumped into bed and hid himself under the duvet to calm himself down.
  • Patiently, she waited for the bus to arrive.
  • Nervously, he tapped his foot during the job interview.
  • Slowly, the sun rose over the horizon, painting the sky with hues of orange and pink.
  • Curiously, the cat investigated the mysterious noise coming from the attic.
  • Carefully snapping the biscuit into two, he passed one half over to his greedy brother.

4. Time- slow starter:

Gradually , everyone left their homes; it wasn’t safe anymore.

More slow pace starter words:

  • Reluctantly, 
  • Eventually, 
  • Patiently, 
  • A while later, 
  • Gradually, 
  • Hesitantly, 
  • Nervously, 
  • Steadily, 
  • Carefully, 
  • After an hour, 
  • Sluggishly, 
  • Years passed,
  • Minutes ticked by, 
  • After a long wait, 
  • After an age, 
  • Then, 
  • Lazily, 
  • Leisurely, 
  • Finally, 
  • Slowly, 

5. Time- fast starter

Frantically , looking through her things, she was desperate to find that important document.

More “fast pace” starter words:

  • In the blink of an eye,
  • As quick as a flash, 
  • As fast as lightning, 
  • Then, without pausing, 
  • Like a shot, 
  • In a flash, 
  • Immediately, 
  • Moments later, 
  • Without hesitating, 
  • Without thinking, 
  • Without waiting, 
  • Without delay, 
  • Without pausing for breath, 
  • Going flat out, 
  • Instantly, 
  • Promptly, 
  • Hurriedly, 
  • Swiftly, 
  • Frantically, 
  • Seconds later, 
  • In a split second,

6. Tripple description starter:

The chocolate was rectangular, with a soft caramel filling and layers of delicate chocolate that crumbles with every bite.

  • The majestic, snow-capped mountains loomed large in the distance, their peaks towering, their slopes glistening, their valleys shrouded in mist.
  • The bustling city streets teemed with life, the honking of cars echoing , the c hatter of pedestrians rising, the neon lights flickering overhead.
  • Her eyes , deep and soulfu l , sparkled with laughter; her smile , warm and inviting, lit up the room; her voice , soft and melodious, filled the air with music.
  • T he ancient, gnarled tree stretched its branches toward the sky; its roots, twisted and tangled , reaching deep into the earth; its leaves, golden and russet, rustling in the breeze.
  • The old, weathered barn stood tall against the backdrop of the rolling, verdant hills, its paint peeling, its roof sagging, its windows cracked.
  • The chocolate was rectangular, with a soft caramel filling and layers of delicate chocolate t hat crumbles with every bite.

7. Tripple action starter:

  • He grabbed the keys from the table, leapt into the car, and sped off into the night, leaving a trail of dust in his wake.
  • The chef chopped the vegetables, stirred the simmering sauce, and sprinkled in a pinch of salt, his movements quick and precise as he prepared the perfect meal.
  • The children laughed, danced, and played in the sun-drenched meadow, their joy infectious as they frolicked in the golden light.
  • The detective examined the clues, pieced together the evidence, and finally cracked the case, his determination unwavering until the very end.
  • The mother grabbed her child, tore open the medicine and shoved it down his throat before the swelling of his tongue grew bigger.
  • With a swift flick of her wrist, she spun around and dashed down the alley, her heart pounding with each step she took.

8. Preposition starter:

  • Underneath the starry sky , they shared their deepest secrets.
  • In the heart of the bustling city , he found solace amidst the chaos.
  • Across the vast expanse of the desert , a lone traveler wandered aimlessly.
  • Beneath the surface of the tranquil lake , a hidden world teemed with life existed.
  • On top of the highest mountain , she felt closer to the heavens than ever before.
  • In the centre of the spongy biscuit was a yellow jelly filling.

Examples of preposition :

  • Surrounding

9. Double adverb starter:

  • Swiftly and silently, she slipped through the darkened corridors of the castle.
  • Carefully and cautiously, he approached the edge of the cliff, peering down into the abyss below.
  • Eagerly and anxiously, they waited for the arrival of the long-awaited guest.
  • Happily and excitedly, the children ran through the sunlit meadow, their laughter echoing in the air.
  • Thoughtfully and carefully , she unwrapped her delicately wrapped precious gift.
  • Confidently and boldly, she addressed the crowd, her words ringing out with conviction.

10. Subordinate clause starter:

  • Although she was tired, she decided to go for a run.
  • While I was studying, my friends were playing video games.
  • Because it was raining, they canceled the outdoor picnic.
  • Since he had already eaten dinner, he wasn’t hungry when he arrived at the party
  • After she finished her homework, she went to bed early.

11. “Although” starter:

  • Although it was raining, we decided to go for a walk in the park.
  • Although she was tired, she stayed up late to finish her assignment.
  • Although he had studied hard, he still failed the exam.
  • Although they disagreed on many issues, they remained good friends.
  • Although the movie received mixed reviews, it was a box office success.
  • Although a Christian, may God forgive me, I dream about murdering him .

12. “As” starter:

  • As the sun set, the colors of the sky deepened into shades of orange and purple.
  • As you can see, the results of the experiment are consistent with our hypothesis.
  • As a result of his hard work, he earned a promotion at work.
  • As she grew older, her passion for music only intensified.
  • As for me, I prefer to take the scenic route when traveling.
  • As the wind grew heavier, the cloud grew thicker and darker.

