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How to Write an English Personal Statement Worthy of Oxbridge!

Are you dreaming of pursuing English at Oxford, Cambridge or a top Russell Group University? This comprehensive guide equips you with top tips for crafting an English personal statement that truly stands out. Learn how to showcase your diverse literary interests, structure your personal statement or tailor your statement for Oxbridge. To bring these concepts to life, we provide an example Oxbridge English personal statement for your reference.

An Image of Text Stating English Literature Personal Statement Writing

When applying to university, your personal statement is your best opportunity to showcase what motivates you to study the subject you are applying for and why you are suited to study it.  You can do this by providing evidence of your interest: how have you gone beyond the curriculum to satisfy questions which reach past the subject at A Level?  

Interviewers for English at university will be looking for students who have an insatiable curiosity for learning and developed interests in various areas of the subject. They will also be looking for candidates who have the analytical skills and academic rigour required for success at university. And, of course, you’ll be expected to demonstrate evidence of substantial reading; a successful English personal statement will provide a starting point for an interview discussion, so gesture towards a range of different texts which you are prepared to discuss at length. Don’t shy away from making a provocative statement, as long as you are prepared to support any claim you make: independent, fresh responses to texts will generate a positive response.

Tips for your English Literature Personal Statement

The key tips to bear in mind when writing a personal statement are: be truthful, be ambitious and don’t undersell yourself.  This is an opportunity to show off what you’re good at! Don’t hold back from writing about times when you have excelled (for example, winning an English essay competition) but don’t distort what you’ve done either. 

Don’t mention books which you haven’t read all the way through . If you feel like your breadth of reading might be lacking, it’s a good idea to do some extension reading in the months leading up to applying for university, so that when it comes to writing your personal statement, you’ll have a wide variety of texts to choose from.

Showcase your literary diversity : Make your personal statement stand out by referencing a range of text forms, from classic novels to contemporary poetry, thought-provoking essays, iconic plays, and compelling prose. This demonstrates your passion for English literature across different mediums and eras.

Embrace the breadth of English literature: Convey your enthusiasm for the subject by including references to works from various eras. Showcase your appreciation for not only contemporary literature but also texts from older periods, like the Medieval age, the Renaissance, and beyond (whilst staying true to your interests). This illustrates your readiness to explore and engage with the rich tapestry of English literature throughout history. This is particularly important when applying for a course like Oxford English Language Literature as the course modules are chronological, spanning Old English (e.g. Beowulf) through to contemporary texts. An admissions tutor is likely to be impressed if you therefore have some appreciation for a range of literary eras.

Craft a narrative with a few (e.g. 3) focused areas of interest: Instead of providing a superficial overview of various topics that interest you, choose say three specific areas of English literature that genuinely intrigue you. These could be thematic, like postcolonial literature, feminist literature, or gothic literature. For each area, go in-depth by referencing a key book or text you've read, a relevant piece of literary criticism (this isn’t required, but can be good to include!), and your thoughtful analysis of the text or critic's perspective. Then, connect these three areas to create a compelling narrative thread that showcases your passion, analytical skills, and the trajectory of your literary exploration. This approach not only demonstrates your commitment but also provides a captivating structure for your personal statement (See the English personal statement posted below as an example of this!)

How to Structure Your English Personal Statement

The word count for personal statements is quite limited, so it’s important to use every sentence effectively. Don’t repeat yourself and don’t include information which isn’t relevant to your application. When applying for English, there are certain areas which should be addressed in your personal statement, so here is a guideline of how one might structure the personal statement to ensure that all of these areas are mentioned.

Introductory paragraph:

What is your motivation to study English?  Be specific: what do you want to explore at university? What is distinctive about studying literature that makes it worthwhile? Ensure you talk about what motivates your study of the subject now, not a catalyst from your childhood as, even if it may be true, the interviewer will find it clichéd and less relevant.

Main body of the personal statement:

Devote at least a paragraph to talking about specific areas of interest within the subject.  What excites you most? For example, do you have a particular fascination with performance studies or postcolonial theory? Indicate that you have opinions and preoccupations within the discipline.

Mention a range of texts which have interested you: ensure that you’ve mentioned at least one play, prose text and piece of poetry (ideally).  It’s also a good idea to show that you’ve engaged with secondary texts, for example a work of literary criticism or a book covering the historical background of a period of literature you’ve studied.

Show that you have an active interest in the subject: Have you sought out performances of plays, special lectures or essay competitions? These will all reveal that you’ve gone out of your way to immerse yourself in your subject already, and this is a very appealing trait in a prospective university candidate.

Showcase your skills: Don’t just name-drop texts but say something incisive and persuasive about them. This could involve discussing what links together works by authors of the same period or what defines the work of a single author.  Demonstrate your ability to analyse texts effectively, because this is the most important skill which you will use studying English at university level.

Concluding your personal statement:

The personal statement isn’t long enough to talk at length about extracurricular hobbies and activities, so don’t let these take up too much space (a few lines maximum). However, it is a good idea to mention what you do outside your subject to present yourself as a well-rounded candidate. Therefore:

You could mention one or two of your other A Level subjects, perhaps describing how they have enhanced your study of English. This will be particularly convincing if you have studied History or a foreign language at A Level.

Mention any extracurricular activities which make you stand out. Do you play a musical instrument, and if so, to what level? If you’re involved in sport, do you play in a team?  Don’t write at length about this: try to contain this information within one sentence.

Mention any prizes or roles of responsibility which you have had at school, including any clubs that you might organise, such as the school newspaper or student council.

Conclude your personal statement by returning to your aptitude for studying the subject . Which core skills do you possess which will equip you to excel at degree level? It’s important to strike a balance between enthusiasm for the subject and evidence of skills.

Pile of books for English personal statement writing

Applying to Oxford or Cambridge (Oxbridge)? Here's What You Should Also Do

Difference Between Oxford English Language and Literature BA & Cambridge English BA

The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, collectively referred to as Oxbridge, are globally renowned for their exceptional academic courses. In the domain of English studies, both universities offer distinct programmes: Oxford's English Language and Literature and Cambridge's English course. In this section, we will precisely explore the key differences between these programmes, highlighting their unique approaches and focus, to ensure you cater your Oxbridge English personal statement to your Number 1 choice of university.

Writing an Oxford English Language and Literature Personal Statement

Oxford's English Language and Literature course is renowned for its extensive scope, offering a comprehensive exploration of English writing from its origins in Anglo-Saxon England to contemporary works. It provides the unique opportunity to examine literature in English on a global scale, encompassing texts from various parts of the world and originally penned in different languages. The course allows students to tailor their studies to match their interests through core papers, dissertation topics, and special options. Some past options include delving into Literature and revolution, Postcolonial literature, Writing lives, Old Norse, Tragedy, and Film criticism, fostering a dynamic and diverse learning experience.

At the University of Oxford, the course titled "English Language and Literature" is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of both the language and literary aspects of the English discipline . It is therefore important that you ideally reference both aspects in your Oxford English personal statement. Even if the other courses you are applying for do not have the Language element, anything you include will still be relevant to the study of Literature (you can entwine the two).

1. Integration of Language and Literature:

Oxford's course integrates the study of the English language with a deep exploration of literary works. Students examine the language's structure, history, and linguistic components while also engaging with a wide array of literary genres and periods.

2. Language Analysis and Literary Critique:

The curriculum at Oxford hones students skills in language analysis, gives them exposure to linguistic theories, and literary critique. Students learn to analyse the nuances of language and its application in literature, fostering critical thinking and analytical skills.

3. Historical and Cultural Context:

Oxford places significant importance on studying literature within its historical and cultural contexts. Students gain insights into the societal influences that shaped literary works, providing a holistic understanding of the subject.

Writing a Cambridge English Personal Statement

Cambridge's English degree course offers a well-rounded curriculum that combines a strong foundation in English literary works with an opportunity to explore various art forms, including music and film in relation to literature . Furthermore, it delves into literature's connections with intellectual traditions such as philosophy, art history, and politics . In Year 1 (Part IA), students undertake compulsory papers in Practical Criticism and Critical Practice, along with an assessment of Shakespeare through a portfolio of essays. Year 2 (Part IB) introduces compulsory and optional papers spanning different literary periods from Early Medieval Literature to the 20th century. In Year 3 (Part II), students engage with compulsory papers in Practical Criticism and Critical Practice II, explore Tragedy across ages, and undertake a dissertation. Additionally, they can choose from a wide array of optional papers that evolve yearly, covering diverse topics such as Chaucer, American Literature, Visual Culture, and more.

Here’s how to tailor your personal statement to align with these features:

Interdisciplinary Approach : Cambridge's English course places a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary connections. In your personal statement, you could showcase your readiness to explore literature's intersections with other fields such as philosophy, art history, and politics. Mention any relevant experiences or readings that demonstrate your interest in these areas and how they relate to literature.

Exploration of Other Art Forms : Cambridge offers the opportunity to delve into other art forms, including music and film, in relation to literature. Highlight your passion for these art forms and their connections to literature. You could discuss a specific instance where you've analysed how music or film enhances the understanding of a literary work, for example, or how these art forms can provide fresh perspectives on literature.