13. Passive sentence starter:

  • The book was read by millions of people around the world .
  • The decision was made to postpone the meeting until next week.
  • The house was built in the 18th century.
  • The cake was eaten before the party even started.
  • The report will be reviewed by the committee before a decision is made.
  • The car was broken. A scream was heard. Blood stains smothered.

14. “Unless” starter:

  • Unless you finish your homework , you can’t go out to play.
  • Unless we leave now, we’ll miss the train.
  • Unless it stops raining, the baseball game will be cancelled.
  • Unless you study hard, you won’t pass the exam .
  • Unless we find a solution soon, the problem will only get worse.

15. “The more, the more” starter:

  • The more you practice, the better you’ll become at playing the piano.
  • The more you save money, the more you’ll have for emergencies.
  • The more you exercise, the healthier you’ll be.
  • The more you read, the more knowledgeable you’ll become.
  • The more you study, the higher your grades will be.
  • The more he spoke, the more angrier his mother got.

16. “Rather than” starter:

  • Rather than take the bus, I prefer to walk to work.
  • Rather than going out to the movies, she decided to stay in and read a book.
  • Rather than wearing the new red one for the party, he chose the blue stained shirt.
  • Rather than Dini out at a restaurant, they opted to stay home and cook dinner.
  • Rather than embracing him wit open arms, she chose to slap him hard across the face.

17. “Despite” starter:

  • Despite the heavy rain, we decided to go for a hike.
  • Despite his age, he remains incredibly active and fit .
  • Despite her fear of flying, she boarded the plane for her dream vacation .
  • Despite the late hour, the party continued well into the night.
  • Despite studying all night, he still didn’t do well on the exam.
  • Despite his hatred for the subject, he always aced his assessments with a perfect score of 100%.

18. “Whenever” starter:

  • Whenever she hears a sad song, she starts to cry.
  • Whenever he feels stressed, he goes for a long walk to clear his mind.
  • Whenever it snows, the children build snowmen in the backyard.
  • Whenever they visit their grandparents, they always bake cookies together.
  • Whenever I have free time, I like to read a book or watch a movie.
  • Whenever the wolves howled, the frightened villagers would quickly rush inside their homes, leaving all of their belongings outside in the open.

19. Simile starter:

  • She danced as gracefully as a swan gliding across a pond.
  • He ran as fast as lightning to catch the train.
  • The baby slept as peacefully as a contented kitten.
  • The old man walked as slowly as a turtle making its way across the sand.
  • Her laughter echoed as brightly as the sound of church bells on a clear morning.
  • Stomping off like a spoilt child, Tim slammed the door behind him.

20. Personification starter:

  • The stars danced in the night sky, twinkling with delight.
  • The trees whispered secrets to each other as the wind rustled through their branches.
  • The sun smiled down warmly on the children playing in the park.
  • The flowers nodded their heads in agreement as if they understood what was being said.
  • The ocean roared angrily, its waves crashing against the shore.
  • As the thunder was grumbling in the distance; I could not sleep.

To make your writing more engaging and easy to read, it’s important to use a variety of sentence beginnings. Regular practice is key, as well as maintaining consistency and being a proactive learner to see improvement in your writing.

Read through carefully, copy the model sentences above and then write your sentences, focusing on the different sentence starters.

If you are struggling to understand unseen texts, then make sure to check out the following link for some tips. AQA GCSE English Language- Understanding Unseen Texts

Read the following post to practise different sentence structure: Technical Accuracy- Sentence Structure

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Paper 1 Question 5: Creative Writing Model Answer ( AQA GCSE English Language )

Revision note.

Sam Evans

Paper 1 Question 5: Creative Writing Model Answer

In Paper 1 Question 5 you will be presented with a choice of two writing tasks and a stimulus image. One task will ask you to write descriptively, most likely based on the image, and the other question will ask you to write a story, based on a statement or title. 

The task requires you to write for a specific purpose and in a specific form. It is important you write in the correct format and use the conventions of this form, as the mark scheme mentions adapting your tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. 

This means: 

  • The tone (sound of the narrator’s ‘voice’) is appropriate and convincing 
  • The register (vocabulary and phrasing) is suitable for the purpose
  • The style of the writing (sentence structure and overall structure) is dynamic and engaging

Below you will find a detailed creative writing model in response to an example of Paper 1 Question 5, under the following sub-headings (click to go straight to that sub-heading):

Writing a GCSE English Language story

Structuring your story, ao5: content and organisation, ao6: technical accuracy, question 5 level 4 model story, why would this story achieve top marks.

Remember, Paper 1 Question 5 is worth 40 marks, broken down into two Assessment Objectives:

Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences

Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts

Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation

When planning your response, it is a good idea to keep the tone, style and register in mind, as well as the conventions of the form. Here, we will consider how you can produce an effective story with these devices in mind:

Story writing should develop a sense of character as well as mood. This means you should consider how your narrator or characters would behave and sound.  

In order to craft a tone which builds characterisation and mood, consider: 

  • The perspective from which your story will be told: 
  • First-person characterisation can include monologues which express the narrator’s thoughts and feelings 
  • Third-person characterisation will generally include a description of the character’s appearance and movements
  • Choose verbs and adverbs carefully to ‘show’ the character’s reactions
  • If you use a third-person omniscient narrator , you can advise the reader of the character’s thoughts and feelings
  • Consider how you can use sentence lengths and types in monologue and dialogue, as well as description of setting:
  • Short sentences reflect tension and unease, e.g. ‘No sound could be heard’
  • Longer sentences and listing can create a sense of being overwhelmed, or of abundance, e.g. ‘The table was laden with apples, grapes, oranges, loaves of bread, chunks of cheese and an array of colourful vegetables’
  • Rhetorical questions can suggest confusion, e.g. ‘Would I ever get it right?’

Style and register

The style of your story writing is closely related to the language you use. For example, in a creative writing response, the best answers show evidence of careful word choice and linguistic techniques.

Creative writing helps the reader to visualise the person, place, or situation being described with word choice and linguistic techniques, as well as being taken on a journey.

The best way to do this is to: 

  • Use vocabulary which is useful to the reader:
  • For example, describing something as ‘great’ or ‘amazing’ is telling rather than showing 
  • Use sensory language to bring the scene to life:
  • For example, a deserted park at night requires a completely different description from a busy park during the daytime
  • Emphasise key ideas or impressions using language techniques and imagery:
  • For example, you could use a simile to create associations about size or colour
  • Personification is a useful technique when describing weather or objects 
  • Ensure you describe the important details:
  • For example, you do not need to describe every inch of a person or scene bit by bit, but instead focus on key, interesting features that develops the story or the sense of character

Creative story writing develops an idea to a conclusion. This means your story should have cohesion by planning an ending with a resolution (you should plan whether your story will end happily or not). In the exam, it is best not to plan a complex story which takes place over a long period of time, employs multiple characters and has more than one setting or plot twist.  

In order to adhere to the conventions of story writing, it is best to: 

  • Plan your writing in an order which takes your character (and reader) on a clear journey:
  • The best way to do this is to plan one main event
  • Consider employing structural techniques such as a flashback:
  • This can give background information to the reader and provide context
  • Ensure you use past-tense verbs for this
  • Develop your characters:
  • Consider essential narrative characterisations, such as villain, victim, hero etc.
  • Decide on how your characters fit this description 
  • When describing people, focus on relevant details only:
  • You could focus on their body language or movements
  • If using dialogue, how your characters speak can reveal more about them than what they say, e.g. “shrieked”, “mumbled”, “whispered”
  • It is effective to repeat ideas related to colour
  • You can repeat ideas for emphasis, for example, black and grey or green and blue

Below is an example of the type of creative writing you may be asked to write in Question 5. This is taken from Language Paper 1 June 2019:

aqa-english-language-paper-1-q5

This task asks you to write a story with the title ‘Abandoned’. This means you are required to construct a story based around this idea. The mark scheme rewards original ideas, but the most successful answers are those which develop an idea effectively and engage the reader in a compelling story. 

Crafting a story plot which conveys a complex and original idea does not need to include multiple characters or take place over a long period of time. Consider the short story as a ‘scene’ in a film. It is not necessary to know everything about your characters, but better to immerse the reader with vivid ‘showing’ techniques, such as sensory imagery, movements and dialogue.

As this is a longer writing question, you can spend about 5 minutes planning your answer. 

Once you are sure of the form you will write in and you have considered how best to convey the mood and character development to your reader, you can begin to think about how you will order your ideas. 

Creative writing responses should be structured in five or six paragraphs. We have suggested basing your narrative structure on Freytag’s Pyramid:

tension-time-graph-eglish-languae

Remember, each paragraph does not have to be the same length. In fact, better answers vary the lengths of their paragraphs for effect. What is important is to develop separate ideas or points in each paragraph, and avoid repeating the same descriptions throughout your response.

Keep using sensory language throughout, but adjust the focus and perspective as your paragraphs develop. Make sure you include description of movement and description of sound to effectively craft a mood.

Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences

Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts



Introducing a memory creates a personal and emotive tone
Introduces complex ideas regarding family history
The story builds characterisation with a first-person monologue


The use of “epitome” is a sophisticated without being overly complicated
The phrase “a shadow if its former glory” uses vocabulary successfully to develop the description

The image of the lively house is contrasted with the word ‘dead’ to add emphasis
The focus on time adverbials emphasise the change e.g. “now”, “no longer” and “once”

Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation



The separation of the clauses using a semi-colon in this long sentence is effective as the second phrase directly builds on the first

Below is an example of a full-mark Level 4 model story:

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Author: Sam Evans

Sam is a graduate in English Language and Literature, specialising in journalism and the history and varieties of English. Before teaching, Sam had a career in tourism in South Africa and Europe. After training to become a teacher, Sam taught English Language and Literature and Communication and Culture in three outstanding secondary schools across England. Her teaching experience began in nursery schools, where she achieved a qualification in Early Years Foundation education. Sam went on to train in the SEN department of a secondary school, working closely with visually impaired students. From there, she went on to manage KS3 and GCSE English language and literature, as well as leading the Sixth Form curriculum. During this time, Sam trained as an examiner in AQA and iGCSE and has marked GCSE English examinations across a range of specifications. She went on to tutor Business English, English as a Second Language and international GCSE English to students around the world, as well as tutoring A level, GCSE and KS3 students for educational provisions in England. Sam freelances as a ghostwriter on novels, business articles and reports, academic resources and non-fiction books.