Critical Thinking and Intellectual Traditions : Cambridge's English course encourages critical thinking and engagement with intellectual traditions. In your personal statement, you could emphasise your analytical abilities by discussing a piece of literature or a critical theory that challenged your thinking. Show how your engagement with intellectual traditions has shaped your approach to literature.

Broad Range of Literature : Mention your fascination with the diverse range of literary works in the Cambridge curriculum, spanning different eras and cultures. Highlight any books or authors that have particularly resonated with you, and explain how they have influenced your literary interests.

How is the Personal Statement Used in Oxbridge English Interviews?

Your personal statement offers admissions tutors a glimpse into your academic journey, showcasing your passion for English Literature or English Language. It acts as a crucial tool for them to assess your commitment to the subject and your ability to articulate your thoughts coherently and persuasively.

Through your personal statement, you have the opportunity to exhibit your enthusiasm for the subject. Your engagement with literary works, language theories, and academic experiences should shine through, portraying a genuine and dedicated interest in the field. Highlighting specific books, theories, or authors you admire and discussing how they have influenced your academic pursuits adds depth to your statement.

Admissions tutors use your personal statement to evaluate how well your academic goals align with the structure and ethos of the course you're applying for. Articulate why you believe the particular course at the university is the right fit for you. Demonstrating an understanding of the curriculum and emphasising how it will help you achieve your academic and career aspirations is key.

During the interview, the personal statement often serves as a starting point for discussion . The interviewers may delve into topics you've mentioned in your statement, seeking deeper insights into your thought processes and motivations. Therefore, it is essential to be well-prepared to expand on the ideas presented in your personal statement, providing a more comprehensive understanding of your perspective.

English Personal Statement

Looking for ideas for English personal statement content?

We have built out an entire co-curricular platform, Minds Underground, for university applicants to use as evidence for their wider subject exploration. A few ideas:

Our English Literature Summer School allows students to broaden their horizons in literature, to consider authors and theorists from across the globe. classes are hosted by our Oxbridge-educated tutors, from a Fellow at all Soul’s College, Oxford, to published authors and Master’s and PhD researchers specialising in English Lang & Lit

Research Projects: E.g. ““Ways of Seeing": Exploring Word, Image and Ideology with a Cambridge Master's English Researcher and Multidisciplinary Artist” (Typically 1 month, 5 project tutorial sessions)

Exemplar Personal Statement for Oxford Language and Literature

Below is a sample English Language and Literature personal statement from U2 Tuition co-founder Camille, that was accepted for Oriel College, Oxford:

The importance of literature in society first became apparent to me when reading Milton’s polemical tract Areopagitica. I was intrigued by the way he used language’s potential not only to liberate, ‘give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely’, but also to manipulate. It is fascinating that this idea of a ‘Janus’ faced’ side to words could have been promoted over 300 years ago. Today, in our progressively plural world and with language’s increasing flexibility, I can see that Milton’s ideas have developed still further. In a culture where we are constantly bombarded with messages, it is all the more important to discern meaning. Here, Saussure’s theories in semiotics have particular resonance. I believe an in-depth study of literature will teach me to deconstruct and question these uses of language. It was for this reason I undertook work as a research assistant on an Oxford University project, Examining the OED. Tracing how language changed over time demonstrated its fluidity and the nuances of the way words are actually used. Considering how literary writers have shaped and influenced the lexicon also showed me how literature constantly interacts with everyday life. This capacity for narrative to be an active force both in the shaping of the lexicon and also upon the reader, became evident to me during my Gap Year travels on the professional tennis tour. During this period of intense training and competition I drew inspiration, both as a tennis player and aspiring novelist, from travel writing such as Robert McFarlane’s Mountains of the Mind and Old Ways and McDougall’s Born to Run. Upon my return I came across Robin Lydenberg’s essay Freud’s Uncanny Narratives. His discussion of the uncanny effect of Freud’s constant shift into autobiographical narrative and complex relation to Italy in The Uncanny, was particularly relevant to a study of a personal and travel narrative. I realised part of the attraction of these texts was their dealings with both the familiar and the foreign. I am also curious about the more typical territory of the uncanny in Gothic fiction, where terror is derived from something, at once strange and intrinsic, in the supernatural. I found the skeleton that reproaches Frederic for his lust in Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto horrific in the truest Gothic sense - an instrument of man’s own secret fears, denials and desires. In a less overt manner (and as a possible reaction to Lewis’s The Monk) Radcliffe interweaves supernatural ‘mysteries’ and human psychology in her rational explanations. I love how she shows the mind itself to almost be a supernatural entity. When reading Radcliffe’s work I was struck by her portrayal of her heroines as paradigms of innocence who cannot function in the active adult world. I recognised this as a recurring theme in Victorian texts like Gaskell’s Ruth, Rossetti’s Goblin Market and Wilde’s A Woman of No Importance. I thought it illuminating that despite Wilde’s feminist tendencies he sends Mrs. Arbuthnot into exile whilst Lord Illingworth is assimilated back into society. The conflict between the way writers depict the private ethics of their female protagonists and the realities of public life is also found in earlier works. In Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece, Lucrece is only given some form of rhetorical political power by committing suicide. Likewise, in Titus Andronicus, Lavinia’s sacrifice and perhaps even her rape are necessary to reestablish purity in Rome, and in Medea, Medea only gains power over Jason by killing her own children. Her revenge is limited. The development of language, the influence of literature in everyday life and the way in which writers treat gender and the supernatural are just some of the literary ideas that intrigue me. I would relish the opportunity to deepen my understanding of these concepts and explore other periods and styles at University level.

Use this personal statement for inspiration and ideas, and to see how to structure an exemplar English personal statement for Oxford or Cambridge. We wish you all the best on your onward journey and encourage you to look at our Personal Statement page for more information, and the ways in which U2 can help.

Looking for an English Personal Statement Writing Tutor or Support For Your Wider Oxbridge English Application?

English Personal Statement Tutoring

U2 Tuition’s Oxbridge-educated tutors have a close insight into what admissions tutors like to see in an English personal statement, and can help students to convey their skills, motivations, and long term goals, in order to stand out from other applicants. The statement should be the candidates own work, but our mentors will provide direction and guide you through the process of content building and writing. We offer offline drafting as well as tuition sessions.

Oxbridge English Tutoring

We have a large team of Oxbridge-educated English mentors including 1st Class, Master’s and PhD level graduates, who support students through each stage of the application process, including personal statement, ELAT and interview preparation.

The Process:

1) We suggest an Oxbridge English graduate as a mentor and send their full CV for review. Our mentors are deeply familiar with the admissions process to study English at the University of Oxford, Cambridge, as well as top UK Universities such as UCL, and are well-placed to guide you through personal statement curation, the entrance exam and interview process. We may suggest a range of application tutors to choose from with slightly differing rates depending on qualifications and level of experience.

2) We typically suggest beginning with a 1.5 hour diagnostic session , where the mentor will informally assess the student’s current performance level for application, including test and interview. Following this, we issue a report with feedback, and structure a plan to best prepare.

3) U2’s approach for regular English application sessions: The main focus of tutorial sessions will be to explore material that can be discussed in the personal statement and at interview - this may sometimes stretch from A-Level standard to First Year Undergraduate. Mentors ensure each student refines their literary interests, and is exposed to a range of literary eras, approaches and new concepts, guiding students in their reading and wider subject exploration. Together, we build a case for the student, solidifying the stance and direction they will take during interview and honing skills for the ELAT if applicable.

Frequency of sessions can be decided between student and mentor. Students can take either ad hoc sessions, or we structure a full programme for preparation, which may include further co-curricular opportunities such as our research projects , English Literature summer school and Oxbridge mock interview days. Honing the skills necessary to succeed for Oxbridge ideally requires long-term preparation and mentoring presents a wonderful opportunity to learn from some of the very best Oxbridge has produced.

Sessions from £75/h + VAT.

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  • English Literature Personal Statement Examples

As an aspiring future English Literature student, writing a compelling personal statement is a crucial step in your UCAS application process . 

To help you in this process, we are presenting three exceptional English Literature personal statement examples from successful applicants who have graciously agreed to share their work with you. 

These English Literature personal statements are available to use for free as inspiration and guidance to help you craft your unique application. 

So, whether you are applying to undergraduate or postgraduate studies in English Literature, we hope that these personal statement examples will help you.

English Literature Personal Statement Example

As an avid reader and student of English Literature, I have developed a strong interest in exploring the depths of literary analysis and critical theory. My studies at A level have provided me with a firm foundation in independent research and critical thinking, which I believe are essential skills for success in the field of English Literature.

During my studies, I have delved into Shakespeare’s works, particularly “Romeo and Juliet” and “The Merchant of Venice”, using Leach Scragg’s “Discovering Shakespeare’s Meaning” to gain a more thorough understanding of the plays. Additionally, Anthony Holden’s biography of Shakespeare has helped me to appreciate the context and historical significance of his work. I have also recently begun exploring critical theory through “Literary Theory: An Anthology”, edited by Rivkin and Ryan, which has piqued my interest in further exploring the theoretical underpinnings of literature.

While my studies thus far have focused largely on modern literature, I have developed a newfound interest in the Victorian novel as a precursor to modernism. I have been particularly intrigued by the didactic, omniscient narrator and how Victorian authors grappled with issues of contemporary social change. Reading Dickens’s “Great Expectations” and Eliot’s “Middlemarch” has allowed me to explore these themes in greater depth. I am also fascinated by the expression of religious faith and doubt in Victorian post-romantic poetry, such as Arnold’s “Dover Beach” and Clough’s “The Latest Decalogue”.

In addition to my studies, I have broadened my knowledge of literature through art and French classes. In my art class, I am currently writing a critical and analytical study on the Stuckism movement, while last year I completed a project based on Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales”. My French studies have allowed me to explore foreign literature, including Pagnol’s “Jean de Florette” and “Manon des Sources”, and have given me the valuable skill of revising my thinking before speaking or writing.

My A level in Media Production and Communication has furthered my interest in linguistics, and reading Phillip Howard’s “The State of the Language” has opened my eyes to the richness and complexity of the English language. I have had the opportunity to write and edit for campus publications, and am excited about the possibility of being involved in future publications.

My love of theatre has allowed me to experience literature in a different medium. I have seen productions by the RSC and our local TOADs theatre company, and have even had a role in a university student play. Witnessing the power of live performance has inspired me to think more deeply about how literature can be brought to life.

My experiences as an English Literature student have fueled my passion for literary analysis, critical theory, and linguistic exploration. I look forward to continuing my studies and pursuing a career in the field of English Literature.

English Literature Personal Statement Example for UCAS

As a student of history and French, I have always been fascinated by the power of language and how it shapes our understanding of the world. My studies have given me a deep appreciation for the nuances of language and how different linguistic structures can convey complex ideas and emotions. This enthusiasm has led me to explore the English language and literature in greater depth, and to seek out opportunities to engage with the works of some of the most influential writers of the past century.

One of the most inspiring experiences I have had in this regard was my invitation to attend the Global Young Leaders Conference in Seattle. This event brought together young people from around the world to explore the challenges and opportunities facing our global community. Through a series of lectures, workshops, and interactive sessions, we were able to engage with a wide range of topics, from environmental sustainability and social justice to entrepreneurship and leadership. For me, the most memorable aspect of the conference was the opportunity to discuss the role of literature in shaping our understanding of these issues. Through these conversations, I came to appreciate the power of literature not only as a tool for self-expression and personal growth but also as a means of fostering empathy and understanding across cultures and communities.

Two writers who have had a particularly profound impact on my thinking in this regard are George Orwell and Mark Twain. Orwell’s life and work, in particular, have greatly interested me. His experiences in the Spanish Civil War and his reflections on the nature of power and authority in modern society have helped to shape my own political and social beliefs. Likewise, Twain’s irreverent wit and his keen observations of human behaviour have challenged me to think critically about the world around me. Through these writers, I have come to appreciate how literature can help us to navigate the complexities of our own lives and the world at large.

My academic background also reflects my passion for English literature. I have A-levels in English literature, history, and biology, which have given me a broad range of skills and knowledge that I believe will be useful in pursuing further studies in this field. In particular, my studies in biology have given me an appreciation for how scientific thinking can inform our understanding of literature, from how we interpret and analyze language to the psychological and neurological processes that underpin our reading experiences.

As I look to the future, I am excited by the prospect of further exploring the intersections between language, literature, and society. I believe that studying English literature will not only deepen my understanding of the world around me but also equip me with the skills and insights needed to make meaningful contributions to my community and beyond. I am eager to engage with the works of writers both past and present, to explore how language and literature can help us to grapple with the most pressing issues of our time, and to contribute to the ongoing conversation about the role of the humanities in shaping our collective future.

Personal Statement For English Literature

I always had a passion for literature, and pursuing an English Literature degree seemed like a natural choice for me. From a young age, I have been fascinated by the way words can be woven together to create complex narratives and powerful emotions. Through my studies in A-level English Literature and Media, I have developed my analytical thinking and gained a deeper understanding of classic works of literature as well as diverse media forums.

One of the things that set me apart from other students is my ability to communicate effectively through my writing skills. I have always been drawn to the written word and have a talent for expressing my thoughts and ideas clearly and concisely. Whether it’s through essays, creative writing, or journalism, I am confident in my ability to use language to convey my message.

Throughout my academic journey, I have also been involved in various extra-curricular activities. One of my proudest achievements was organizing an entire show for 19th Century History Month, which required me to draw on my creativity and organizational skills. This experience taught me the value of teamwork, communication, and dedication, which are all essential skills that I will carry with me throughout my future endeavours.

In addition to my extra-curricular activities, I was also selected as head girl in my primary school, where I was responsible for maintaining discipline and providing leadership to my peers. This experience allowed me to develop my interpersonal skills and learn the importance of empathy and understanding when working with others.

I had the opportunity to intern with a secondary school newspaper for two years, where I honed my journalism skills and gained valuable experience in the field. I learned the importance of accurate research, effective communication, and engaging storytelling, which are all essential skills that will serve me well in my future career.

My passion for English Literature, combined with my skills in communication, organization, and leadership, make me a strong candidate for a degree in English Literature. I am excited about the opportunity to continue my academic journey and explore the endless possibilities that the world of literature has to offer.

Recommended for further reading:

  • How to Write a Personal Statement for a Master’s
  • How to Write a Personal Statement for a PhD
  • UCAS Personal Statement: A Writing Guide And Tips For Success
  • Tips for Writing a Personal Statement for the University
  • How to Write a Personal Statement That Stands Out
  • UCAS Application: Process and Deadlines Explained in Details
  • Personal Statement Examples UK

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  • Oct 6, 2020

Oxbridge Practical Personal Statements Tips

By Chantale Davies

english lit oxford personal statement

Personal statements can be frustrating and certainly daunting when it is your first attempt at writing one. What is a personal statement? Think of it as a short essay that best expresses you, a chance to show what you enjoy about your subject and why, and make you stand out to any university you apply to amidst hundreds and thousands of other UCAS applications. Not many people applying to university for the first time will have ever written a personal statement (I certainly had not), so it can seem like a real challenge. Luckily, there are plenty of resources to help you write your personal statement, and plenty of places to find advice. Here are some practical tips for writing your personal statement.

Firstly, I suggest reading example personal statements. There are many available online, and some universities even have personal statements from past students available for prospective applicants to read. If you have time, you can even read some personal statements for different courses. This will help you familiarise yourself with the format, structure, and style of different personal statements, and can help you find your own style and structure as you begin to write your personal statement. However, do not plagiarise or copy from online examples – universities want to get to know you, after all. Research some personal statements do’s & don’ts to familiarise yourself with what is expected from a personal statement.

The best advice that I have ever received regarding writing my personal statement was to write a list of all my past accomplishments and extracurricular activities. For example, as I was writing a personal statement for English Language & Literature, I felt it important to mention some subject-related accomplishments, such as attending summer schools, and co-running a creative writing club in secondary school. Creating a list of everything I had done during my school years (outside of the classroom especially) helped me narrow down what I wanted to include, what I was proud of, and made it easier to find suitable achievements to spruce up my personal statement and make me stand out.

If you are applying to Oxford or Cambridge, try to keep extracurricular activities and accomplishments reserved for the end of your personal statement, unless it is something linked to your academic subject – Oxford and Cambridge do not place as great a significance on extracurriculars as other universities, but you can still mention them at the end or link them to your subject.

Keeping a book journal, like keeping a list of achievements, accomplishments, and extracurricular activities, can help you add to your personal statement too, especially for English Language & Literature, and other similar subjects. My book journal was small, only containing a list of books that I had read between Spring and Summer with a short description of what I remembered best about each book – but those short descriptions were crucial to developing my personal statement as I could discuss more aspects of what I particularly enjoyed about English and showed my chosen universities that I had read beyond my subjects at school. Like the list of accomplishments and extracurriculars, you can refer to the book journal if you need to reflect on your chosen subject, if you do not have many extracurriculars or achievements you want to share, and if you are ever stuck about what you could mention.

Of course, try to mention books that are related to the course that you are applying for. You should also try to read around your subject – think of what you like to read and study most within your subject and try to find more in-depth knowledge outside of the classroom. This does not always mean reading lots of books, however; podcasts, documentaries, trips to museums and reputable journals can also be good resources for developing your knowledge independently.

Finally, begin writing the first draft of your personal statement early (if possible). As I was applying to Oxford, I wrote my first draft in early summer and redrafted at the end of summer.By doing this, you will have one or two drafts prepared before you are back to school and will likely be ready to redraft again. If this is not possible, try to write a draft as soon as you can – beginning your personal statement as early as possible can save you from the stress of rushing to write it before the UCAS deadline, and will put you at ease during the rest of the UCAS application process.

Additionally, share drafts of your personal statement with your teachers, friends, and family – anyone who will give you feedback on what you can improve. My teachers helped a lot with all my personal statement problems; whether it was too long, too short, if I had made any grammatical errors or had left out a crucial paragraph.

Above all, especially if you are applying to Oxford or Cambridge, remember that your personal statement is only one aspect of the application process. Do your best, write as many drafts of your personal statement as it takes to feel confident in your UCAS application, but feel reassured that it is not the only part of the application process. It is a good chance to stand out and set yourself apart from many other applicants, but it can take many redrafts to get there, so take courage and do not lose hope. Good luck writing your personal statements!