25 Awesome Story Ideas for Creative Writing for GCSE English Language

by melaniewp | Jun 23, 2013 | Creative Writing , English Language Exam , GCSE , IGCSE , Writing | 0 comments

ALL ABOUT CHARACTER

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[1] Old man loses his last picture of himself with his long dead wife. This could link to ‘Long Distance’ by Tony Harrison. Trying to find it, he goes through her things. This is one for flashback. He discovers secrets, or that she has left him a series of letters/notes for after her death. Start this when he realises he’s lost the picture.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[3]  A woman’s (or man’s) jealousy of her (or his) best friend takes over their life . Could link to ‘Othello’ or ‘Medusa’. Think about why. Start this when the woman is with her friend in a frenzy of jealousy…

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[4]  A model who has always been obsessed with her looks has acid splashed in her face and is disfigured. Could link to ‘Les Grands Seigneurs’, or ‘Mirror’ by Sylvia Plath. Start this with her looking in the mirror then opening her front door… By the way, this story is true. The woman in the picture is called Katie Piper .

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[5]  Fear of heights : nine year old with family who are in visiting a famous tall tower for the first time. The rest of her family want to go up the tower, but if the child won’t go up, someone will have to stay behind with them. Start this at the foot of the tower…

Want more ideas? Get a complete set plus a teaching scheme with model essays and all resources on my TES Resources shop  here .

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[6]  Small child really wants cake but has been forbidden from taking it down from the shelf. Start this story with the child lusting after the cake, which you should describe – baking, decorating etc – in delicious detail. [ read a short, very funny version of this here ]

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[7]  A man is obsessed with a woman who does not love him back (or the other way round) . Could link to ‘Havisham’ by Carol Ann Duffy, ‘Give’ or ‘Alaska’ by Simon Armitage or  ‘The River God’ by Stevie Smith . Start this when he realises she doesn’t love him back or when he decides to do something about it – get a haircut, stop eating raw onions, go to the gym, pretend that he also loves ‘horoscopes’ and ‘shopping’…

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[8] Dangerous Ambition (links to Macbeth). Want the lead role in the school play (or to be head girl/boy)? What will you do to get it? Start this when you realise the lead is up for grabs but you’re not the first choice.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

Racing Car driver (motorcross, road or drag racer) is up against his old teammate, now his main rival. Driver needs to win this one or it’s the end of his career. He sees that one of the mechanics on his  rival’s car has fixed something up wrong. What does he do?

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[9]  Jealous woman (or man) chases husband (wife) to find out where they’re going. Could link to ‘Medusa’, ‘Havisham’, or ‘Othello’. Start this story when they decide to chase / follow. Use flashback, or recollection to explain why.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[10] Small child really wants to go to another child’s birthday party but there’s a problem. He has to go to his dad’s that weekend/hasn’t been invited/has to go to the dentist instead. How does he deal with or solve it? Start this story at the moment where the child realises he can’t go. [ read a short, hilarious one here ] III Lost

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[11]  An old man, who has never cooked or cleaned for himself, has just got home after his wife died (of old age, in hospital). You could link this to ‘Old Age Gets Up’ by Ted Hughes. Now he has to try to do housework – cook, etc. Could be comic / tragic.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[12]  You go for a forest walk (e.g. on a Geography trip or DofE) with someone you don’t like much from school and get lost.  Could link to Robert Frost’s poem ‘The Road Not Taken’, ‘Storm in the Black Forest’ by D.H. Lawrence or ‘Wind’ by Ted Hughes. Start this story just before the main character begins to suspect they are lost. Start funny, ends up scary as it starts to go dark. Get describing words for a forest story here .

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[13] Parent-Child:  In a busy town centre, a mother loses her child who has previously been annoying her . Link this to ‘Mother A Distance Greater…’ by Simon Armitage, ‘Catrin’ by Gillian Clarke or ‘My Father Thought it Bloody Queer’. Start this with the child’s tantrum, mother’s thoughts then quickly move to realising the child is gone.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[14]  World famous BMXer (or other sports person, footballer, skateboarder, surfer) is in a car crash – or other accident – and loses his leg. Will he ever ride again?  This can link to ‘Out, Out-‘ by Robert Frost. For more on the guy in the photo see this video . Start this story when he wakes up in a hospital bed.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[15] A bsent father returns trying to spend time with his kids. How do they react to seeing him after so long? [this idea is done beautifully in the story, ‘Compass and Torch’ in the AQA anthology Sunlight on the Grass]. You could also link this to ‘Follower’ by Seamus Heaney. Start this when the re’s a knock at the front door.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[16]  You win a million pounds on the lottery. Everyone you know wants some. What would you buy? Friendships are ruined. Then you are robbed… Start this when you check your bank balance and there are sooooo many noughts at the end it looks like a bank malfunction. IV Coming of Age

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[17]  Death of a pet. Ferociously funny, very short story about a girl and a fish [ here ]. Start this when you find the pet… dead, or just before. You can use flashback – when you first got the pet, etc.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[18]  Learning a secret you wish you’d never found out – e.g. finding texts on your dad’s mobile from his girlfriend while your parents are still married – or learning that your mum is planning to secretly leave your dad. Start this when you’re just idly messing with the parent’s phone or laptop.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[19]  falling in love for the first time , as in Romeo and Juliet. Start this when they see each other or their first proper meeting. Link this to ‘Sonnet 18 Shall I Compare Thee’, ‘Sonnet 116 Let Me Not’, ‘Quickdraw’ or ‘Hour’, by Carol Ann Duffy or ‘To His Coy Mistress’ by Andrew Marvell.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[20]  The first time you have to do a really disgusting piece of housework / cook a meal for yourself and how you tackle it. Start this when you realise that no one else is going to do this foul job except you. Read a description of cooking a meal here .