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12 Personal Statement FAQs and answers!

There is often a large amount of confusion surrounding how to write personal statements, especially when it comes to oxford and cambridge and other top research universities., every year, we have thousands of students ask us what qualities go into making a successful personal statement., to help, we have broken down this question into 12 of the most frequently asked questions our prospective students ask when they are trying to draft their personal statements., 1. how do i write the introduction.

Introductions are often disappointingly generic. To help you achieve more specificity and concision, the best way to write a good personal statement introduction is to complete the rest of it first. When you are getting started on the first draft, it can be overwhelming to begin at a blank page, but discussing your achievements and interests – relevant to the courses and universities you are applying to – can help you clarify what your motivation to study the subject really is. Then you can come back and explain the reasons behind your passion for Mathematics, Anglo Saxon literature or your subject of choice.

2. How many books should I talk about?

This question can be answered in various ways depending on the subject you intend to study. Clinical scientific subjects will not require many book mentions, however, Arts and Humanities personal statements for Oxbridge see a great benefit from discussing at least two books in detail, with further reading mentioned.

It’s also important to remember that academic sources shouldn’t be only limited to books. A well-rounded personal statement discusses specific theories, touches on lectures you have attended or essays and articles you have read to gain a better understanding of specific academic points rather than a general discussion. One of the biggest pitfalls students fall into when drafting Oxbridge personal statements is getting stuck waffling about general points around a subject of interest. To avoid getting stuck in general chatter, try to use only specific examples in your personal statement.

Centrally, admissions tutors want to see that you know you are getting yourself in for. Only reading a couple of books from their introductory list will therefore not tantalise them; try to follow your interests in a bit more depth and look at readings and ideas which are representative of degree level material.

3. What do I do if I have no work experience?

Referencing work experience in your personal statement is dependent on the subject you intend to study. A rule of thumb is to ask yourself whether you think an academic in the faculty you are applying to will think your work experience was relevant for the course. If you are applying to study History, for example, your two-weeks at an accounting or law firm organising files will be of little interest.

For Medicine, work experience is integral not only to the application process but will help build a strong personal statement. When applying to a vocational subject such as Medicine, where possible you should always ensure you are able to reference at least one work experience placement held. If you don’t have any work experience and your personal statement is due, make sure to arrange some and refer to this in the future tense in your personal statement when talking about your upcoming placement.

Work experience can also be useful for other more vocation-leaning subjects, such as architecture and engineering. More widely, doing work experience is extremely useful to help you begin thinking about what you might want to do with your career, and can build highly useful skills, but, unless it is relevant to the course content, it is unlikely to proffer you any credit for university admission.

4. How long should I talk about extra-curricular activities?

Leading research universities are looking for your potential to succeed on the course you are applying for. Nevertheless, two applicants who seem academically matched might be distinguished from each other by their ability to balance their time with several other things. Do include what you do outside of academia, then, but keep non-relevant activities mentioned to a minimum rather than an exhaustive list. This might mean sacrificing some of the things you do outside of your course and focus on those few things you do most often, or to the highest level. (N.B. Your reference might be able to discuss some of your extra-curricular activities too, and you don’t want to overlap this material).

What you do mention, try to link to your subject. This might be easy, as with an English literature student who has directed lots of theatre, or less easy, such as a maths applicant who plays the violin to a high level. Nevertheless, making these links convincingly can bring originality and creativity to your statement.

5. How can I tailor it for different courses?

Subjects like HSPS at Cambridge or Classical Archaeology and Ancient History at Oxford might make it tricky to tailor your statement for different courses. Oxford and Cambridge are very understanding of this, and specific guidance can usually be found on faculty websites about their expectations.

However, as a rule of thumb, focus on the areas of convergence between the courses you are applying for. If these differ in title, then avoid stating the title of the course in your statement and instead refer to the disciplinary area or focus instead. This involves: a) making sure the courses you are applying for are sufficiently similar to give you a chance of doing this, and b) doing your research on the course content and options so that you are covering the appropriate material.

This research stands even if you are applying for the same titled course everywhere. English, for example, is taught very differently at Oxford to Bristol, and focusing on an interest which does not feature in either course will result in your application being put aside.

Doing this research early can also help you to direct your reading and research to build material for your personal statement which speaks to all your choices.

6. How should I talk about my other A-level subjects?

Lots of students are told to discuss the skills they have gathered from their A Level subjects, but we caution around this; your UCAS application includes a full list of A-Level subjects studied, and your school reference will discuss your A-Level abilities. Talking about the time management or analytical skills you gained from studying history, and the logical skills you gained from physics, can therefore come across as ‘fodder’ which could have already been inferred.

You can, however, talk about how other subjects provide further insight into the course or subject you’d like to study. For example, students who have taken Classics that intend to study English Literature at university can talk about translating texts, such as the Aeneid, and how this helped gain a greater understanding of classical influence in modern English Literature. As with the whole statement, the more specific you can make this, the better.

7. How long should it be?

This is an easy one. Your personal statement should be at most, 4,000 characters or 47 lines, whichever you meet first. Although it can be shorter, we strongly recommend taking full advantage of the available space. Ideally, you want your first draft to be much longer so you can cut down and edit your personal statement to be shorter, rather than using general waffle or struggling to fill the space.

Cutting it down is usually relatively easy, but it might take an outside eye to see the ‘wood from the trees’. Any non-relevant, generic material, anything which is likely to be in many other statements, and frilly, decorative language or repetition can all be chopped down.

If you find you are struggling to reach 4,000 characters or 47 lines, you probably need to revisit the body of your personal statement and discuss more subject-specific content. You may, alternatively, need to go back to the research and reading phase of writing.

8. What formatting should I use?

The final version of your personal statement will be submitted in a digital form with no formatting options, so there is no need to worry about formatting. That means you won’t have to decide what font or colour to use and there is no need for styles such as bold or italics. If you do include these, they won’t appear in the submitted version.

Your school should already have discussed best practice for writing your personal statement but as a reminder – do not write your statement draft in the real form! As with any content that is going to be submitted digitally, you should write it in a word document first (Microsoft Office, Google Docs, Pages, etc) where you can save a copy locally to your computer (and back-up regularly). This way, you can avoid the devastating loss of your best statement draft due to an accidental refresh or the internet dropping out.

9. How many paragraphs should it be?

There is no set-in-stone rule for the number of paragraphs but generally, a well-structured personal statement will be broken up into five or six paragraphs and be easy to read. Admissions tutors will need to comprehend your statement very quickly, so structure with this in mind.

A frequently-successful structure follows this pattern: an introduction, two to three course/subject-specific main paragraphs, a penultimate paragraph detailing your extracurricular activities, and then a final summary paragraph. The final two paragraphs are sometimes pushed together to form one.

10. Will they find out if I slightly…exaggerate my talents?

Yes! Your personal statement for Oxford and Cambridge should be considered a springboard for your interview and you could and should expect to be questioned about any single detail of it. At Oxbridge Applications, every year, we have students that approach us in January who are upset that their Admissions Tutor spent 20 minutes focused on a certain author when “I only mentioned that book briefly as a side note”.

However, you DON’T need to be an expert, or even particularly knowledgeable, about a particular idea or author to mention it in your statement. If you are questioned about an aspect of an author’s work you have mentioned which you are unsure about, then be intellectually honest and say so, but try your best to have a go given what you already know about them or similar authors/ideas.

This is not only the case for authors/books mentioned, but also if you put forward a highly ambitious or critical view in your statement. If you want to argue that Marx was totally wrong, then you better be ready to defend your view in a nuanced way. The bottom line is: stay intellectually honest and err on the side of modesty; academics tend to become less rather than more sure about the ‘truth’ the further they delve into their subject matter.

11. How many teachers should check my personal statement?

Preferably, you will get your drafted personal statement checked by at last two of your teachers or guidance advisers. One should be subject-specific who can check over the content of your paragraphs and the other can be from a different department to provide feedback on grammatical accuracy and quality of the statement.

Getting guidance from second and third parties can be useful ensure you retain editorial control, and that your voice and taste runs through the statement. If you try to include everyone’s different opinion, you can quickly end up with a jumbled statement that no longer reflects on you and your communication style and strengths.

Make sure you leave plenty of time between completing your first draft and the Oxbridge personal statement deadline ensuring you have time for others to check it over and you can make changes as necessary.

12. Should I start my personal statement with a quote?

‘Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.’ Oscar Wilde.

How much have you learned about me from reading Wilde’s words?

Quotes are used each year by applicants who end up getting offers from top universities, including Oxford and Cambridge. It’s not necessarily going to bring your application to an end. Quotes are also awarded marks in certain A Level subjects, if you have taken the time to remember them and give them a bit of context.

However, your personal statement gives admissions tutors the chance to hear your voice, and to get a sense of what you might be like as a student on their course. By definition , using a quote – i.e. someone else’s words – is not personal. It is therefore preferable to avoid using a quote unless it’s absolutely essential. Using a quote doesn’t make YOU sound more interesting.

Before you decide to use a quote, think long and hard. If you would really like to use a quote, try to make it as pithy and concise as possible, and make sure it elevates and builds on what you are saying; that it expresses something you couldn’t have otherwise expressed on your own. (Also, by ‘quote’, we are not talking about specific concepts or theories – these are absolutely fine to include.)

Driven by 20 years of research and first-hand experience in guiding thousands of applicants, our consultations provide an honest and detailed assessment with guidance on individual personal statements.

If you would like to speak to one of our oxbridge-graduate advisors about your own personal statement, contact our oxbridge advising team on  +44 (0)207499 2394 , email at [email protected] , or request a callback  to discuss your situation., explore oxbridge applications, request a callback, application resources, related content, essential tips for oxbridge interviews, how to create a positive space for study, admissions tests: the thinking skills assessment (tsa).

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Writing Oxford English Literature Personal Statement for University

Table of Contents

There is no one-size-fits-all approach when writing a personal statement for Oxford University’s English Literature course. It is vital to be unique and tell your story in a way that captures the reader’s attention.

This post will provide helpful tips on writing an effective Oxford English Literature Personal Statement . This way, you can be unique and get noticed by admissions officers.

What Is an Oxford English Literature Personal Statement?

An Oxford English Literature Personal Statement is a document that you submit with your university application. It is an opportunity to demonstrate your interest in the course . And explain why you have chosen it and show how you are suited to the course.

You should focus on conveying what makes you unique. Also, demonstrate why the Oxford University English Literature course can benefit from having you as a student.

Tips for Writing Your Oxford Literature Personal Statement

open book lot

1. Highlight Your Interests and Passions

When writing your statement, highlight your interests and passions within the literature. Use examples of books or authors you’ve read during your studies that have inspired or influenced your writing style and ideas about literature. Additionally, discuss any experiences related to English Literature that you have had, such as attending a play or engaging in discussions about literature.

2. Demonstrate Your Knowledge

 Showcase your knowledge of the history and development of English literature by referencing important authors, works, and periods within the field. Make sure to explain how each author has shaped your understanding of literature and why their work is relevant to today’s society.

3. Mention Research Projects

If you have researched English Literature – such as writing an essay or dissertation – make sure to mention it in your personal statement. By doing this, you will demonstrate that you have the required skills necessary for studying at Oxford University.

4. Showcase Your Personal Qualities

Use your personal statement to reflect on qualities such as motivation, confidence, and self-discipline that make you an ideal candidate for the course. Explain how these qualities will help you excel in an Oxford English Literature course.

5. Conclude With a Vision

End your personal statement by concluding with a vision for your future. Explain why this particular course appeals to you and what goals you hope to achieve upon graduation. This will show admissions officers that you are determined and passionate about studying English literature at Oxford University.

Example of Oxford English Literature Personal Statement

I have been an avid reader of English literature since I was a young child. This led me to pursue the subject at college and university. Reading books by authors such as Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, and George Orwell has enriched my understanding of literature. And its relevance in today’s society. My passion for studying English Literature is also demonstrated through my dedication to researching related topics. For example, I wrote an essay about the effects of censorship on works by 18th-century authors. This course is particularly appealing to me because it will allow me to hone my research skills. It also lets me explore new ideas related to the field. With determination and dedication, I am confident that I can make the most of this course and contribute to Oxford University’s English Literature department.

What Kind of Formatting Should I Use?

The website will submit your final version of your personal statement as digital form with no formatting options. You won’t have to worry about formatting. You won’t have to decide what font or color to use, and you won’t need to choose bold or italics styles.

How Many Paragraphs Should It Have?

While there are no formal rules for the number of paragraphs, a well-structured personal statement tends to be divided. It should be according to five or six paragraphs and easy to read. Admission tutors will need to comprehend your statement very quickly, so structure this statement with this in mind.

Is There a Chance They’ll Find Out If I…overstate My Talents?

Your personal statement for Oxford and Cambridge should serve as a springboard for your interview. It should be expected to be questioned about any detail of it. At Oxbridge Applications, every year, students approach them in January. They complain that their Admissions Tutor spent 20 minutes focusing on a particular author. They claim “I only mentioned that book briefly as a side note.”

The above examples demonstrate how to write an effective Oxford English Literature personal statement. It is essential to showcase your passion for the subject and explain why you are interested in it .

Outline what qualities you possess that make you an ideal candidate for the course. With careful consideration and effort, your personal statement can be unique from other applicants and get you accepted into this prestigious university. Good luck!

Writing Oxford English Literature Personal Statement for University

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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Suggested Subject Resources

Whether you need inspiration for your personal statement, something to think about before your interview or whether you are simply intellectually curious, you might find the suggested reading and resources below useful and entertaining. They are intended to give you an idea of the kind of material you might engage with during a course at Oxford. We've also included links to the University's current research to give you an idea of how academic research can impact upon society. 

Remember, these are only suggestions for further reading, so please don't feel restricted to only reading what we recommend! We have also compiled the best of our cross-curricular digital resources to support learning and exploration in our Digital Resource Hub . 

You can also enjoy an insight into what it's like to study at Oxford by exploring our free podcasts and videos. These include public lectures covering a wide range of subjects, plus teaching resources, interviews with leading academics, and more. You can watch and listen on your computer, or download files via our  podcasts page .

You may also like to have a look at our Medium channel for articles about Oxford research, covering topics from the weirdest plants in the Botanical Garden to how to teach a computer to recognise your cat. 

Archaeology and Anthropology

Suggested reading for Archaeology and Anthropology .

You may also like to take a look at the website Discover Anthropology .

Oxford research: 

  • Reconnecting Indigenous Nations with their Material Heritage
  • Who Needs Migrant Workers
  • Endangered Archaeology video  

Biochemistry (Molecular and Cellular)

Read the  recommended reading list for Biochemistry. 

At present we do not produce a reading list for students applying for Biology but we encourage you to read New Scientist , National Geographic or any other Biology materials which you find interesting.

  • Putting ticks on the map
  • Poetry in motion
  • Defeating dengue with GM mosquitoes
  • The loneliness of the long-distance seabird
  • Balancing conservation and commerce in the world’s forests
  • The surprising uses of silk
  • Bringing back the large blue butterfly - Jeremy Thomas
  • Preserving Endangered Trees: A Chilean case study 
  • Jatropha Curcas in the Global Race for Biofuels
  • Peru's Data Collectors
  • Researching the Reef: fish and coral of the Caribbean

Biomedical Sciences

Introductory Reading for Biomedical Sciences .

  • Bringing together universities, industry and the NHS to benefit people in the Oxfordshire region and beyond
  • Restoring Sight With Gene Therapy
  • Cooling babies to save lives
  • Innovative genomics
  • Helping diabetes sufferers
  • Transforming the diagnosis of Tuberculosis
  • Mending broken hearts
  • The million women study
  • Helping the brain to control Parkinson’s
  • Combining cultures
  • Preventing strokes

Research videos: 

  • The TOBY Trial - Cooling Babies  
  • Tackling and tracking TB through DNA analysis
  • "Bionic eye" trial in Oxford  
  • Fighting Arthritis: the development of anti-TNF therapies  
  • The Paternal Age Effect: Identifying reproductive risks 

Introductory reading for Chemistry .

You may also like to read Chemistry World magazine , and view other resources from the Royal Society of Chemistry .

  • Turning orange into grapefruit
  • Fuel cells inspired by nature video
  • Chemistry in the garden video

Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

There is no reading list for students applying for Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, as we encourage students to engage with whatever they find interesting about the ancient world. If you are interested in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, this will include the historical and archaeological evidence through which we learn about that world.

As well as visiting your local museum, or other museums, you may wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to historical and archaeological materials, such as the British Museum or Oxford’s own Ashmolean Museum's collection highlights , or the BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome .

There are also many social media sites which you can join such as Classics Confidential, Classics Outreach and Classics International.

  • Classics for the people
  • Endangered archaeology video
  • Conserving by copying: 3D Printing Tutankhamun's Tomb video

There is no reading list for students applying for Classics, as we encourage students to read as widely as possible about any Classics materials they find interesting (in literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, and/or philology), and to think critically about their reading. You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the British Museum or the BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from  Ancient Greece  and  Ancient Rome .

Classics and English

There is no reading list for students applying for Classics, as we encourage students to read as widely as possible about any Classics materials they find interesting (in literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, and/or philology), and to think critically about their reading. You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the  British Museum  or the  BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from  Ancient Greece  and  Ancient Rome .

For the English Literature element of the course, we recommend that you read as widely as possible, and think critically about all the texts – literary or not – that you read. Read more about this in our  examples of interview questions . You can find literary resources on our  Great Writers Inspire site . You may also like to look at literary websites and listen to radio programs such as BBC Radio 4's ' In Our Time '.

  • Dramatic research
  • Making Britain
  • Digitising Jane Austen's fiction manuscripts
  • On the joy of not rehearsing Shakespeare video

Classics and Modern Languages

There is no reading list for students applying for Classics, as we encourage students to read as widely as possible about any Classics materials they find interesting (in literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, and/or philology), and to think critically about their reading. You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the  British Museum  or the  BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from  Ancient Greece  and  Ancient Rome . There are also many social media sites which you can join such as Classics Confidential, Classics Outreach and Classics International. 