V The Chase / Monsters

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[21]  You’re camping with your friend in the woods. Then you hear a noise outside (wolves, person, etc). Start this as you’re getting settled to go to sleep – then you hear snuffling (or whatever). Read Bill Bryson’s hilarious account of this exact event, and also an account of surviving a bear attack from the OCR exam paper here.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[22]  You have something someone else wants – gold, diamonds etc. They chase you to get it. You choose the landscape: city, ruined derelict warehouses, Brazil, forest, cliffs etc. Start this at the moment you realise someone is following you. You can link this to the final chapter of Lord of the Flies .

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[23]  You are the last surviving human after the zombie/vampire apocalypse. Now they have found you. This is the plot of ‘I Am Legend’. You can link this to Edwin Muir’s post-apocalyptic poem ‘Horses’, ‘Wind’ by Ted Hughes or the final chapter of Lord of the Flies . Start this at the moment you (or the main character) realises someone is coming towards your hiding place.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[24]  The King is a tyrant who has killed your family. Now you will take revenge . Start this story as you are just about to go through the city walls.

sentence starters gcse creative writing

[25]  You wake up and discover you have been turned into a giant insect. How does your family react? This is the plot of Kafka’s Metamorphosis. Read this here . Start at the point you wake up, and gradually realise what has happened.

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10+ GCSE creative writing ideas, prompts and plot lines

sentence starters gcse creative writing

Getting a good GCSE creative writing plot going can be difficult, here are some ideas to help you out.

Ahead of your exams, here are a selection of GCSE creative writing ideas and prompts to hopefully provide some inspiration.

The Lost Timepiece

Prompt: In an old, dusty attic, a teenager discovers a mysterious pocket watch that doesn’t seem to tell the correct time.

Potential Story Directions:

  • The watch could transport the teenager to different moments in history whenever it's wound.
  • The watch might belong to a long-lost relative, leading to a family mystery.
  • The watch could be counting down to a significant event, and the protagonist must figure out what is about to happen.

The Secret Garden Door

Prompt: Behind the overgrown ivy in the school's garden, a student finds a door that wasn't there before.

  • The door could lead to a magical world, offering an escape from everyday life but with challenges of its own.
  • It might be a portal to the past, showing the school's history and secrets.
  • The door could be a metaphorical passage to self-discovery, revealing hidden aspects of the character’s personality.

The Last Message

Prompt: A character receives a mysterious message in a bottle on the beach, written in a cryptic language.

  • Deciphering the message could lead to an adventure, perhaps a treasure hunt or a rescue mission.
  • The message might be from a distant land or time, offering insights into an ancient or futuristic world.
  • It could be a personal message from someone significant in the character’s past, triggering a journey of emotional growth.

Midnight at the Museum

Prompt: A night guard at a museum notices that the exhibits come to life after midnight.

  • The guard could interact with historical figures, learning about history firsthand.
  • There might be a plot to steal an exhibit, and the living exhibits help to thwart it.
  • The phenomenon could be linked to a supernatural event or an ancient curse that needs resolving.

The Forgotten Melody

Prompt: A pianist discovers an old, unplayed piano in a neglected music room that plays a melody no one seems to recognize.

  • The melody could be a key to unlocking forgotten memories or a hidden past.
  • It might be a magical melody, having various effects on listeners.

Each of these prompts offers a starting point for creative exploration, allowing students to develop their storytelling skills in imaginative and engaging ways.

Galactic Storm

Prompt: Astronauts on a mission to a distant planet encounter a bizarre, otherworldly storm.

  • The storm could have strange, mind-altering effects on the crew.
  • It might be a living entity, communicating in an unprecedented way.
  • The crew must navigate through the storm to discover a hidden aspect of the universe.

Unearthed Powers

Prompt: A teenager suddenly discovers they have a supernatural ability.

  • The power could be a family secret, leading to a journey of self-discovery.
  • It might cause conflict with friends and society, forcing the protagonist to make difficult choices.
  • The ability could attract unwanted attention, leading to a thrilling adventure.

Reflections of Reality

Prompt: A story that mirrors a significant real-life experience involving friendship or a pet.

  • The story could explore the depth of human-animal bonds or the complexities of friendship.
  • It might involve a heartwarming journey or a challenging ordeal.
  • The protagonist learns valuable life lessons through these relationships.

Chronicle of Times

Prompt: A character discovers a way to travel through time.

  • Traveling to the future, they encounter a radically different world.
  • In the past, they might inadvertently alter history.
  • The story could explore the moral and emotional implications of time travel.

Apocalyptic Event

Prompt: A natural disaster of unprecedented scale threatens humanity.

  • The story could focus on survival, resilience, and human spirit.
  • It might involve a journey to avert the disaster.
  • The narrative could explore the societal changes that occur in the face of such a disaster.

The Unsolved Case

Prompt: A detective starts investigating a complex and mysterious murder.