Please view the guidance on the FAQs section of the  Modern Languages faculty website  under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages: 

  • Modern Greek
  • Shedding new light on Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin
  • Writing Brecht, living well

Classics and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

There is no reading list for students applying for Classics, as we encourage students to read as widely as possible about any Classics materials they find interesting (in literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, and/or philology), and to think critically about their reading.

You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the  British Museum  or the  BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from  Ancient Greece  and  Ancient Rome .

Suggested reading for Asian and Middle Eastern Studies can be found on the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies website by following the relevant links below:

  • BA in Arabic
  • BA in Sanskrit
  • BA in Persian
  • BA in Turkish
  • Recreating an experience of ancient Egypt
  • Helping the UK understand China

Computer Science

Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Computer Science can be found on the departmental website.

You may also like to look at our GeomLab website which will introduce you to some of the most important ideas in computer programming in an interactive, visual way through a guided activity.

  • Securing the internet of the future
  • Putting out ‘Digital Wildfires’ before they take hold
  • The friendly face of robots
  • Safety by design
  • Computers at the heart of the matter
  • 60 Years of Computer Science
  • Oxford and Cybersecurity 1 – the Internet and Policy
  • Oxford and Cybersecurity 2 – Trusted Computing
  • Oxford and Cybersecurity 3 – The Academic Edge

Computer Science and Philosophy

Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Computer Science can be found on the departmental website.

There are many introductions to philosophy: Myles Burnyeat and Ted Honderich’s ‘Philosophy’ as it is a very useful collection. Martin Hollis ‘An Invitation to Philosophy’ and Simon Blackburn’s ‘Think’ are also recommended but feel free to pick up any introductory or beginners’ text.

Earth Sciences

At present we do not produce a reading list for students applying for Earth Sciences but we encourage you to read New Scientist , National Geographic or any other relevant materials which you find interesting.

  • Preserving an exceptional fossil site for future generations
  • Understanding oil-rich strata
  • Influencing global policy on mercury
  • Reducing toxic mercury emissions video
  • Tracking Life 40 Degrees South video
  • Volcano hunting, Italy to Peru video

Economics and Management

An indispensable introduction to economic analysis, both for those who have not studied it at school and for those who have is ‘The Economist’ or the Economics pages of newspapers. Paul Krugman’s writings are highly recommended. Begg, Fischer and Dornbusch’s ‘Economics’ is one of the introductory textbooks widely used at Oxford.

You can find the Economics reading list and Management reading list  online. 

Oxford research:

  • The value of mutuality
  • Geometry to the rescue
  • Research led to Supreme Court ruling on removal of UK employment tribunal fees video
  • The surprising uses of auctions video

Engineering Science

At present we do not produce a reading list for students applying for Engineering Science but we encourage you to read any relevant materials which you find interesting. Here are some online resources you may like to use to test your knowledge:

  • Isaac Physics :  this website contains lots of maths and physics problem solving questions.
  • British Physics Olympiad : this website contains lots of past papers and solutions of problem solving type questions.
  • Next time, education centre : this website contains some quite fun questions designed to make you think about physical concepts.
  • I want to study Engineering : this website is just as useful for all applicants not just those applying to engineering.
  • Brilliant.org : this website has some resources to test your mathematical and physics knowledge.
  • Providing the technology for ‘space refrigerators’
  • Improving hospitals’ ‘early warning’ systems
  • Data scientists to the rescue
  • Driverless cars video
  • Delivering drugs better - using sound video

English Language and Literature

English and modern languages.

Please visit the guidance on the FAQs section of the  Modern Languages faculty website  under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages: 

European and Middle Eastern Languages

Please visit the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How can I prepare myself for the entrance procedure?'. This advice can be applied to both the European and the Middle Eastern elements of the course. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages:

Suggested reading for Asian and Middle Eastern Studies can be found on the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies website by following the relevant links below:

Experimental Psychology

Please view the  suggested reading for Experimental Psychology. This document also includes reading suggestions for those interested in the Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics course.

Research videos:

  • Improving Access to Psychological Therapies: Using evidence to change policy
  • Spread the word
  • How people with depression see faces
  • From the Minds of Babes: New frontiers in paediatric pain

The following list is suggested as a starting point and is not exhaustive and nor does it mean that you must read these. 

  • Barthes, Roland , Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography  (Vintage) 
  • Crow, Thomas, The Rise of the Sixties: American and European Art in the Era of Dissent  (Everyman )
  • Stallabrass, Julian, Contemporary Art: A Very Short Introductions  (Oxford University Press) 
  • Smith, Terry, Contemporary Art: World Currents (Laurence King Publishing)

We strongly encourage all students to attend exhibitions and look at art works as much as possible. Public art galleries like Tate Modern, the Whitechapel, and the Serpentine in London, the Ikon in Birmingham, the Liverpool Tate, the Whitworth in Manchester, the Baltic in Gateshead, the Arnolfini in Bristol, and Tramway in Glasgow are all excellent places to see contemporary art and to find out more about it.

Other excellent resources include:

  • the UK-wide exhibition listings
  • the online edition of the US journal Artforum  
  • the excellent repository of moving image and sound art, called UBU Web

It is also a good idea to look at journals such as:

An indispensable introduction to contemporary issues in Geography is the Royal Geographical Society 'Geographical Magazine'. Reading 'The Economist' is also highly recommended.

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  • Stopping floods on the cheap: A success story from Yorkshire

The best way to prepare for a History degree is to read the history books which interest you, either related to your school work or ranging beyond it – and be prepared to discuss your views of those books and their arguments.  To find such material, you might want to follow up on references made in your school or college text books, or your History teacher may also be able to recommend particular works for you to read on topics that you find most interesting.

One good way of broadening your historical horizons is to read one of the popular History magazines: History Today or BBC History , which has weekly podcasts . You may like to look at the books which are being reviewed in the quality press.

You may also like to explore the websites of public institutions which have excellent links to historical materials, such as the British Museum or BBC Radio 4 archives .

Lastly, delving into some historical sources can be a great way to develop your ideas and understanding. You could try exploring literature, art, music or even films produced by different societies, and consider what these can tell us about the people of that time.

  • Looking back to understand the recent economic crisis

History (Ancient and Modern)

There is no reading list for students applying for Ancient and Modern History, as we encourage students to read as widely as possible about any period of history, ancient and/or modern, that they find interesting. (View 'History' above). For the ancient world, you may also wish to explore websites which have excellent links to historical materials, such as the British Museum or Oxford’s own Ashmolean Museum , the BBC Radio 4 archives , for example for the programme ‘In Our Time', covering material from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome .

History and Economics

An indispensable introduction to economic analysis, both for those who have not studied it at school and for those who have is ‘ The Economist ’ or the Economics pages of newspapers. Paul Krugman’s writings are highly recommended. Begg, Fischer and Dornbusch’s ‘Economics ’ is one of the introductory textbooks widely used at Oxford.

History and English

One good way of broadening your historical horizons is to read one of the popular History magazines:  History Today  or  BBC History , which has  weekly podcasts . You may like to look at the books which are being reviewed in the quality press. You may also like to explore the websites of public institutions which have excellent links to historical materials, such as the  British Museum  or  BBC Radio 4 archives . Lastly, delving into some historical sources can be a great way to develop your ideas and understanding. You could try exploring literature, art, music or even films produced by different societies, and consider what these can tell us about the people of that time.

History and Modern Languages

Please visit the guidance on the FAQs section of the  Modern Languages faculty website  under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages:

History and Politics

Politics is a very wide-ranging subject. In addition to newspapers and weeklies, Jonathan Wolff’s 'An Introduction to Political Philosophy' is recommended; and also, for interesting and up-to-date insights into recent political developments in a number of countries, the series of texts produced by Macmillan publishers at regular intervals called ‘Developments in British (French, German, East European etc.) Politics’ .

One good way of broadening your historical horizons is to read one of the popular History magazines:  History Today  or  BBC History , which has  weekly podcasts . You may like to look at the books which are being reviewed in the quality press.

You may also like to explore the websites of public institutions which have excellent links to historical materials, such as the  British Museum  or  BBC Radio 4 archives .

History of Art

A reading list for prospective applicants to History of Art can be found on the History of Art departmental website .

You may also find it interesting to explore the following resources:

  • BBC Radio 4 'In Our Time' - Culture archive
  • BBC Arts coverage

Human Sciences

Introductory reading lists can be found on the Institute of Human Sciences website .

  • Who needs migrant workers

We recommend that you start by reading the court reports in broad sheet newspapers.

As the reading lists for the degree course change each year it isn't always advisable to buy text books in advance, but you may find one or more of the books from this list useful when preparing your application Introductory reading for Law . It can be useful to look at the list of law academics on the departmental website and follow the links to their latest publications. All lecturers have their own lists, which change from year to year and include books and journal articles.

You may also like to read the BBC's website Law in Action , and download their podcasts. Other recommendation are the Guardian's law pages and the Counsel magazine .

  • Research led to Supreme Court ruling on removal of UK employment tribunal fees
  • Tackling Adolescent to Parent Violence
  • Research in Westminster: Human Rights law and the treatment of rape victims

Materials Science

There is no set text and students should read widely around the subject. Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Materials Science can be found on the departmental website.