  • The investigation uncovers deep secrets and conspiracies.
  • The detective's personal life might intertwine with the case.
  • The story could have a surprising twist, challenging the reader's expectations.

Retold Fable

Prompt: Modernize a classic fable or story, such as the Boy Who Cried Wolf, in a contemporary setting.

  • The story could be set in a modern city, exploring current social issues.
  • It might be told from a different perspective, offering a fresh take on the moral of the story.
  • The narrative could blend the original fable with current events, creating a powerful commentary.

Forbidden Love

Prompt: Two characters from vastly different worlds fall in love, against all odds.

  • Their love could challenge societal norms and expectations.
  • The story might explore the sacrifices they make for each other.
  • It could be a journey of self-discovery and acceptance in the face of adversity.

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Here are Some Really Good Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

So, your head is chock-a-block with ideas, and yet you're struggling to begin your story. No cause for worry, as it happens to most of us. Instead, read this Penlighten post - it has some amazing ideas to get your creative juices flowing.

Good Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

So, your head is chock-a-block with ideas, and yet you’re struggling to begin your story. No cause for worry, as it happens to most of us. Instead, read this Penlighten post – it has some amazing ideas to get your creative juices flowing.

“The scariest moment is always just before you start.” ― Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Master storyteller that he is, Stephen King was gracious enough to admit that a writer tends to dread the moment when he actually begins writing any piece―this can be a bit of a make-or-break kind of a situation. A flying start tends to set the tone of the work, all positive, of course, whereas an unsure start only leads to the doomed path of redrafts.

You may have the entire concept of your story or essay in mind, but when it comes to the actual act of putting pen to paper, the enthusiasm tends to deflate a little. A rather strange phenomenon, this, and it wouldn’t be wrong to say that most writers, at some point, have encountered this experience.

To our fellow budding writers, we’re offering a helping hand by providing a few sample starts to get that creativity rolling, followed by a little inspiration from the stalwarts of the business.

Sample Sentence Starters for Fiction

Fiction writing is a boundless category, and each author has his preferred style of beginning a story or a novel. It is obvious that the beginning of a story depends on the overall plot, but there are times when you can use all the inspiration you need to get the start you were looking for. Therefore, we’ve included 5 ideas you can use in your starter, along with 3 examples for each.

Describe the weather

► The warm Californian sunshine hit her face as she stepped outside for the first time as a free woman.

► It had been raining nonstop for the past six days.

► The night sky was exceptionally clear tonight.

Introduce a character

► Daniel hated reunions and all the fake camaraderie.

► Edie Brent’s gruesome murder made it to the front page of the New York Times.

► Alison loved to keep secrets.

Talk about the city

► The streets of London come alive during the Holidays.

► Springtime is the best time to be in New York.

► Rio de Janeiro was where his dreams were.

Add a little suspense

► Walking home in the dead of the night was not new to Carol, but tonight felt different.

► The key clicked in the lock as Alan opened the door to his apartment. Everything seemed to be in place, and yet, something wasn’t right.

► It was 3 a. m. and there was no sign of Tim. He always called to tell if he was getting late. Why hadn’t he called?

And some drama

► How do you react when you’re told that you have a mere hours left to live?

► Prom queen and head cheerleader, Jessica always loved to be the center of attention.

► “Get the hell out of my life!”, screamed Karen at the top of her lungs.

Sentence Starters for Formal Essays

Middle school and high school students have to draft varied writing assignments, including persuasive essays, arguments, and narratives. In case of essays, particularly, the kind of start you make depends entirely on the topic at hand. However, formal essays or presentations need to begin in a certain manner. We’ve listed a few examples here:

► (The topic) has fostered a debate on …

► There is growing support for the notion that …

► The data gathered in the study strongly suggests that …

► The focus of discussion in this paper is …

► The premise of (the topic) seems to be based on …

► Latest research corroborates the view that …

Learn from the Greats

Who doesn’t seek inspiration from the masters of the field? Agreed, we all do. Therefore, we’ve brought you a list of the first sentences of some of the most iconic novels ever written.

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. ― Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. ― Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. ― George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four

Call me Ishmael. ― J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Mr and Mrs Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. ― J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love. ― Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera

These sample sentence starters ought to have helped you get over your dry spell. Getting the right start is crucial when it comes to creative writing, and you need to give it your all to bring it up to standard.

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RSS

Creative Writing Hacks to Impress GCSE Examiners

the room picture

A whopping 25% of GCSE English Language marks are assigned to creative writing – such as a story or description in 45 minutes. Always a tall order as it needs to have all the right ingredients to WOW the examiner.

For starters, the question usually reads like this:

You have been invited to take part in a creative writing competition judged by people your own age. Write a description of this picture.

With just 45 minutes allocated time, you need to get your skates on fast.