Students may also wish to read the New Scientist magazine which may be available in your school or local library.

Running an internet search on Nanoscience or Nanotechnology will give useful background information in the sciences. Here are some further resources to test your knowledge:

  • Isaac Physics :  This website contains lots of maths and physics problem solving questions.
  • British Physics Olympiad : This website contains lots of past papers and solutions of problem solving type questions.
  • Next time : This website contains some quite fun questions designed to make you think about physical concepts.
  • I want to study Engineering : This website is just as useful for all applicants not just those applying to engineering.
  • Brilliant.org : This website has some resources to test your mathematical and physics knowledge.

Oxford research:  

  • A new material for reconstructive surgery

Mathematics

Reading lists for prospective Mathematics applicants can be found on page 12 of the departmental prospectus, available to download from the Maths Department website .

  • Influencing HIV/AIDS policy in India through mathematical modelling
  • Helping the ‘Greeks’ to run faster
  • Mathematics in the design and manufacture of novel glass products
  • Mathematical solutions for industry
  • Sharing the beauty of networks video
  • A computer model of the heart video

Mathematics and Computer Science

Reading lists for prospective Mathematics applicants can be found on page 12 of the departmental prospectus, available to download from the  Maths Department website .

Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Computer Science can be found on the departmental website. You may also like to look at our  GeomLab website  which will introduce you to some of the most important ideas in computer programming in an interactive, visual way through a guided activity.

Mathematics and Philosophy

Reading lists for prospective Mathematics and Philosophy applicants can be found on page 18 of the departmental prospectus, available to download from the  Maths Department website .

Mathematics and Statistics

Reading lists for prospective Mathematics and Statistics applicants can be found on page 12 of the departmental prospectus, available to download from the  Maths Department website .

  • Statistical expertise in drug discovery

Prospective students for Medicine may like to start by looking at the introductory reading list below. You may also be interested in the Oxford Medical School Gazette, for more information about the Gazette and subscription offers for Sixth Form students please visit  the Medicine website .

Introductory Reading for Medicine

  • The TOBY Trial - cooling babies
  • "Bionic eye" trial in Oxford
  • Fighting Arthritis: the development of anti-TNF therapies
  • The Paternal Age Effect: Identifying reproductive risks

Modern Languages

Please view the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. You can find reading lists on the individual pages for of following languages: 

Modern Languages and Linguistics

Please visit the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages: 

You can also download the  Introductory reading list for Linguistics .

  • Improving treatment of speech disorders
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  • Voice analysis for everyone: health monitoring by phone video

Please refer to this recommended reading list for Music .

  • Medieval plainsong gets a contemporary makeover
  • Composing Opera for Children
  • Searching for Schumann video

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

Suggested reading for Asian and Middle Eastern Studies can be found on the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies website by following the relevant links below:

  • BA in Arabic
  • BA in Chinese
  • BA in Japanese
  • BA in Persian
  • BA in Turkish

Suggested reading lists for BA Egyptology and Near Eastern Studies, BA Hebrew Studies and BA Jewish Studies are currently in development and will hopefully be available in the near future.

Philosophy and Modern Languages

There are many introductions to philosophy: Myles Burnyeat and Ted Honderich’s ‘ Philosophy ’ as it is a very useful collection. Martin Hollis ‘ An Invitation to Philosophy ’ and Simon Blackburn’s ‘ Think ’ are also recommended but feel free to pick up any introductory or beginners’ text.

Please visit the guidance on the FAQs section of the  Modern Languages faculty website  under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure' for the Modern Languages element of this course. You of also find reading lists on the individual pages for the following languages: 

Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE)

We always recommend that students read widely around their subject, deepening their knowledge and understanding, to help prepare for their application. Tutors will be looking for evidence of students' academic potential, as well as their commitment and motivation for their course, so will certainly be looking for evidence that a student has really engaged with their subject, and has a passion for studying it. This is particularly important for courses like PPE, as many students will not have studied any of these three subjects at their school or college.

The very best preparation is a reasonable grasp of the workings of the social and political world in which we live. For PPEists, reading newspapers, watching TV and listening to radio news and current affairs programmes are not optional activities – they are crucial to success at the subject. Students should read a good quality daily newspaper, and ‘ The Economist ’ weekly is also highly recommended – this offers unparalleled quantity and quality analysis of current events.

Politics is a very wide-ranging subject. In addition to newspapers and weeklies, Jonathan Wolff’s ' An Introduction to Political Philosophy ' is recommended; and also, for interesting and up-to-date insights into recent political developments in a number of countries, the series of texts produced by Macmillan publishers at regular intervals called ‘ Developments in British (French, German, East European etc.) Politics ’.

An indispensable introduction to economic analysis in use both for those who have not studied it at school and for those who have is ‘ The Economist ’ or the Economics pages of newspapers. Paul Krugman’s writings are highly recommended. Begg, Fischer and Dornbusch’s ‘ Economics ’ is one of the introductory textbooks widely used at Oxford.

Oxford research:   

Philosophy and Theology

At present we do not produce a specific Theology reading list for people who are considering making an application, though we always advise prospective candidates to read beyond what they are reading in school and to explore areas that interest them.

  • Empires of Faith video

There are many suitable sources for reading. Popular science books are normally readily available at your local library, as are copies of the New Scientist or other scientific periodicals. Anything that takes your interest will be valuable; we have no set reading list.

However, for general preparation prospective candidates can view the suggestions on the Physics department website . We also recommend maths preparation .

There is also lots of information on the internet, on sites such as www.physics.org  or through some of the excellent science blogs. The University of Oxford publishes a science blog and our department also runs a project called Galaxy Zoo which is part of the Zooniverse community of projects , which allows members of the public to contribute to astrophysics research. Large scientific organisations such as CERN and NASA publish a lot of good material online, for example the Astronomy Picture of the Day website . Here are some further resources to test your Physics knowledge:

  • Isaac Physics : This website contains lots of maths and physics problem solving questions.
  • Brilliant.org : This website has some resources to test your mathematical and physics knowledge.

iTunesU can also be a very useful resource, as it has a range of physics content, from public talks to undergraduate lectures, from a variety of reputable sources.

  • Near-perfect distance measurement
  • Cheaper, smaller, super-resolution
  • To the Zooniverse and beyond
  • Particle accelerator physics for the masses
  • A revolution in solar power technology
  • How to be certain of uncertainty in climate and weather forecasts
  • How do quantum physicists affect industry? video

Physics and Philosophy

However, for general preparation prospective candidates can view the suggestions on the  Physics department website . We also recommend  maths preparation .

There is also lots of information on the internet, on sites such as  www.physics.org . or through some of the excellent science blogs. The University of Oxford publishes a  science blog  and our department also runs a project called  Galaxy Zoo  which is part of the  Zooniverse  community of projects , which allows members of the public to contribute to astrophysics research. Large scientific organisations such as CERN and NASA publish a lot of good material online, for example the  Astronomy Picture of the Day website . Here are some further resources to test your Physics knowledge:

Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics (PPL)

Please follow this link for the suggested reading list for Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics. This document also includes suggested reading for Experimental Psychology.

  • Building consensus on Developmental Language Disorder
  • Voice analysis for everyone: health monitoring by phone

Religion and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

At present we do not produce a specific Religion and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies reading list for people who are considering making an application, though we always advise prospective candidates to read beyond what they are reading in school and to explore areas that interest them.

Theology and Religion

You may also find it interesting to explore the BBC Radio 4 archives of the ' In Our Time ' program, especially the Religion and Philosophy archives .

  • Empires of Faith

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Staircase 12

Staircase 12 is an online hub of resources brought to you by University College . It's full of tips and ideas on how to stretch yourself beyond the school syllabus. So why not check out the  Reading Bank , and Resource Hub , or to find out why all this is important in the first place, check out the ‘Explore your Subject’ top tips page .

The Bookshelf

The Worcester Bookshelf project is all about sharing books that we love about our subjects with you. We suggest books that we love - you tell us what you think of them. Every term we will release a new list of six books that our tutors and academics would like to share with you. If you are in year 10, 11 or 12 at a UK state school and would like to find out more, simply email [email protected] .

Digital Resource Hub

We have compiled the best of our digital resources to support learning and exploration. These resources can help inspire you to think broadly as well as enable you to explore your passions and interests further, and to discover more about Oxford.

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English literature and creative writing personal statement example 1.

I once aspired to be a visual artist, a photographer or painter. However, I later discovered the unique ability of poetry and the written word to maintain its power and resonance in a world saturated with images and messages. The study of literature allows us to engage deeply with novels, plays and poems. Terry Eagelton states in his Theory of Literature that Literature is considered Literature because some value is attached to it by society. I wish to understand what it is we value and why, make sense of the ways people have tried to make sense of the world. I find that my other A level courses Philosophy and History are complimentary to English Literature, and provide new perspectives from which to approach the subject.

I have been writing 'seriously' for two years now, and have enjoyed some success; I was a Foyle Young Poet of the Year in both 2007 and 2008, and received the BBC Prize for Creative Writing in Southwark for a short story. Receiving these prizes lent me extra confidence in my writing, and I have since been published in a variety of poetry magazines, including Pomegranate, Young Writer, Rising, Iota and Cadaverine. I have performed some of my work in The Poetry Cafe in London, and on BBC radio. I am to be included in a forthcoming anthology on Bloodaxe, 'Voice Recognition: 21 poets for the 21st century', in which I will be the youngest poet featured. Although poetry is less popular than it has been, it is just as relevant, if not more so. It has a unique ability to communicate what other mediums cannot, often elucidating through allusion. Unfortunately, it is viewed by many as an antiquated art form; all 'thee' and 'thou'. Some believe that this is what poetry ought to be, but this is like saying all paintings ought to be Pre-Raphaelites. I try to maintain a distinctive voice that resonates outside of a 'poetic' context within my writing.

I cannot write without reading; one fuels the other. Some of my favourite writers are modernists. Hemingway is often dismissed as 'macho', telling war stories for boys, but I think this is a simplification. The Old Man and the Sea is beautifully and economically written, and I enjoy Hemingway's ability to evoke burning emotional struggles through a simple story. His choice of language is wonderful; he leaves you thinking of lavender striped fish and the lions on the beach. Fitzgerald, another favourite, writes with an elegance that makes each of his sentences a jewel. He expresses complex emotional and moral states through mundane images; 'the wretched aura of stale wine, with its inevitable suggestion of beauty gone foul.' I also find it necessary to keep up with contemporary poetry; Clare Pollard and Selima Hill are my favourites. I admire poets able to write powerfully through sparse language, and Yehuda Amichai is a prime example. If his poems were pictures, they'd be stark monochromes. For AS Level Literature I studied William Blake, and admire the dark intensity of his work, his ability to juxtapose the divine with the squalid in a subtly condemning tone.

During my internship with the poetry society in the summer of 2008, I saw the work done by the organisation to encourage fresh talent. I have also experienced first hand the benefits the Poetry Society's work in education, and this has encouraged me to pursue a career in teaching; to inspire interest in Literature in other young people. To this end, I have volunteered in both 2007 and 2008 to help as a teaching assistant in the literature summer school at my college. As a reader and a writer, I look forward to the challenges a degree course will present, but also the opportunities; to immerse myself in the slices of human experience and wealth of ideas offered to us by literature, while also developing my own skills as a writer.

Profile info

This personal statement was written by ablakemore for application in 2009.

Degree English Literature at Oxford University

ablakemore's Comments

Got me offers from all five of my choices; Oxford University, York, Warwick, Sheffield and Goldsmiths. s'alright, i found the length restrictions difficult to work within, but i suppose that's the point.

This personal statement is unrated

Related Personal Statements

Tue, 20/09/2011 - 09:26

why are you alive?

Sun, 02/10/2011 - 16:53

You sound like you've lived each of your years twice. I shudder at your feet.

Sun, 02/10/2011 - 17:22

Insanely impressive. I have a two-page note of what made your PS tick. Consider yourself dissected :).

You make me want to read your poems.

Thanks a bundle.

Mon, 10/09/2012 - 20:43

Truly refreshing after having

Fri, 09/08/2013 - 16:33

Truly refreshing after having trudled through so many dull personal statements. Not only do you seem a very able student, but an interesting person too! No wonder Oxford liked you. I liked the focus on poetry too. Good luck with your career!

Thu, 15/08/2013 - 18:28

This was so helpful, thank you so much!

I was just wondering, what

Thu, 10/07/2014 - 17:29

I was just wondering, what were your AS level and A level grades?

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Successful Personal Statement For English At Cambridge

Last Updated: 5th April 2022

Author: Rob Needleman

Table of Contents

Welcome to our popular Personal Statement series where we present a successful Personal Statement, and our Oxbridge Tutors provide their feedback on it. 

Today, we are looking through an English applicant’s Personal Statement that helped secure a place at Cambridge University. The English Course at Cambridge balances a strong grounding in literary works. Let’s see how the candidate addresses this in their Personal Statement. 

Here’s a breakdown of the Personal Statement (the applicant came very close to the 4,000 character limit):

SUCCESSFUL?

The universities this candidate applied to were the following:

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English Personal Statement

Growing up in a house where books have replaced wallpaper, acquiring a love of literature was inevitable. I love the way in which writers explore, question, and critique aspects of human nature through the presentation of their worlds and characters. My favourite pieces of writing are ones such as Levi’s ‘Order on the Cheap’, Gogol’s ‘The Overcoat’ or Hartley’s ‘The Go Between’, where a particular human tendency is both beautifully presented and meticulously analysed. In his short story, Levi explores curiosity by invoking that of his audience: readers become distracted by the narrator’s descriptions of his experiments and overlook their morally problematic side. Hartley employs an opposite technique, allowing the reader to be often sharply aware of the innocence and naivety of the protagonist. Gogol manipulates the reader even more, invoking a painful sense of pathos around the main character whilst at the same time daring us to find Akaky’s concerns a little ridiculous.

I have to admit, however, that I am drawn to Levi’s short story not only because of its literary merits, but also because I sympathise with its main character: a man driven by his fascination with the process of creation. My favourite parts of my Chemistry A level were the ‘practicals’; I derived great excitement from the process of taking a simple substance, subjecting it to particular conditions, and thereby creating a completely different, and often much more complex, chemical. In ‘The Monkey’s Wrench’ Levi seems to emulate the same process in his development of the character of Tino. Starting from a simple first picture Tino is slowly developed, snippet by snippet, as the stories progress, until a fully evolved character finally emerges.

I find it fascinating how unexpected links can suddenly emerge between works: reading around a set text, Murakami’s ‘Blind Willow Sleeping Woman’, I read his ‘Kafka on the Shore’, which led me to read some of Kafka’s short stories, including ‘The Penal Colony’ and ‘A Country Doctor’. Whilst the works of the two writers are in many ways extremely different, I noticed some stylistic similarities. Both present protagonists whose apparently unexceptional lives are suddenly interrupted by a series of unexplained fantastical events. These events are often a metaphor for a wider-reaching process in the life of the narrator.

But without a doubt, poetry has always been my favourite form of literature: I like listening to poems or reading them aloud, appreciating their rhythm and sound, before going back and analysing them. Some of my favourite poems are those in which the sound is almost as important as the words themselves, for example, Lawrence’s ‘Ship of Death’ or Frost’s ‘After Apple Picking’. In this vein, I have a YouTube channel on which I post my readings of various poems, and have also earned at least several pence through poetry busking in the streets of Waterloo.

Eagleton’s ‘Literary Theory: an Introduction’ gave me another way in which to approach texts. As well as my visceral response and the various meanings extracted through analysis, the texts might exemplify the literary or political beliefs of a particular period. Further, members of different literary movements might approach them in very different ways – I enjoyed trying to put on the ‘mask’ of one movement or another and read a poem through it. Similarly, whilst studying ‘Othello’ I was interested by the hugely varying approaches of different critics, from Bradley who focused chiefly on character but seemed to forget the literary context, to Empson who concentrated almost solely on the changing meaning of the word ‘honest’ throughout time. Perhaps most significantly, Eagleton and the other critics reinforced the idea that engaging with a text is itself a creative process.

However, Eagleton’s book is just ‘an Introduction’: what draws me most to the study of English literature is not only that I love it, but that I want so much to learn more about it.

For more inspiration, take a look through our other successful Personal Statement a nalysis articles:

Successful Personal Statement For Natural Science (Physical) At Cambridge

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Good Points Of The Personal Statement

The candidate clearly demonstrates a keen and actioned interest in their chosen subject through the presentation of their reading and subsequent thoughts. They can articulate their present interests in their subject, as well as the sources of these interests, and their potential directions for further development. They indicate their ability to think laterally and creatively through their cohesive discussions of seemingly disparate texts, and are self-aware of their strengths and weaknesses as a reader. Their statement is fuelled by their evident personal enthusiasm for their subject, which makes it an engaging and urgent read.

Bad Points Of The Personal Statement

The candidate has acquired a relatively personal tone, which veers into the casual or confessional at times; their point might have been made more clearly or precisely had they adopted more strictly academic modes of communicating. Their consideration of various works is quite itemised, insofar as their statement reads like a series of ‘nuggets’ of information, rather than a clearly-focused piece with argument and direction. The candidate does reference another subject they study for A-Level, but beyond that, they have not included much information beyond their academic reading and interests. While this could certainly be justified as an approach, it does leave the statement suggesting that the writer is not particularly engaged in questions or activities beyond specific areas of literature.

UniAdmissions Overall Score:

The statement is at times quite chaotic in style, due to its familiar tone and slightly haphazard structure. However, it more than compensates for this since its familiarity is clearly a result of the candidate’s sheer enthusiasm for the subject. In addition, the range of material that they consider is very impressive — it includes both primary texts (of various forms) and secondary reading. The candidate has, moreover, articulated their own ideas on these works, and even if their exact communication of these are not particularly precise, the level of thought and consideration is still strong.

This Personal Statement for English is a great example of enthusiasm and passion. The candidate’s interest is clearly shown which is vital to Admissions Tutors.

Remember, at Cambridge, these Admissions Tutors are often the people who will be teaching you for the next few years so you need to appeal directly to them.

Go to our Free Personal Statement Resources page for even more successful personal statements and expert guides.

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COMMENTS

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