Rule 1: PLAN IDEAS FIRST

  • BRING THE PICTURE TO LIFE in your head as if it is a movie scene. Annotate the picture with sounds, sensations, light, moving things, noises from far away, weather outside. Something may feel physically hard or spiky underfoot; there might be a perishingly cold wind seeping through walls or window cracks.
  • BOX OFF FOUR SECTIONS –  perhaps the panoramic scene/the background. Then zoom into two other areas as you approach the foreground: the walls, the window. ZOOM RIGHT IN: see the shards of glass on the floor, or curly moss stretching up the wallpaper etc. Then, perhaps cut to the foreground: the chair or the tunnel. These will help you to set the scene and establish atmosphere at the start.
  • Focus on ACTION/SWITCH FOCUS/ZOOM IN ON SOMETHING NEW . Perhaps the focus switches to the darkened tunnel into the next room – add some movement.
  • Next, ADD A TWIST/A CHANGE/A DISCOVERY/A FLASHBACK . Dialogue could work here if a new character enters the scene. It’s also an opportunity to change the atmosphere. If sun streamed though the window at the start, dark clouds could have darkened the room. Rain might start punching the window. Always great to pop some personification in there!
  • WRAP IT UP. Short stories or descriptions can end on a cryptic note or a cliff-hanger. Perhaps an unexpected twist or narrator’s reflection on the scene.

RULE 2: ADD CREATIVE WRITING TECHNIQUES:

  • USE MASSIVE DEVICES. Add: Metaphors, Adjectives, Senses, Superlatives, Imagery, Verbs, Emotion. Strong creative writing relies on you weaving a range of language techniques into your work to create different effects.
  • VARY SENTENCE STRUCTURES.  Start sentences with: verbs, prepositions, adjective/noun combos. Follow a complex sentence with a short, punchy one to increase tension/change pace. 
  • BE ORIGINAL . No fluffy clouds looking like sheep, or wooden doors that creak open. Instead practise metaphors/personification writing to achieve original effects. Clouds might look like a sea of metallic-grey mountains if a storm is on the way, for instance. Perhaps blackened soot might crawl its inky fingers across every particle of plaster. It’s ALL about the detail.

Of course, this is just the start to becoming a fabulous creative writer. Something our experienced English teachers here at 121 Home Tutors always advise is to read. As many different genres as you can.

Check out the BBC Sounds app too. There’s all sorts of novels, short stories and podcasts to listen to.

Be inspired … become a better writer

Ready to transform your writing capabilities? Please get in touch with our tutor team. With a fantastic mix of tutors local to Manchester and Cheshire, or tutors available online, we can help you not only achieve your target grades , but smash them.

Just drop us a line here to start the ball rolling.

Tags: annotate , creative writing techniques , English Language GCSE , English teachers , how to be a brilliant writer , online English tutor , original writing , personification , read more , sentence structures

This entry was posted on Sunday, January 23rd, 2022 at 7:06 pm and is filed under English , Writing . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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KS4 English Language Sentence starters

KS4 English Language Sentence starters

Subject: English

Age range: 14-16

Resource type: Assessment and revision

Miss De La Mare English Resources

Last updated

1 September 2021

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sentence starters gcse creative writing

This is a double sided help sheet for GCSE students with sentence starters, useful essay writing terminology and a list of ambitious vocabulary for creative writing. They can be printed double sided and laminated for students to keep on hand in lessons.

This resource is aimed at mixed ability and there is a different version on my page for high ability/A Level.

Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

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IMAGES

  1. 51 Great Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

  2. Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

  3. AQA English Language Paper 1 GCSE Writing Frame, Word-mats, Sentence

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

  4. Creative and Amazing Sentence Starters by Mrs C is now Grade Three

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

  5. 16 Creative Writing Sentence Starters by Angela Brown

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

  6. Here is a list of useful common sentence starters that you can use

    sentence starters gcse creative writing

VIDEO

  1. Varying sentence structure for GCSE English

  2. 46. How to write amazing articles for your GCSE

  3. Creative Writing: How to use structure

  4. Amazing Sentence Starters! #gcse #exams #creative #education #english #revision #english #school

  5. Explicit Writing Uncovered #gcse#englishlang #englishgrammar #literacyskills#questions

  6. GCSE Creative Writing Example: 40/40 Model Answer Plan Explained In 5 Mins! (Language Paper 1: Q5)

COMMENTS

  1. Insider GCSE creative writing tips + 106 prompts from past papers

    Unit 2 Reading and Writing: Description, Narration and Exposition gives two prompts to choose between, for an account and an essay perhaps, and Unit 3: Reading and Writing: Argumentation, Persuasion and Instructional sets up a letter, or similar. Jump ahead to WJEC Eduqas non-fiction writing prompts from past GCSE papers.

  2. Your Inner Author

    1/ Sentence starters for creative writing for different age groups (KS1, KS2, KS3, adults, high school) Creative writing is a fantastic way to express your thoughts, feelings, and imagination through words. It's an art that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, from young children to adults. Let's explore some sentence starters specifically ...

  3. 51 Super Story Starter Sentences » JournalBuddies.com

    51 Super Story Starter Sentences. Story Starter Sentences to Ignite Your Mind— We've made it easy for you to start your next story. You see, we put together a wonderfully fun and creative list of 51 story starter sentences. Hopefully, these ideas will give you the inspiration you need to get started on your next creative writing project.

  4. Sentence variety

    Varying sentence openings. Vary the way that you start sentences to keep your writing interesting and lively. For example: Sentence opener type. Example. Simile - comparing something to something ...

  5. GCSE English Language, Technical Accuracy- Sentence Starters

    In GCSE English Language Section B, which often requires creative or persuasive writing, using varied sentence starters is essential for multiple reasons: Demonstrating Writing Skills: using varied sentence starters showcases a candidate's ability to manipulate language effectively, demonstrating a range of writing techniques and structures.

  6. GCSE English language: 10+ tips for creative writing

    READ MORE: > 10+ GCSE creative writing ideas, prompts and plot lines. ... Varying Sentence Structure and Vocabulary. Using a range of sentence structures and a rich vocabulary can make your writing more interesting and dynamic. Avoid repetition of words and phrases, and try to use descriptive language that paints a picture for the reader. ...

  7. Paper 1 Question 5: Creative Writing Model Answer

    The style of the writing (sentence structure and overall structure) is dynamic and engaging; Below you will find a detailed creative writing model in response to an example of Paper 1 Question 5, under the following sub-headings (click to go straight to that sub-heading): Writing a GCSE English Language story; Structuring your story

  8. 25 Awesome Story Ideas for Creative Writing for GCSE English Language

    II. Desire. [6] Small child really wants cake but has been forbidden from taking it down from the shelf. Start this story with the child lusting after the cake, which you should describe - baking, decorating etc - in delicious detail. [ read a short, very funny version of this here]

  9. 10+ GCSE creative writing ideas, prompts and plot lines

    Each of these prompts offers a starting point for creative exploration, allowing students to develop their storytelling skills in imaginative and engaging ways. Absolutely, here are the creative writing prompts based on the themes you provided, each with a heading and suggestions for story development and potential plot lines. Galactic Storm

  10. 50 Exciting Sentence Starters for Writing Stories

    A lot of the time, getting started with your story can be the most difficult part of the writing process.Finding that winning opening line to hook your reader in can be a challenge but, have no fear, we've got a list of smash-hit story starters guaranteed to get the creative juices flowing!. Perfect for use at home, with your children, or in English lessons, our story starters cover a range ...

  11. 101 Sentence Prompts To Spark Your Creative Writing

    Sentence Prompts. 1. The Beginning of Adventure: "The ice cream truck's jingle was suddenly drowned out by the roar of thunder, changing the course of the little girl's day." 2. A Mysterious Morning: "He woke up with icy fingers clutching his shoulder, only to find an empty room." 3.

  12. English Language Paper 1: Step-by-Step guide

    Q5. Writing to DESCRIBE based on an image/title! Possible sentence starters for each of the 5 sections: 1.The ashy clouds blocked out the sun, blanketing the sky in a charcoal light… 2.Tumbling from the inky darkness, the raindrops crashed into the pale face of a figure looking upwards who was lost in thought.

  13. Sentence Stems for Creative Writing

    Sentence Stems for Creative Writing | KS4 Teaching Resource. Click on the link above to access the document with the sentence stems. Cheers -. Doug. [email protected]. , , Sentence stems for students to use and adapt. GCSE English Language Paper 1. Question 5.

  14. Here are Some Really Good Sentence Starters for Creative Writing

    Sentence Starters for Formal Essays. Middle school and high school students have to draft varied writing assignments, including persuasive essays, arguments, and narratives. In case of essays, particularly, the kind of start you make depends entirely on the topic at hand. However, formal essays or presentations need to begin in a certain manner.

  15. GCSE English Language: Creative Writing in an Exam

    Sophia Thakur and Solomon O.B. sit a mock English GSCE language exam. Suitable for teaching English language at GCSE and National 4 and 5.

  16. Sentence structures and variety

    Sentence starter: Example: An adverb to describe the verb (action) Frantically, the man shouted out of the window…: An adjective to add further description to a noun (ie the subject of the sentence)

  17. AQA 8700/1 GCSE English Language Creative Writing Starters

    AQA 8700/1 GCSE English Language Creative Writing Starters. Subject: English. Age range: 14-16. Resource type: Worksheet/Activity. File previews. docx, 369.71 KB. pdf, 395.21 KB. docx, 130.87 KB. Just something fun and engaging that kids have played all over the world - Boy/Girl is something I've turned into a vocabulary builder - hope your ...

  18. Creative Writing

    Creative Writing - Sentence Starters. Subject: English. Age range: 11-14. Resource type: Worksheet/Activity. File previews. pdf, 309.75 KB. This resource is aimed at encouraging learners to consider how they start each sentence and to vary it for effect. Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

  19. Creative Writing

    A fully differentiated and resourced lesson that focuses on varying sentence openers for effective narrative writing, descriptive writing and creative writing. Ideal preparation for both KS3 and KS4 students. Check out our English Shop for loads more free and inexpensive KS3, KS4, KS5, Literacy and whole school resources.

  20. Writing Skills

    Narration - the voice that tells the story, either first person (I/me) or third person (he/him/she/her). This needs to have the effect of interesting your reader in the story with a warm and ...

  21. Creative Writing Hacks to Impress GCSE Examiners

    Creative Writing Hacks to Impress GCSE Examiners. A whopping 25% of GCSE English Language marks are assigned to creative writing - such as a story or description in 45 minutes. Always a tall order as it needs to have all the right ingredients to WOW the examiner. For starters, the question usually reads like this:

  22. KS4 English Language Sentence starters

    KS4 English Language Sentence starters. This is a double sided help sheet for GCSE students with sentence starters, useful essay writing terminology and a list of ambitious vocabulary for creative writing. They can be printed double sided and laminated for students to keep on hand in lessons. This resource is aimed at mixed ability and there is ...

  23. Sample question

    Attempt 1. It was windy and wet and the road was full of big puddles. Walking along whistling he was making his way home from school in a bit of a dream. He'd got out early because of the bad ...